35 Burst results for "Julia"

Mother says son with autism was 'kicked out' of church by priest

The Joe Piscopo Morning

00:25 sec | 3 d ago

Mother says son with autism was 'kicked out' of church by priest

"A New Jersey mother says her autistic son's treatment by the church he has attended for years. Has made her decide to leave the church. Julia Vic Amini says she brought her seven year old son to his baby sister's baptism because their son is nonverbal and there would be no crowd of the baptism. But she says the priest kicked her son out of the ceremony. After he began playing with a ball and made noise. She says they asked the priest for an apology. But he refused. The Archdiocese of Newark issued an apology to the

Julia Vic Amini Archdiocese Of Newark New Jersey
Unemployment Rate Fell to 10.2% in July

Marketplace

01:53 min | Last week

Unemployment Rate Fell to 10.2% in July

"Labor Department told us that employers kept bringing jobs back in July 1.8 million. Overall, the unemployment rate fell about 1% to 10.2%. That's a little higher than the worst of the great recession, but certainly better than April's 15%. We asked marketplaces Mitchell Hartman to look into which jobs are coming back and which might not If the job losses early in the pandemic, we're a torrent. 22 million jobs washed away in just about six weeks. The rebound since then has been more like a steady current. Around nine million jobs gained back and the backto work flows been strongest in low wage service jobs that were savaged early on, says Julia Polic, a Zip recruiter. The largest gains were in leisure hospitality and in retail job stocking shelves at reopened stores, serving drinks at bars and restaurants, cleaning people's teeth at dentist's offices. But job gains slowed considerably in July compared to June, And that's because as many cities and states had to pause there re openings to fightback surges in Kobe cases Businesses couldn't really resume business as usual. The jobs recovery is doing better in sectors less affected by government, covert restrictions and consumers. Caution, says Robert Frick at Navy Federal Credit Union. Own construction in construction in general is doing well. Manufacturing is doing relatively well. I love those are important to the economy because that support service jobs, But Julia Pollock has a warning for professionals whose jobs depend on the consumer economy Among high wage occupations where most workers can work from home that typically are recession proof we see stagnation and even continued decline. In July. Employers cut jobs in business management advertising computer systems in commercial

Julia Polic Julia Pollock Navy Federal Credit Union Mitchell Hartman Labor Department Robert Frick
U.S. Employers Add 1.8 million Jobs In July

Marketplace

01:58 min | Last week

U.S. Employers Add 1.8 million Jobs In July

"Today. We got a decent but not great economic report to kick off the weekend, the Labor Department told us that employers kept bringing jobs back in July 1.8 million. Overall, the unemployment rate fell about 1% to 10.2%. That's a little higher than the worst of the great recession, but certainly better than April's 15%. We asked marketplaces Mitchell Hartman to look into which jobs are coming back and which might not If the job losses early in the pandemic, we're a torrent. 22 million jobs washed away in just about six weeks. The rebound since then has been more like a steady current. Around nine million jobs gained back and the backto work flows been strongest in low wage service jobs that were savaged early on, says Julia Polic, a ZIP recruiter. The largest gains were in leisure and hospitality and in retail Job stocking shelves at reopened stores, serving drinks at bars and restaurants cleaning people's teeth at dentist's offices. But job gains slowed considerably in July compared to June, And that's because as many cities and states had to pause there re openings to fightback surges in Kobe cases. Businesses couldn't really resume business as usual. The jobs recovery is doing better in sectors less affected by government covert restrictions and consumers. Caution, says Robert Frick at Navy Federal Credit Union. Own construction and construction in general is doing well. Manufacturing is doing relatively well. I love those are important to the economy because it supports service jobs. But Julia Pollock has a warning for professionals whose jobs depend on the consumer economy Among high wage occupations where most workers can work from home that typically are recession proof we see stagnation and even continued decline. In July. Employers cut jobs in business management advertising computer systems in commercial

Julia Polic Julia Pollock Navy Federal Credit Union Mitchell Hartman Labor Department Robert Frick
More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

04:42 min | Last week

More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

"We're GONNA talk about recommendations. I for the long haul and these are things that we are either current or in the way back and there's this you know the. He is like when I sit down to try find something there's so much going on that I spent like an hour being watched I don't WanNa Watch. That should do this and it's like I, just want someone tell me what to watch. That's what we're going to hear for. Yeah. So we're GONNA basis off the some of the nominees for best show in the emmy categories I start off with HBO's watchmen as from Damon Lindelof this set in an alternative universe and drafting off the ground and comic book watchmen is It's like this dazzling procedure designed to also make you think that twenty six emmy nominations, the most of any serious. Like NERF gun to your head best show of the year. What would you say? Oh, it's watchmen watchmen to me like for limited series. So it's an a different categories, but I would even say it's better than all dramas on I. Think. So it's it's crowning achievement of TV this. So for sharp for me, I'm I'm thinking of like I want a show that looks great. Visually also will make me think. So I I wanted to go directly off of Damon Lindelof because I feel like he's kind of peak of his powers right now. So guys are wondering like other stuff he's done and I I can't think about the leftovers it's a similarly. It's a great show. It's alternative universe incredibly well, made really thoughtful but also like very simplistic in terms of you applying it to your that feels like watchmen felt current but also set in a different time. And leftovers current but also sat in a different times. So I love that the weirdness of the masks in watchmen which was so precious. So yeah, it's it's. It's phenomenal the other one I was thinking of when I want to. Recommend a show in in that Washington vein I'll say Black Mirror it's close enough. It's not really narrative based. Yeah. It's vignettes and different standalone stories, but it's kind of an alternate. Reality it looks close enough to realize that you're not sure that it's not. Yeah. But it's also telling us some darkened weird stuff about yourself. And the good thing about Black Mirror is to watch it. You're not watching it in each episode is its own Y'all episode so That's will put like some of our own favorite episodes that we both have really loved that we can include in the note. So you don't have to wonder because listen that first episode it's Just you just need to skip it. Hear me if you don't hear anything else if you don't hear Jamie doing the weird change of momentum at the beginning of the show if you forgot that already that's okay. Forget it. Here me this do not watch the first episode. Mom Don't do it dad don't do it much mom don't do it nobody do. It. Would be a mistake. Okay. It's a for me. If you love watchmen where you're like, that seems like it's good. Let me tell you to other shows that are good. So on that flakes, you can watch Jessica Jones I chose this because you got strong female lead just like you have in watchman, you have a superhero component which you also have and Jessica Jones it's dark. It's Gritty the villain in Jessica Jones is played by David tennant in that first season and he is per faction it keeps you on your toes. It's also very you're very to the visuals also recommending legion. Hulu. That's weird. Right because I think when you watch watchman, you're like I'm confused. Limits where you're like I, need to watch this again. Being, existing Ip it makes you think should I know that and I can confirm I. Didn't know. And watchmen I would sometimes read like recaps after I. Would Watch an episode and that would help me catch things maybe that I didn't grab the first time with Legion stars Dan Stevens? Famous playing. Matthew on. Downton Abbey He. It's a done by Noah. All Superhero Jason because this is the story of professor x his incredibly powerful, mentally ill mutant sign and so it's it also stars Jean Smart who is also in watchmen man she's in a Lotta. Golf that she has very good taste, and so it's weird enough that you're like It's not that classic Superhero which is what I also like about watchmen if we had done if we'd time traveled and done a designing women saying draft Jean Smart would not be my. Number. One pick would be any pots it would be we'll for private. Not. It be any pods, Anthony Delta Burke Julia sugarbakers. dixie Carter lab next to last over Jean Smart. Yeah. My point here is everyone would have been before Jean Smart Jean Smart was second. I'm going to be in Sweet Home Alabama and you're not going to know what to do with the low key cares. Okay.

Watchmen Jean Smart Jean Smart Damon Lindelof Emmy Jessica Jones HBO Anthony Delta Burke Julia Suga Jamie Hulu David Tennant Sweet Home Alabama Matthew Washington Dan Stevens Golf Noah Jason Professor
Forever POTUS

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:00 min | Last week

Forever POTUS

"Well guys guess what today is. It is our forever, President Barack Obama's fifty, nine, th birthday. Yeah. Why? Still. Cool. Yeah I mean, he's. So, much they run for damn thing. Would he? He looked so good. Well, you know what happens when we have a birthday around here? Well, junior desert poem, of course, everybody. What. Everybody don't get upon. You gotta be important for me to right. Here with the Special Paul We. Believe with the name of this poem is called let's. Get with the junior. Juniors Obama's birthday poem. That's all I. Can I ask? Whether some names you threw away before you settled on that with. Bottom for I got. I was like Obama Julia's birthday poem, I've switched around. As Morocco, Obama. was talking to Barack Obama about his birthday. Here, it is juniors, Obama's birthday point A. While sitting mouth jealous. I wrote a poem about Barack Obama. Never Causes Drama. He was raised by his. Mum. Now there's more. And I'M GONNA. Tell you what I like about Barack Obama. He's Cool He's neat and With class. Eight years by so fast. They probably. I, wouldn't. We from the first day. So, we wish him happy birthday. To, the girl Michelle. And we're hope you're doing well.

President Barack Obama Obama Julia Michelle Morocco Obama.
Virus relief bill remains up in air as negotiations resume

Frank Beckmann

00:31 sec | Last week

Virus relief bill remains up in air as negotiations resume

"And White House negotiations on another Corona virus relief bill are set to resume after the lapse of a $600 per week. Supplemental jobless benefit Julia Chatterley says million's air Seeing that $600 fall to zero this week with not much of a job mark around 30 million Americans collecting some form of benefit. Job openings in the United States around 5.5 1,000,000. So we've got 345 potentially times people out of work than there are jobs available.

