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35 Burst results for "Julia I"

Phoenix mayor says state opened 'way too early'

Lori and Julia

00:31 sec | 13 hrs ago

Phoenix mayor says state opened 'way too early'

"With the highest daily new cases per capita in the country. Phoenix Mayor Cake Diego tells ABC is this week her state reopened way too early. We had crowded nightclubs, handing out free champagne, no masks. 22 44 year olds, which is my own demographic, really lead thie explosion and we've seen such growth in that area. Health experts here 20 to 30 year olds believe they can't get sick from Cove in 19. Driving an alarming you trend showing more college age students are getting infected. Earlier this week,

Mayor Cake Diego ABC Phoenix
Look, I Made a Hat! (Stephen Sondheim)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:44 min | 5 d ago

Look, I Made a Hat! (Stephen Sondheim)

"Hello and welcome to misinformation Trivia podcast for ladies and Gents, and whoever who? what I lost my train of vodka. Feed Trivia Quiz Yeah like Trivia. Teams in Trivia. Listened this podcast. We are hosts I'm Lauren Julia. Yeah when you. Layered half to oh, God. We've been doing this for like almost three years now. I know it's kind of amazing. So good that we're both organized. People are else. This would not have happened for as long as. Know. Basically doing a book report every week for three years. Who knew that we loved book reports so much, so we decided to like a side hobby. So speaking of book reports actually mine is a pretty today my topic is. As Book Report he is. It's GONNA get for the most part this weekend next and my next topic the week after next I think is going to be very very like middle school. This is my. This is my report on so and so. But. Today I decided to do a little a little something different for all Lt. I've I'm expanding my my my mind and my different areas, and like going back in time to where where I was like where I wasn't high school, and what my where my interest lied, so. Today my topic is going to be on Sondheim. is to make. DIS lunch everybody La. So. Caveat. About Sante time. Your girl Lauren is recovering musical theater nerd. I cannot sing which I think. Where a lot of my resentment lies about musical theater, so I used to be super musical theater, and then I was not, and I am to this day like very uncomfortable with musicals, so I am not super familiar with Sondheim like the nitty gritty about it so I will not be. You know giving you personal stories about things, but I will say son. Heim has been involved with both one of my favorite musicals and my most hated musical, the musical I hate more than anything in the whole wide World Flint. Let's just get into it. Shall we please? Stephen Joshua Sondheim was born march twenty, second, nineteen thirty. He is still alive. He's ninety this year. Yep and we'll talk about that in a minute, but He was born into a Jewish family in new. York City the son of Janet and Herbert Sondheim. His father manufactured dresses designed by his mother. and. The composer grew up on the upper west side of Manhattan and after his parents divorced on a farm near Doylestown Pennsylvania so he was an only child of well-to-do parents, and he lived in the San. Remo on Central Park West and was described in Merrill. seacrest biography, which is called Stephen Sondheim a life. He was an isolated, emotionally neglected child. Perfect for. Perfect for musical theatre Yep he traces his interest in theater to warm for May, which was a broadway musical. He saw when he was nine quote. The curtain went up and reveal the piano. sondheim recalled a Butler to the duster and brushed it up tinkling the keys. I thought that was thrilling. He attended the New York. Military Academy and George School, which was a private quaker preparatory school in Bucks County Pennsylvania. When Sondheim was ten years old, his father already, a distant figure had left his mother for another woman. Herbert sought custody of Steven, but was unsuccessful. sondheim explained it biographer secrets that he was what they called an institutionalized child, meaning one who had no contact with any kind of family. You're in though its luxurious, you're in an environment that supplies you with everything, but human contact, no brothers and sisters, no parents, and yet plenty to eat and friends to play with and a warm bed, you know. SONDHEIM detested his mother, who is said to be psychologically abusive and projected her anger from her failed marriage onto her son. He said when my father left her. She substituted me for him and she used me the way she used him to. Come onto and berate. beat up on. You see what she did for five years is treat me like dirt, but come on to me at the same time. She wants wrote him a letter I know. She wants wrote him a letter, saying that the quote only regrets, she ever had was giving him birth.

Stephen Joshua Sondheim Lauren Julia Manhattan Middle School Sante Pennsylvania Heim Central Park West LA Sondheim. York City Bucks County Pennsylvania George School Merrill. Seacrest Herbert Military Academy SAN Janet Steven
Netflix Nabs ‘Chicken Run’ Sequel 20 Years After Original Was Released

Midday News

00:34 sec | Last week

Netflix Nabs ‘Chicken Run’ Sequel 20 Years After Original Was Released

"Some real characters are coming back in a new cartoon to remember these guys from chicken run this fall is on the way the original was released exactly twenty years ago to celebrate Netflix as production will begin on part two next year the original starred Mel Gibson and Julia swallow as rocky and ginger leading their animated friends in an escape from Mrs Tweedy before he could convert her farm into a chicken pot pie factory no word on casting but the sequel finds rocky and ginger living in a human free

Netflix Julia Swallow Mrs Tweedy Mel Gibson
Philippine journalist convicted of libel, given six-year prison term

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Philippine journalist convicted of libel, given six-year prison term

"In Happier Times, President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines would seem like a malignant anomaly, a belligerent populist, not merely indifferent to a free press and rule of law, but actively hostile to them witness detainees. Critical journalist like replica, CEO Maria Raza convicted this week in a libel case and now facing potential prison sentence. But we are enduring an era in which to Turkey is just one among a cohort of reactionary demagogues, trading in paranoia and vengeance, forever, waging war with enemies, political and personal, real and imaginary. It is impossible not to perceive Detaille as some spiritual kin of Ladimir Putin vision paying Julia, Bolsonaro wretched type. A ONE DONALD TRUMP. Do Turtle is distinctive, even among by awful crew, however by willingness to actually do what more cautious rabble rouses, mealy threaten when turtles is sort of the Philippines presidency in two thousand and sixteen, he cheerfully promised to kill drug dealers by the thousand due process. Be Damned, and so he has. He said he'd take on the media, and in May, his government shutdown the country's largest TV network. ABS To the distress of on lookers, especially on lookers who recall the sacrifices Filipinos made to emerge from dictatorship into democracy in the nineteen eighty s to Turkey remains vexing, Lee popular is his renewed assault on critical press indication that he now believes he can get away with anything. What more does he hope to do before his term expires and is his foreign policy largely an exercise in outreach to his fellow

