11 Burst results for "Julia Layton"

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:27 min | 2 d ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Hey and welcome to the podcast I'm Josh Clark. There's Charles W Chuck Bryant. There's Jerry over there. This is stuff you should know. Another prison edition were starting to fill it out a little bit. I don't remember even talking about this in our prison episode. Did We? There's just no way. We didn't mention it somehow we certainly didn't go into depth I remember wanting to do this for a while and looking into it before and being like, oh, it's not really a thing. Luckily. You put Julia Layton on it, and she did a little more digging and it turned out it was A. kind of a human rights. Criminology thing. Yeah but you're SORTA right that it's not really much of a thing which is sad. I've learned. Yeah. I think so I think any yeah. I we'll get to it but yes, I'm in favor of Extended family visits, which may or may not include tax. Yeah I got that from. Now. Hobgoblins the mystery science theater three, thousand version of HOBGOBLINS. It's it's pretty great. Just just go check it out. You know show up eventually. Yeah well, I mean you mentioned Sexy time in I think when you think of conjugal visits. Let's deferred I mean that's a originally what it was and we'll get to the history but this is the first thing you probably think of as. A time set aside at a certain place at a prison probably not you know a separate building at a prison where and you generally think of a wife going to have sex with her inmate husband. Yeah. In fact I mean that's actually PRETTY GOOD Term for it because in CA- in biology to conjugate means to become temporarily united in order to exchange genetic material. May and if that's not a clinical term. Bird. Radio Mouth Parts I mean yeah. It does everybody's heard of conjugal visits. I mean like it's kind of like this legendary mythological thing like if you've ever seen a bugs bunny cartoon from the forties, you know about conjugal visits you know what I mean really. No. But. You could see the couldn't. You wouldn't that be like one of those random things whereas an adult you went back you're like I can't believe this is part of this cartoon. I, think it'd be surprised if bugs bunny featured prison or sex. So yeah, it'd be pretty surprise. All right. I guarantee prisons made an appearance, right but the thing is there does seem to be like a a huge misunderstanding about conjugal visit or an understanding about them but then a complete lack of understanding about how much further these visits go and actually I think that that kind of has led to their decline because you need public support to keep something like that up because it's real easy to get rid of if you are. Are So minded a very easy to get rid of, and as you'll see or you know or here that's been happening over the course of the past twenty years in a big way and a big reason is because what you mentioned earlier, what we're really talking about these days in the United States, we'll get to other countries other countries or like bring it, do it six ways to Sunday. A month. But No like we really have to watch They're called extended family visits in new. York called family reunion visits. and. It's really easy for a politician of a certain kind of politician that doesn't want this kind of thing going on to just lump it in there as you know, your taxpayer dollars going toward these hardcore criminals just being able to have sex and like why would we support that right? The case they can say watch this I'm fiscally conservative and tough on criminals. And then the people say how much did you save go Yeah. Well, we'll get to that do. So. Let's talk about. How well explain the how how much beyond what the public's understanding of conjugal visits are that it goes but let's talk about the origins of these things you want to. Yeah. The the basically racist origins in Mississippi Mississippi State Penn in the early nineteen hundreds there was a for profit labor camp called parchment farm where the warden basically said, you know what? everybody knows. That that black men have an insatiable sex drive and that's one reason they're in here to begin with. So if we get these guys have been a little bit of sex as an incentive, then they're going to work harder for US increase our profits that that's the origin of conjugal visits. Period Really. That's it, and so this warden started this program at parchment which became I believe the Mississippi State Penitentiary. and this was in one thousand nine, hundred, eighteen Yeah Nine, hundred eighteen when he started bringing in sex workers right and you just hit the nail on the head. As it were on Sundays on Sundays the warden would bring in sex workers for to. Lay with the inmates. And do more than just laying. Yeah. Like married not a problem single not a problem. We got the shack out in the back. And you know I don't know if you WANNA be like ten on that list for the day but. That's that's how we're going to do things around here. Yeah, and like the the you're right about the racist origins of it because it wasn't until twelve years after that program was instituted that it was extended to white inmates, and then it wasn't a another think fifty four years before it was finally extended to female to women. Feminine? Female Inmates Yeah and along the way what's crazy is between that that Gulf of time nineteen, eighteen and nineteen seventy-two when women were first became eligible and Mississippi for conjugal visits. Underwent this kind of like. Surprising enlightenment transition to where there is a a nineteen sixty..

United States Josh Clark Mississippi Mississippi Jerry Mississippi State Penitentiary Mississippi Julia Layton Charles W Chuck Bryant York
"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

