21 Burst results for "Julia Pollock"

"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:37 min | 5 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Of them is gone nowhere to go it's also a big change from early in the pandemic when millions were getting laid off and claiming unemployment every week, which Hamrick says did a great deal of damage to the notion and the reality of job security. Fast forward all these many months later. The storyline has almost been turned totally upside down. It is the employer mounting the mighty struggle. Retaining and finding workers. What we've got says Robert Frick at navy federal credit union is a flip in economic leverage from employers to employees. People will quit on a hair trigger right now. So employers are really holding on to them like mad. So not only are we seeing layoffs go down, we're seeing wages go up. Frick says the biggest risk going forward is another COVID search, which could push layoffs back up again as each prior wave has. But for the moment, let's bask in some good news. Caro's economist Julia Pollock at zip recruiter, which is a marketplace underwriter. Getting laid off or fired is one of the most stressful experiences right up there with divorce and illness. So it should bring some good holiday cheer to knows that the chance that you're going to be fired or laid off is unusually low right now. And on that happy note with just about 28 minutes before I head out on vacation, I am Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. Have a nice time, Mitchell, I have a nice time. On Wall Street today, pretty much downhill from.

Robert Frick Hamrick navy federal credit union Julia Pollock zip recruiter Frick Caro Mitchell Hartman Mitchell
"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Coming up. They have this invisible power. Could be good, could be bad, I guess. First though, let's do the numbers. Now industrials up 6 17 today 617 points one and 8 tenth percent 34,639 on the blue chips. The NASDAQ up a 127.8% 15,301. The S&P 500 up 64 one and four 10% 45 77 OPEC and its oil producing allies OPEC plus is the shorthand decided today to continue following a schedule for monthly oil production increases. So, some of the major energy companies ExxonMobil pumped up 2.4% royal Dutch Shell soon to be just shell boosted one and a half percent. Soro maker Kellogg has reached tenant agreement with some of the 1400 plant workers that have been out on strike 3% raise is included Kellogg up one in four 10% today. Bonds down yield on the ten year T note. 1.44%. You're listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is supported by give well. When you give to charity, how much impact will your donation actually have? This question can be hard if not impossible to know. Give well spends over 20,000 hours each year researching charitable organizations and only recommends a few of the highest impact evidence backed charities they found. If you've never donated to give wells recommended charities before, you can have your donation matched up to $250 before the end of the year or as long as matching funds last. To claim your match, go to give well dot org and pick podcast and enter marketplace at checkout. Make sure they know that you heard about give well from marketplace to get your donation matched. This is marketplace. I'm Kai, risd. First time claims for unemployment benefits out this morning. 222,000 up a bit from a week ago, but still within spitting distance of where things were in the before times. They got jobs update, as I said, just a couple of minutes ago comes tomorrow with the November unemployment report. And one of the things economists and analysts are keeping an eye on are the people who have not yet come back to the labor force. Marketplaces Meghan mccarty corino has that one. In October, there were about 3.6 million more Americans who didn't have a job and weren't looking for one, then before the pandemic. Economist Nick bunker at job search site indeed, a marketplace funder says his firm surveys of unemployed people indicate a major reason why. Because of continued fears about the pandemic that they are hesitant to return to in place work because of health concerns related to the pandemic. Another hint is found looking at the age of the workers missing from the economy, says Julia Pollock, at job site zip recruiter. About half of them are people who are retired, but who would otherwise have either state network or unretired and gone back to the workforce. Workers over 65 were the fastest growing segment of the labor force before the pandemic, but they've retired at an accelerated rate over the last two years, and they've been slower to return to the workforce as the economy has improved compared to the last recession, says Richard Johnson at the urban institute. And the other factors that have been encouraging people to work longer at older ages, those are still in place. Things like concerns about financial security, increasing healthcare costs, and lower physical demands at most jobs. But continued concerns about the pandemic could be changing the calculus for older workers in the long term, says Aaron sojourner at the university of Minnesota. A lot of older Americans turned on retirement income turned on social security and making it work. And it will be harder to attempt them out of that. He says that could make for a smaller labor pool.

OPEC Soro Kellogg royal Dutch Shell ExxonMobil Meghan mccarty corino Nick bunker Julia Pollock Kai wells Richard Johnson urban institute Aaron sojourner
"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 6 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The bill also invests $17 billion in the infrastructure ports which the Biden administration says will eventually help straighten out kinks in the supply chain All right so much here but talk to me about the money here for making Internet faster in America There's $65 billion for that The White House says that money would ensure that every American has access to reliable high-speed Internet And this has been a problem David especially in rural areas The administration says more than 30 million Americans live in places that don't have at least minimal broadband infrastructure All right infrastructure But what about the other social and environmental spending package still in progress briefly where things Is still in progress the house did pass a procedural measure on it It still hasn't held the actual vote a group of moderate Democrats held that up saying they wanted a report first from the congressional budget office on how much it'll cost Nancy thank you Now that jobs report from late last week was stronger than expected with indeed people piling back into the workforce with COVID infections falling but one sector that lagged in October hiring for state and local governments especially public schools where payrolls dropped by 65,000 last month when seasonally adjusted marketplaces Meghan mccarty corino looked into this October is the third month in a row that local public sector jobs took a hit as economist dean baker with the center for economic and policy research A lot of us had been kind of scratching our heads because I and I think most analysts had been expecting a big jump particularly in the education where schools are open again almost everywhere But he says there's a lot of competition for labor In the private sector if you want to hire someone you could raise wages They could offer bonuses Private employers are pulling out all the stops as Julia Pollock chief economist at job site zip recruiter offering extra money new benefits more flexibility and it's happening everywhere across every industry with the exception of government And that's because government hiring is very inflexible Salaries and benefits in government often have to go through time consuming approval processes But states are flush with hundreds of billions of dollars in federal relief funds so Pollock expects compensation to start catching up and coming months I make a mccarty corino for marketplace Do.