Philippines Turkey Donald Trump Bolsonaro President Rodrigo Duterte Ceo Maria Raza Ladimir Putin Detaille Assault LEE Julia
Ansel Elgort accused of sexually assaulting 17-year-old girl

Lori and Julia

01:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Ansel Elgort accused of sexually assaulting 17-year-old girl

"Going to talk about actor and sell Elgort today he's the star of the upcoming Steven Spielberg version of West Side Story and a woman has gone online accusing him of sexually assaulting her in twenty fourteen when she was twenty seven years old so this woman named Gabby we don't know are nasty last name tweeted a statement today and made an unverified claim that Elgort sexually assaulted her when she was a teenager and she describes a pretty graphically and she says that in twenty fourteen she direct messaged Elgort letting him know that it would be her birthday then he gave her his private Snapchat account and asked for nude photos oh boy Hey I under age girls through the DM's yup so that's what she's alleging and Gabby also posted a photo of what appeared to be her sitting with Ansel as well as what she said is a screenshot of their direct message exchange Gabby said she was coming forward now quote so I can finally heal and so nobody from Ansel Elgort camp is replying to emails or calls from multiple publications and bite your weekend al's Ansel's PR team and other people coming forward the other girls you know I'm not seeing anything at this point but I'm looking at a report from the rap and they said they were unable to reach Gabby to corroborate her story and that her Twitter account has been around since twenty fourteen that's what they're finding here so it is it is not a good story

Elgort West Side Story Gabby Ansel Steven Spielberg Snapchat Ansel Elgort Twitter
Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

Environment: NPR

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

"This next story is about a strange fossil found in and Arctic as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce. Report scientists were astounded when they finally realized what it was a couple years ago, a paleontologist named Julia Clark was visiting a colleague at a natural history, museum, and Chile the two were chatting about fossils SINISA. Hey, you know you should see this thing we collected. And he said we call it the thing. The thing wasn't a bone, but what was it exactly? No one knew it was about. The same size and shape is a deflated football. I just take one look at this thing, and it's the thing and. That is a giant deflated AIG a soft shelled egg to be precise, the biggest one ever found now today some snakes and turtles and lizards lay eggs with soft flexible shells, but they're rare to find in the fossil record. We did not realize said soft shelled eggs could even get this big Clark who works at the University of Texas at Austin collaborated with her colleague from Chile and. And other researchers to study this egg in the journal Nature. They say it was likely laid by a Moses Sore, a twenty foot, long marine lizard that lived some sixty six million years ago. The enormous egg thrilled paleobiologist like yaws Meena Vamon of university, I mean just thought Oh. This is fantastic. That's because she was making her own discoveries about ancient soft shelled eggs from dinosaurs in. In the past scientists assumed that dinosaurs had hard shelled eggs like their living, relatives, Crocodilians and birds, now in the same issue of the journal Nature Vehement and her colleagues described fossils from two very different dinosaurs. We're definitely here dealing with the very first evidence for completely soft-shell non mineralized shells. Their chemical analysis shows that the young dinosaur offspring were surrounded by soft shells much like the. The shells of turtle eggs, vitamin says it looks like the earliest dinosaurs started out with soft shelled eggs hard shelled eggs evolved later. The dinosaur calcified egg is something that is not ancestor that is not set of primitive feature of all dinosaurs, and now that researchers have shown how to find soft shelled eggs in the fossil record. Scientists will likely start finding more Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR

Julia Clark Chile Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce Npr Football Moses Sore AIG Meena Vamon University Of Texas Austin
The Big Easy (with Father Brad Doyle)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:09 min | 2 weeks ago

The Big Easy (with Father Brad Doyle)

"And welcome to misinformation true you podcast for ladies and engines who love Cool Trivia and sticking it to annoying teams a quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren and I'm Julia Hate Y'all. Hey, Hey, do you feel? Do you feel the presence of the Lord in this podcast today in this podcast today? Cast in House yes yeah. It might be because we have our first. Holy. Man of the cloth, a man of the cloth who I'm planning on calling every possible iteration of your holiness and Monsignor. Today. Today we have a father brad of the quizzical papist on Hello Father Brad. How're you doing? Thanks for having me on. We are thrilled to have you on so excited. father. Brad sent us an email and he is a listener, and he's not lying about that because he is a priest and can't lie. Entrap Bruce Lie, but I'm not lying about that. That is the one that's one thing. I didn't lie about okay. Great perfect, thank you, thank you for clarifying. And he is here to talk to us about some stuff, so father Brad. What are you? GonNa talk to us about today. Yes, so I was listening to a couple weeks back and y'all had an episode of Buffalo. Yes, and I really enjoyed that episode I I love when people speak about things they love, and they care about, and I really care about a lot of things, the faith being won right relationship with God, but also my city. Where my family's from my my history, our culture people know this on my podcast. I'm talking about Mardi Gras the time talking about music, I'm talking about food and and so I reached out and I was like hey. I think they would enjoy kind of deep dive into New Orleans. As an episode. I'm so excited for this because I. Admittedly have never been to New Orleans. Although many Louisianans. Oh, Lord, what's the Deborah and we're going to get into that I got. Using Indians Louisianans have told me like. Oh, you gotta get down there and have some shrimp to fe. experienced the joy of New Orleans, so. Yeah, yeah, I just allow me to bathe in the knowledge of the south. I was you in crab? Boil right now. Sounds a little painful. Be Baptized and Gumbo. Is that service you provide in your church Father Brad. I cook. I Cook like the other day. I went over in at a social distance, sat and and prisoners, driveway and boiled to Sachse, crawfish and like just gave it to him and sat at. It's socially distant. Right off, but so I I do do that, but they usually eat it. They don't pour it on their head or it on themselves. I mean that's the waste, so that's understandable. Who Hey please. The floor is yours Sir Nice okay, so we're gonNA start with pronunciation. Very while the city derives its name from the city of early-on, France. It's not pronounced that way or else people think you are conceded. I'm in New Orleans. So, it's some other mistaken. Situations are new, Orleans or even worse knowledge wins okay. That's very touristy. Okay, One's going around. Saying Nolan's in New Orleans like when we kept referring to Chicago is Chinatown. From What he says, so the best way to say New Orleans is just a smash two words together and just say New Orleans. Let's try like Toronto. Toronto Yeah Yeah. New Orleans okay, and if you live in new, Orleans you're a newer Linian. Okay important, okay, so history! I think it's historically interesting because it's. It's kind of very different from a lot of the country, our country. As is the case with most of the Americas the human history of South Louisiana begins with native Americans right. There were there. And the major tribes inhabiting the area, or the president. Of President of the Chitter Maka and the choctaw tribes, and what's cool is the chicken Maka are the only native tribe of Louisiana. He's still inhabit part of their ancestral land, so we still have people who are a part of the tribe that still inhabit where their ancestors lift our. And many of the rivers streets still bear their the language of the choctaw. For instance there's a street called Chop Tulips, which is just really hard to pronounce even harder to spell. But it is right there on the river, and a lot of stuff is on top of tulips now it's. Exploding section of the city and that's actually a choctaw word. It's not French anish or Haitian or anything. okay. New Orleans. As we know it now is the result of a French colony. Probably know that is founded in seventeen eighteen by Montreal Frenchman and this is you know. French people have these long names a John. Baptiste Lemond be in Ville. But we just call him. Be in Ville feels like a the founder of New Orleans. Chose New Orleans because of the high elevation like where it's at. It's actually has a natural levee where it's located like the French quarter now is where the original spotless, and it didn't flood during Katrina so the French quarter didn't flood. who was all the surrounding areas that flooded?