07:31 min | 3 months ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Your preorder gift and you can hang it in your room next to the tour out. Posters from Tiger beat magazine. Wasn't it teen beat? I don't think so smart smart. yeah, so we're going to be mentioning this a lot. Because as John Hodgman told us the secret. ABC ABC. Always be plugging. That's I know? That is going to be on his headstone. And they'll probably be a qr code on his head starts. He combined his books. Oh man to great idea We're talking today not. Necessarily we're talking more about essential oils than books, although there's plenty of books on essential oils, but has nothing to do with our book. Fred essential oils has to do with our podcast in particular this episode of Our podcast, which is on essential oils. That's right and these are the oils. These little chemicals that are stored. In plants in the glands of all different kinds of plants, and all over the plants from pedals to stems to routes in depending on where you are in the plant, you might be getting a different kind of oil from that particular spot. Yeah, there there might be certain type of essential oil found in the seeds in a totally different one found in the leaves or the roots are the Barker. the Thames the twigs the hair the teeth. Basically every part of the plant can hold some sort of essential oil, and one of the things that I love about this chuck is that science isn't a hundred percent sure. Early what the functions are of essential oils, but they know that it's some form of communication I mean like sent is a form of communication in the plant world in the Animal World and these communicate different things likely things like getaway cow. I don't want you near me eating me instead. Bring on the honeybee to help pollinate me. That's right and we'll get into What they have been used for an are used for, but. It's safe to say that since the Times of ancient, Egypt people have been using essential oils. Set back then before there was modern medicine. Yeah, as medicine, right? So, so we'll talk about all this. Let's let's get into also big shout to Julia Layton for helping us out with this one. Yeah Julius back in the rotation very happy about that yet for sure so Essential oils us you know it. In essential oil is most people do but as far as like plants go as far as chemistry goes. They're really just a certain kind of compound. You can divide them into two different categories. One is oxygenated compounds. Hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds come in all different forms and shapes, things like alcohols, females, oxides, esters, Aldehydes and then on the hydrocarbon side. There's a there. They fall under one category called TERP. Hugh have ever been in a drug education class in the the educator brought out that briefcase full of different drugs. You may have gotten a whiff of the marijuana that is the Turpin marijuana that give it that distinctive smell. The trite and by the way I'm going to read it listener mail some point someone said that we should not use the term marijuana anymore. Oh my gosh, why and and use the term cannabis? Because apparently the marijuana was created as sort of a racist term to make it sound. How foreign south of the border wow, it's evil. Yeah, WOW! News to me so. It makes sense. Yes sure. Well! Okay well, we'll start calling it ex-leader! K., that's the new name for pot. Everybody X. Factor I think that's a TV. Show. We might get sued. That's Joe TV show, isn't it now? That was fear factor. I bet you anything. There was an x factor in a bit Joe Rogan something to do with it. We got to come up with a good name for the spin off. So you were talking about like you mentioned one thing you said something about an alcohol. People are like what in plant But. That's true like if you look at peppermint. That that great sense that you get from peppermint oil. Is that the alcohol Menthol? Right and all of these all these different things are different kinds of compounds there They have different kinds of atoms put together. They do different things. They provide different functions again. They probably all largely have to do with plant communication to other plants or to animals, but they smell different. They combine to make different smells the thing that they all have in common is that essential oils are all VOC's volatile organic compounds, which are just a type of compound usually I guess carbon-based. They might have to be yeah, because it's organic, so they're all carbon based compounds that have in common the fact that at room, temperature or at low temperatures they evaporate. There boiling point is so low that it happens at room temperature, and it can happen at such a low point that it doesn't actually even go from solid. You know alcohol's to. To liquid into gas, it can sublimate sometimes just solid into gas, and it's that gas that spreads out of the plant's stems or leaves or row or pedals. And and hit our olfactory senses through our nose, and we smell, but that's all it is a compound that that vaporizes very easily at low temperatures and spreads through the air. Yeah. And you know those little tiny droplets they diffuse through the cell membrane, and then all of a sudden they're on the surface of the planet, just waiting for somebody's nostrils to come by, but it's kind of like that old question like if a tree falls in the woods, does it make a sound like if if there's nobody there to smell of volatile organic compound? Does it actually smell and the answer is clearly yes. just the the tiniest I mean, sometimes you can just smell with your nose in. It smells great, but sometimes the tiniest bit of activation will get it going. One of my favorite things to do is on a walk when someone's got one of those big beautiful rosemary Bush's out in their by the sidewalk and. Just you know emily and I both in an my daughter to just run our hands up one of those stocks share, and just rub our hands together, and you've got delicious. Steak hands, which is why I mean that's also a good example. Why if you grow Rosemary that you use in your food? You want to grow it away from the. Who knows people touching walking by with? What on their hands rubbing your food basically? Hey, man, if you if you got a edibles in your front yard then. That's your fault. I know I'm saying yeah over grabs, but you so you. You need like the Public Rosemary Bush for people to walk by and smell the you need like your head. Stash Rosemary Butcher by your house, you know. Right and if you go to the house, you can lean out the window. Go and say hey, sir, that's my private Bush. Stay away, steer.