Biden administration COVID Meghan mccarty corino congressional budget office White House center for economic and policy dean baker America David Nancy Julia Pollock house Pollock mccarty corino
"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Improve drinking water by removing lead pipes and Bill also invest $17 billion in the infrastructure of ports which the Biden administration says will eventually help straighten out kinks in the supply chain All right so much here but talk to me about the money here for making Internet faster in America There's $65 billion for that The White House says that money would ensure that every American has access to reliable high-speed Internet And this has been a problem David especially in rural areas The administration says more than 30 million Americans live in places that don't have at least minimal broadband infrastructure Infrastructure but what about the other social and environmental spending package Still in progress briefly where things Is still in progress the house did passive procedural measure on it It still hasn't held the actual vote a group of moderate Democrats held that up saying they wanted a report first from the congressional budget office on how much it'll cost All right Nancy Marshall guns are thank you Now that jobs report from late last week was stronger than expected with indeed people piling back into the workforce with COVID infections falling but one sector that lagged in October hiring for state and local government jobs especially public schools where payrolls dropped by 65,000 when seasonally adjusted Marketplaces Meghan mccarty corino looked into that October is the third month in a row that local public sector jobs took a hit as economist dean baker with the center for economic and policy research Lot of us had been kind of scratching our heads because I and I think most analysts had been expecting a big jump particularly in the education where schools are open again almost everywhere But he says there's a lot of competition for labor In the private sector if you want to hire someone you could raise wages They could offer bonuses Private employers are pulling out all the stops as Julia Pollock chief economist at job site zip recruiter offering extra money new benefits more flexibility and it's happening everywhere across every industry with the exception of government And that's because government hiring is very inflexible Salaries and benefits in government often have to go through time consuming approval processes But states are flush with hundreds of billions of dollars in federal relief funds so Pollock expects compensation to start catching up and coming months I make a mccarty corino for marketplace Let me check my market screens.

Biden administration Nancy Marshall COVID Meghan mccarty corino congressional budget office White House center for economic and policy dean baker America David Julia Pollock Pollock mccarty corino
"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:29 min | 7 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"More good news for the American labor market today. Another drop in first time claims for unemployment benefits 281,000 people filed last week the fewest in a year and a half. Pandemic layoffs are decreasing, yes, but it's also true that lots of workers are leaving their jobs voluntarily for lots of reasons as we've been telling you. An employers are having trouble filling those openings. Where then do you suppose the workers who were leaving their jobs are going? Marketplaces, Kristin Schwab takes a look. Right now, it is statistically more difficult to become a receptionist than it is to get into Harvard. That's according to data from zip recruiter where Julia Pollock is chief economist. I have a lot of bad news for job seekers in certain occupations. Some are much more competitive even. Some of these jobs are specialized or senior roles, but a lot of them are what Pollock calls pleasant jobs with predictable schedules in customer service or communications. Also jobs like airport security. So jobs where you have some degree of prestige, perhaps the uniform, and a union looking out for your interests. And growing interest in these jobs that are more stable and have better pay and benefits makes sense when you compare them to jobs that require similar skills and are begging people to come back. Think less predictable or less protected industries like trucking or restaurants. Daniel zhao, an economist at glassdoor, says understaffing has gotten so bad in those categories that it's actually compounding the problem and contributing to even more turnover. If you're a worker at a restaurant and suddenly the restaurant is short staffed, it's going to be that much harder for you to actually manage your shift. People are tired, burnt out, fed up. And a lot of them are looking for a new work from home lifestyle. Glassdoor says search for remote roles is up more than 350% in the last year. Whether everyone can get one is a different story. Jesse rothstein is a labor economist at UC Berkeley. I don't think it's reasonable to think that we're going to transition millions of hospitality and food service workers into IT jobs. He says eventually, something's gotta give, whether it's employers upping pay to attract workers or job growth in some sectors, petering out. Or at the end of.