Julia Chatterley White House United States
Elton John celebrates 30 years of sobriety

Jason and Alexis

00:28 sec | 2 weeks ago

Elton John celebrates 30 years of sobriety

"Elton John celebrated 30 years of sobriety with a post on instagram with photos featuring his husband, David Furnish, and their two sons, Zachary and Elijah, as well his notes of congratulations. John expressed his gratitude, he said, reflecting on the most magical day, having celebrated my 30th sobriety birthday, so many lovely cards, flowers and chips from my son's David friends. In the post Graham in the program, Sorry staff at the office and in our homes. I'm Julia. Blessed

Elton John David Furnish David Friends Elijah Zachary Graham
Philadelphia - Feds say they've stopped $44M of unemployment fraud in Pennsylvania

KYW 24 Hour News

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia - Feds say they've stopped $44M of unemployment fraud in Pennsylvania

"Say they've tracked down $44 million meant for jobless Pennsylvanians as they continue to investigate unemployment fraud across the country. Hey, What'll youse Kristen Joe Hansen tells us honest people who are out of work are getting caught up in the investigation. Labor and law enforcement officials say fraudsters have been using people's identity to get cash meant for those who have lost their job during the pandemic, specifically self employed and gig workers. Investigators say they've stopped $28 million from getting into the wrong pockets and they figured out where the other 16 million is and they're getting it back. But Julia Simon Michela, supervising attorney for Philadelphia's legal assist Tints says jobless workers in desperate need of benefits still aren't getting the cash it in progress next to their weekly certification with unresolved issues that are not defined in the online portal. Those possibly affected have to send two forms of I d like a driver's license, passport or social Security card with another, like a tax return or birth certificate to D l I verify at p a dot gov and then unfortunately, they have to wait. The government goes through and confirmed and looked at those identity documents and then will release benefits. But it is taking a very long time and in the process, people are hurting a lot. Kristen

Kristen Joe Hansen Julia Simon Michela Fraud Self Employed Supervising Attorney Philadelphia
A ‘Non-Starter': Gov. Cuomo, Mayor de Blasio Rip Republican Senate's Proposed Stimulus Package

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 2 weeks ago

A ‘Non-Starter': Gov. Cuomo, Mayor de Blasio Rip Republican Senate's Proposed Stimulus Package

"A very bleak picture of what it will happen if the federal stimulus package put out by the GOP Senate today passes. In fact, things are so dire they might even run out of paint. Juliet Papa Mayor De Blasio says There's no money in the Senate plan to help New York City and state recover from the cove in crisis. But I have to say to majority leader McConnell, not much of a stimulus there. In fact, I would call a nonstarter. His honor was looking at the possibility of 22,000 layoffs across all agencies. If federal financial aid doesn't come through governor, Cuomo says, if he cannot plug budget holes that will raise fares for the New York City subway system. Holds on bridges and the fair's on the Long Island Railroad. He says the Democratic House plan would provide tax relief, He says the Republican Senate plan provides a grim reality. Julia Papa, 10 10 wins New Democrats on the Hill, hoping to come to terms with their GOP counterparts before things get down to the wire this weekend. That's when the current stimulus runs out. Tri state

Gop Senate Juliet Papa Mayor De Blasio New York City Cuomo Julia Papa Republican Senate Senate GOP Long Island Railroad Mcconnell Democratic House
Julia Elbaba on keeping her pro dreams alive

The Tennis.com Podcast

05:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Julia Elbaba on keeping her pro dreams alive

"Our special guest is someone who was a legend in College Julia. L. Baba. High Girls! Thanks for having me. A brief rundown of Julian tennis career, she was number one in college as a junior Uva four time all American set a record at UvA singles with one hundred and thirty three wins, and then took her skills. Bro tour which is has been ranked as high as number three seventy two, so we want to talk about your career. Your Life, your tennis, story and kind of what's next for you because you're in New York I guess I. Where have you been for this whole pandemic? Have you been in New York or if you've been? So my father is a frontline health care worker in New York so I decided instead of like kind of staying away from him in the House I thought you know, let me just go to back to my. Stomping grounds at Virginia where things were kind of magical for me there i. just honestly they say best. Four years are in college and I never boating and when I actually went to school. I totally understood why they say that I can't get enough of that place. And I feel like many other tennis players that had attended UBA same way 'cause we were kind of all in quarantine together in Charlottesville from about mid March two up until a couple of weeks ago. We were kind of all. They're not necessarily hanging out, but we were all doing our thing in Charlottesville. Some people were hitting, but Just being there with so nice and The situation is a lot better there than New York is far as corona virus. So with regards to your college experience I. Mean I went to college for two years and I mean. You're clearly very excited talking about your college experience. What would you say like sticks out? What is it that you love so much about it? I just really appreciate a team environment of tennis and kind of playing for team. I actually that's the hardest thing I've been dealing with after call just kind of transitioning back to the individual lifestyle so playing for a team playing for your coaches, the school. The fans something about that was. Just brought me to life every day, and it was, it was beautiful and and also I'm a person that thrives in a situation where I have more than one thing going on multitasking so doing school with tennis I really that busy lifestyle, and that's kind of actually why. I started my own podcast as a way to have something else to juggle with professional tennis right now. It's a tricky time. I feel like especially. You just turned twenty six and you sound like you're still very connected to your college experience, but you did. Take your skills to the pro tour. Can you tell us where you're at in your career with tennis? Yeah so up. Until the beginning of two thousand, nineteen, I was going strong with competing traveling around the world. And then unfortunately, my body is very easily injured. I have a very muscular physique and it's just. Primarily like just genetics people think what are you doing, Jim that your body so muscular and strong like? Oh, you can ask my mom. But honestly I feel like the muscle mass. Mass! makes me more prone to injury and I'm actually now unhealthy but I was dealing with an injury for the past year. A torn UCLA in my right elbow, which is like You probably know what Tommy John. If you have to get surgery, it's Tommy John Surgery. But I didn't need that. Luckily I was actually ready to start competing again once. Quarantine hit sides kind of bad lockwood the timing. What's been one of the things that you've found other than the fact that you have to play for yourself now? I mean being on the tour is not easy. A lot of people just think that Oh. I was a good college player. You know now I'm going to just transition easily into the tour, but what was kind of the most shocking thing for you. Definitely the adjustment to just being on the road by herself. Obviously, if you know you're doing really well, you can bring a whole entourage and it's great. physios of massage therapists families all your support system, but also I Adore on court coaching. I it just really works well for me. And I get really tight and nervous on tennis court so having that coach during matches especially in college, I definitely thrived in that environment. So I'm actually very. Much like into trying to have coaching during matches in protest I think that would just be super cool. Tennis is like the only sport that doesn't have that like why.

Tennis New York College Julia L. Baba Charlottesville Virginia Tommy John Tommy John Surgery Lockwood JIM
Transvaal Jammies

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

03:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Transvaal Jammies

"You know. What of all do you know anything about the war? Julia. I know that Britain was involved Yup. Ask you know what that would have been a good guess at the very least. South Africa is. Is Part of it. Yes, you are correct on both counts, so that is pretty. Well. You know what that was more than I knew when I started researching this topic so congratulations. I didn't know about Britain but I did not know about. South Africa and I will not be referred to it as that from for the rest of the I promise so to begin with the conflict is commonly referred to as the second bower war. Since the first war, which was December eight, hundred, eighty, two, Martini one only lasted. A couple of months was smaller. It was just it was really a war. It was kind of a battle. The Word Bower B. O. E. R. means farmer. And it's the common term for Afrikaans speaking white South Africans descended from Dutch east India Company's original settlers at the Cape of Good Hope, so these are white. South Africans who speak Afrikaans which is. Like a sort of a weird hybrid between like Dutch and then. African it's kind of a cool language. In South Africa it is officially called the South African War. And, they also sometimes called the second Anglo Bower War and in fact, according to two thousand eleven BBC report. Most scholars prefer to call the war of eighteen thousand nine tonight to the South African. War, thereby acknowledging that all South Africans White and black were affected by the war, and many were participants all right Yup so. Why, why why did they go to war? So here's the war far away. Though so far away so it as as with many wars, there's a long history to it. So the origins were complex, and they stemmed from more than a century of conflict between the bowers and Britain, so let's with a little background, the first European Settlements Africa was founded at the Cape of Good Hope in sixteen fifty two. And thereafter administered as part of the Dutch Cape Colony. The Cape was governed by the Dutch east India Company until its bankruptcy, the late seventeen hundreds, and thereafter it was directly by the Netherlands. The Netherlands took over when the Dutch east India Company collapsed. The British occupied the Cape three times during the Napoleonic wars as a result of political turmoil in the Netherlands and the occupation became permanent after British forces defeated the Dutch at the battle of Blouberg in eighteen o six. So at the time, the colony was home to about twenty six thousand colonists settled under Dutch rule and a relative majority still represented old. Dutch families brought to the Cape during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. However close to one fourth of this demographic was of German origin and one sixth of French huguenot descent, so you got a little bit of a mix. It's mostly dislike dissenters like descendants of Dutch people from way back when but also a little bit of German a little bit of French. So divisions amongst these people were likelier to occur along socioeconomic rather than ethnic lines, however, and broadly speaking colonists included a number of distinct subgroups, including the bowers, so the bowers were like the the farmers for all intents

Dutch East India Company Dutch Cape Colony South Africa Britain Bowers The Netherlands Julia BBC Martini Africa Blouberg
Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

Business Wars Daily

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

"The abandonment of the suit helps explain the struggles of one of America's most iconic fashion companies, brooks brothers, the two hundred two year old brand filed for bankruptcy protection on July eight sure blame cove nineteen, but now you'd be wrong. Suits with the three piece with Thai or skirts and high heels used to convey professionalism and competence, they served as symbols that you took your job seriously and respected your customers, the ones you were treating too expensive lunches, madman style, but even before the pandemic they'd become something of an anachronism. Most of us now see little to no relationship between the way we dress in our competence at work, think Mark Zuckerberg's hoodies. Indeed expensive suits can be viewed as a sign of elitism. Put it starkly. The corporate fashion code has gone by the wayside. Brooks brothers struggles represent a cultural shift, not just a Kobe tragedy. Brooks brothers famously dressed all but four presidents. It is the longest continuously operating fashion business in America and until this month it boasted about making its products in America the Brandon's three factories in the states in Massachusetts North, Carolina and New York. CEO Claude Delvecchio is planning to close those factories. We'll get to that in a minute. As you know, apparel sales have been decimated by pandemic closures in April nobody bought clothes whether from Brooks brothers or JC, Penney and other retail casualty, but did you know the actual numbers? Clothing sales fell almost ninety percent in April, according to retail dive, but brooks brothers began looking for a buyer about a year ago. The company operates five hundred stores two hundred of them in the US sales have been flat at about a billion dollars a year since twenty, seventeen, prior to the pandemic bankers estimated the company's value at three hundred to three hundred fifty million dollars. Figure Delvecchio disputed. As, I mentioned the company intends to close its three US factories later this month in the gritty industrial town of. Massachusetts home of its largest factory. Its largest immigrant workforce is being denied severance pay many of those workers, immigrants and refugees women from the Dominican Republic. Vietnam Burma and Nepal have made the company's fine clothing for years so far brooks isn't budging. Despite pleas from the union, and from members of Congress according to the Boston Globe in North Carolina, the factories, the only large employer in the little town of Garland closure would affect that town forever, mayor winifred. Hill, Murphy told The New York Times. In response, CEO, Del Vecchio, says for survival. We must hang onto as much cash as possible, but the globe reports that its chapter eleven filing includes plans to give compensation benefits, severance and bonuses totaling millions to other workers. Brooks brothers will transform, but unlike many of its retail brethren its survival is not in question. In fact, at least one bidder for the company believes it can earn annual revenue of three billion dollars within five years more than triple its current sales, so many buyers are vying for the brand at both the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg used the phrase the races on those making bids. Bids Include Mall Company Simon, property, group, authentic brands, group and W. H. P. Global another bidder is a group of Italian. Investors led by a company called GIO which typically helps fashion companies improve their online presences. The Wall Street Journal possibly with tongue firmly in cheek, considering the state cut of Brooks brothers clothing says Julia wants to quote introduced some European flair to the quintessential American brand. Julia's clients include Armani Maxmara and other designers. Brooks brothers is accepting bids through August fifth, so brooks will survive, but what about it's cheaper? Rival men's warehouse tailored brands which owns men's warehouse and the more upscale Joseph. A. Bank plans to close at least a third of its fifteen hundred stores. It said this month it hasn't filed for chapter eleven protection, but it came close according to CNN. That threat remains even after it stores reopened. Sales have been falling. They were down about eighty percent at Joseph A. Bank in the first week of June, as we all continue to do business in Pajama Pants as we all know nostalgia sells Joseph A. Bank doesn't have nearly the name or the history of Brooks brothers, which drips with nostalgia. Teddy Roosevelt apparently insisted his rough riders. Riders wear the Brand Abe. Lincoln was also a brooks brothers customer, one reason for the bidding war beyond what is sure to be the lowest price anyone ever imagined for the stalwart brand. Is What author Lisa Burn? Bach believes about Fashions Post. Pandemic Future Birnbaum who authored the twenty ten book true. Prep argues that the company must be saved after the pandemic finally end, she writes. There will be weddings. There will be funerals. There will be. We hope live operas and theatre and premieres in concerts and fancy dress parties. Where we can't predict the future, but we can observe the present, and what's happening to upscale apparel in the US. WHO's buying it and WHO's making it. Reveals a lot about our rapidly changing an enormously conflicted culture.