marijuana Rosemary Bush Tiger beat magazine John Hodgman ABC Rosemary Butcher Joe Rogan Egypt Julia Layton Rosemary Fred Joe TV Julius Barker. cannabis Hugh emily
"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"So okay congress comes also big shots Dave Reuss. This is his first article that we're doing an episode on Yeah. Dave Dave is one of the great writers from House Forks Dot Com that we long admired over the years and tapped him to do some stuff for us tapping them tapping them and he's just happened back. It's great. We got a pretty great little stable going here. We got Dave reuss Julia Layton and the grab stor all writing for stuff. You should know right. That's right and I think if if they keep up the good work then that's all we need sure yeah I think so too because we still put together own stuff through yes we do. I WanNa give us a pat on the back as well all right. That's fine all right so I just pulled muscle. I can't write this so like we said before the break this is only happened end four times since nineteen seventy seven that all twelve approach appropriations bills were passed by that October deadline so funny so when it comes into October second it doesn't mean if we haven't passed those appropriations bills. It's like everything just stops working right because if you pay attention to the news news you will notice that there's something called a continuing resolution so this can happen for a lot of reasons one. one good in sort of yes. non-offensive reason could be that man. We were really close and we're we're almost there. We just need another week or the weekend. We'll work through the weekend even to get this done right. a good offensive reason is because someone farted and everyone cleared out of the Chamber and missed the deadline so they had to we do a continuing with. Oh no I mean if they're close and they just need a few more days to work it out then that can happen. They'll pass a continuing resolution which means everything stays stays the same. You don't get any more money or you. Don't get money taken away. Just keep like operate as usual right. You can't increase spending you. Can you can spend differently or whatever you can't spend above the rivals of the previous fiscal year known as you're currently in right. That's right okay. I'm with you. I think continuing resolution whether it's one for a day for a year and there have been ones that have been like year long continuing resolution. There's no limit you can pass a forever long. You think you need right. it does show that negotiations are still ongoing. They haven't broken down just having reached the point. Where we're there an agreement yet. That's right. The problem comes when they stop issuing continuing resolutions. That's right Dave threw in a few pretty cool facts here. one hundred hundred eighty six continuing resolutions have been passed since nineteen seventy seven and one hundred seventeen or those of those or those have been since nineteen ninety eight yes so it's taken them one hundred seventeen times that they could not work it out since nineteen ninety eight. That's a lot yeah. That's it is but if you think about the it's a out evenly split. Well no signed evenly split. It's like seventy seventy two CY. I think sixty nine to one hundred and seventeen over to twenty year periods and it does seem to be getting worse but that's kind of lopsided because in two thousand one there were twenty one of the hundred and seventeen twenty. One of them all came in two thousand one yeah so I I'm not quite sure about this but I wonder is AH number and increasing continuing resolutions. Is that like a barometer for government or how governments working I don't know 'cause I wonder because I mean ideally like they would get all this done by the October first deadline every time well it de-. It depends because as this points out like sometimes it is over the weekend and it's just a few days and they're like really close to having it worked out so to me. That's not the biggest deal in the world that doesn't mean the government isn't functioning well right. I mean and as well as ever does sure am I right yeah but like in two thousand seven eleven and thirteen they were for all year long. There were no appropriations bills right. They just say we're just going to repeat last real appropriations bills. I guess they just they just said remember the spending levels from before go with God. That's what you got again. This year because to me means an agreement. That's when things are bad so continuing resolutions to to like it doesn't affect spending levels or doesn't increase them. Can't I wonder I don't know if it can decrease or not. I know you just basically says same same spending levels last year so maybe it can't decrease decrease. I think it's just your current. Funding is locked right but you can attach riders onto continuing resolutions. Yeah these policy writers those can be like the make or break and if it's clean which I don't know how often that happens had be curious to see a stat it but if it's a clean policy writer that means it has nothing else or clean CR CR. It doesn't have any policy right. That's right so a lot of times though if there's a policy writer on a CR it might be like okay we can't come to agreement about Medicaid funding abortion that was a big one in the nineteen seventies yeah and but in this same appropriations bill that were were haggling ogling over. There's this other thing. That's like super critical. It's like like local hospitals aren't going to get any any Niki funding and it's about to run out right so we need to increase the Nikkei funding for local hospitals will attach that as a policy writer to this continuing resolution because this is kind of an emergency and it doesn't really have anything anything to do with the contentious part. That's keeping the policy or the appropriations bill from being passed right so I think usually what happens with that. You know what show really nails. The stuff is veep. Gosh for all. It's like you know comedy and funny stuff they. It seems like they really nail kind of what it's like in Washington sure 'cause there's a lot a lot of talk of this kind of stuff yeah clean bills and writers and who's on whose side and can we sway this one person side yeah a lot of just dirty dirty laying command. Julia Louis Dreyfuss she is Nash. She's an international treasure totally at one interaction with our briefly win in La La in my friends building in Los feels the Halley Mont building he lived there. Scotty you know Scotty sure and we had a case of beer and a and a pizza and some snacks and and we were going. She showed up as like where's the party well. That's sort of what happened. We were going up in the front of the building and she was shooting new adventures of old Christine right there at the entrance prince and we literally walked by and they were like putting on her makeup like right in front of their right about to go and she said who were those guys. I want to go with them. Where are you you guys going. And of course we come on up. That's cool and then intellect. Tristian knocked on her door and asked to put a light in his apartment shining out the window. How much does he charge orange. We didn't come on and it's nice and then Eric Estrada showed up and arrested you all right. So where are we here so I'll tell tell you where we left off. Chuck we left off with continuing resolutions temporary funding yeah eventually if a position is contentious this enough oh about some part of the budget right and very rarely is it. Something is it something financial necessarily like it. It has to do with finances because it's in the budget but typically. It's something more political than that like the idea of Medicaid funding abortions right in nineteen seventy seven and nine hundred seventy eight there were there impassive were reached where they could not come to an agreement on using Medicaid to fund on Abortions Federal Dollars to fund abortions right. That's right very contentious issue. Yes it had to do with money and to do with finances Medicaid funding but really it was about the social issue is cultural issue abortion. That's usually the kind of the kind of political impasse or divide that it. It takes to really reach a point where one side says you know. I don't even agree to continuing resolution anymore. Just forget it. We're done yeah. It seems like it's usually something something that is so important to that either President or Party or both that they feel like it's worth digging in and a lot of times that has to do sometimes that has to do with the thing itself but sometimes it has to do with the perception of that thing to your voting base sure that's part of it too but I mean we're talking politicians here I think you could you just said the last part you know that's true yeah so what happens when they fail to pass that appropriations bill and they're not talking. You'RE GONNA get a funding gap gap and that doesn't necessarily lead to a shutdown either. Can we please get to the show well since one thousand nine hundred eighty one more than half of the funny gaps lasted just a few days when I talked about solving over the weekend a lot of times that will happen over the weekend if it's less than a few days that means no one had to sit out work or whatever it was furloughed right so technically the government was shut down but notice because it happened on days when the federal government is an open anyway yet yeah and until Nineteen eighty-one they were actually allowed to keep operating but the Reagan administration changes all that yeah what was the name Benjamin Civiletti Cipolletti civility technically in Italian Chit because a C- followed by a vowel makes a Chis- sound that I do it. I don't remember this guy. I don't either I mean. We were young and probably too young to really know about attorney. General reckless like any of the president and vice-president sure maybe the speaker of the house or something I attorney general. I was cognizant of Burmese wasn't he or was he state. I don't even know he was the first cabinet member okay aware of Edwin meese avenue at me because I think they made foam in in mad magazine showed him like getting hit by a mouse trap because he was a meese. That's kind of how I was exposed to politics mad. I think so sure yeah. I knew all about Spiro Agnew even though I knew who he was still don't really know what's there's this Great Simpson's quote mill house in Barter looking at a magazine. They're like they're making fun of that. Spiro Agnew again. He must work there. Something remember ver- thinking Spiro Agnew works there because they used to skewer like the publisher to thought Spiro Agnew. I think it's a funny name to ensure comedy circles. Yeah that's a good one. Yes Attorney General Benjamin Cipolletti he was Reagan's. AG and he said it is not constitutional how to keep spending money without congressional approval. which is what's happening when you say we'll go ahead and keep working federal government so he? I mean they kind of made shutdowns happen. Yeah like it was like okay. We're shutdown. Ha Ha. We're still discontinuing on like normal right until CIPOLLETTI said we'll remember the anti-deficiency act that's actually for real and I saw somewhere that had like they actually enforce that in like federal agencies are are frequently fined for violating these things like going into contracts are hiring people when they don't really have the money for it. I saw somewhere the SEC garden eight hundred million dollar fine once for couldn't find it anywhere else but it was a spectacular enough number to at least mention it yeah so aaa really changed the rules for shutdowns because before if the government shutdown by the government still functioned yes it was almost more of like a what's the word..

Spiro Agnew writer Dave Dave Medicaid federal government Dave Reuss Attorney General Benjamin Cipo Reagan House Forks Dot Com congress Scotty Eric Estrada Julia Louis Dreyfuss attorney Julia Layton Edwin meese mad magazine SEC Party
"julia layton" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"julia layton" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles every purchase every day and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. An a welcome to brain stuff but production of iheartradio brain Steph Lorraine Vogel bomb here and I'm here today to tell you that an oddball catfish species I spotted in one thousand nine hundred eight in Brazil at last has a name and it is Grio. Yes as in the Rhodesian Bounty Hunter Star Wars more formerly the catfish at fish who's bug-eyed stare and Droopy Chin like extension really do bring to mind Guido will henceforth be known as Peck Alenia greeted by that final is sound in Latin is a possessive so it means something like grotto's fish one Dr Jonathan armbruster professor professor and curator officials at Auburn University and Longtime Star Wars Fan created the name while studying the fish in two thousand fifteen. It's about one of forty species of fish. He's named date by tradition. Whoever discovers a new species gets to name it discovers covers doesn't necessarily mean fines though armbruster explained discoveries a weird term? I discovered Pedo I in a jar but others actually discovered it in nature. They just didn't have everything they needed to describe it. Armbruster did describe it he. He discovered the nature of the species. The new part of new species is weird to in this context armbruster explains a new species is one that is newly described named of course it existed before scientists got involved describing describing a new species is a science in itself in taxonomy which is the scientific discipline of classifying living things scientists examined physical genetic behavioral. 'em ecological traits to logically scituate species within the biosphere taxonomy is a big deal it reveals how a new species fits into are known world and provides a universal language to describe study it taxonomy lays out the components of biodiversity and thus the tools to preserve it it offers scientists engineers and inventors their best chance at understanding were standing the incredible capabilities that the natural world and explaining it to the rest of US naming is part of taxonomy. A name often reflects a distinctive characteristic like the name Tattoo Rita Brazilian ncis for bat discovered that lives in Brazil. Oh there's a lot of leeway in naming though and scientists often get creative like p Guido I for a fish that looks like Guido or my oldest might attack this for a bat with golden for after mythologies golden touched King Midas. This approach can sometimes be problematic though we spoke with Dr Ricardo More telly biologist with the Waldo crews foundation who named the Golden Bat he explained a characteristic that we I think is you need to that species. Maybe revealed as shared with others or even variable. Able within the species for instance the aforementioned t Brazilian says was later found to live throughout north and South America resulting in sub-species like T- Brazilian says Mexicana or the Mexican Brazilian F- Retail Bat other names <music> honor colleagues immortalized family members or less common but more compelling exact revenge scientists Carlin is who in these seventeen hundreds founded the taxonomy and nomenclature systems still used in biology today named an entire genus of Rican weeds <music> secust Becca after one Johan seek us back a botanist who had endlessly criticized his work. The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature needs to approve names but the organization is Pretty Open minded it approved sid vicious aside and Johnny Rotten. I four two species extinct trial bite named by taxonomic whose friend loved the sex pistols it also gave the nod to Agatha Idiom Bush. I A Cheney I and a Rumsfeld I four three species beetle title. The Republican taxonomic actually entered is a good thing it also approved ampule X. Demento for wasp that turns cockroaches zombies before eating them the behavior apparently recalled Harry Potter's spirit sucking adversaries that last one was chosen in a vote by visitors to Berlin Museum of Natural History. Some scientists are giving away. They're naming rights to educate engage and fund research and Conservation Merlin's museum patrons learned about the new wasp and taxonomy and it's critical role in conservation. Asian as part of the voting the scripts institution for oceanography cells naming rights for five thousand two twenty five thousand per species with the proceeds porting institutions work and that's a bargain at a two thousand five auction the online Golden Palace Casino L. paid sixty five thousand dollars the rights to name a species of monkey supporting the National Park in Bolivia where the new monkey was discovered. This commercialization makes some in the field uncomfortable with money in the mix. There's concern about biased. taxonomy armbruster said it has the possibility of getting out of hand. Buying a name is a good thing as long as it is four species we have already identified as new. We need more money for taxonomy. Finding creative ways to fund the science is a good thing by the way a Golden Palace named the Monkey Cassius our pilot. Why are we piloting meaning Golden Palace and Latin the Casino wanted dot com in there too but it couldn't be Latin sized? Today's episode was written by Julia Layton and produced by Tyler Clang. Breen stuff is the production of iheartradio's house stuff works for more in this and lots of other well categorized topics visit our home planet house networks dot Com and more podcast from iheartradio iheartradio APP apple podcasts. I listened to your favorite shows would not rob.