Kristin Schwab Julia Pollock Daniel zhao Pollock Harvard glassdoor Jesse rothstein UC Berkeley Glassdoor
"julia pollock" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:08 min | 7 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"A treat because get a little sugar to help us get through the scary parts. The grade. So Julia Pollock is chief economist at the job site zip recruiter. And she basically spends all day watching labor market data, move around. The labor market is usually this very boring thing. It's a stable inert pretty boring system. Julius's usually changes in the labor market are so subtle that when things move around by like a tenth of a percent or a hundredth of a percent even, it's like a really big deal. What are the labor condoms America doing now? They're scratching their head and adjusting for the Y axis on every single charge. Their grass all went completely off the borders of their charts. Oh, you have to make more room for big change in the chart. Okay, we're gonna need a bigger chart. Exactly. You have to really zoom into that chart to see that change. But now, everything is turning upside down. For workers, a lot of these changes have been really sweet. Yeah, so here is a treat indicator. The number of open jobs right now is 50% higher than it was before the pandemic. This is across the whole economy, all kinds of jobs. Yeah, I mean, wages are the highest they've been in more than ten years. And when people switch jobs, they're getting paid more. On average nearly 6% more. And also, a lot of work places are now offering more flexibility, like working from home or working different schedules. And that is really great news, especially for people who need to accommodate child care or family care, things like that. But also the possibility of remote work means many job seekers have way more options than they used to. Location has typically been a deciding factor for job seekers because taking a job at a new place means uprooting the family, pulling the kids out of school, finding a new house. For a lot of positions, it doesn't mean that anymore. Yeah, in fact, Julia Pollock herself experienced this, so back in 2018, she was looking for an economist's job that was based in or very near her city. Santa Monica, California. And when she looked, there were two job openings. But now, remote work means she could do her job from anywhere in the U.S.. Well, there are 20,000 cities in the United States that I could now search. And so in my case, there are now actually a 179,000 relevant jobs when I just type economists. What? Yes, or very closely related jobs that require economics. So having maybe zip recruiter needs to give you a raise. I'm so excited. So in my case, the remote work revolution has increased my options, but 90,000 times. That is amazing. Connects, can you do a search on podcast host? Never mind. This, of course, is not possible for all jobs..

Julia Pollock Julius U.S. Santa Monica California
"julia pollock" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:38 min | 8 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Help right now offers a unique opportunity to address these issues. This message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one offering capital one. Shopping a downloadable browser extension that searches various sites for shoppers. What's in your wallet. More at capital one shopping dotcom this message comes from. Npr sponsor fund rise making investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks bonds or mutual funds build a more diversified portfolio today at fund rise f. u. n. d. r. i s. e. dot com slash indicator. So during i recently had a book come out. it's called machiavelli for women. And while i was researching the book leading to all kinds of economic data. And i think the data about motherhood shocked me the most i mean. Don't get me wrong. Women have seen enormous progress in the workplace. The share of women who work has been growing ediborah at a pretty fast clip. In fact a couple of years ago women hit this workplace milestone by december of twenty nineteen. Women held the majority of jobs where there's an employer this is betsy. Stevenson professor of economics and public policy at the university of michigan. And i will never forget doing an interview in january of twenty twenty and saying. I can't imagine what could happen. That would lead women to fall behind men again anytime in the next decade turned down what i imagine was a global pandemic right all children to be sent home from school. I mean i'm going to give her a break for that one look. The pandemic was extremely hot on parents but especially hot on women. Millions of women dropped out of the workforce to care for children and family to educate their kids. Thirty years of progress was lost. In terms of the share of women in the workforce so to be clear women have started going back to work especially a schools have reopened but the pace has been pretty slow in fact at the rate that we saw last month it will take nearly a decade for women to gain back all of the jobs they lost in the pandemic. And but this is a lot of these women have basically been forced to make a really difficult choice to leave their jobs and careers you know and a lot of people are like look. This is the choices families. We're making of course their choices choices in terrible circumstances and there are a couple of main issues that come into play around childcare and the economy and one of the big ones is cost. childcare can be really expensive and that's getting worse over the last year more than one hundred thousand jobs were lost in the childcare sector. according to the bureau of labor statistics and that has been pushing up prices for childcare and because women tend to earn less than men. Do it will often just make more economic sense in a mixed gender couple for the man to continue working and for the woman to stay home and world where they don't have control over a lot of things they don't have control over the fact that the men in the household is earning more or that the men in the household can't more easily take time off but money of course is not the only issue when it comes to women leaving the workforce for childcare reasons. Another big one is flexibility. Julia pollock is a labor economist. With ziprecruiter she's been working from home with two kids at toddler and a new baby and julia says during the pandemic millions of women were also juggling work housework sitting up kids with zoom school and for a lot of them. It just became too much but a lot of the reason for this. She says is because of the culture of the workplace which doesn't like to make those particular accommodations. I find that in my life. I'm actually able to get as much work done. As i was before the birth of my my children just now and again i need to jump up for you know a couple of minutes when when the baby wakes up maybe an hour or so and put her back to sleep and then she's asleep for another three to four hour block and i can actually get a ton done. The problem is it's very hard to find work arrangement with that. Kind of flexibility is ill. Julia says it sounds a lot better to say in another meeting. Long call with the client than it does to say. Hey i need to feed my baby. Put it to sleep. And i'll call you back in thirty minutes. We all know situations where huge rims of people have waited thirty minutes. An hour four A male ceo so we. We are flexible with all kinds of situations which is not so flexible for childcare. Yeah oh i think hear is the little young. My my name just handed me the baby. She woke up a mirror amira. Hi how's she doing. I was sounds like a little baby. Like the little like her over to me and she just started eating right away like oh no. Is this her first. Step broadcast this drug as into yes it is. I mean is there also an act in that way that the businesses are less. So i think for this navy dog. She's making too much noise in the background. Gotta love it. I feel like it's really beautiful metaphor but yes. Take your time to do what you need to do. And just because of little moments like these little five ten thirty minute interruptions. Julia says mothers end up being paid less promoted more slowly and their work is viewed far more critically than that of women. Without children people assume mothers are not serious about their work or dedicated to their jobs. Why can understand why so. Many women when they are in that situation Even though it will only be a thirty minute interruption. And they'll be able to get right back to work. Just give up on the whole enterprise at work altogether still julia points out that right now is a huge opportunity for women in the workplace because not only are many companies a lot more open minded about working from home or making more flexible work situations but also workers have a lot more power right now so employers are more willing to talk to parents and workout situations that will help them. Economists bitsy stevenson says she's hopeful have seen just a revolution and how managers are thinking about providing workplace flexibility. And about helping to reduce discrimination against parents. Betsy says congress proposing things like the child tax credit and free pre k. These are all signs of the government is starting to address these issues as well. She points out that. In europe government initiatives like free childcare and months of guaranteed parental leave have increased the number of women in the workplace. Betsy hopes that the conversations that have been started during the pandemic will translate into some solutions and options for women so they won't have to choose between having a career and having a family. I do think there's a big question here. Where at where at a pivot point are we going to do something. Different is childcare personal issue or an issue that we should think about as being essential to a modern. No twenty-first-century developed economy. Betsy says there's just a huge opportunity right now. For policy makers and companies to address these issues and hopefully irian make the economic impact of crying babies. A little smaller episode of the indicator was produced by cronin and it was backchecked by caitlyn nicholas the indicators edited and his production npr..