New Orleans Father Brad Toronto South Louisiana Bruce Lie Lauren Deborah Baptiste Lemond Chitter Maka Americas Katrina Ville Sachse President Trump Montreal Early-On Nolan France Founder
Reinvention With Julia Dean

The Candid Frame

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Reinvention With Julia Dean

"In the past when we've faced difficult times as we are currently experiencing, it has been an opportunity for reinvention. As difficult as it has, in can be such moments pushed people and institutions the finally act on ideas and plans that have been long delayed. For photographers with her professional or enthusiasts, these moments pushes in new directions and create unexpected opportunities. That's been the case with today's guest Julia Dean. Who is the founder of the Los Angeles Center photography after career as a successful photojournalist, Julian began what was then called the Julia Dean School of Photography over the last few decades, l. p. has become a thriving photographic community that offers classes and workshops, but most importantly. It creates a community in which photographers of all stripes have grown and thrive recent events of Giuliano our team to reinvent lic P.. Including offering online courses as well as in person events and workshops or opening up L. ACP to audience well outside the Los Angeles Area As with any new effort, there are challenges, but as you'll hear. Julius Passion for Photography and for people is why lic. has become such a success, and why I believe it will continue to be so in the future this is he body acts and welcome back to the candidate frame. But I always. Challenging time for you, it is a challenging time for everybody, but we're hanging in there. We have quite a team between our board of directors and friends and donors and students and staff. We've had a lot of people who have really wanted to help us including you. Yeah I mean. It's just amazing what you've built over these many years. Especially in in Los Angeles Los Angeles always lacked a sort of a central hub for a photo community this new. York San Francisco. Other places I've always seemed to have it, but I've always felt that one of the best things that you offered outside of the classes was just a place for people who love Photography WanNa community to come together so I'm I've always been supportive of the work, and that's why I'm just really want to be a cheerleader for you as you guys. Go through this this transition because I think despite the obvious challenges I think that there are so many people who outside the Los Angeles area that could really stand. To benefit from not just the classes, but the community that you've built. Let's. Let's talk a little about how you're dealing with the restrictions that the pandemic has put on and how you're seeing. The reinvention of La CPI. Yes, well. We've had to move quickly like like everybody else. In mid March, when all the doors were shut down for everyone, our revenue stream completely shut down as well and as you might know. We just moved into this really beautiful center in December, that is a costly on a monthly basis, and it's just beautiful, and everybody was so excited about it. We had a five events before we had to shut the doors, and they were all packed, and everybody was so excited about the new center and this new beautiful place, and so we hope to be back to classes in the fall. We've moved everything online in a very amazingly quick manner to our staff Kevin Jansen, Brandon and Jason and Sarah. An amazing staff and everybody's kind of worked around the clock to do what we needed to apply for a lot of grants and a lot of federal aid. We had board of directors helping us at without two. We've sent out lots of help us. You know, send money in. Trying to get donations we've we've done everything we can, and we've gotten some some help from a lot of people and also some fed. We just got a federal aid last week. So that's GONNA. Help US tremendously, so we feel very optimistic, which is a completely different than a month ago? When this all happened, and it was so scary and we were all very nervous and very scared, but we didn't have much time. To stay scared or nervous or depressed because we had a lot to do so that that was a good thing because I kept our minds off of what what could happen, you know after twenty one years of building, this place is beautiful community that we all have. But. We just feel very optimistic now. We're doing everything we can that the aid that we just got really helped a lot. Our Board of directors outstanding to help us, and our staff is just working so hard to make everything happen, so we're looking at. If it's indeed we can come back to the classroom in the fall hideout. We're going to be able to ever have a big event for a while, but if we can come back to the classrooms in the fall. Then will not only have classrooms, but we'll also have online programs because we've been wanting to do online learning for years is just that we've had such a small staff, and we've just never had the man or woman power to get it done, and now we really didn't this time, either, but we had to. We had to make it happen. So come fall we'll have both. Brandon came up with a whole series of Webinars, which is really need, and so I think that it kind of pushed us to do some new cool things, and then we'll be able to come back to the classroom as well hopefully in September. Normal season starts in July, but we pushed the season back to not starting until September with hopes that more time would be. You know possible to get back in the

Los Angeles Los Angeles Center Julia Dean Julia Dean School Of Photograp Brandon Photography Wanna United States Founder San Francisco Julius Passion Julian La Cpi Kevin Jansen L. P. Sarah Jason
Beijing closes market, locks down area in new virus outbreak

News, Traffic and Weather

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

Beijing closes market, locks down area in new virus outbreak

"I knew Kobe nineteen outbreak linked to a market place in China triggering with Chinese officials call a wartime emergency mode A. B. C.'s Julia macfarlane London edition Fadi on Beijing's southwest side Asia's largest whole food market now closed another twenty four hour police guard off the spot testing revealed at least forty five new cases of coronavirus authorities also banning tourism in the district canceling sports events closing

China A. B. C. Beijing Asia Kobe Julia Macfarlane London
New York's Governor Cuomo signs "long overdue" police reform legislation

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

New York's Governor Cuomo signs "long overdue" police reform legislation

"The state governor Cuomo signing into law reform reform legislation which will include total transparency about officer background checks and an executive order requiring even more changes in the way patrols conduct themselves ten ten wins reporter Julia Papa has our story the governor's executive order requires local police departments across the state a total of five hundred to devise a plan for new leasing strategies including use of force and bias awareness sit down at the table with the local community address these issues get to the root of these issues he set a deadline for passage and implementation of the new procedures for April first otherwise he says those agencies will not get state funding the police reform measures signed into law include the Eric garner chokehold ban garner's mother Gwen Carr was in attendance it was a long time coming when it came the law makes the crime a C. felony with a possible fifteen year prison