Dr Jonathan armbruster Golden Palace Guido Brazil Steph Lorraine Vogel Golden Palace Casino professor Grio Golden Bat US Droopy Chin Agatha Idiom Bush South America Auburn University Peck Alenia iheartradio Dr Ricardo Conservation Merlin Julia Layton Breen
How Do Animals Get Their Scientific Names?

BrainStuff

06:28 min | 1 year ago

How Do Animals Get Their Scientific Names?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles every purchase every day and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. An a welcome to brain stuff but production of iheartradio brain Steph Lorraine Vogel bomb here and I'm here today to tell you that an oddball catfish species I spotted in one thousand nine hundred eight in Brazil at last has a name and it is Grio. Yes as in the Rhodesian Bounty Hunter Star Wars more formerly the catfish at fish who's bug-eyed stare and Droopy Chin like extension really do bring to mind Guido will henceforth be known as Peck Alenia greeted by that final is sound in Latin is a possessive so it means something like grotto's fish one Dr Jonathan armbruster professor professor and curator officials at Auburn University and Longtime Star Wars Fan created the name while studying the fish in two thousand fifteen. It's about one of forty species of fish. He's named date by tradition. Whoever discovers a new species gets to name it discovers covers doesn't necessarily mean fines though armbruster explained discoveries a weird term? I discovered Pedo I in a jar but others actually discovered it in nature. They just didn't have everything they needed to describe it. Armbruster did describe it he. He discovered the nature of the species. The new part of new species is weird to in this context armbruster explains a new species is one that is newly described named of course it existed before scientists got involved describing describing a new species is a science in itself in taxonomy which is the scientific discipline of classifying living things scientists examined physical genetic behavioral. 'em ecological traits to logically scituate species within the biosphere taxonomy is a big deal it reveals how a new species fits into are known world and provides a universal language to describe study it taxonomy lays out the components of biodiversity and thus the tools to preserve it it offers scientists engineers and inventors their best chance at understanding were standing the incredible capabilities that the natural world and explaining it to the rest of US naming is part of taxonomy. A name often reflects a distinctive characteristic like the name Tattoo Rita Brazilian ncis for bat discovered that lives in Brazil. Oh there's a lot of leeway in naming though and scientists often get creative like p Guido I for a fish that looks like Guido or my oldest might attack this for a bat with golden for after mythologies golden touched King Midas. This approach can sometimes be problematic though we spoke with Dr Ricardo More telly biologist with the Waldo crews foundation who named the Golden Bat he explained a characteristic that we I think is you need to that species. Maybe revealed as shared with others or even variable. Able within the species for instance the aforementioned t Brazilian says was later found to live throughout north and South America resulting in sub-species like T- Brazilian says Mexicana or the Mexican Brazilian F- Retail Bat other names <music> honor colleagues immortalized family members or less common but more compelling exact revenge scientists Carlin is who in these seventeen hundreds founded the taxonomy and nomenclature systems still used in biology today named an entire genus of Rican weeds <music> secust Becca after one Johan seek us back a botanist who had endlessly criticized his work. The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature needs to approve names but the organization is Pretty Open minded it approved sid vicious aside and Johnny Rotten. I four two species extinct trial bite named by taxonomic whose friend loved the sex pistols it also gave the nod to Agatha Idiom Bush. I A Cheney I and a Rumsfeld I four three species beetle title. The Republican taxonomic actually entered is a good thing it also approved ampule X. Demento for wasp that turns cockroaches zombies before eating them the behavior apparently recalled Harry Potter's spirit sucking adversaries that last one was chosen in a vote by visitors to Berlin Museum of Natural History. Some scientists are giving away. They're naming rights to educate engage and fund research and Conservation Merlin's museum patrons learned about the new wasp and taxonomy and it's critical role in conservation. Asian as part of the voting the scripts institution for oceanography cells naming rights for five thousand two twenty five thousand per species with the proceeds porting institutions work and that's a bargain at a two thousand five auction the online Golden Palace Casino L. paid sixty five thousand dollars the rights to name a species of monkey supporting the National Park in Bolivia where the new monkey was discovered. This commercialization makes some in the field uncomfortable with money in the mix. There's concern about biased. taxonomy armbruster said it has the possibility of getting out of hand. Buying a name is a good thing as long as it is four species we have already identified as new. We need more money for taxonomy. Finding creative ways to fund the science is a good thing by the way a Golden Palace named the Monkey Cassius our pilot. Why are we piloting meaning Golden Palace and Latin the Casino wanted dot com in there too but it couldn't be Latin sized? Today's episode was written by Julia Layton and produced by Tyler Clang. Breen stuff is the production of iheartradio's house stuff works for more in this and lots of other well categorized topics visit our home planet house networks dot Com and more podcast from iheartradio iheartradio APP apple podcasts. I listened to your favorite shows would not rob.