Npr bureau of labor statistics Julia pollock machiavelli betsy Stevenson university of michigan julia Julia bitsy stevenson Betsy navy congress europe caitlyn nicholas cronin npr
"julia pollock" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:27 min | 11 months ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And barbecue sauce made using copay Luwak, coffee and McCall in Macallan single malt whisky described as having a complimentary but intense flavor profile. The first Burger has already been sold with the entire purchase price going to a local Food Bank. Name. What do you think this cost? $1200 $1200.6100 dollars. $6100. Here's the thing. Here's why this is intriguing to me. That's absurd. Clearly absurd. Clearly, sir. I do want to know what it tastes like. I do want to know that does sound like he'd rather rather intense flavor situation. But I want to know what do you have any desire to know what that tastes like that know how many of those those flavors are complementary? Okay, Well, it's funny. You ask anything super fatty, which is going to be the wagyu the ham? Uh, even the beluga caviar to some degree is going to be cut by the acidity. Of the barbecue sauce and the champagne. That's in the the onion ring. I think it could be good in the king crabs can be super rich. I think it could be good. What I think you need to make. A central Indiana version of this with everything that you can buy at the grocery store. Oh, my gosh. What an idea. Okay, So what would be the Indiana via tenderloin would be involved. I mean, but this is a of remake of Pete seat in the making right here. I mean, this is a special edition. My gosh, I'm in Dame. What? So actually before you do your news segment, can we talk about where the jobs came back and where they didn't? Because I'm fascinated by this will lead away. Peter. Okay, so a great jobs report for June 850,000 jobs added to the economy. Of the 850,000 jobs. 343,000 of them were in leisure and hospitality, Dan, You're not surprised by this. Not at all. Okay. Have you seen this list? By the way, Because the next thing I'm about to tell you is not the shocking thing on the bottom. It's the second largest growth area. Do you know that? So I don't think so. Okay. You ready to be both dismayed and shocked? Yes. What's the second category? I thought you were gonna tell me. No, no, no, it's a guessing game. Now It's 188,000 jobs. What industry is the second leading jobs being added back in June of 2020 Dismayed and shocked, Uh Would normally guess something with like, uh, dining or something that but I know that's not the case. So what is it? Government. Oh, and, uh, that's why, like I You are dismayed and shocked, aren't you? Yes. 188,000 and I have no further context around that. Maybe it makes sense. I would have a hard time believing that makes sense next. His professional business services that's good 72,000 jobs. Retail at 67,000 jobs. Alright, Dame Are you ready to hear what industry lost the most jobs, According to this report in June of 2021, This is also shocking ended. Dismayed in a different way. What do you think the percentage of those jobs and government where I R s agents? Did you see? There's might be one of your stories this week, There's like a 36 million returned backlog. So extra turns right now No It might even be more It might be like 63. I may have inverse the numbers. What I mean. I've talked to a number of people that are like well story, not my refund. They're just there's all sorts of issues inside the I R. S right now what industry lost 7000 jobs in June. Horse racing. Construction. Really, really. How What kind of construction is not doing Well, right now. I have no idea. I can't figure it out. I mean, is that about the because lumber prices fell 41% or something like I'm I just can't even get my head around that I talked to a contractor that I'm pretty good friends with just last week and asked if he'd seen any of the relief and lumber prices because not around here. That's maybe by design. Were there 7000 people building the wall on the southern border that got laid off. That's it. Farish question. I don't know. What's the news this week? Signing bonuses are usually reserved for professional athletes and privileged few white collar professionals. Not this summer beat. As U. S employers. Search for hires increases an urgency especially in manufacturing, logistics, healthcare and food service industries. Like truck drivers, hotel cleaners, warehouse workers, They're all being offered signing bonuses of hundreds, if not thousands. Dollars. Nearly 20% of all jobs posted on search site ZIP recruiter in June offer a signing bonus, which is up from 2% of jobs advertised on the site in March. The states with the highest shares of job listings that include signing bonuses are Iowa, Missouri, Vermont, Wyoming and Arkansas, according to ZIP recruiter economists Julia Pollock. Hiring bonuses. Often started $500 but quickly rise from their job postings across sectors show that $1000 hiring bonuses quickly becoming table stakes and recruiting hourly workers who make between 16 50 $25 an hour I mean, I don't like gaming systems as you and I mentioned in previous segments today. At that level of I'm trying to think how I can say what I want to say, without sounding incredibly elitist and condescending. Well, why is that stopped me before? Uh, why wouldn't a person get the signing bonus work? Whatever sort of profession Eri period. They have to work and then go. Just do it again and again and again and then turn over becomes a major issue. Don't know It's the same thing. I thought, I'm not sure why. Especially younger kids aren't just going to job hop and, uh and mix signing bonuses and move on. What else is in the news this week?.