Governor Cuomo Julia Papa Gwen Carr Officer Executive Reporter Eric Garner
Asia Pacific stocks mixed as China's inflation data misses expectations

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Asia Pacific stocks mixed as China's inflation data misses expectations

"Hundred you Florian Asia appears to be wearing off stocks in the region finished today's session mostly mixed numbers really at Sally joins us from Singapore with the details good morning Julia good morning Karen the China X. index of small cap stocks listed in China rose nearly one percent while the broader CSI three hundred because lower by two tenths of one percent with data pointing to slowing inflation south Korea's KOSPI gained a third of one percent to close at a four month high and so despite the nation's jobless rate rising to a ten year high Japan's Nikkei two to five index closed above twenty three thousand points with the relative strength index now showing Japanese stocks

Singapore China Korea Japan Florian Asia Sally Julia Karen
Cate Blanchett reveals 'a bit of a chainsaw accident'

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:40 sec | Last month

Cate Blanchett reveals 'a bit of a chainsaw accident'

"In Oscar winner wearing some new hats lately reveals an unusual injury actors Cate Blanchett has accidentally cut her head with a chain saw while in lockdown the Australian actress revealed the injury during a podcast interview with former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard last week Blanchet saying quote I had a bit of a chainsaw accident yesterday which sounds very very exciting but it wasn't adding quote besides a little neck to my head I'm fine planted in our family had been a lockdown in Sussex England faxes my guns woman the mother of four also picking up the role of teacher while everyone's

Cate Blanchett Julia Gillard Blanchet Oscar Prime Minister Sussex England
Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

Software Engineering Daily

20:28 min | Last month

Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

"Honest welcome back to the show. It's great to be back under so thanks so much for having me. Of course you run. PRISMA and PRISMA is involved in workflows for accessing data. Can you describe the AP? Is that sit between the front and the back end database layer, and where PRISMA fits in sure so I think that's a pretty complex questions. It's always. Always depends on what your application architecture looks like, and there's so many angles to take does feed for example, take a more mortar jam, stag texture, or if you take a micro services architecture, the onset is always depends. What's always the same as if you build application that requires state of assistance? Then chances are you're using database and how PRISMA fits into. Is that it tries to help application developers built applications more easily was working with the databases so typically that means you're using a part of PRISMA. What's called the prisoner client that sits typically in your application server? That's typically an API server and talks to your database. Typically, this part of the stack is known as an or layer or data access layer. PRESI-, in particular is not an Orem can talk about that separately. The pretty nuanced topic, but prison up to. The main function is to serve to access state. I'm more easily in your application language. Can you talk about that in more detail? Like? Why would I need a additional layer of access I? Mean I think in general? I if I'm sitting on the front end and I want to access the database I m hitting some service that services talking to a database and the service is requesting the data from the database. Why do I need prisma to help out with that database access so this setup just to recap one more time, so you have your fronton application. Let's say you have reactive of you up on the other end. You have database. Let's say you have a more traditional postures, my sequel database, but would also apply to same for more modern. Modern Dynamo DB etc, and then typically have this middle tier that's let's say an API server, and where you would use prisma for is just having an easier time building your API server in order to talk to the database, so let's say you're using pastas. The most barebones thing you could do is implementing your Api Server and just writing implementing your points, or let's say rebuilding a graph gals over implementing overs, and then just talking directly to the database by writing raw sequel. Curry's and that works, but that comes also was some problems. Problems typically in terms of productivity, and does not quite abstraction level that you want as an application developer to be productive and confident in what you're writing the same way as fronton applications are built through abstraction layers. Let's say react angular view. It's the same on the back end that you also want more application at U. Matic obstruction layer for away you talking to the database, and historically there's been many forms of the most common one is in Orem, and they're on more modern ways of how you build a better abstraction on top. Top of fear database for data access, and that's a pattern that implementing was prisma that to be referred to as careerbuilder. Can you explain in more detail? What is the difference between a query builder and an OEM right? So that comes down to the way how you're thinking about these application patterns, an Orem stands for object, relational knepper, and the idea behind an orum is mapping a typically a database table to a class in typically object oriented programming language, and this is a pretty intuitive model and is widely used in tons of. The most prominent one of be being active record as part of friggin rails, but there tons of other ones as well and the Java world. There's hibernate and the idea there you have tons of tables in your database, and you want to map that somehow and Julia programming language and your programming language. You're typically working with classes as opposed to a career rebuilder with looks more like sequel way, but maps you sequel statements into statements in your programme language and the difference really come down to how much flexibility and control you need, but they're tons of downsides of or and that as Good more widely used became more and more well known, so there's a great block posed called the Vietnam of computer science, which is all about or ems and the problems behind orum's most importantly one thing called the object relational impedance mismatch. Talks about the problems of mapping databases database tables to objects where he's just a big amount of oven, impedance mismatch, and the way around that is that you should think about the craziest that you're writing a database instead of obsessing too much about the classes and objects, and your curry should really determine the shape of the data. You're getting back in the same way as the British striking analogy to how gruff LDL's was the sort of pattern where draft, but L. is all about the quarry writing that you need in your components, and it's a pretty similar pattern that you're now applying the way how you do. They access on the back end. If I was to set up PRISMA for Miami application. What would the life of a query look like and the structure of a query look like? So what you'd be using concretely, there is prisoner. Database took. And what you would use to career database is a part of prisma called the PRISMA Klein's. The prisoner client is basically just a Java script library that you installed installed from NPR. And you're. Writing that query ones in your coat. One great advantage is that it's fully type safe by leveraging type script, so you're writing that query and then strode run times when your application is deployed. That code gets invokes that under the hood generates a database dependent query, typically a sequel query, but as we were supporting of databases, swell could generate dynamo queries, Atra, and these queries are centered underlying database, and the data's returned, and then returned injury application code. Got It and. What the difference between using PRISMA AND USING GRAPH KUNAL! So, it's a really two fundamentally different technologies for different use cases I. think a good way to think about is where into application stack. These technology said so graphic. L. is typically used for fronton applications to talk back end up locations whereas prisoners specifically the prison. My client is used for typically your backup location to talk to your database so analogous in this way, but typically the different layers of the stack. However, it always depends was newer approaches like the jam stack your friends and education can statically directly talk to