Dr Jonathan Armbruster Golden Palace Guido Brazil Steph Lorraine Vogel Golden Palace Casino Professor Grio Golden Bat United States Droopy Chin South America Agatha Idiom Bush Auburn University Peck Alenia Iheartradio Dr Ricardo Conservation Merlin Julia Layton Breen
"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Summer babysitting gig as a fourteen year old babysitting. These two kids that were like seventeen and nineteen. They were pretty close to my age looking back. They were probably like eight and nine or something close. I was sort of like paid to go there and kind of hang out with them and make sure they didn't get in trouble wasn't like babysitting babysitting. Right. But I remember I watched virtually all the Live Aid telecast on MTV sauce and was just stuck to it all day long. Cool. I was I was nine. Yeah. Yeah. And we were in London budding. But you and Jerry were and hide barking out. She's like there's this annoying nine year old just following me around talking about podcasts says he's from the future. So the about a way back machine. So yeah, thanks to. Julia. Layton, who we have doing some writing for us now Dr lates from back in the old day. She's great and Wright's great stuff. And I threw live eight out there because I thought it'd be good to learn a little bit more about it was a good idea. Thanks. So let's talk about the the origins of this. Yes. Because live eight happened on July thirteenth nineteen eighty five. And. The whole thing started the seed was planted about six months before L O more than six months before. But not much more than that. When either the BBC or the CBC, depending on who you asked. Yes, ran a series of documentaries about a drought and famine that was going on in Ethiopia at the time. And apparently, no one knew about this. No one was reporting on it. Yeah. It wasn't talked about. And today, it's hard to imagine that with our news cycle, but different back. Then right. But even still like, you know, we we became so indoctrinated from that point on in the idea of famine in Ethiopia that that it's hard to think of, you know, not connecting the two, but no one knew about it. Yeah. And no one knew about it until I should say that the CBC or BBC documentary series was aired and it was powerful. There is a very famously a young girl. Let me see very and find her name who was. She looked like she was on the verge of death. She her head just kind of lawing around she skeletal. And she she looks like at the camera at one point and became kind of the face of starving. Children in Ethiopia, like really, drove home. What what was going on there? Her name was a beer Han wall do and she's grown now in his an ambassador surprised to ask kind of like a I don't think she's an official investors kind of an unofficial ambassador for poverty, combating poverty in. We'll she. I bet she knows Bonn. I'm guarantee she does. But but sh she really kind of drove home what was going on to viewers, including a guy from Ireland named Bob Geldof. Yeah. Who actually I do as a b list Irish rocker? It's probably pretty accurate BoomTown rats were a medium big band at best. He also if you're a Pink Floyd fan. He played pink in the movie the wall. Oh, really? Yeah. I think he told me this every time, Bob. Up there. We talked about this before. Yeah. Obviously there was no pink in real life. But in the movie that was a character named pink, by the way, which one's pink. Right. Exactly. So Geldof they had that great song. I don't know. Why? I don't like Mondays Pink Floyd. Did that was the name rats, my friend? Yeah. Got that one plenty role. That was their big hit though that was killed off speak hit. Which again, I thought was a novice Castillo song entitled explained it to me. It's right. We definitely have talked about that threat. So man, I wonder if twenty years if we're going to be like remember when we already happening suck. But we don't sound like Abe Simpson quite yet. So Geldof saw this really spoke to him. And he said here's what we're going to do. I wanna put together a fundraiser. And this is not Live Aid yet. No this band aid. Right. Previous alive aid. They did the song that we some of us all still love around Christmas time good song. Some of us hate it. Who does do? They know it's Christmas who hates that song. I think some people hate all Christmas music. Yeah. You know, or or the very least get sick of certain songs. I can see that. Yeah. But that one is. Okay. I let me put it this way. I have never gotten sick of that one yet to this day. No, I agree bond. Oh, of course, Boy, George Bowie banana Ramu Duran Duran Wham you to sting Phil Collins, you name it. They're saying on that song. And it'd benefited Ethiopian famine relief. That's what got the ball rolling. Yeah. And again, this is Bob Geldof saw this documentary and certain calling up everybody. He knew pulling all these strings aimed put this together, and everyone was going how to build Geldof get my number exactly Bolus Irish rocker, right? He he got this single produced and released by December. He saw the documentary in October. I know so they kind of gives you a hint of the kind of dude, Bob Geldof. Was it gets things done? He lied. He bluffed. He didn't take no answer. Yeah. He got things done. Sure. Sure. But to him it was always for the greatest greater good. The there was a the ends definitely justified. The means especially for manipulating spoiled rockers. Yeah. In and we'll get to some Amore some more of that later. He for sure did. Now that song itself though, by itself. Raise more than ten million bucks. And they have over the years done a few different versions. They seems like they update it every now and then with new whoever's the hot British rockers are at the time. Ed Sheeran, right, Hugh. He was in the two thousand fourteen version. So it was one direction. Okay. They're a group. Right. Yeah. Okay. There are super group. Oh, and then well, I don't know if that's actually accurate or not. But then seal, you know, supergroup doesn't just mean they're super that means right now. That's why correct. Gotcha. And then Sinead O'Connor. She was on a two oh on the New Orleans two thousand fourteen version of do they nosed Crispin? Nice. Yeah. So a month after that, Harry Belafonte got together with a producer named Qin crag in Oregon, and they said, well, we need to do our own version over here in the US because we're looking pretty bad. Right. Geldof is a B-list Irish rocker and he's getting all the limelight. I'm Harry Belafonte. Right. So he gets together. And they this is where and this is something I never knew the song. We are the world. Of course, is what we're talking about always heard USA for Africa. I always thought it was the United States of America that they wanted you to think I never knew that it stood for United support of artists for Africa right until today. Very yesterday. Well, how about that? I think it's a a great thing that they served tissue slip that in and that song was, you know, Quincy Jones famously worked on it. It was written. It was supposed to be written by Lionel Richie, Michael Jackson. Stevie Wonder Stevie Wonder was to wanted to work on. It was a little too busy to get involved in the writing at the time. So it fell the line on Richie and Michael Jackson. And apparently if you believe the Toya Jackson, it was mostly Michael who put that song together. I don't know about that, man. Because Lionel Ritchie's a pretty stand up dude from everything I've ever heard. Well, I don't think he's made some claim like I wrote half fifty percent of that song. He was apparently pretty blown away because Michael Jackson like after he left when ahead and like cut a demo. No, really. And brought it back, and he was like, oh, well, that's impressive and exclusionary, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Good ideas. Okay. Go go home. Like, you literally waited 'til I walked out the door to record. I'll see you later. I'd like to see Lionel Ritchie yet. I just looked up his he played somewhere. And I was like what's he playing? These days looked up. His set lists coming to Chastain anytime. I don't know, man. But the settlers is amazing unlikely every single song 'cause he's doing Commodore stuff. He's doing his own stuff. Yeah. Truly it's seems like a fun show a little bit of deep purple. Oh, sure. Do we take a break? All ready. No. We haven't Chuck. And I think it's high time that we did. All right. Let's do it. So