Julia Pollock June of 2020 March $1000 $6100 $500 June of 2021 67,000 jobs Peter 41% $1200 188,000 jobs 36 million 343,000 June 7000 jobs Vermont 7000 people Arkansas Iowa
U.S. economy added 559,000 jobs in May

The Indicator from Planet Money

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. economy added 559,000 jobs in May

"In may the. Us economy added five hundred and fifty nine thousand jobs while the unemployment rate fell to five point eight percent which is a huge improvement over last month when the economy added two hundred seventy eight thousand new jobs and everyone started panicking response to this report f. in pretty mixed so to figure out what to make of five hundred fifty nine thousand new jobs. We called julia pollock. She's a labor economist at ziprecruiter. When you open up these numbers like what went through your head. This report is kind of and there may may i know. But here's the weird part darrien history of jobs reports going all the way back to the nineteen thirties. The may jobs report are meth. May is one of the best all time. Jobs reports ever recorded in terms of the number of jobs added in one month. It's like in the top twenty. I like to hear it.

Julia Pollock Darrien United States Jobs
"julia pollock" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Npr's ping wong reports it boost the case for twelve to seventeen year olds to get vaccinated. Young people are three times more likely to get hospitalized for covid. Nineteen the flu and the possibility has increased in recent months. The report shows that the rate of teens getting hospitalized crept up in april when more kids went back to school and the country loosened up. Mask wearing doctor rochelle will lansky head of the cdc encouraged adolescents to get vaccinated as soon as possible and of course still teams are fully vaccinated. They should continue to wear masks and take precautions went around others who were not vaccinated to protect themselves. The friends family and community so far around one out of every four teens and preteens has gotten a coke shot ping pong. Npr news closer and biden as extended another offer to gop lawmakers concerning his proposed infrastructure improvement proposal at once again they appear to be shooting it down senate. Republicans panning proposal from the president to put in place a fifteen percent minimum corporate tax instead of raising the overall corporate tax rate to twenty eight percent by in the gop negotiator talking today and agreeing to reconnect day. The white house said. It's looking to reach a bipartisan agreement. Before next week women accounted for more than half of last month's job gains. That's according to the may jobs report out today. Sectors and employ more women than men saw the most growth. Npr's andrew shoe has more of the five hundred fifty. Nine thousand jobs added in may more than half were in leisure and hospitality as restaurants and bars reopened and travel picked up. There were also notable gains in education and health services is dominated by women. Still julia pollock. A labor economist with ziprecruiter says a full recovery to pre pandemic employment levels is going to take a while. There are many many people who are switching industries now gaining new skills and taking time to build new networks so this is not going to be a quick overnight fixed to the economy even with the games this past month. The number of women in the labor force is down one point eight million since before the pandemic andrea shoe. Npr news letters reboard chair. Jerome powell says the west central bank intends to study how climate change might affect the banking industry. Though powell says he doesn't see the fed getting involved in the actual fight against climate change. Paul saying the bank's mandate from congress to supervise banks and financial stability then. The central bank chairman says the fed has gathering data on how climate change could affect those interests up end of the week on wall street. The dow gained one hundred and seventy nine points to thirty four thousand seven fifty six. The nasdaq rose one hundred. Ninety nine points. The snp gained thirty seven points today. You're listening to npr. The food and drug administration now says it will allow a popular diabetes medicine to be sold as a weight loss drug in the us the fda signing off on that use for the higher dose version of a drug made by danish company. Novo nordisk called goby a company funded study showing the patients who took the drug average to fifteen percent weight loss. More than one hundred. Us adults are considered to be obese. Scientists.