Prisma Orem Prisma Klein AP Developer Curry U. Matic Julia Careerbuilder NPR Orum Miami
Oil prices fall on doubts over output cuts, surging U.S. diesel inventories

BTV Simulcast

06:12 min | Last month

Oil prices fall on doubts over output cuts, surging U.S. diesel inventories

"Oil they're retreating from the three month high OPEC plus unity is being threatened by law already sealed over compliance when it comes to production cutbacks meantime US data is casting doubt on the strength of demand recovery as well let's bring in a J. T. D. energy services services director director John John Driskell Driskell joining joining us us with with more more John John thanks thanks for for joining joining us us you you know know the the stunning stunning rally rally seen seen in in crude crude for for Brent Brent basically basically we we touched touched briefly briefly about about forty Bucks and basically we come back from seventeen dollars just a month ago how far can we go in this group rally right now is a more upside thank I would prefer my optimism if you could surge to forty dollars but it was short lived and a lot of the momentum behind me was based on the signals we're receiving about the poem OPEC meeting which is supposed to be held on the ninth of June on the whole idea was what the deal would be one point seven million perilously close with each step further because if someone's exactly between the Saudis and the Russians quickly with extra mushrooms and in fact the wooden bowls the meeting criminals who made a lot of sense everybody to talk about it resolve it for you that way you could send a signal to customers who July here's what was beautiful and moving forward but several we have this a breath only yesterday that the also in the meeting was called off it's going to be postponed or rescheduled for later and so when the focus is on the so called lawyers the I could be wrong a link has extra money Julia wait I think what you have to do is to look at his murder trial collated and market demand hopefully recovers you can see how much more intense competition the crew members markets will be the lord Collins of the sponsors like major area all right group because of the length of the title what is the market need to hear from OPEC plus here sensually it isn't what the Saudis are proposing where we need to extend those curves up to three months or the Russians have a point here that you know as economies re open demand is picking up again maybe we just need to extend for one month all the employees of the service call center there are yeah and is returning we've been doing a lot of bottom fishing he's cool crisis caused by third base I stopped the Russian Urals we're sorry Colaco who took the controls and soon a surgeon physical the marvelous okay we can copy paper for he's still on the conservative side Merkel I'm still on the ground because through the end of the year so one of us needs to do which is the one more knowledge was terrible it fell apart Michelle back walks on the meeting it's gonna be a stronger sense of compromise with the realism that allows us to be school because for the nine point seven five scored five it'll be civil read more the latest things are opposites one month and that's underwhelming the same term it's understandable they need to crack down on the on the outliers who who are over producing you couldn't see three months of a local court you can only spend the visual agendas of the Russians get excited about blasphemous because the physical demands well don't get too excited don't cha think well let's suppose he cooled stainless phone for at least three months just chill size shale production is bad given that oil is about thirty a barrel and how will this play out in terms of supply and prices world world has gone coming off any we'll exporters immediately he prefers home girls with a cream cold credentials and others call on political I hope we can achieve a permission from the court last week that's because some people have been through a number of cities also cross off of almost two million also day and that's been strictly voluntary medicine driven by economics that yeah this is on the rise produces from even going well so there's some concerts since Christmas thirty five forty dollars this is going to provide a signal with some shale producers to relaunch could actually set headline says Sarah E. O. G. because we were sure sure Sir we have to restart from some of the help is if you look at the pretty close all the loopholes on the shelves BP's ensure ground he announced moments across multiple expenditures from hopefully some room because it's difficult to protect their digital mobility social okay transaction size for this in the case of chevron overlaying all star I mean those people experts also growing expenditure are not going to be fun to go through with this song keep expectancy continues to drop off in breast reduction reducing other non OPEC countries like Norway announcing massive cuts in this morning so it is fun to show producers I don't know if that's what they're going to switch back on the magically restore production I think going forward it to the end of the year because he got a little off before

Opec
Play Your Cards Right

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:48 min | Last month

Play Your Cards Right

"Hello and welcome to misinformation Trivia podcast for ladies and gents who love Cool Trivia. Sticking it to annoying teams pop quiz. We're hosts I'm Lauren. I'm Julia Hey. Joel Hi Laurin. Referring we're still recording from afar. Yeah, and you know what I listen to our first episode were recorded from afar, and while I feel like we needed. You know we got. We needed some getting used to. But I think it sounded pretty good. Yeah, yeah, it's fine. It's fine. It's a free podcast. Twenty all want from us. Yeah exactly. We're all very stressed out. Yeah Yeah Yeah everyone stressed out. You know what that's understandable. It's a weird time and it's. It's not. SUPERFUND right now. So, what are you GonNa do, but you you're going to. You're going to pull us out of this and there's GonNa. Be Something Fun. You'RE GONNA share with us today. Is that correct? That is correct great. They for that great intro so. I've been thinking about it all day. We're all home her trying to figure out ways to you know, entertain ourselves more And I decided to cover a topic this week. That it things about it do come up and trivial a lot so day. This episode is called play your cards right. WHO owns. This is trivia about playing cards interesting I. Don't know a lot about well I'm not a big card player. I'm not a big game person too I. Mean we've talked about this, but I have rarely played a card game, so I'm not that familiar with. Most things about cards so I'm excited, well great. I'm not GonNa talk too much about. Different Card Games per se I. Am GonNa Wind detail, but I'm talking more about like the actual cards themselves. Okay cool so. If you remember in Mr, information to Turbo back from two thousand nineteen. Who could forget? Steve covered the history of playing cards like their origin started in China. They made a to Europe. There's different styles The Germans have different symbols on their cards than the Italians do that kind of thing. Interested in that kind of stuff. Please go back to that episode where he did a great job of covering that. Also there's a really great article. I read on collectors weekly by Simon wintel. It's called the evolution history imagery of playing cards, those published in April, two thousand eight, and there's a lot of great information there, too. Also collectors weekly a surprisingly great resource and excellent publication. I love it. I will digress for a moment so anytime. Anybody talks about how they're afraid of clowns. Yes, I send them this really amazing article from collectors weekly that tops out how? She started as like a trope, and you know the the renaissance period, and how got filtered down, and how they appeared in operas, and what this type of clown, and that type of climate and like clowns actually like weren't actually scary until John Wayne Gay it. True like. Clowns were fine. People like them. That's why when we look back at like our parents at birthday parties when they were little and we're like. What does that thing like? No people liked clowns. Then they were, they were not. Is this source of fear that they are today? It seems but Yeah No. I send that article out. Probably like a couple times a year to people. Yes, I remember using sites great site fabulous site. Shadow to collectors. Anyway back to cards, please. The cards that we use that. We think of as playing cards especially here in North America, but also most most card games at this point used what are called the French suited cards, so there are four suits, hearts, diamonds, clubs, and spades. Each suit usually has three picture cards. Those face cards the King Queen and Jack, and then numeral cards from ace, all the way to ten some packs that like special have like fewer or different numerals pursuit, but when we talk about French suited cards a fifty two card deck. That's this is where we're heading. So the graphic symbols that's the hearts, diamonds clubs spades. They're called pips. Like you just like on a die, like all the dots on a diet. On a pair of dice or a single diet, they're called pips as well so the letter or number that you see in the top corner of Card, is called an index, so that players can identify their cards without having to spread them so widely as to risk exposure of their cards to opponents. Oh, that makes a Lotta Sense. and, though French suited cards are again. They're the most common playing cards that are used internationally. There are a lot of countries or regions that use their own regional cards that are preferred many games, but none of those have fifty two cards like when you're talking to fifty hardback. It's a French suited pack. And they almost always come with at least additional special cards, nowadays again called a joker, the long any suit. And they are required for some games and some games that use jokers require them to be distinguishable from one another, so in a lot of modern packs. The jokers are printed in different colors. You might have one that's red and when this blacker when the? Plane and one that's colored where they're given different pictures.