Bob Geldof Lionel Richie Ethiopia Michael Jackson United States MTV Pink Floyd Harry Belafonte Bob BBC Jerry Julia Wright Layton London Bonn Dr lates Sinead O'Connor CBC
"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"On the next Ron burgundy podcast. This is actually exciting. You got Mr Peter Dinka GE he's Chang's impersonal poetry, actually. So a lot of people actually find poetry interesting. The sound machine away series thrown of games game of thrones Ron in any surprises. We can expect from Tylenol Lancaster, curious minister. Iheart radio is number one for podcasts. And it's easy to see. Why? Find the Ron burgundy podcast on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to step. You should know a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Hey, welcome to the podcast. I'm Josh Clark whose child Chuck Bryant news, Jerry Roland over there. And if you put all three of us together, you get a little something called stuff, you should know. Oh, man. AM addition Hoover. Have you ever been to Hoover dam? I've been there twice. Oh show. Yeah. I went I went in ninety one. The great Hoover dam tour of ninety one. Sure either. It may have been eighty nine almost custody. Then I heard that. I almost did that the other day to get into movie crush sure, it may have been eighty nine or ninety. It was when I went out to visit my brother when he lived in L A, and we met in Las Vegas rove down to the Hoover dam and then back to LA. So the first time you guys met. Yeah. It was great. And then I went again in ninety six for sure ninety six and McKay, I think both times I took the tour. And it's have you ever been? It's really something else. Yes. For the first time. You mean, I went about a year ago, we drove from Scottsdale to Vegas in stopped in Hoover dam on the way. And it was great as you do. It was very very well. There's nothing nothing. Nothing. Nothing. Hoover dam Vegas is kinda how it goes. Yeah. In, you know, we'll get to the water levels. But it's it's startling from. When I was there. What it looks like now? Yeah. I can imagine like if you gone anytime before about two thousand from what I understand it's like a different different place. Yeah. But the the damn still there, and it's still intact doing really well. You got that? At least right? It's just the ecological catastrophe. That's kind of looming that kind of is a Downer. That's right. And we should give a big shoutout to Julia. Layton, new used to be one of the great great writers for how stuff works dot com. Back when we were still associated with that website. I think she might still right for McKay. Generally. I really well. She's great. And now, we are commissioning some articles from her and boy, she's good. Yes. She is. So what's her nickname? Check the lates. Julia Layton lates. No. Because it sounds like she's not tardy. Oh, yeah. That's right. Let's just call her Dr Layton. Okay. There you go. Although I don't think she's a doctor, but she does have her masters in writing. That's right. So we better than me. She cranks out some good stuff. That's right. So thanks, Julia. I'm glad you call that out Chuck well done. So let's go back, shall we to a time in the the little the little area of the southwestern United States where Arizona reaches out to hug, Nevada, Nevada which way are we supposed to say, well, we're supposed to say Nevada, but we're not from there. So we'll say Nevada like everybody else, right? And where they almost meet there's a little gorge there's a canyon. Well, there's a lot of kings. But there's one in particular and it's called boulder canyon. And if you went to boulder canyon today to find the Hoover dam, you'd be SOL because while they were originally going to build the Hoover dam at boulder canyon so much so that the name of the project for the first decade or so it was called the bolder boulder dam. This bowl boulder wants not to boulders the boulder dam project. They actually moved it a little further upstream too much more suitable site called black canyon. And if you go visit the Hoover dam today. That's where you're actually going is black canyon where Nevada and Arizona almost meet. That's right. And this idea was conceived this concrete, gravity arch hydroelectric dam hydroelectric almost almost there. Hydro electric, excuse me. This was all conceived because well for three reasons plus a cherry on top one is that the Colorado river had had a bad habit of flooding and causing lots of devastation just a nasty boy so to to LASSO that that beast number two to create water in times of drought, as you know, creating a big reservoir that would be lake Mead to create energy.