Jerome powell Paul thirty seven points one hundred twelve twenty eight percent powell congress Republicans rochelle april fifteen percent Nine thousand jobs Ninety nine points More than one hundred julia pollock Npr one point seventeen year eight million
"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ah Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company to turn complexity into simplicity, CDW people who get it. Heard I'm Tanya, Mo's late in South Pasadena, California and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. We got more news from the federal government tonight about cyber attacks on the U. S election yesterday. The story was about efforts by Iran Tonight We're learning more about attacks originating from Russia. NPR's miles parks covers voting and joins us now. Hi, miles. Hi, Ari. What have you learned about the newest attacks? So these attacks came from one of Russia's most formidable hacking groups, sometimes known as energetic bear or dragon fly. The U. S government says that over the past month or so, They've been observed targeting a range of government networks across the country, including aviation systems, and, in some cases, election systems. This isn't new for this group. A couple of years ago, there were reports about them hacking into nuclear power plants in this country. So in the case of two local election jurisdictions, local government systems were breached. And because of the simplicity of those networks, the Attackers also got some access to a limited amount of voter data. But federal government officials are stressing that there is no indication that this was some sort of targeted attack on election infrastructure. Basically, what they say is that these sorts of Attackers air probing for vulnerabilities anywhere they were able to find him in the case of this county, and once they got in, they were able to access some voter data. Well, we know that Russia's interference directed at the U. S spiked in 2016 and has never really stopped since then. How does this latest revelation fit into the picture? Right. What election officials say is that a national security officials say, I should say is that there is comparatively less activity from Russia on the election interference landscape right now, and there was in 2016 in terms of active attempts of breaches. But there's been a lot of discussion since 2016 about what happened then and how to protect our elections now. What US election officials tell us and I cannot stress this for listeners enough. There is no indication that these sorts of attacks or the attacks in 2016 led to any changes of votes or any access to the tallies of those votes. But what foreign adversaries are targeting are the system is basically one step or two steps removed from those vote tallying systems. Maybe it's a website that reports results or gives voters information. For example, potentially with an effort to maybe try to affect those sorts of sources of information, make a hack seemed like it was worse than it was and try to sow some doubt in those results, even if the actual underlying data wasn't actually touched. Miles. Just a couple days ago, federal officials indicted six Russian officers for Hackinginto other country's elections. What are they doing in response to this activity? Right. We know that Russia has an interest in bringing down a number of democracies around the world, not just ours. One thing they're doing this time around. That's really different than the last presidential election is talking about this sort of interference openly. The director of national intelligence and the FBI director convene this hastily convened press conference yesterday to talk about another foreign interference effort, this one from Iran. Where this Iranian group was sending e mails to voters intimidating emails basically trying to tell them to vote for President Trump. They were two registered Democrats, Democrats or else basically, is what they said. The Treasury Department said today it's imposing new sanctions on Iranian government agencies that American officials believe are behind that attack. And now they're looking basically to try and attribute this election appearance today to basically give voters and eye out for what to look for in the future. Iran Yesterday. Russia today is this just what life is going to be like, at least until election day on November 3rd. I hate to say it, but it kind of looks that way. You know, we knew that these foreign adversary still had an interest in our democracy. But what election officials say is that the two things voters Khun do to kind of fight back is a look for trusted information on all of this stuff. Miss information is a huge part of this election interference puzzle on then the other thing is, don't be discouraged to go out and vote. Don't have these doubts in these fears affect people who are, you know, thinking about going out and voting. That is what the adversaries underlying goals are in. A lot of these cases is to try and get voters to not participate. Election officials say. Don't let him win. NPR's miles parks. Thank you. Thank you. One of the topics in tonight's presidential debate will be climate change. President Trump says he'll defend oil and gas jobs. Former Vice President Joe Biden focuses on new green jobs that could be created. NPR's Camilla Domino Ski asks what it would mean for workers. If the U. S has fewer drilling rigs and more wind farms in 2008 Damon Ray moved to Utah to find work in the oil fields. He had no expertise out there for two days. And I had a job making about $30. Now, er he was a roughneck doing hard labor it drill sites, and he made double what he could have earned back home in California. I was able to turn my life around. Four, sir. He switched into oil field service worked his way up. The money was great. The hours were tough as a single dad. But what drove him out of the industry back in 2014 was the volatility. Jobs would come and go is the price of oil changed. I was tired of living by the cost of a barrel. My life depends on how much that barrel Kat. Now He's a welding inspector working in construction. That's oil and gas jobs. In a nutshell. They pay exceptionally well. Extraction jobs pay nearly double the median wage, but it's always been a boom and bust industry trumps backing hasn't changed that. As for clean energy jobs, analysts have found they pay up to $5 more on average than the typical US job. Good but not as good as oil, but they're also less volatile, says Julia Pollock, a labor economist. A dip recruiter You just have. Ah, you're a straight sort are linear trend. Not the wild fluctuations that you see in oil. That's true for renewables like solar and wind power. People drive less during bad economic times, but they.