Brooks Brothers Brooks United States America Ceo Claude Delvecchio Mark Zuckerberg Julia Dominican Republic Massachusetts CEO Teddy Roosevelt The Wall Street Journal Joseph A. Bank CNN Burma Congress North Carolina Joseph
Weekly $600 jobless benefit set to expire soon as lawmakers negotiate extension

WBZ Midday News

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Weekly $600 jobless benefit set to expire soon as lawmakers negotiate extension

"The White House has been pushing ahead toward a planned roll out of a trillion dollars effort from Senate Republicans on a Corona virus relief bill. However, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Rogamos GOP disarray as time wasting during the crisis. The long delayed legislation comes amid alarming new cases in the virus. It was originally supposed to be released Thursday morning by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. But instead, he hosted an unscheduled meeting with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and White House acting chief of staff Mark Meadows. And delayed the planned release of the proposal until this afternoon, that is correspondent Julia Walker. The

White House Senate Mitch Mcconnell Nancy Pelosi Julia Walker GOP Acting Chief Mark Meadows Steve Mnuchin
Johnny Depp wanted Amber Heard ‘barefoot, pregnant – and at home’, court told

Lori and Julia

01:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Johnny Depp wanted Amber Heard ‘barefoot, pregnant – and at home’, court told

"Last week, which is where all the poop in the P and the things were coming from now. Amber heard. A couple of headlines coming out of this case today. Johnny Depp, allegedly, according to Amber, heard's testimony wanted her barefoot, pregnant in that home. This is what the court was being told today. Her acting coach testifying and her acting coach, outlining her growing suspicions that Johnny Depp was hitting. Amber heard so Christian sects in is the name of the acting coach said that she had not seen Johnny Depp hit kicker throw anything at Amber, but that she was aware of the volatilities in the relationship. And it overheard some serious fights while waiting for her to start coaching sessions with Amber, so That's according to the acting coach. And then today, other headlines that Johnny Depp allegedly joked Now I can punch her after getting married to Amber heard. So that was also according to testimony today. Ah, an author named Toe, Let Right Testified to this who was Johnny Depp's best man at their 2015 wedding.

Johnny Depp Amber
Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool  Especially In A Pandemic

Short Wave

14:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool Especially In A Pandemic

"Believe me I get it. I'm frustrated and angry to. After all, it's been four months of this. We know the right things to do. And when you see someone wearing a mask or groups of people hanging out close together, it's easy to get mad, even if in all fairness. Once or twice. Open defiance at this Castle Rock Colorado restaurant large crowds, no social distancing, and there's some news coverage right now. That caters to this anger. You know what I'm talking about. Many Americans are out and about on this memorial day visiting newly reopened businesses seems from the unofficial kickoff to the summer showing many Americans not practicing social distancing measure. I'm telling you to wear a mask where a damn ask, but this Kinda thing anger public shaming the urge to yell at people who aren't doing the right things. That can be precisely the opposite of productive. Yeah, as the researcher I've been. Watching all this unfold through that Lens Julia Marcus is an epidemiologist and professor at the Harvard. Medical School, she said he's HIV prevention. And for scientists Julia, who work in HIV or sexual health or even substance abuse? They know that shame can be a huge barrier when it comes to public health, and in these first few months of the Cova pandemic I was watching this same pattern happen where you know, these kind of absolutist public health messages and moralistic undertones were potentially contributing to what became rampant shaming of people who were flouting public health guidelines or doing things that people felt. Felt were high risk, and when we shame people for their risky behavior in a way that distracts us from where risk is really happening, which is typically much less visible like in prisons and nursing homes and food, processing plants, and those don't inspire the same moral outrage. I think for two reasons one. They're not right in front of our faces, but also to we don't think of those as people having fun and a pandemic which I think people really upset. Matt rage, Julia says might feel good to act on in the moment, but it's not gonNA solve our biggest problems right now. I find that taking that rage home, and really screaming alone has been very helpful for me to. Do that as well or you know my rage these days first of all I would say that knows no bounds, but also. To be honest. My regions more directed at institutional failures than individual ones. To episode Julia Marcus on the role. Shame plays in public health crises. We talk masks. School reopenings in the long road ahead. I'm Maddie's defy, and this is shortwave daily science podcast from NPR. Julia Marcus has written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic about why. Shame is not helpful right now and how we can do things better. She's looked this when it comes to mask wearing social distancing and how we open college campuses, we talked about all those things, but the first thing to say here is that there is a fine line between public shaming and some positive forms of peer pressure. I, yeah I WANNA make a distinction here between social norms and shaming I. think social norms are very powerful and. That can be one of the best ways I think to change. Health behavior is like well. Everybody else is doing it so I'm going to do it because it's more like i. want to feel good when I go in the grocery store and I'm not gonNA. Feel great if I'm the only one not wearing a mask, so, but there's a difference between making people feel bad about their risky behavior and making people feel good about engaging and protective behaviors as a way of like becoming part of What the new social norm is Marie right? Right Okay Julius. You've written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic. Let's talk about your most recent one I. It's you know how to not open colleges this fall. You started out by describing an email that went out to students at Tulane University earlier this month July seventh. What what happened there? Yeah I mean I I I don't WanNa. Pick on two lane here. Becher, that was it just an example of some of the communications that were starting to see toward students who are on campus this summer and have been having some parties. And there was an email that we're not to students that really condemned stat behavior as disrespectful, indefensible, dangerous selfish, and made it very clear in bold all caps that hosting parties of more than fifteen people would result in suspension or expulsion from the university and that if students wanted the school to remain open, they needed to be personally responsible. I'm in their behavior and When a university says, we will hold you accountable for having a party, and actually there will be dire swift punishment when inevitably there is an outbreak at a party. Students are going to be terrified to disclose that they were there. And students have now said this at the University of Connecticut were interviewed and surveyed about what kind of thing is going to work for them what their concerns are about the fall. And they universally said we. We are early close to universally said we're really afraid of how infection and risky behavior are going to be stigmatized such that we outbreaks will not be able to be controlled, so there needs to be appropriate consequences for putting your community at risk, and I would never say otherwise but that needs to be balanced against the need for public health efforts to be separate from discipline. And we've already seen contact tracing start to break down outside of campuses, because people are afraid to talk about having been at event that that they know is something they should not have been doing yeah. So. You know kind of following that thread. The part of this pandemic that's been hardest for a lot of people is is social distancing in in several of your pieces you wrote about how a lot of the advice especially in the beginning was almost like an abstinence based approach like stay home. See Nobody which absolutely made sense kind of at the. The beginning, but tell me about why. That approach doesn't necessarily make sense for the long-term well asking people to abstain from all social contact indefinitely or until we've scaled up. An effective vaccine is just not going to be a sustainable public health strategy, and I think now our messaging has evolved a bit especially as there's been an accumulation of evidence around. The risk is highest like what's settings or higher risk, in which ones are lower risk, but I think we continue to still have a tendency toward absolutist messaging and I think that our goal should be to two inch. People tour to a place where they are living their lives in a way that addresses all aspects of their health, while trying to keep tr- risk of transmission low, and so one way that that could play out is encouraging outdoor activities, especially in spacious areas, opening up more outdoor space for people, and there's been a tendency to close beaches and close parks where people gather, but. But I actually think doing the opposite on could could be helpful, but the essential point is. We can't stay in our homes forever and many people couldn't stay in their homes for the last few months because they were working sure, but it's clear from other areas of public health that asking people to abstain from something that they fundamentally need or strongly desire is not an effective public health strategies, so we have to find ways of making our messaging more nuanced, that allows people to get what they need to be able to live sustainably while keeping the risk of transmission low until you there. There are examples of nuanced messaging from others accessible public health campaigns. Right I. Mean You work on HIV? Can you give me an example of that? Yeah, so we you know we don't tell people don't have sex. Because that's the best way to not get HIV, we may save the safest thing you can do to avoid HIV transmission is not have sex, but we understand that many people are going to have sex, and that it's a you know a part of a healthy life, and so here are some safer ways to have sex, both in terms of certain sexual acts in in terms. Terms of protection different ways you can protect yourself and you know becomes a more nuanced message, but it's much more sustainable for people and realistic and the long term, and it also acknowledges people's basic human needs right, and there's also this idea that talking about ways to reduce risk encourages people to take those risks, even though from a public health standpoint. We know that isn't true. So I'm wondering Julia like. Why do people hold onto this concern? Like what is this really about yeah I, mean this is definitely not new. It comes up a lot. I think especially around drug, use and sex. And I think the reason it especially comes up in those settings is that those are behaviors that we have a lot of moral judgments about particularly in this country, and there's this kind of moral outrage that happens when we think about people engaging in risky, which is often pleasurable, behavior, sex, drug use, and these days going to the beach like. it's kind of playing out in this new way now with social contact and partying and people having a good time in a pandemic, which it's actually a public health win when we find ways to support people in enjoying their lives, and and getting their basic social or sexual needs, met while remaining a safest possible, and you've made the point that we've. We've already seen this play out with the corona virus, public health officials, hesitating to give people detailed ways to protect themselves instead of avoiding risk altogether, I mean I remember. We reported early on in this pandemic when Dr Burks of the White House Coronavirus Task Force said. We don't want people to get this artificial sense of protection because they're behind a mask. This lack of consistent messaging is one of the reason that a lot of people still aren't convinced that masks are helpful, so you know. Julia, how do public health officials effectively reach? Those people yeah I mean I. Think in general we always see some resistance to any new public health intervention, condoms, and you know pre exposure prophylaxis for each V. I mean every intervention that comes out. There's resistance. There's challenges with implementation. There are moral concerns you know. This is all kind of par for the course, but I think what's new here and a bit different is not necessarily just the polarization which we do, see an Ciaran things like vaccines, but the politicization. Politicization I don't think there has been I can't think of an example where a sitting president has flouted public health recommendations and I think that that has created kind of a politicized around masks. That wouldn't have necessarily been there and so how do we overcome that? And how do we reach people I think again it comes back to hearing people's concerns, acknowledging them, and then working to overcome those barriers in our messaging and I. Think there are some good examples of that there have been a couple of great mask campaigns that have come out of California acknowledging that people dislike wearing them and acknowledging the reasons why people dislike wearing them. And I would guess that they are more effective in reaching certain populations than campaigns that that are more focused on this. Just wear ask. It's really easy kind of messaging. Yeah and don't you care about your community and don't you want to not kill people and That kind of messaging is like early days of AIDS. Messaging around condoms that I think was not as successful as the messaging that really focused on what the barriers were, and how people could overcome them. Yeah, yeah, with all this stuff that we've been talking about colleges masks. You know keeping safe distance. It's pretty tough because the stakes feel so high like this is really a nasty virus, and when we see people, you know not doing the right things, the instinct there to shame them to get mad for a lot of us at first instinct and I. I guess it's just that we need to take some patients to push past them. Yeah, I mean I, think it's really. Valid to feel angry about what's happening right now, and for people who are not necessarily taking care of themselves or their community and putting other people at risk. It's very frustrating to see, but I think especially for public health professionals. It's on us to do the work to avoid the shaming and the anger and the moralizing in our messaging. Because we've learned that that doesn't work in other areas of health and really try to take the time to craft messaging. That is going to be more effective. Julia Marcus. Checkout episode notes for a link where you can find her writing to the Atlantic. Can say the Atlantic is crushing it these days, but the magazine, not the ocean. I mean