Steve Joel Hi Laurin Julia Hey Superfund Europe John Wayne Simon Wintel North America China King Queen Jack
Apple acquires the full Fraggle Rock collection in first major licensing play

Techmeme Ride Home

03:05 min | Last month

Apple acquires the full Fraggle Rock collection in first major licensing play

"And here's another interesting apple acquisition if you will. Apparently apple is involved in a reboot of the once popular kids TV Staple Frugal Rock. That's been under development at apple for a while now to be released on Apple. Tv plus it's involving a full partnership with the Jim Henson Company and it makes sense as Netflix's and Disney plus have shown having kids programming is key to getting families to lock into your streaming service. But what is new and potentially interesting because it suggests a strategy shift on. Apple's part is the further news. That apple has also quietly acquired frugal rocks back catalogue. All Ninety six original episodes of the TV show aired between Nineteen Eighty. Three and nineteen eighty. Seven have been quietly made available to stream on Apple. Tv plus so is apple shifting its original strategy of creating original content into a mix strategy of also licensing existing Ip. If so might that be a tall order because I mean since everyone in their mother is investing in streaming plays right now. Why would anyone be willing to part with valuable? Ip that they could leverage to make their own efforts viable quoting the Great Julia Alexander in the verge as Joseph adhaline reported in vulture this week with big studios like Disney Warner media and NBC UNIVERSAL. Quote looking to keep their best and brightest titles for their own streaming platforms. There simply aren't enough great titles around to justify making a play for a traditional library of licensed content instead it makes more sense for apple to look at acquiring full libraries for shows wants to reboot keeping everything in one place makes for a better consumer experience quote so were apple to end up doing a deal for the rights to the James Bond Franchise something which has been buzzed about. Since at least two thousand seventeen the company would also likely try to get the back library of bond films so it could market itself as the home for all things 007 at Elaine wrote apple like all streaming players. Right now is making licensing bets where they make sense. Apple isn't about to try to use NETFLIX's licensing strategy which helped the general entertainment platform catapult into a behemoth for its own gain as apple figures out which properties make the most sense to either resurrects remake or reboot building out. Full collections is also a smart play. Apple isn't calling this a strategy shift but it is one apple. Tv plus launched without any license content and CEO. Tim Cook reiterated at a shareholders meeting in February that Apple. Tv plus wasn't about hosting older series or films specifically saying that's not what Apple TV pluses about cook. Restated that Apple. Tv plus is about original programming and quote. It doesn't feel right for apple to just go out and take a rerun. Cook said now. The caveat seems to be if that original program is based on an older series or movie. It's likely that collection will wind up on Apple.

Apple Nineteen Eighty Tim Cook Netflix Jim Henson Company Disney CEO Elaine Disney Warner Julia Alexander General Entertainment Nbc Universal Joseph Adhaline
Finding Simplicity in Complex Times With Julia Hobsbawm