Russia Iran NPR federal government President Trump US Ari Shapiro California CDW Hewlett Packard Enterprise Com Washington Mo Pasadena director Julia Pollock Hackinginto
"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dozens of state, local government and aviation networks and that they successfully compromised some of those networks and stole data from at least two of them. They also said that the Russian actor has been obtaining U User and administrator credentials, so that gives them the ability to maneuver once they're inside these networks, and they said, In at least one case, the actor was able to access documents related to printing access badges and be setting passwords. Right At this point. They said that there's no indication that Thie this hacker has disrupted any government operations. But they said that quote the actor may be seeking access to obtain future disruption, options. And, of course, you know we're only less than two weeks out from the election, So this is Obviously of great concern. But at this point, the agency said that there's no sign that any election information has been compromised. Okay, Pam, you know it's hard to ignore the timing of this warning. Tens of millions of Americans have already cast ballots and The intelligence community already made that announcement I mentioned about Iran last night. Do we know what sort of impact this could have on the election? Well, I think that the intelligence and election officials there they're goingto try to be very careful about you know, first, letting Americans know what's going on, but without scaring them or undermining confidence in the election, And one of the biggest fears is that you know, Russia or some other foreign actor could cause a lot of damage just by making it look like they have access to election information and that they might be able to manipulate votes even if they don't have the ability to do so. And that might be what's going on here. An effort by you know the Russians to say, Look, we can shake up the system of we want to, and I think what intelligence and election officials will be saying a response in the coming days is Trying to assure the public that you know we have protections in place on we're on top of this. We know you know what's going on. You've been covering elections for years. What have local election officials been doing to shore up their system Since Russia made those efforts toe hack several states back in 2016? That's right. I mean, things were so much different now. I mean there There is much, much more communication between the federal officials, intelligence officials and all these state local election officials before who in 2016 really had no clue what was going on. They've done a lot to beef up security, as I say, and really, you know, voting systems themselves and the actual Ah, vote in elections are really quite secure. It's all these sort of system. Around the voting systems. And it's things like websites that might announce the results that they're worried that those are the things that might be manipulated on Election day, and that would cause more confusion wouldn't change votes. It wouldn't change the results, but it might cause confusion and undermine confidence. That's NPR's Pam Fessler, who covers election security. Thank you so much for this update. Pam. I'll get thanks A lot. One of the topics in tonight's presidential debate will be climate change. President Trump says he'll defend oil and gas jobs. Former Vice President Joe Biden focuses on new green jobs that could be created. NPR's Camilla Domino Ski asks what it would mean for workers if the U. S has fewer drilling rigs and more wind farms. In 2008. Damon Ray moved to Utah to find work in the oil fields. He had no expertise. So I was out there for two days. And I had a job making about $30. Now, er he was a roughneck doing hard labor it drill sites, and he made double what he could have earned back home in California. I was able to turn my life around. Coarser. He switched into oil field service worked his way up. The money was great. The hours were tough as a single dad. But what drove him out of the industry back in 2014 was the volatility jobs would come and go is the price of oil changed that was tired of livin. Why just the cost of a barrel. My life depends on how much that barrel cost. So now he's a welding inspector working in construction. That's oil and gas jobs. In a nutshell. They pay exceptionally well. Extraction jobs pay nearly double the median wage, but it's always been a boom and bust industry trumps backing hasn't changed that. As for clean energy jobs, analysts have found they pay up to $5 more on average than the typical US job. Good but not as good as oil, but they're also less volatile, says Julia Pollock, a labor economist. A dip recruiter You just have. Ah, you're a straight sort of linear trend. Not the wild fluctuations that you see in oil. That's true for renewables like.

Pam Fessler Russia Damon Ray NPR administrator Thie President Trump Julia Pollock Joe Biden Iran Vice President Camilla Domino Ski US California Utah
"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's gone up dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time. Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have beans to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic and has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform up work. Hubbard's study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Glory. Berliner NPR news It's all things considered from NPR news. W sponsors include T Mobile for business dedicated to delivering wireless service without compromise to help small businesses thrive. Customers. Khun stop by a store today to.

Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock NPR Cogan Post Cove Julia Polish Khun Tio T Mobile Connell founder Pollack Hubbard Black Girl Group
"julia pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Sipa quota tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the applicant certain employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers, and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bill don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. NPR News It's all things considered from NPR News Traffic.

NPR Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Julia Polish Cogan Post Cove Pollack Tio Connell Black Girl Group founder
"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

"Going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner

Diana Gil NPR Gauri Berliner Caputo New York Politico Cesar Selina Simmons HHS Julia Polic Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove executive editor president editor Pollack Tio Connell Black Girl Group
Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

"Going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner

Diana Gil Gauri Berliner New York Executive Editor Julia Polic President Trump NPR Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove Editor Pollack TIO Connell Black Girl Group Founder
"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's gone up dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Orry Berliner NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. And this is double u N Y. You are listening to all things considered. Stay with us just after the break on WN my sea we'll hear from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Mess about the latest report of no new Corona virus cases at the reservation. That's a landmark for a region devastated by the pandemic. I'll have that story and more just after the break on W and my C statement..

Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock NPR Cogan Post Cove Julia Polish Tio Jonathan Mess Connell Black Girl Group President Pollack founder
Unemployment Rate Fell to 10.2% in July

Marketplace

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Unemployment Rate Fell to 10.2% in July

"Labor Department told us that employers kept bringing jobs back in July 1.8 million. Overall, the unemployment rate fell about 1% to 10.2%. That's a little higher than the worst of the great recession, but certainly better than April's 15%. We asked marketplaces Mitchell Hartman to look into which jobs are coming back and which might not If the job losses early in the pandemic, we're a torrent. 22 million jobs washed away in just about six weeks. The rebound since then has been more like a steady current. Around nine million jobs gained back and the backto work flows been strongest in low wage service jobs that were savaged early on, says Julia Polic, a Zip recruiter. The largest gains were in leisure hospitality and in retail job stocking shelves at reopened stores, serving drinks at bars and restaurants, cleaning people's teeth at dentist's offices. But job gains slowed considerably in July compared to June, And that's because as many cities and states had to pause there re openings to fightback surges in Kobe cases Businesses couldn't really resume business as usual. The jobs recovery is doing better in sectors less affected by government, covert restrictions and consumers. Caution, says Robert Frick at Navy Federal Credit Union. Own construction in construction in general is doing well. Manufacturing is doing relatively well. I love those are important to the economy because that support service jobs, But Julia Pollock has a warning for professionals whose jobs depend on the consumer economy Among high wage occupations where most workers can work from home that typically are recession proof we see stagnation and even continued decline. In July. Employers cut jobs in business management advertising computer systems in commercial