Julia Marcus Atlantic HIV Castle Rock Colorado Harvard Researcher Wanna Medical School Matt Rage Maddie Becher Tulane University Marie NPR University Of Connecticut Professor California Ciaran Dr Burks
Iran sends downed Ukrainian plane's black box to France

Howie Carr

00:26 sec | 3 weeks ago

Iran sends downed Ukrainian plane's black box to France

"Iran sends the black box flight recorder of the down. Ukrainian jetliners shot down over Tehran to France for analysis. ABC is Julia McFarland. All 176 people on board were killed when the passenger jet was hit by two Iranian missiles shortly after takeoff in January this year. Iran admitted the targeting of the jet was human error and that the plane had been mistaken for a cruise missile. The Iranian government said the boxes would be analyzed in Paris on

Iran Iranian Government Julia Mcfarland Tehran ABC Paris France
Fatal Affair Is Obsessed With Insert Shots

Roe Conn

02:00 min | Last month

Fatal Affair Is Obsessed With Insert Shots

"Affair on Netflix With that all about Well, fatal affair. You might not be able to figure this out from the title. But what happens is there's an affair, and then it gives almost fatal of. It's not a good idea so nothing like fatal attraction. So this star's Nia Long who we Love and Omar Epps, and they knew each other in college, and you always had a crush on her. 20 years later, they hook up in a bar, but she's married. She says. This is a bad idea. You gotta leave me alone. But he has other ideas Row he thinks they're destined to be together. And then we kick off the classic stalker movie except for is not a classic stalker movie. This is what they call a Netflix original because it's an original movie on Netflix. On Lee, 50% of that statement is accurate. It is on Netflix. There is nothing original about this movie. We've seen it a 1,000,000 times before. I was hoping it would be like a guilty pleasure where you could, like hurl your kernels of popcorn at the screen because everybody has to act like an idiot in order for the plot to continue. But even the actors look like they're bored. Halfway through this, it's terrible, fatal affair. And that would be 1.5 stars for fetal affair, which is nothing fatal attraction other than even the poster for it looks exactly like the poster for fatal attraction, which, by the way, if people haven't seen it, that's a 1987 film. Watch that instead Okay. Look good. Fine. I'd like to know that there are things I don't have to watch. I feel very great pressure when I'm going through Netflix and Julia and all the rest of it. I'm looking for stuff to watch and think. Well, maybe I should. Maybe it is the argument I had with myself on almost every thumbnail that I stop. Or that now stops on itself and that by the way, I got it. I just want to say one thing about Netflix. I don't really want to see a scene when I'm just on the thumbnail. I don't don't like it when it does. I don't want to see a scene now asked for the scene. And the volume Super out if it's like an action movie it like you fall out of your chair. Yeah, like that. All add for the stereo. You know where the guy was in the chair like this wasn't blown back. Yeah, I agree with you. I've met they accept doing that. Netflix who we see about that.

Netflix Nia Long Omar Epps LEE Julia
"julia" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

07:22 min | Last month

"julia" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"What set the addition we have is critical classics context. And includes notes on African literature in Essay by Simon Key Condie, and then an essay on Igbo Culture history by Don C O had gay very very helpful so helpful. Oh my gosh. I'm I'm definite person who will like skim over all the like intro notes and be like okay. It seems interesting, but like let's just get to the story here like I'm on the novel, not here for a history lesson, but Julia had mentioned like Oh the interest of is really like. Really essential to read. So I, dug in there. That really helps sets it up well to the novelty has these moments of suspense. That really catch me in it. Because you like you said. It's more of a character study. There isn't necessarily one overarching plot. There's cut of these different episodes that happen and there is some chapters dislike. Hold the phone. I don't eat dinner finishing this chapter. I WanNa know what's happening, so we get this foreshadowing conquest going to kill his foster sons this this boy that was taken from another village as payment for the murder of someone from conquest village. And he's kind of take him in, and he lives with him for like three years, and like the adopted son kind of foster son and A. Oldest son become like good friends and like. It's really sweet relationship and the foster son almost feels. More connected to. This village that has brought him in versus the someone he grew up in, but it's for shot. That concord kills Mr that Whole Scene Carey so much suspense. When his second wife daughter is taken by the like head chief Julius. The AH Head, priests of the Earth Goddess. Kabbalah. That one really yeah, true man, and so there's those are just a couple of examples, but. That was of like my highlight of the reading. Experience was the drama. Yeah I actually. I. I'm kind of the same way I only read the. The intro essays. But I read them after I read the book. I found them so fascinating. I mean there's stuff will go into more, but I. It sort of pointed out to me. The severe lack of education in the way that I had no idea. What. Any in any region in Africa what their specific regional culture was like and. It was all sort of. I feel we weren't taught much about. Africa pre. Colonialism you know what I mean like somehow didn't have significance into light. People showed up, and yes, we were taught that it was a bad thing, but armful thing, but we weren't taught like what was destroyed. United way of life was destroyed. who were the people there? Until, I was really fascinated by sort of the unpacking of. this of region. And just a really like day to day. Life, I. That's not what I was expecting I was expecting like a really political sort of culture wars story at instead I was just following a sort of tragic hero and You sort of see. He had his. If it's a very sort of Greco Roman like fatal flaw kind of structure where you can see how it's going to end. Because, he can't be anything other than himself, and it's sort of leads him to his demise. and. That's like a very classical structure, but set in an environment that I had no previous experience and so. That was really. Cool to me I don't know I. Really enjoyed that. And because really the only knowledge I had of. Really anything about Nigeria was from to Amanda from Bosie. She's obviously writing from a generation or two after a champion so. The main character in Americana is ego. And, she has some critiques of Christianity and their culture what it did to her mother, but. It's a pretty distant look compared to this right. So! Very three modern look I guess the characters she writes about. Reading it to me, it's funny that we ended up talking the Bible. Reading this book to me felt kind of like reading the Old Testament more like reading the ILIAD. And where you can clearly tell that it was originally an oral tradition, right that someone wrote down eventually. Not this story. was passed down for many generations before attorney wrote it, but he wrote it in the style of. The oral traditions of his culture like he was a very deliberate choice on his part, added something that they talk about in the introductory essays and just make that up. But I thought, that was really interesting that like it had the feeling of. Certain details get included in. In like something like the Iliad where? It just has to fit the meter or Include all these random details. Really. Why is that there or something? Where like had left handed right? His Epithet of the left handed man was probably just because it completed the line of poetry, and then you move onto the next one like that's what epithets were for was just so that your name took up a whole whole line, and then you can move on. And it is just like the description that always follows your name. And so I i. Kinda got that feeling from reading this until made it feel really old, really important, even those. In. The nineteen fifties like similar ages. My mother Britain that it made it feel I could of feel the weight of the culture that he was like. Everything for us. Which I was very. Young in the insurer essay by Condie, he writes how achieve as African literature is like oral tradition plus English forms like we have these contracts from English literature that Shea Group studying, but then also the oral tradition of his family his heritage. One as I can outside someone not like reading the The story where one of Caucus wives.