Hoover dam McKay Julia Layton bolder boulder dam Ron burgundy boulder canyon Hoover black canyon Las Vegas Nevada iheartradio Tylenol Lancaster Chuck Bryant Mr Peter Dinka Josh Clark Colorado river lake Mead LA Scottsdale Chang
"julia layton" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"julia layton" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Okay. Chuck, we're back. You know, tell you one thing I looked up tasers stock. Yeah. If you bought in two thousand ten you can pretty good. Yeah. Because of their body camera program. Yeah. It was like five dollars and before this. I think they only made like tasers non lethal weapons, but when the gun to the body camera market their stock went from like five bucks think peaked at like thirty five or forty. Yeah. Not bad. All good for them. Again. A can't remember the name of it. But if you read the S Alec pasternack article, it's it's really short system I own zero stock in tasers like I'm just a fan. I'm not a fan, even they're non lethal weapons, but their their body worn cameras is pretty smart seems like. Yeah. Fan of smart thing. Sure. If you're going to design a system, it should be full proof in work. Well, and yeah store everything needed to not break down. Right. Seems like they got going on. Yeah. So one of the other reasons that. Like, I said earlier this is not a magic pill because you're only getting this one. It's not article points out very student that it's not an unbiased view still if you had six or eight like if you're in London yet six or eight cameras and different angles on different light posts, and you could coordinate this thing and fully see everything that happened. Right. It may be unbiased truly, but a just a single shot from a body camera. Sing that single angle is not unbiased by any means did. And that's about it. Did you see the nurse wells arrest of Utah nursery, refused to draw the blood suspect conscious? So if you just watched the arresting officers Jeff pains body camera. Yeah. I mean like because it's up close and personal. It goes like suddenly just basically goes dark when it's pressed up against her back. And it shows like very little of anything it was because of the other officer that was with him body camera. Yeah. That you get like. Oh, wow. That really was a a lot of force unnecessary force that this guy was using on this lady that you wouldn't have gotten just from the footage from his body camera. Right having supporting video evidence. Definitely expands. The context one way or the other. It's interesting, though, we're getting to a point where you're gonna have a say a crime on a officer stop a car with a car camera dashboard camera. Let's say two officers body cameras. The people inside the car filming with their iphones. Let's say two. So you've got five different points of view going on that people the courts in juries are gonna have to sift through the as defendants are good. The look at all this stuff and try and piece together what happened, and this is all new like previously did this from testimony. Only. Exactly. So like are. We opening ourselves up to a time. When DA's are are less willing to bring up charges unless there is put it, you know. Yeah. I wonder but I mean, it doesn't sound like there's going to be much lack of it. There's a company called wolf com who makes body worn cameras for police has also releasing one for civilians is basically the same thing without their police software like just somebody just wears at all times. Basically film the police while the police are filming them, and they say it's perfect for protests improving legality. There's like there's like a button the power button or stop or the record button has to be pressed at certain ways. So even if like somebody's bumping into your beating you up your camera won't stop recording. Yeah. It's like good Lord. Like the fact that this is the climate that that's like a selling point. Yeah. As is really unsettling in sad. You know, it is like, hey, everybody get your body worn cameras because you need to film, the people who are filming you because you can't trust the even this measure that's being used supposedly. Protect your rights. Crazy. It's crazy that were in the state in this country. It's depressing. It is severance another point to teach the idea of having all these different points of view are video documentation. This is also coming at a time when we are starting to see editing software where you can care video and make it do anything yet. They make it say anything you can make it you can do anything with video moon landing. How how is that gonna affect? Yeah. You know, the use of video in in in documentation for court cases to well. We've already seen just with Baltimore, you know, what can happen when cops not have to wear these where they're trying to coordinate who's got who's camera on. Did you ever camera on the what about that thirty second buffer keys told the sad that we're at that state now to where? But it's also a good thing that like for how many years were. Bad things happening without any citizen. There was no recourse, you know, for so long, and it's still isn't to a large degree this just a little small thing. No, it's true. I mean has to be a certain level of at least grad of fixation among people who've lived with distrust of the police are have been abused. As a a whole by police for decades that people are now finally starting to be like, oh, man. This is crazy you how long has this been going on because there's a light being shined on it? And so in that sense. Yes, it's crazy that we're at this state right now in our country, but you know, maybe it's just a growing pain toward moving to a better place. Yeah. You know that realtor study to in their summation. They also said something about commemorate put at something about how they found that it they think that it also requires police to take to take more verbal abuse from people, which you know, is it fun. But sorta like the days are over where if you smart off to a cop. They can't just throw your face on the ground right and put their cheekbone right because you've smarted off to them. So they don't think they wait in either way on what that means. They said what it looks like cops are going to have to start enduring a little more talk back from the drunk guy at the bar without diving right into excessive force. They were pissed off now junk the Barnabas standard at one of the big things of that that these body cameras are counted for anything he said early on is that people behave differently when they know they're being recorded. Right. So that officers won't have to take verbal lashings from people. Well, maybe often. And so that might that the very presence of the cameras supposedly. Can keep situations from escalating or can actually de-escalate situation. If officers like are needed to know you're being recorded right now. Do they have to supposedly straighten up? I don't know if they have to or not. Well, we're in such the early nascent days of this. It's yeah. This is sort of an early podcast to see what ramifications are going to happen later on you know, who knows? Yeah. I'm one of the things that I saw was that this is this is a technology that's gotten a lot of press. But it's still very early on in actual like academic study of it. You're supposedly, including the real to study most studies are not published in journals and aren't pure review. They're just, you know, studies largely carried out by like criminologists or scientists. But also by the local police departments carrying the studies out on their own department. Right, right. There's a supposedly only been two peer reviewed journal studies published I'm body worn cameras so far. And one of them was on the effect of giving an officer leeway on win press record, right? How does that impact things like they use violence, and this this two thousand sixteen study in the journal of experimental criminology found that compared to the control group if the officer had very little leeway in deciding to record meaning they had to record all the time. That physical the use of physical violence decreased by thirty seven percent. Yeah. But in situations where officers had a lot of leeway in deciding when to press record or not it. It was seventy one percent higher than the control group yet that this whole win. Is it recording win? Is it not is the seems like the biggest sticking point right now. And are we gonna move to a future where they are absolutely required to record any interaction with a citizen or they get suspended or something? Right. Like who knows what we're headed toward. Yeah. Like, it's a big deal if they're recording. Not like, a, you know, you gotta you're supposed to be recording kind of thing. I mean, I guess from good cops point of view, they should say. Like man, I want to record the saying because this is what's going to exonerate me in this atmosphere. We have today, but I do it. Right. I think cups are also scared that that that footage that could also be. Like footage can be used against them. Even if it doesn't show anything, you know, what? I mean. I think. Yeah. I think it's a it's a manage just so fraught as with complicated to be used like this. Yeah. You know? And again, the fact that we're using it says, hey, you guys don't trust you guys. So we're going to keep these cameras here. So everybody be cool. Like that solves anything. I wonder when cars are going to come a quipped with built in cameras that record all around the car. Let's say I mean, the cameras already there with a lot of these safety features lacking record button while the cops have those for running license plates while they're driving down the street. Oh, yeah. They're cameras are just looking at license place of the cars driving past to to run them. There was one other thing. I saw in that fast co motherboard pasternack article. He's just kind of casually made mention that department stores hospitals airports. They're already using video facial recognition systems. So if you walk into like Macy's or something, I don't know specifically, but I'm just picking on Macy's. When you're on camera. Your face is being run against the database to see if you're somebody that they should be worried about or maybe even call the cops about say that somebody that likes neckties and. They may have that too. It depends on whether they got their software from taser or from Neiman, Marcus. Yeah. Did not know that and that that just takes profiling to a higher level. Yeah. Well, or maybe not. If they're getting good information. Right. I mean, that's not profiling is it all true tailored, profiling if someone walks in and they're like, well this guy committed three acts of shoplifting in the past year might wanna watch him is that profiling no because it's specific to you not say your race or something like that. So yeah, it's it's v. Call to argue that that at that point of it. It's more just like the, you know, the being surveilled everywhere. Yeah. So this is a good one. Yeah. You anything else? No. I'm interested. See where this goes plenty of follow up stories over the years. I'm sure what happened. Yes. I'm sure as well. If you wanna know more about body worn cameras police cameras look up police body cameras. It'll bring up this really good article by Julia Layton on how stuff works since I said that it's time for listener mail. I'm going to call this. Well, call it very cute Email from little kid. Maybe I shouldn't read that one on this one. Right. He's got a slog through this. And be like, this is the future. I have a head of me. All right. So this was from Noah he is five years old in his Scottish, and his mom sort of supplemented the Email with some little things here. And there in the end, she said, you know, he really wanted to write any guys personally. So let him use my Email account. And otherwise, it is just his words and then a PS from dear Josh C H, h smart kid, very cute. Like listening to your podcast. I listen to it in the car and before a fall asleep..