Julia Polic Julia Pollock Navy Federal Credit Union Mitchell Hartman Labor Department Robert Frick
U.S. Employers Add 1.8 million Jobs In July

Marketplace

01:58 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Employers Add 1.8 million Jobs In July

"Today. We got a decent but not great economic report to kick off the weekend, the Labor Department told us that employers kept bringing jobs back in July 1.8 million. Overall, the unemployment rate fell about 1% to 10.2%. That's a little higher than the worst of the great recession, but certainly better than April's 15%. We asked marketplaces Mitchell Hartman to look into which jobs are coming back and which might not If the job losses early in the pandemic, we're a torrent. 22 million jobs washed away in just about six weeks. The rebound since then has been more like a steady current. Around nine million jobs gained back and the backto work flows been strongest in low wage service jobs that were savaged early on, says Julia Polic, a ZIP recruiter. The largest gains were in leisure and hospitality and in retail Job stocking shelves at reopened stores, serving drinks at bars and restaurants cleaning people's teeth at dentist's offices. But job gains slowed considerably in July compared to June, And that's because as many cities and states had to pause there re openings to fightback surges in Kobe cases. Businesses couldn't really resume business as usual. The jobs recovery is doing better in sectors less affected by government covert restrictions and consumers. Caution, says Robert Frick at Navy Federal Credit Union. Own construction and construction in general is doing well. Manufacturing is doing relatively well. I love those are important to the economy because it supports service jobs. But Julia Pollock has a warning for professionals whose jobs depend on the consumer economy Among high wage occupations where most workers can work from home that typically are recession proof we see stagnation and even continued decline. In July. Employers cut jobs in business management advertising computer systems in commercial

Julia Polic Julia Pollock Navy Federal Credit Union Mitchell Hartman Labor Department Robert Frick
"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on KCRW

"To be quite strong yet again market place's Mitchell Hartman reports back in twenty eighteen the labor market was on fire fueled by the trump tax cuts and sky high consumer confidence employers added about two hundred and twenty five thousand new jobs on average every month then in twenty nineteen that's slow to around a hundred and eighty thousand a month amid rising trade tensions and sluggish global growth still that's well above what's needed to absorb young people entering the work force here's zip recruiter economists Julia Pollock as we start twenty twenty we see a job market characterized by remarkably steady job growth but economists Dan north that business in sure you'll Hermes North America sees some signs of weakness in the job market as the US economy slows temporary job growth shrunk to zero and temporary people are usually the ones that stop getting hired first plus state unemployment claims have risen over the past few months those so far that hasn't been reflected in the unemployment rate which remains at a fifty year low hi Mitchell Hartman for market place holiday sales at Macy's were down half a percent we've learned while that was better than expected Macy's says it is closing more than a dozen of its locations its stock it had a bad twelve months also pure one imports said this week it is closing about half of its stores market places to replenish your looks ahead here's what we do now how the sales were not amazing but not bad nothing to ring the bell from the house tops with but not terrible at all there were three point four give or take Paul Rosen Blum is a managing partner at our S. R. research three point four sales growth isn't as high as some predictions but okay but that is sales you know it's one thing to sell the product it's another thing to make money selling the product Charles OSes vice president at moody's there were.

Mitchell Hartman Julia Pollock Hermes North America Macy Paul Rosen Blum managing partner vice president moody Dan north US
"julia pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"julia pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To be quite strong yet again market place's Mitchell Hartman reports back in twenty eighteen the labor market was on fire fueled by the trump tax cuts and sky high consumer confidence employers added about two hundred and twenty five thousand new jobs on average every month then in twenty nineteen that's slow to around a hundred and eighty thousand a month amid rising trade tensions and sluggish global growth still that's well above what's needed to absorb young people entering the work force here's zip recruiter economists Julia Pollock as we start twenty twenty we see a job market characterized by remarkably steady job growth but economists Dan north that business in sure you'll Hermes North America sees some signs of weakness in the job market as the US economy slows temporary job growth shrunk to zero and temporary people are usually the ones that stop getting hired first plus state unemployment claims have risen over the past few months those so far that hasn't been reflected in the unemployment rate which remains at a fifty year low I'm Mitchell Hartman for market place holiday sales at Macy's were down half a percent we've learned while that was better than expected Macy's says it is closing more than a dozen of its locations its stock it had a bad twelve months also your one imports of this week it is closing about half of its stores market places to replenish your looks ahead here's what we do now how the sales were not amazing but not bad nothing to ring the bell from the house tops with but not terrible at all there were three point four give or take Paul Rosen Blum is a managing partner at our S. R. research three point four sales growth isn't as high as some predictions but okay but that is sales you know it's one thing to sell the product it's another thing to make money selling the product Charles OSes vice president at moody's there were.

Mitchell Hartman Julia Pollock Hermes North America Macy Paul Rosen Blum managing partner vice president moody Dan north US