Simon Key Condie conquest village Julia Africa Don C O murder Carey A. Oldest Greco Roman Shea Group Britain attorney Bosie Nigeria Amanda
Our Place in Space

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:07 min | Last month

Our Place in Space

"Hello and welcome to misinformation, a Trivia podcasts for ladies and gents who have cooled Trivia and sticking it to join teams at pub quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren in I'm Julia Hey Schule hi, Laurin. We are just were like cranking through some episodes lately. We've been like recording a bunch of Italian. This is our. This is our finishing episode for this recording. And I figured you know what? We haven't touched on space in a while you know. I did that long series about dads and space. Aged MOMS Mason to the mission to Mars like I'm going to go back. To back to the beginning, WE'RE GONNA go back to the beginning, and even though you fear it, even though I fear it. It's like you know like that's why they why women love stories about serial killers, because ultimately we are the ones who will probably be murdered by a serial killer, just like statistically, so you have to face that fear and somehow love it. Together hair your brain. Get to know your enemy. Know your enemy exactly you gotTa. Know your enemy, so my enemy is space. I am at a constant battle with space and I know I'll lose on. Aren't we all time and space so today? I've decided to go back to the beginning. Go get like some elementary level info and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the solar system. Did you build a model for this sir, Oh, no, I should have model. Scrap. Is Episode Comeback When you alcon back? Steve has a model. He'll make a full like. One of those rotating. Oh, yeah, own. An oratory. Ory himself. He's GonNa. He's GonNa. WanNa. Make an ordinary, so you're welcome. Yeah, thanks! It's going to be my whole upstairs anyway. So just as an FYI, I I will not be touching on earth because we live here. You know what earth is A. And also I've already done an episode on Mars. So we'll just be doing the rest of the solar system to. Be going in order. To begin with. What is the solar system? The planetary system we call home is located in outer spiral arm of the Milky Way Galaxy. That's our neighborhood. Our solar system consists of our star. The Sun and everything bound to it by gravity. The planets mercury Venus, Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune as well as dwarf planets, such as Pluto dozens of moons and millions of asteroids, comets and meteoroid. The solar system also includes the Kuyper belt that lies past Neptune's orbit, which way back there. This is a sparsely occupied ring of bodies, almost all smaller than the most popular Kuyper. Bell Object, which is Dorf Planet Pluto and we will talk about him in a minute. The most popular, the most popular of the Kuyper belt objects. So beyond the fringes of the Kuyper belt is the or cloud. This junk, yes, the worked cloud over RT cloud. This giant spherical shell surrounds our solar system like a big old bubble. And it has never been directly observed, but its existence is predicted based on mathematical models and observations comments that likely originate from there. So. The or cloud is made of icy pieces of space debris, the sizes of mountains and sometimes larger orbiting our son as far as one point six light years away. This shell of material is thick extending from five thousand astronomical units to one hundred thousand astronomical units, so an astronomical unit just for Reference One Astronomical Unit or AU is the distance from the sun to the earth. And that is about ninety three million miles or one hundred and fifty million kilometers. So one astronomical unit is ninety three million miles so. The ORT cloud is anywhere from five thousand, two hundred thousand astronomical units, so it's enormous. God I. Don't think about okay. The ordered cloud is also the boundary of the Sun's Gravitational influence where orbiting objects can turn around and return closer to our son. So that's that's the extent of how far the sun's gravity pull. Goes, to. The Sun's helium fear doesn't extend quite as far so that's like how far the light can travel from the sun. healers the bubble created by the solar wind, which is a stream of electrically charged gas, blowing outward from the sun in all directions, so it's like the soup that the sun is like floating that creates. The boundary where the solar wind is abruptly slowed by pressure from interstellar gases is called the termination shock, so it's like the edge of the bubble. Okay where it crosses into it.

ORY Reference One Astronomical Uni Kuyper Laurin Steve Wanna Mason
"julia" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"julia" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"In the past when we've faced difficult times as we are currently experiencing, it has been an opportunity for reinvention. As difficult as it has, in can be such moments pushed people and institutions the finally act on ideas and plans that have been long delayed. For photographers with her professional or enthusiasts, these moments pushes in new directions and create unexpected opportunities. That's been the case with today's guest Julia Dean. Who is the founder of the Los Angeles Center photography after career as a successful photojournalist, Julian began what was then called the Julia Dean School of Photography over the last few decades, l. p. has become a thriving photographic community that offers classes and workshops, but most importantly. It creates a community in which photographers of all stripes have grown and thrive recent events of Giuliano our team to reinvent lic P.. Including offering online courses as well as in person events and workshops or opening up L. ACP to audience well outside the Los Angeles Area As with any new effort, there are challenges, but as you'll hear. Julius Passion for Photography and for people is why lic. has become such a success, and why I believe it will continue to be so in the future this is he body acts and welcome back to the candidate frame. But I always. Challenging time for you, it is a challenging time for everybody, but we're hanging in there. We have quite a team between our board of directors and friends and donors and students and staff. We've had a lot of people who have really wanted to help us including you. Yeah I mean. It's just amazing what you've built over these many years. Especially in in Los Angeles Los Angeles <unk> always lacked a sort of a central hub for a photo community this new. York San Francisco. Other places I've always seemed to have it, but I've always felt that one of the best things that you offered outside of the classes was just a place for people who love Photography WanNa community to come together so I'm I've always been supportive of the work, and that's why I'm just really want to be a cheerleader for you as you guys. Go through this this transition because I think despite the obvious challenges I think that there are so many people who outside the Los Angeles area that could really stand. To benefit from not just the classes, but the community that you've built. Let's. Let's talk a little about how you're dealing with the restrictions that the pandemic has put on and how you're seeing. The reinvention of La CPI. Yes, well. We've had to move quickly like like everybody else. In mid March, when all the doors were shut down for everyone, our revenue stream completely shut down as well and as you might know. We just moved into this really beautiful center in December, that is a costly <hes> on a monthly basis, and it's just beautiful, and everybody was so excited about it. We had a five events before we had to shut the doors, and they were all packed, and everybody was so excited about the new center and this new beautiful place, and so we hope to be back to classes in the fall. We've moved everything online in a very amazingly quick manner <hes> to our staff Kevin Jansen, Brandon and Jason and Sarah. An amazing staff and everybody's kind of worked around the clock to do what we needed to apply for a lot of grants and a lot of federal aid. We had board of directors helping us at without two. We've sent out lots of help us. You know, send money in. Trying to get donations we've we've done everything we can, and we've gotten some some help from a lot of people and also some fed. We just got a federal aid last week. So that's GONNA. Help US tremendously, so we feel very optimistic, which is a completely different than a month ago? When this all happened, and it was so scary and we were all very nervous and very scared, but we didn't have much time. To stay scared or nervous or depressed because we had a lot to do so that that was a good thing because I kept our minds off of what what could happen, you know after twenty one years of building, this place is beautiful community that we all have. But. We just feel very optimistic now. We're doing everything we can that the aid that we just got really helped a lot. Our Board of directors outstanding to help us, and our staff is just working so hard to make everything happen, so we're looking at. If it's indeed <unk>, we can come back to the classroom in the fall hideout. We're going to be able to ever have a big event for a while, but if we can come back to the classrooms in the fall. Then will not only have classrooms, but we'll also have online programs because we've been wanting to do online learning for years is just that we've had such a small staff, and we've just never had the man or woman power to get it done, and now we really didn't this time, either, but we had to. We had to make it happen. So come fall <hes> we'll have both. Brandon came up with a whole series of Webinars, which is really need, and so I think that it kind of pushed us to do some new cool things, and then we'll be able to come back to the classroom as well hopefully in September. Normal season starts in July, but we pushed the season back to not starting until September with hopes that more time would be. You know possible to get back in the classroom.

Julia Dean School of Photograp Julia Dean Los Angeles Los Angeles Center Julius Passion founder l. p. Julian
"julia" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"julia" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"Know by. I never knew. He paid more attention to what Julia had mentioned as far as the never do comment that she made and so we worked on another version of the song called. Never do so at this point. We've got three different songs. We've got glad you came the original and then changed it to a minute with you. Then I go in and I talked to Ryan and we've changed it to never do so completely different lyrics the but the melodies of stayed because Julia mentioned the room that she felt like most of the lyrics will have to change. It was GONNA have to be pretty much of a rewrite which I expected. You know what I mean. That wasn't a surprise to me just based off of the content of the song. So we've got three different versions of the song of this point and then eventually Ryan. Here's back from Julia. And then she comes with this completely different idea totally different from anything that me and him had come up with and so basically she was just like I wanted to be more stripped back so me and Ryan start working on a fourth version of the song called. Give it to you and so we finally finish out. This final version Ryan made the decision that we needed to bring it a female vocalist to sing it to just kinda give Julia a better picture of like. This is what it would sound like if I were singing it. That is Austin who came in saying that and she was awesome. She did a great job learning the song quickly and under pressure so excited to hear what you guys did. King is going to play Guitar Keegan and this is give.