officer Alec pasternack tasers Chuck Baltimore Utah Macy Jeff pains London DA Julia Layton journal of experimental crimin Josh C H Noah shoplifting thirty seven percent seventy one percent thirty second
"julia layton" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"julia layton" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans. Chances are you're confident when it comes to your work, your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage, you can apply simply and understand fully. So you can mortgage confidently to get started, go to rocket mortgage dot com. Slash brain stuff, equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and am L S consumer access dot org. Number three, zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hi brain stuff. Lauren, Boko bomb here. An increasing number of studies are finding a direct connection between sleep deprivation and weight gain. Generally people who get at least seven hours of sleep per night, have less body fat than people who don't. There are of course, other factors involved in determining who will become over weight and who will not like food and take exercise and genetics. But sleep is a more integral part of the process than most people realize in a study involving nine thousand subjects between nineteen eighty two and nineteen Eighty-four researchers found that people who averaged six hours of sleep per night or twenty-seven percent more likely to be overweight than their seven to nine our counterparts and those averaging five hours of sleep per night or seventy three percent more likely to be overweight. Many people who are sleep deprived, don't even know it. A lots of us think that there's quite a bit of give and how much sleep a person needs to be healthy and well-functioning. But most researchers disagree putting seven hours as the minimum for everyone except the very young and the very old besides straight numbers. There are a couple ways to tell if you're sleep deprived including how fast you fall asleep at night. Most non sleep deprived people take about fifteen minutes to fall asleep falling asleep. Almost instantly along with chronic sleepiness is a good indicator that you're not getting enough sleep. If you are sleep deprived, there are some obvious tie-ins to abusively like you're sleeping this making physical activity, less likely, but there are also a number of things going on in your body that could contribute to weight gain in scientific studies. The most commonly cited effects of sleep deprivation are hormonal disturbances, specifically involving the hormones leptin and Gretl in when you don't get enough sleep, your body has two little leptin and too much in. Let's unpack that. At the hormone leptin is intricately involved in the regulation of appetite metabolism and calorie burning. It's the chemical that tells your brain when you're full when it should start burning up calories and by extension, when it should create energy for your body to use, it triggers a series of messages and responses that starts in the hypothalamus and ends in the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland controls the way your body stores and uses energy during sleep. Leptin levels increase telling your brain, you have plenty of energy for the time being and that there's no need to trigger the feeling of hunger or the burning of calories. When you don't get enough sleep. You end up with two little leptin in your body, which through a series of steps makes your brain. Thank you. Don't have enough energy for your needs. So your brain tells you, you're hungry, even though you don't actually need food at that time and to take steps to store the calories you eat as fat. So you'll have enough energy the next time you need it. The decrease in leptin brought on by sleep. Deprivation can result in a constant feeling of hunger and a general slowdown of. Your metabolism. The other hormone found to be related to sleep and wait is gremlin. The purpose of Gretl in is basically the exact opposite of lepton. It tells your brain when you need to eat when it should stop burning calories. And when it should store energy as fat during sleep levels of gremlin decrease because sleep requires far less energy than being awake. People who don't sleep enough end up with too much Dylan in their system. So the body thinks it's Hungary and it needs more calories and it stops burning those calories because it thinks there's a shortage, some scientists hypothesize that these hormonal changes that occur during sleep are the result of an evolutionary process that favoured humans who could survive the food shortages of winters. Traditionally, speaking winters have long nights and little food and summers have short nights and an abundance of food with shorter nights comes less sleep, less leptin, and more gremlin making the body eat as much as possible and save those calories for the long winter ahead with winter comes more. Sleep, meaning more leptin, endless gremlin, both of which tell the body, it's time to burn those calories at stored during the summer. Sleep deprivation has also been found to increase levels of stress hormones and resistance to insulin, both of which can contribute to weight gain insulin resistance can also lead to type two diabetes. The national sleep foundation offers the following tips to help make sure you get enough sleep for your body to function optimally, try to aim for seven to nine hours of sleep per night, increase your exercise level, but trying to exercise within three hours of your bedtime and don't ingest caffeine or alcohol. Near your bedtime. Caffeine can keep you awake and alcohol can disrupt the normal stages of your sleep. Today's episode was written by Julia Layton and produced by Tyler clang interest in McNeil for more on this and lots of other hefty topics, visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Scott Goldman executive director of the Grammy museum in Los Angeles. I hope you'll join me for our new podcast required. Listen as a fan. I'm always interested in experiencing music from the inside out, and that's what we tried to do every day at the Grammy museum. Because music is such a personal medium. And oftentimes I feel like I know in artist, but there's still that barrier between me the audience in those making the music required listening breaks down that barrier. It's all about music in the creative process. Each week in the Clive Davis theater. I talked to artists songwriters and producers at every level from emerging legendary across every genera about what moves them to create from their challenges to their influences in the coming weeks. You'll hear my conversations with imagine dragons. Demi Levato, Jimmy Ivy Alan Hughes and Julia Michaels. The discussions are intimate personal and completely unscripted. They never fail to surprise me. And I think you'll feel the same way. So join me. For required. Listen available wherever find podcasts found.

national sleep foundation Grammy museum Quicken Loans Hungary Lauren Caffeine lepton Scott Goldman Dylan Demi Levato Clive Davis theater caffeine Julia Layton Los Angeles executive director Julia Michaels Alan Hughes Jimmy Ivy McNeil
"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"julia layton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Brought to its original condition right so like you don't it made a point in this article like uh you don't disc clean the carpet because if the carpet has a twoinch bloodstain on the carpet there's probably a twofoot bloodstain under the carpet on the floor board right yeah it says clearly in the carver doesn't work in a you got a cut the carpet out yet malik at the base base were doubt right so it is decontamination some a who wrote this julia layton yes yes that she got goods she definitely has the goods with the wish you put it has to be actually clean not just apparently cleaned right yet which i do apparently cleaning hit my house any two for naming were not cutting up carpet in replacing floorboards or anything um so it it takes a very certain type of person um because of the gore that you're going to have to deal with a out in a large number of your cases i'm so a lot of the people in um the ct s a d khan industry or former or maybe even current emts yeah emergency room nurses people who are already trained to deal with this kind of thing he added that one article assent yet think they that company said they heard a lot of a former fireman mmhmm and i i would think probably military people people that have dealt with high stress and uh dead bodies yes basically but it's not just that i mean you have to um also as a crime scene a cleanup person you have to have a sympathetic nature is one of the points in this article right sympathetic but not pathetic right because there's a lot of times win all the the the ambulances gone the cops are gone but the family still there he ah and they may be sitting there sabic mcnair watching you clean the house yeah um and you you have to be able to yes sympathize with them without getting caught up in india what they're experiencing right then you have to be able to remain detached but supply line you have to be um uh you have to be understanding to what they're gone.

malik julia layton gore mcnair the house twofoot twoinch
"julia layton" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"julia layton" Discussed on TechStuff

"So i applied to work for how stuff works in late two thousand six got an interview in early two thousand seven it was hired on february 15th two thousand seven at that time tracy and i were the only two fulltime staff writers with julia layton writing questions of the day and we'll talk more about that in our interview with allison lower milk lee managing editor of house of works in just a few moments now a few months after i joined the company began to reinvest in the editorial department so in a gone through a dep where a lot of the people were either laid off or people left the job to go and do something else and tracy and we're the only to there uh but they then switched where there was this reinvestment and the department began to grow and we started to hire new writers and editors and some of those people are folks that you might be familiar with such as josh clark chuck bryant they came in on that first wave so i was here first i want that noted these days they do host stuff you should now a podcast of some renowned that i do not begrudge them their success they are actually amazing they are talented they are funny there wicked smart and so they are uh a fantastic coworkers and great podcasters now in october two thousand seven this was less than a year after i had started at the company we got the announcement that discovery communications that is the company behind the discovery channel the science channel t l c and more was going to buy how stuff works and the generally agreed upon estimate for the sales price because these things are not always public was two hundred fifty million dollars as a pretty nice profit for that milliondollar investment that was made back in two thousand two may also explain what life was like back then for uh the writers of how stuff works not in general i mean 2007 wasn't that long ago you could probably remember it yourself but if you were a writer in two thousand seven particularly when tracy and i were writing.

tracy managing editor discovery communications writer julia layton allison josh clark chuck bryant two hundred fifty million doll milliondollar milk