Live Happy Now

07:22 min | Last month

Finding Simplicity in Complex Times With Julia Hobsbawm

"Good day. Now welcome to episode two hundred sixty two of live happy now. This is Paula Phelps. And I'd like to thank you for joining us once again this week. Today's world has become increasingly challenging. So it's fitting that this week we're talking about simplicity. How do you find more simplicity in a complex world? Well that's complicated in this week. Author and social commentator. Julia Hobsbawm looks at how we can live a simpler more creative and productive life. Her new book the simplicity. Principle six steps toward clarity in a complex world looks at how we can become more focused and less distracted. It's something we can all benefit from learning. So let's hear what she has to say Julia. Welcome to happy. Now thank you for having me a pleasure to be with you. Will you have a wonderful topic to talk to us about? And it's a great time to talk about it too because our lives seem very complex. And so you're talking to us about the simplicity principle. I guess to start. Can you tell me what made you want to take on this issue? Yes it is a funny time. I think a good time to be talking about symptoms tedious. When all lives became both Bruce Lee simple through lockdown but also a lot more complicated with the ramifications and implications of life next began writing seven. Right is go around. The connected age in the digital age in all the complications of that role. And I wrote a book fully connected and that book really seemed to resonate with people that were worrying about overload and then I thought well what's next for the people concerned about now. I thought it was in the end that people feel they have almost limitless choices. Limitless possibilities windows within windows and APPS and meetings and opportunities and the world was becoming so full of potential that it was also getting really complicated. And I thought what is it that we really want. We want all these opportunities. We want to be innovative and entrepreneurial allies at least I do but equally we want to not feel like we're going a bit nuts and the truth is I think we all did feel even before corona virus. That life was just really getting complicated spell. I wrote the simplicity principle to really say. Can IT BE SIMPLISAFE Walk to simplicity? Look like what's wrong with complexity in the first place and you know what a successful at like and that's what I came up with the book and why is complexity so difficult for us well in some ways complexities natural human beings a curious and you only have to look the way we like sports. That have complicated rules or hobbies have intricate ways in which you do something. Even a jigsaw puzzle is complicated. The human brain itself as an organism as about as complicated objects if you like in the world so there's nothing unnatural about impact city and everything from viruses and weather systems to ecosystems all complex. The problem I think comes down to the fact that the human being that we own all inside systems and jobs digital worlds. We're actually a bit more basic. We need sleep. We need dressed. We honked overload our brains without stressing out tuning out venturing out. And when we do that things happen which might not make light operate smoothly in other words. You want your pilot to fall asleep at the controls because they're exhausted or you don't want somebody to miss. As arguably authorities have missed the signs of endemic coming because s what the systems to warn each other and take action. Were too complicated so really. What I'm saying is at the very least. We need to balance on the spectrum. Between what is simple uncomplicated? But in an ideal world we would also give the human body and the human mind more of what we now know that needs which is simple straightforward reset nut chewing respecting the complexity respecting. That things are not straightforward. This is not a book about being simplistic. I think of things at simplistic is a bit like it's stupid. You know him wants to be stupid but simplicity is actually what sophisticated and the person who taught me. That actually was the late great my Angelo. Who I have the pleasure and privilege of working alongside for a good few years when I was a lot younger. And you want me to keep it simple. And she taught me that when you can connect with what you want and what you're Abou- and what's real and what matters sat is smart but it might also be simple as what I've tried to create is a bit of a blueprint for how to get to that simple. It's right in the middle of everything that super super complicated and one thing that makes your approach so unique and so effective is. There's a lot of books at tells. Here's how to simplify. Here's what you need to do but yours isn't just about that. You really look at how the world can open up for us when we live a simpler life all of that. So can you talk about the research that you did to discover these result? Yes I wanted to write a book. That was a like a bit of a business book on a business woman. And I'm a business writer and so I wanted to give it a magic number. Because lots of the best business books do say who it intense steps seven steps in the four ways in the and so on and I want to really structure it so that it was incredibly useful but I also wanted to a homage if you like to the philosopher and all of we're on a quest to find meaning and I think more and more we want meaning in our lives and so I thought how do I do this and so I alighted on the idea that I would write about simplicity and the human brain I would dig into the research around. Neuroscience and present some case studies at pupil could relate to as some data that says. Look this is why the human brain needs to keep it simple but I would also structure the book a little bit like a cross between a business book recipe. Frankly so that. If you like may acquire impatient to say all right I buy it. I'm into simplicity versus exte- when the line begin how do I stop that? It would be easy to pick up. The book died in and to find something within five minutes of. Reading the book that you could relate to and do that's what I want and to feedback Sephora has been quite good because I think that most of us now want just quick wins. You know we want hacks and simplicity as well as wanting to look at the deeper meaning and I think the coronavirus crisis is a really good moment to reset and rethink. What are we wanted to? How do we WANNA live? How's it going to be

Julia Hobsbawm Paula Phelps Sephora Bruce Lee Writer
Crisis-affected communities hold UN in high regard, says senior woman peacekeeper

UN News

05:30 min | Last month

Crisis-affected communities hold UN in high regard, says senior woman peacekeeper

"Well female peacekeepers at an extra dynamic two teams in the field breaking barriers that allow women civilians to describe what's really going on inside the communities thoughts the view of Major Fiona Bruce from the Australian Defence Force. Who served in the UN's truce supervision organization in both Lebanon and Syria an interview ahead of UN peacekeeping? Day marked on the twenty ninth of May Major. Bruce highlights the fact that people going through crisis and conflict still view the UN in high regard Julia Dean from our UN. Australia country team spoke to her online and began by asking about her old daily routine serving in Lebanon so house two points to observe great Lebanon from December two thousand eighteen through to June. Two Thousand and Nineteen. N That job there. I was a United Nations Military Observer. So that means is in a small group My team had ten ten of us. We had a defined air responsibility and we would conducts daily patrols along the Blue Line between Israel and Lebanon which was the the withdrawn from two thousand and then we'd also conduct village patrol and Ship engagements with latest from the local Lebanese community through to security forces. So just on the first one on patrolling those different areas. What was it like? She'd like it was. It was a fairly interesting time to get to Lebanon. When I arrived there was an Israeli fence. Fools Operation Hold Operation Northern Shield which commenced I think the day that we landed for induction training in Jerusalem And that was we some tunnels that were likely to be found dug beneath our. The Blue Line is situated so during the first sort of initial months out. Patrols consisted of static patrols defined observation observe what was occurring on the Israeli side. Any reaction to the Lebanese side to ensure those nicer to inflame tensions because it was quite a tense situation occurring. But will that looks like his way. Would Golf troll in amid vehicle and I would be with a colleague from another nation. I'm we'd also have a language assistant so like eleven as member who was who had been employed by the UN to Are the main things that certain mission is quite proud of is not for us to make an observation we have to have it verified by a of different military different nations so in our everyday on with my colleague from Saint China or Russia old New Zealand on Saturday was different on one of the things. That was yeah quite quite interesting particularly during that that first month where it was quite tense on instead reaction to what was going on son to to as quite a bit Which was which good philosophy? Five months in in Lebanon and what about working with colleagues from different cultures. I think out of. That's probably my fondest memory of working. Go answer joining the military. I never never would have imagined that I would be with closely with a an officer soldier from Russia or China. You know. It's not something that of course out Defense Force Does do we have. We have working relationships with the countries but saw something. I ever thought that I would be in a position to be able to do from a culture point of view it was really fascinating not just down to language but just down to simple things like the level of driving competencies across the team how we interpret something from a military perspective from a cultural perspective on inside Leadership engagement in Lebanese community then moved onto the observer group in Garland. What were your first impressions and so in June two thousand nineteen? I transferred to observer of Golomb by Syrian. And to do this you actually draw from Lebanon across Syria and I remember driving down off of the the mountain range that separates the two countries nervous and excited at the same time and not really sure what was going to go on to haul the future up because everything I knew about Syria with like most people which was based off the news that before I even put in at the bikes that I was gonna live on. I was really an in ore of the Syrian help. Relation are met some people at the border point. Who would just happy to practice? English skills with me and I think are really excited to save myself and my colleague who was a Finnish officer. Famous finish up to see two women in uniform so he had a bit of a photo and a chat and that sort of really set a positive. Time Famara small-time in Syria just on that yet. What why was that important for you. I think it was. It was really nice that that you can say that no matter what the population is going through. Do they view the UN in such a high regard? They they wanted us there which really sort of took away some of the concerns that I had about moving into a country that still being on armed observer. It's still quite a hod. Mental shift doesn't military professional military opposition to be in a dangerous environment. What you think is a dangerous environment aunt so it goes against a lot of training realized at that point that everyone he just wants benefit and we had a small role to play in that So that was that was really important for me.