Julia Ryan Austin King
"julia" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"julia" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hi I'm Kristin miser and I'm Gillette Greenberg and we're the hosts of by the book today. We're excited to introduce one of our favorite feminists that's been featured on Encyclopedia. Will MONICA JULIA. Child Jilin. I Love Julia Child. Not only because we love eating and you know we also love people who cook for us but we also love that. She's a feminist role model and especially great role model for anybody. Who Worries am I too old to try something new? Am I too old to be successful? What if it's too late for me? Julia Child didn't even pick up a knife and spoon to cook for the first time until she was thirty. Seven and as a tall woman. I also appreciate that. Julia child was like you know what when I'm building my kitchen. Let's make that counter height taller so I don't have to bend over all the time and I can go comfortably. That is a baller woman. This episode initially aired back in November two thousand nineteen but we like to think it does not matter the day of the year every day is a good day to celebrate Julia Child. Now here's euros. Jenny Kaplan to tell you all about our girl Julia Child. Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica today. We're talking about one of the giants of the twentieth century. Culinary World An American Cook Author Television Personality an international celebrity. She's best known for introducing Americans to the delights of French cuisine. Welcome I'm doing a child. We're to have a someone summer dinner tonight. Please welcome the one and only Julia Child. Julia was born into a life of privilege on August. Fifteen nineteen twelve in Pasadena California. Her father was a banker and landowner and her mother was a member of the wealthy west and family owners of the Western Paper Company. As was her family's Tradition Julia was sent to boarding school in Northern California for her high school years though she took a full college. Preparatory course load. Tulio was more social butterfly then bookworm. She was extremely popular among her peers and was an especially good athlete. Sanding at six feet two inches tall Julia played tennis. Swam captain the basketball team and served as president of the hiking club like her mother. An aunt before her Julia attended Smith College in Massachusetts where she majored in history and led an active social life. Julia graduated from Smith in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and return to California for a year before moving back to Massachusetts to attend secretarial school. She was there for just a month before she found a secretarial job. A home furnishing company New York City after being fired from her New York job for insubordination. Julia headed back to California in nineteen forty one knowing that the war was just around the corner. Julia began volunteering for the Red Cross. In Pasadena there. She headed the Department of Stomach. Graphic Services Julia tried joining two of the US military's organizations for women but was denied from both because she was deemed. Too Tall still. Julia wanted to play a larger role in the war effort so she moved to Washington. Dc In one thousand nine hundred forty two and took a job as a typist at the office of war information later that year she moved over to a job as a junior research assistant for the intelligence branch of the Office of Strategic Services the forerunner to the CIA. During her time with the Julia held a variety of positions she even did intelligence were over seas nineteen forty four to nineteen forty-five she was stationed in India and then China while working in India. Julia met Paul Child an officer with the US Foreign Service. The two married soon after World War Two ended in nineteen forty eight. The child's moved to Paris for Paul's Work Julia now without a job decided that she wanted to try her hand at serious cooking and enrolled at the famous Lacordaire. Bleu cooking school. She stayed there for six months before beginning. Private Studies with Master Chef Max Boon Yar in nineteen fifty one Julia and two French friends. Simone Beck and Louisette. Toll started a cooking school together. Called the school of the French Gorman's ten years later. The three women published seminal book called mastering the art of French cooking. The book was meant to bring French recipes and cooking techniques to an American audience. That often considered French cuisine too difficult and tedious with this. Julia Child launched her legendary career in the culinary world that same year. Julia and Paul returned to the US and settled down in Cambridge Massachusetts. After Julia made an appearance on Boston television she was approached by the city's public TV station. Which would eventually become. Pbs to host her own cooking show. The French chef went on air in nineteen sixty three and was an immense success running for over two hundred episodes and making Julia a household name through trial presents. That chicken sisters broiler. Fryer Miss Roaster Miss Capable Mr. You're an old madame him. She took home both an emmy and peabody for her work on the show for instance. You've got the French CAU- Zumo foodies. I don't care what happens can fall on. Let's go over all over the stone. The French chef is credited with introducing Americans. Two French food that they could make it home and generally popularizing French cuisine with the American public audiences. Love Julia's humor enthusiasm accessibility and willingness to accept culinary mishaps all encouraging her audience. To just keep cooking I'M GONNA learn. I shall overcome sort of Women's liberation. I mean everything like that. If you'RE NOT GONNA BE READY TO FAIL YOU'RE NOT GONNA learn how to cook with that. Little lecture is All. She famously ended each episode with her signature bone. Apetite sign off. So that's offered a on. A Petit Julia went on to host a number of other hit TV shows including Julia Child and company dinner at Julia's baking with Julia in Julia's kitchen with master chefs and Julia. Child and Jacques Papa cooking at home. She also published a series of additional cookbooks including the long-awaited volume two of mastering the art of French. Cooking in two thousand Julia was appointed to the French. Legion of Honor and two thousand three. She received the US Presidential Medal of freedom for her work. Julia died on August thirteenth. Two Thousand Four. She was ninety one years old. Her legendary kitchen made famous by her. Numerous cooking programs in decades on the air was donated in its entirety to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. Dc where it remains on display for museum visitors today tune in tomorrow for the story of another remarkable taste maker. Special thanks to Liz. Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator Talk.

Petit Julia Julia Child MONICA JULIA US Paul Child California Dc Massachusetts Pasadena Washington Jenny Kaplan Kristin miser Chef Max Boon Yar New York City Smithsonian Institution Simone Beck Gillette Greenberg Wonder Media Network Smith College
"julia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"julia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Julia you're in our food skier what say you one pencil is I don't like to be called this is one thing you always bring skiing you know add kids usually guys it now and you know like basketball shorts or something or leave it I don't see guys doing this I always be like why but you know whatever it's not my thing when you fall on the snow it's a little chilly yeah not my thing not my thing now I'm not saying anything at all global establish no I know I know your thing is the Beatles though Holly yes Hansal skiing yeah but if that is true hits the Beatles hand prince Harry joined Jon Bon Jovi at Abbey Road Studios and at this the iconic street what's that street called Abbey Road there you go the bridge thus the name of the studio that's really unfair it's got that funny name that is the same as the studio names of famous zebra crossing right to start with what you hear it on the front of the Beatles in nineteen sixty nine album and every year the crossing which apparently has a grade two listed status which might means it's got a historical saddle draws thousands of music fans who just slack the dude recreate a picture taken by the infamous Ian McMillan of the fab four so Tim mark this joint venture with Jon Bon Jovi for the Invictus games twenty twenty or twenty twenty one whenever the next one is they had and the Invictus games are games for military vets who have been injured to have an athletic yeah they have different competition yeah thank you and first across was a wheelchair user and a former servicemen and the mod followed by Jon Bon Jovi Susan Warner and finely hairy who take took up the same position as George Harrison so the for some posed while freezing rain fell on them and traffic was held by police and then they went inside and they're working on singing a song together the single is going to be on broken which Jon Bon Jovi created to shine a spotlight on veterans living with post traumatic stress disorder cannot have their service so hopefully and he had already saying in the past with the likes jam and jelly dad with arm I think you sing with William at one point really he did it's in this story here William and I'm Taylor swift and so someone asked him who was better William or Harry very diplomatically time by Joe he is on his hair go gray and has just like a Baxter still has hair you know it's great he said they both have a set of pipes Lehrer Landau well that was very diplomatic that is the correct answer Jon Bon Jovi charge thanks to that spot I feel like you would have had a picture of yourself taken I did have a picture taken but yes I have been Abbey Road and I was fortunate enough to actually go inside Abbey Road Han and they offered yeah they offered a tour it when I was there okay basically you are actually looking at a ghost me that has been around for fifteen years because thank you for everything so studio two Abbey Road is where the Beatles recorded all their music and it's a really kind of a small space then there's a window really up high where George Martin the producer would be and then you just walk through Abbey Road there's like three studios I think they got a little cafeteria and it's just like the small nondescript building in London you can actually go interestingly enough on Abbey Road dot com they have a live cam outside on the zebra crossings you can go and watch that now and you can you know if you were friendly they do this on the weekends are you telling us something about yourself I talked to Julie I go to the White House pedia and watch YouTube videos and I have that is how I have no life not on the Abbey Road thing but you exactly but it's kind of funny if you have some going to London they're going to cross the zebra crossing watching do it live the the future is now that's totally fine that's like a state fair Kaman Lori's mom would watch us yeah well you know if you can understand many where are you now that's totally cool I like that yeah it I don't think we need these cuts because we we talked about everything that was there okay but more importantly very who do you guys think I'm are the for all gosh I gotta find it it's a good one Martin round hang a right on the water talk about a road Noreen island so here it is here it is why do you okay I was a driver I think you guys know this already if you read.

Julia
"julia" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"julia" Discussed on How I Built This

"And today show how Julia hearts and husband Kevin Launch their ticketing platform event. Bright from closet and the San Francisco Warehouse and today manage events in seventy countries around the world. There's a famous quote by Warren Buffett about his investment strategy when he looks for investment opportunities. He looks for quote Economic Castles. Protected by UNBREACHABLE MOATS SO. In other words huge companies have scale that can withstand or even quash any potential competitor in getting over. That mode is meant to be hard and sometimes the only way to penetrate. The castle isn't by crossing the drawbridge but by going raeside sort of like the way monosso. Bhargava launched five hour energy. If you heard that episode you might remember that when Minoshe got started. The energy drink market was dominated by red bull and monster. There was no way as small upstart like his was going to compete with. The big guys is for shelf space so instead of marketing. Five hour energy drink minnows. Turn it into a different kind of product and energy shot and before his competitors could even react. He'd created a whole new kind of product in the energy drink industry and in kind of a similar way when Julia and Kevin Hart's decided to get into event ticketing. The obvious competition of course was a massive company called ticketmaster a company with lots of control over large events at stadiums and arenas virtually Kevin noticed. That ticketmaster wasn't all that interested in small and medium-sized events. And when they saw that opportunity they realized it could be their way across the moat that ticketmaster around the ticketing business and while is still the biggest player in the ticket. Space event. Bright is no slouch today. Fourteen years since it was founded event. Bright is a publicly traded with a market cap of nearly two billion dollars for for. Julia hearts much from her early life suggested she become an entrepreneur in fact.

ticketmaster Julia Warren Buffett Minoshe Kevin Launch San Francisco Economic Castles Bhargava Kevin Kevin Hart
"julia" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"julia" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"She's politics before British politics becoming incredibly toxic and it has over the last couple of years really taken a turn. I've had rape and death threats before I did some work. On Women's means representation on our banknotes with Caroline Credit President Amazing campaign and that was cut the first time people saw that. It's now become so common that it's not really talked. The amount is just seen as part of the job. But I think what was happening to me and I think particularly the idea that you could target a pregnant woman in that way was so people quite shocking. I want to close with one of the strongest most resilient and most inspiring women honored to call a friend at a special live event. At King's College London we welcomed Hillary are- Rodham Clinton to talk to us about her experiences and thoughts about the world today and global progress on gender equality. I took it back almost almost twenty five years to her now famous speech delivered as US First Lady in Beijing at a Union meeting in which she declared women's Rights Human Rights Human Rights Women's rights she told me about the huge reaction worldwide that her woods triggered. I remember it very well. Because it was the fourth United Nations Conference on women it was being held in Beijing and we of course in the United States were sending a delegation but the UN invited me to come to speak. And I think it's a bit of an understatement to say that There were many in the administration namely my husband's administration at the time. who were very reluctant to have me go and members very powerful members members of Congress as well because there were several human rights issues that had sprung up at the time between the United States and China with their imprisoning imprisoning of human rights activists so it was a bit of a tug of war back and forth and I very much wanted to go? The delegation allegation was hoping I would go and I finally said I really want to go and my husband said why. I think it's fine if you go and I said okay fine. We're going then and off. We went but I also wanted to go because I thought it was important to you. Push the envelope. As far as we could about a lot of the practices some of them cultural some of them political social. Some of them legal. So that we're holding women back in many many ways and so in the speech I spoke a lot about those actions and the impact that they had on on girls and women and then of course made the comment about human rights being women's rights and women's rights being human rights in front of the official delegation that I was speaking speaking. It was simultaneous translation in about fifty languages and so nobody was responding. And if you've ever given a speech in front of a big audience and people are hunched over there listening hard. They're not looking at you because they're trying to hear what you're saying it. It is so unnerving thought WHOA. They don't like me talking about the one child policy or they don't like me saying that women can't inherit property the whole list of problems. I was discussing but at the end they did turn out to really like the speech and like the message of the speech. It was funny because because I was criticizing practices including those of our hosts China. So it's one point. China turned off the sound in the rest of the Convention Center left it on in the room but turned off so people outside. Couldn't hear it fast forward like I don't know twenty two years I get a call from a friend of mine in Beijing. Who Says I'm shopping? This large department store and they usually play music over the loudspeakers but they're playing your speech from Beijing. Nineteen ninety five and I went. That's progress. Thanks.

Beijing United States China rape Caroline Hillary President Rodham Clinton United Nations Conference UN Congress King's College London Convention Center official
"julia" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"julia" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Hey, Queiroz Cami here. I am a little bit sick. But that doesn't mean I'm not excited about this current episode with guest cookbook author. Julia Tertia man, we have some good chats about like queer nece in chef and food are really like this person. And I hope you like this episode. Julia take it away feeling. Still. No, no, no careless. Will I always have folks that are on the podcast introduce themselves, which you introduce yourself star. I am Juliette Tertia n- cookbook author. And yeah. L up sued, and I love people. Are you? Are you also a chef is that what you call yourself? Like, what do you call yourself Grena? Yeah. So I do not come selfish chef lieu, and and when someone does I like look over my shoulder like who were they talking about? Okay. Because to me that means someone who runs a restaurant kitchen, okay? And like in a restaurant and sort of cooking professionally in that way. Like, I very much consider myself a home cook. Like, a proud home cook. What is your and you can call me, whatever, you know. I think that was a great answer because I don't know that. So that's why I asked and then I'm curious to hear more about your background in terms of 'cause like straight up your food. Always looks amazing. And I was just saying before we started recording that something that like just your social media tells me is that you also do a lot of social good with your cooking. You do some. Some work with organizations in the community where you live very regularly time project angel food is out it's called. So it's just called angel food. But I think it should be called project angel food. You know, what I didn't have to look at anything. Do you see that? There's no notes. No, that's impressive. I'm I into a. Seems like you. I I like your life your life seems good because seem like it's like did. That's the dream, right? If you're like, I figured out what I'm good at. I know that I can do it to make money. And then also no way I can involve myself in the community with like that's like the is not what you do. Oh, fuck am. I living the dream shit. The first. Oh, it honestly in the first person that told me that. Oh, okay. Yeah. That's what I do. I mean. Yeah. I don't know I've been thinking because I've been excited that you asked me to come on the show because I'm a big fan of the show. I think to all of them, and I was just thinking today, I feel like we do such different stuff. I mean, our work is like very different. But I was thinking there are a lot of parallels. Tell me about thing that like I think exactly what you said like finding something you love to do and getting to do it in a way that like supports you financially. But then also getting to kind of give back to community. I'm trying to kind of gather community river you go. That's like definitely something. That's really important to me. So yeah, I've just been dying to know what you eat. We're on the road on my God. I love this question. Finally, someone good questions. I'm so curious. I got pretty specific about this a couple years ago because. It really is. I find as I'm aging and unlike I'm still like, I'm a young person. I think I'm thirty seven I want to do this job for another several decades as I'm aging I find that your your body, actually, nobody talks about how much your Bod is not suited for touring like hotel is like, yeah. 'cause when people travel very often, they think of vacation like or they're about to take a man. So they're like getting on a plane, you know, once or twice to go there and back they're staying in a hotel, but they don't have to necessarily. Prepare for work in that hotel travel for work. I know that you do to promote your cookbooks you'll tour, but yeah. Food on the road. It's like you can't make silly decisions ate a lot of my writer my contract. The thing that what's in..

Julia Tertia Juliette Tertia Queiroz Cami community river writer
"julia" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"julia" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"And delight you. Julia knew that watching the influx of new customers could point them toward their next initiative, and she continually watched the incoming events within the listings for west coast techniques, they saw different kind of vent appearing east coast. Speed dating nights that that's kind of when the light bulb went on for us. Oh, how we really could create a platform that was fully inclusive of all different. Categories of events because you really can't get farther away from tech meet ups than speed dating. There is a different expectation from those craters and also a different way of using technology, and that was really helpful to start expanding our functionality in the way that we thought about building for different types of people the tough feedback of the early tech adopters had not only taught them how to make a responsive product. It also taught them how to leap upon parse customer feedback and translate that into new product features in record time while customers outside of tech may not be as immediately vocal with her opinions. Julia knew how to encourage it we had the benefit of just like constant feedback loop. But when that happened when we started to see the platform, be organically adopted by event creators in different categories in different Geos. That's when we really started to understand that we. We would just follow our van creators. Note Julian our team weren't just asking answering questions they were watching the customers closely to understand emerging trends, the kind of behavior or use case you couldn't predict what kinds of aunts needed them. And what did these event organizers need event? Bright.

Julia
"julia" Discussed on Great Women of Business

Great Women of Business

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Great Women of Business

"The year was nineteen fifty julia child had attended a few meetings of la circa deg or met one of these nineteen fifty meetings would prove to be the catalyst for the rest of julius career at this particular meeting julia met to french women the proud and skilled simone beck fishbachur nicknamed sympa and the charming lewis at berthold both were married women like julia but they were engaged in a herculean effort of editing together a book of recipes made up of the secrets and legacies pass down by their families from the french countryside however symtas last cookbook what's cooking in france sold poorly in the us to boost the appeal of the next book the women needed to bring in an american perspective julia child was a perfect fit this was julius dream an american and a french woman working together trying to bridge their cultures and expand fine cuisines influence across the world by january nineteen fifty two julia had solidified this into her first business plan julius sympa and louis set began holding cooking lessons to female american pats they called it let cold twat or moan or the school of the three food lovers julius business instinct was taking over before she even knew she wanted to be a businesswoman again we return to investing in oneself julius certainly wasn't making a fortune from running these informal lessons they weren't out on the streets marketing this as a true business in other words she wasn't in this to make money instead these classes help julia to enhance their own skills to share her skills and to pinpoint any weaknesses in her thinking about her goals one such weakness revealed itself very quickly many american women had no idea how to find or identify french ingredients there was a vast difference innovator bility and use between french and american ingredients julia later wrote quote from that time on i never lost sight of the fact that my sole purpose was to teach cooking to americans not the french i had to find a way to translate everything into a pleasurable experience that typical housewife could execute without fuss americans were enamored with canned goods and frozen food that's all they wanted to do and sort of prided themselves not being in.

julia lewis france us julius sympa simone beck louis
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Understand where there's turbulence being generated and so you're sort of figuring out how air molecules move around roughly right then the you're doing all of this with floating point numbers and you need to do a lot of them because there are many many many things to be evaluated all at one time and so that's where having these supercomputer clusters measured in pedophile is you're basically running one gigantic distributed computation that is like this isn't exactly right but but imagine if you were going to actually simulate every air molecule right so the simulation wants to advance one millisecond and you need to four every air molecule in the volume of interest you need to figure out where that air molecule would go would it bounce off of an object would it bounce off of another air molecule in this sort of one millisecond interval and do that forever air molecule and then you update now you have the new state and now you need to keep doing that except when you bump into another molecule you sort of have this cascade effect is very complicated right so that's sort of contrived example that's not how they do it but if you sort of think about that if you were running a simulation that did that that would be enormously computational expensive and so when you have these things measured in pedophile the supercomputers for some things you can let them run really long but if you're trying to do weather forecasting you know if it takes you five days to forecast what the weather's going to be tomorrow that's actually not useful i guess it kind of but it's not useful for four cats makes sense i guess the thing i'm not sure about is if julia is cpos plus and see under the hood like does it but it's not seen as plus what do you mean by under the hood so in other words like the julia perations i mean obviously the farming to other machines and things like that are are written and julia or maybe written in some high level language but under the hood that thing is doing the computation it's still amazing to some blase library or something i mean it's openly calling machine code right but the program itself the thing that is doing the high that is not scripting but doing the high level hooking together of all of the pieces is written in julie i think is what they're trying to say but i guess my question is why isn't every language on that list because with any language that has a cpa was binding you could use you could run the code really fast because you wouldn't actually be running i dunno java code you'd be running c plus plus just called from jolla you know what i mean but that's not i mean you're it is the difference between libraries calling a library and your actual code so sure if you wrote one big library that was do really complex math for my problem in its totality and all i did is ready to a program that said call library do my gigantic program yes you could do that sure i guess maybe another way of saying it is wise in matlab on this list because it doesn't is nobody describes the computations in matlab for supercomputers that running or hasn't according to this thing oh i see because it's it's so big that it's related to strict that's does right so there's no single machine that has one point five it's a whole bunch of things right it's so matlab has no or at least not built in tcp if you wanted to do it in java you're going to have to like well again if you're not going to do it in an sort of hacky cheat way you would need java to handle all of the networking communication back and forth you would have to have doing the computations sure at the lowest level you say like transpose this matrix maybe it runs machine code that originally came from c plus plus but i mean so does everything else right right i guess but the reason why they're not all on this list is is because of the.

five days
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"You have a license there's a phone number or something maybe i'm not maybe i'm making i know making it up your wrong but i mean i guess to point out to we've talked about this in matlab episode but for a one to one replacement for amount knob style stuff i guess you'd probably consider octave so julia isn't going to be drop in one to one replacement but for the style of work that is often done in mail that would be where you consider julia yep exactly in terms of like you know one of the hesitations easing julia might be that it doesn't necessarily have so much support in terms of library like for example let's say you need to load outta know some geospatial data that's in some gi custom format or something like that or you call buffers or whatever right you might say all i'm taking a risk using language like julia because it's not going to support something i really need they do have julia pie library which lets you run python code inside of julia it is pretty good it actually they wrote a bunch of logic there to handle num pie arrays so if you create a numb pie array in pipe on part of some process part of this julia pie process and they bring that back to julia they'll actually just do a pointer pointer assignment they're not gonna actually copy archie i think they yeah if you if you create an empire rate using the pie data or the the julia pie data objects a little bit of soap you have to do that's a little special but basically it's very performance you can call into python if you need to and that shouldn't stop you from trying it out so one of the cool things that i've found about julia was that they're only four languages for high level languages that have ever been used to write computer programs executed at greater than one peta flop sort of compute compute power and so those are sie plus four tran and julia so those are pretty good accomplishment and you were talking about the you know support for distributed messaging and working and that kind of stuff and right i mean this is sort of evidence of that that that you know isn't every language that you would use in such an environment and one day i guess everybody will have a pedophile under their desk right but that days not today and it was interesting that i have thought the number of languages would have been higher but at least according to your pd this is yeah it's only four languages for high level languages that have ever been used to build programs that have run it that that processing so i have to i have to confess terrible which is like i don't actually no i don't have an intuition as to how flops relates to like make gigahertz can you put it if okay ready for this flops is floating point operations per second so a pet of flop is ten to fifteen floating point operations in one second so that is if you think about a million gigaflops gigaflop is tend to the nine million gigaflops yes so if you think of gigahertz computer doing that many instructions and if you could soon that you do like a flop in one hurts than this would be a million gigahertz i didn't follow them but i mean the the ideas that each so floating point operations can take longer and often do take longer than injure calculation so and your computers ale you right you might be able to say i want to increase this number by one in for an integer that's straightforward like there are literal like gates that just execute that not instantaneously but within one clock cycle and handle the results but to increase a floating point number by integer value of one you can't just sort of directly manipulate some bits like the amount of logic you need to do for the various parts of the floating point number mean that it takes a little longer often so depending on your architecture and the exact computers and this is why you have things like high performance computer clusters that often always often run different hardware or might run certain kinds of processors that are different is because of this ability to focus on floating point operations so if you're doing something like computational fluid dynamics where you're say modeling how airflows over an airplane wing and you're trying to.

million gigahertz one second one day
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Could just say hey julia process all hundred twenty is fast as possible and it's going to go off and do that and so there's a lot of complexity or that's that's hidden from you like for example let's say you have ten computers and you tell julia processes hundred twenty things as fast as possible julia l send the first ten out but let's say the tenth one comes back i and the for the other nine are still processing it's not gonna wait for the other nine to fish going to just send me eleventh one to that machine that's done with the tenth one and so it's kind of keeping track of everything for you making sure that another computers are really waiting if they don't have to wait so so that's that's the really kind of big ad and it seems it seems really cool if you come from sort of a matlab environment where you're loading image i probably silly but then you're on a for you transform that might take a while or you're writing a four loop to loop through all these images and process them and you go to something like julia where you know you just have this one line that says hey here's ten thousand images just no that's that's really nice right so so to matlab but one of the things about matlab is not as really expensive yeah that's true you said even if you know things that are free we've had this issue java recently where oracle actually end up winning that lawsuit and so google has to pay oracle like billions of dollars it's something crazy but there's some languages that they're not or packages or whatever were they're not they're free but then they have sort of like a catch right like that they have a really restrictive license or whatever yeah although i mean i guess for java most people are probably not doing what google did yeah i don't know the details on that so like if you just use java is it okay i'm not a lawyer so he has to but let's just say that you don't have that issue in julia because jews completely it licensed which is people don't know mit and bsd are the two licenses where you know if you talk to a lawyer you know those are the licenses that will make them smile right like if it doesn't say mit or vsd the lawyer is going to have a lot of questions and be really nervous about using that software so so julius totally unencumbered so i'm i don't know if this is correct for home use matlab even just for home use is one hundred fifty dollars why are a standard license for one year presumably for.

google julia l bsd one hundred fifty dollars one year
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Let's say you julia and i'm going to kind of be able hindi of the year just speak in code but julia you you say sync one plus one and it doesn't return that line if you say a qu'ils eysenck one plus one that's not just going to as not going to be too he's going to be cool to a future and then whenever you go to use a let's say you now say sequels eight plus b now see is going to be a future and this going and going and then surely you're going to need to know value so let's say you print see or right see to a file or something like that now all of a sudden julius hang on all of these features i needed no now they actually are and so it it's going to do it's going to you know start waiting blocking on these features so let's say hey see gino chew are yet sees waiting on as though hey have you figured it out yet no not yet okay i'm gonna hang out and the nascent says oh yeah figured it out when one is two and then see says oh now i got my value to and then you print see right and so you know when you're writing code like this you're just accumulating a lot of these futures but then you know while this interpreters running and doing this those futures correspond to you know tasks that are running and they could be either code routines so the running in the same process just in the on a separate a separate threat just to be little wavy they could be separate threads sixty supper processes even be on another machine and that's that's one thing that really such julia part in no j you can do you know a sink function and you'll get a future and same kind of thing but you know no jay won't actually ship that function over to another machine that's a whole different university because think about the complexity there like for you to ship function call to another machine that machine has to have all of the context that function uses the library that library has to exist on the other machine then there's also some things that just can't happen right like that function tries to read from disk when out you're kind of in trouble if you ssume that it was going to be on the same machine right and so you julia there's ways to say you know run this synchronous lee but it has to be online machine versus i don't care just run it anywhere but but the cool thing is is let's say you have some program where you're loading some images from disk you're doing a four h transform and then you're running conned blueshield neural net and then you're adding the two and you're doing some other stuff and you're playing bounding boxes that you can just do all of this and julia will farm out all of these tasks and he'll use many resources machines as as you give it as are allowed by by the commander specifying and then it's going to try to keep itself busy and it's got a lot of lakes built in sort of pool support so let's say you have one hundred twenty images that all need to be processed you.

julia
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Of length a million each and you want to add them together well if you write a for loop in matlab for one to a million see of isaiah via via vi that's going to get longtime i mean like maybe a minute right but if you do see goals plus b you know fisher's one line in the interpreter that line can be very complicated and time consuming and matt level do that just extremely fast like i don't know not even a millisecond like a fraction of second right and so the way that that these things work is under the hood for each instruction each instruction maps to a bunch of really complicated but extremely fast logic so there's blah's libraries we've talked about in the past of laws means basic linear algebra system so for example there's there's sort of an api that you can adhere to to be of laws library it says things like you know add two vectors at two matrices multiply matrices so and so forth implement all of these functions than you support blah's level one or whatever right and so you know the best these these blah's libraries tradeoffs too has all of them and it knows us the right way right time there's things like f f t w we shan't for fastest for you transform in the west which is just as says super fast for a transfer library things like open mp for multi processor support things like that and so you don't have to know how any of these things work or that even any of them are happening because it's all kind of behind the scenes but you know the price you pay there is that each instruction now requires a lot of thinking has really think about what to do and so things like four loops kinda kill your performance so the last go ahead so the when you said that you know the realm of scientific programming or whatever i mean this is one of those places where that there's actually still a lot of people using fortran using see eight sometimes i think like scientific program people using scifi numb pie but i mean there's still a lot of people using language as much older than that yeah i mean like i feel you you're more in that realm i guess than i am so i mean is like of the mindshare is julia competing against these old ones or competing against something like python i think julia's really competing with matt latin so work there there's some people using julia not really on my team but it's a huge company and there's a whole group of people on using julia and i noticed almost all of them are ex are ex matlab people so yeah i think so yeah to your point i mean when you say scientific program of course like you can do scientific programming in anything but but typically like scientific programming languages are ones that are more high level that that make it easy to experiment so that's why like most of these languages will have like an id belted so for example you'll not loud has as matlab like you start matlab and it pops up this whole developer environment where you can see the status of variables and look at plots and things like that while you're coding and so for for julia or known pie or any of these you've easing jupiter which jupiter's what is the rebranding of i on notebook and so one of the reasons that rebranding jupiter supports julia supports torch which is in lua and a bunch of other things supports what's it called spark you can do spark in jupiter now so what are the for juliette self though what are the features that that really questions like why does julia like really standout right so let's say you're matlab user or are easer what's really the the reason to switch right one of the biggest things about julia is an embraces the sort of a synchronous paradigm which we talked a lot about in back appetite forty one which is probably years ago but in the know jay us episode we talked earlier about this hoisting paradigm and ideal basic is pretty simple it's just you call a function but instead of doing what it's supposed to do it just goes off and starts working and it gives you a future so.

isaiah
"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"So because especially you can watch ten people do or one hundred people do it and each time you'll learn something a little different it is true that sometime you can get bad advice but i think you said earlier kind of cream rises i think often especially in the like how to the people who kind of are doing stuff that's very dangerous often get flagged for doing stuff that's very dangerous yeah i mean i looked up how to use a jigsaw the you know the video had millions of views and it was just very professionally curated and yeah i mean in theory yeah if someone could trick you for one they probably have a lot of thumbs down's you know that that has a big impact on the search results and all that so yeah i would have worked to about it but but specifically in this relates to convert before like you know things that you don't use often but when you do well it's nice is i've been watching this channel three blue one brown and this guy goes into like all sorts of discussion about math and not like oh here what is the khan academy you know it's like very practical amount than how to learn dutch grade too but that's very different this is like for math that you would never i personally would never have attempted before like the riemann zeta function and he'll describe in like a it makes me feel like a superhero like understand the riemann zeta function and what does eurozone how it relates to pry i mean i don't but i watched it he convinced me that like oh it's totally obvious and intuitive how these things relate to the primes and why and just great video great channel i don't remember high came across it i think maybe i had number of eilon awhile ago i think last time in this i think it was sort of referred to it and i may even talked about last month of i did well because it's really good the videos are a little long but you know definitely worth it the explanations he gives and understanding of math and i think it's one of those things where although i'll never probably have used for the remains eight function like the way he breaks down and things and he does his talking about mapping from one problem onto another looking first lucians which is very common in mathematical proofs and that technique right it just helps get you thinking about those kinds of things normally valuable so you do and for specific channel recommendation because why not do for one three blue one brown very cool yeah me a similar one that i fall is called ted ed where it's i don't know how it's affiliated with ted but it's just high it's a guy named good it's it's high quality like cartoon style emissions but explaining some concepts like they had one the other day that was why you can't divide by zero and but i mean the thing is i mean obviously you can't they go into like why you can't do that and why if you could then one equal to or whatever but then the explain how you can't even really fudge around it like you can't say one over zeros and finnity like you can't really even write a role to handle that because any rule you write ends up contradicting itself is super interesting very cool time for talking about julia julia my wife actually saw julia computer she's like who's that i would name some famous actress but i'm drawing a blank chewy there's some julia julia robert any other julia child she's a chef oh yeah right yes we know about culture exact i cultural reference of in years so you talk about julia you really have to talk about scientific programming at a high level because julius in this class of languages that contains matlab and are and things like non pie and the core idea behind all of these has been that you have a slow interpreter like the matlab interpreters extremely slow but then each individual instruction is super fast for what you're doing so like so like to tell straighten example let's say you have two vectors and their.

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"julia" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Programming grow campuses seventy seven julia takeaway patrick welcome everyone to episode seventy seven you know we have a lot of discussions with people emailing in who aren't an university anymore or are thinking about what the study and the question always comes up about the importance of of computer science in i don't maybe it's not a classical term but how i always thought about computer science now it'd be relative to just programming or software engineering which i don't keep up on the kind of subtleties of all the different words and i know we've probably talked about the differences back and forth several times on the show but what i mean here is the things you would find in a textbook like data structures and algorithms pick your favorite yeah i mean it's like you know computer science on sorta list tender for ways and you built a tree and etc etc and the thing is that even if you're going to you know go to some sort of boot camp if you're watching online courses learning how to code a website i mean these things are awesome and actually the mechanics of using an e telling you computer what to do how programs work all that is important in i'm also a huge of understanding actually architecture how computers work for me that's a big help in the work i do about getting programs to run into run quickly and debugging when there's problems especially in languages.

julia