Lebanon UN Syria United Nations Military Observ Major Fiona Bruce Australian Defence Force Officer Julia Dean Australia Russia Golf Jerusalem Israel Garland Saint China New Zealand China
"julia i" Discussed on Haunted Places

Haunted Places

08:32 min | 3 months ago

"julia i" Discussed on Haunted Places

"The time. Ten o'clock Rolls Around Ray. Had imbibed plenty of liquid courage along with several pieces of Pie. He loaded Bernie's photo equipment into their van and slid into the back seat. So Dwight and Bernie could sit up front. Dwight was wearing his white Mohair coat. It was the closest thing he could get to a nineteenth century phantasm on short notice. But it didn't look fabulous. The boys picked their way between the graves. The darkness Bernie's obsessive cataloging. The cemetery that morning meant that he knew exactly where to go back. They went moving between the tombstones. Like the whistling wind. Finally reaching the train line and the Tomb Julie lagaras mausoleum glowed slightly under the flashlight. Beams some parts of its till so well-polished that they reflected the beams back at them. Bernie bit his lip muttered something about that bounce and went about setting up inside the small stone. Space Race stood around awkwardly just outside the doorway. He never really knew what to do with these particular moments. Do I didn't Bernie sometimes called him there bodyguard if he was there bodyguard though he would have wanted to drag them out of their his unease had returned and grown in the darkness. He was sure they were being watched. Do I pay raise tense body language? No mind he was back to clawing at the walls. Then ray heard a whisper soft soft. It could have been the wind if he hadn't felt a cold hand press against his back. He asked his friends if they were close to done. Bernie wind only half jokingly. No one was respecting his process. Dwight admitted he was getting a bit cold in the seabreeze and went to put his jacket back on over. Bernie's objections glad for the opportunity break quickly moved towards the tomb to help Bernie Mac things up but there was a scraping behind him deep heavy. He turned his flashlight towards the trees expecting a deer or a Turkey or something but there was nothing he heard it again. He slowly lowered his flashlight to find a large pink stone slab the same material as the tomb behind him. It was moving towards him completely rigid and untouched yet scraping forward all the same. It wasn't moving fast more like one at the Zombie movie. Slow but determined F- recalled Auto Bernie Dwight to be sure the pie in the Guyana. Liquor hadn't gone to his head. The other boys walked out of the tomb gazes fixed strange sight. They were just as puzzled as he was. Bernie was mostly frozen except for his hands which lifted his cameras slowly to his face. Bernie took the picture and all hell broke loose. The slab left the earth. Suddenly Hurtling Dwight's direction Bernie barely managed to push him out of the way in time and the two boys tumbled to the Ground Bernie's Lens crack beneath him but he was too busy checking on Dwight to care. Dwight was cursing a mile. A minute asking the same question. Over and over ray rushed to French side and pull them up quickly. They watch the Pink Slab. Warily half expecting it to rise again but it was completely still rate told them they needed to go. Bernie shook his head he needed to go back into the mausoleum. Ray told him he was crazy. Bernie fixed him with a hard look. The car keys were in his bag. The bag was in the mausoleum. Dwight cursed some more but rain just started walking slowly but surely towards the Tomb. The wind whistled through the trees and between the graves. Ray walked carefully humbly. His head bowed almost instinctively. He lifted his foot to cross the threshold whispering a prayer and an apology as he stepped. Forward the bag was near the entrance. He reached forward and grabbed it tucking it along the hard floor slowly slowly. He lifted up his head. Still lowered indifference. He just turned around to go when he heard this from Dwight. His jacket was in there to could he get it. The stone tumbled forward to the ground. Shut his mouth and the boys booked back to the van. Rain looked over his shoulder for just a moment to see if they were being followed until the day he died sober or not he would swear he saw the slab sliding back towards the woods. The darkness of the to watching warily behind it the membership of the Presbyterian Church of still island does their best to keep visitors from staging reenactments. Julia GEARS TRAGIC DEMISE. But it was hard for the two hundred member congregation and five person staff to keep up with the marauders so they fitted bars to the front of the. Lagarto seeking a spiritual compromise. Julia appears to have accepted the measure. Julie legare story could easily belong to early. Nineteenth Century author Edgar Allan Poe. Who wrote of both a tragic noblewoman buried alive and a beautiful lady chill and killed in kingdom by the Sea of real life southern Gothic. It's no wonder that her disturbing tale has captured the imagination of many tourists in the area. Who Leaves Julia? Handwritten notes shells and Mason Jars of flowers. Dying at twenty two from a painful disease like diphtheria is horrific enough but to suffer so much for so long before. Finally passing is even more heartbreaking in theory. Julia shouldn't be left alone. Her husband and son lie beside her. But the LEGARE CRIPS refusal to keep its doors. Shot this a sign of a larger restlessness. That seems impossible to cleanse or he'll so if you visit the young. Julia legare best to bring some sort of offering for. She Demands Attention. Whether you want to give it or not. Thanks again for tuning into haunted places will be back on Thursday with a new episode. And don't forget to come back on Tuesday for Urban Legend series available. Only on spotify you can find more episodes of haunted places and all other podcast originals for free on spotify DOT Alita spotify already. Have all your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast rituals like haunted places for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker. Just dream haunted places on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type haunted places in the search more and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. I'll see you next time. Haunted places was created by Max Cutler. As a park has studios original executive producers include Max Enron Cutler. Sound design by Kenny. Hobbs with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Aaron Larson and Paul. Muller this episode of haunted places was written by Lil deridder and Jennifer Recherche with writing assistance by Greg Castro..

Bernie Dwight Bernie Julia legare Bernie Mac ray Tomb Julie lagaras mausoleum spotify Pink Slab Julie legare Max Cutler diphtheria Nineteenth Century facebook executive Edgar Allan Poe Guyana Presbyterian Church Lagarto Ron Shapiro Instagram
"julia i" Discussed on Let's Be Real with Sammy Jaye

Let's Be Real with Sammy Jaye

11:46 min | 5 months ago

"julia i" Discussed on Let's Be Real with Sammy Jaye

"Hi Guys I am so excited for you to listen to this week's episode because Jillian Michaels is my guess which is still crazy to say. Her music helped me get through a very hard time with last year and switches meant a lot that she agreed to come on. This episode was actually recorded in two different sessions. The first one was in prison and then we did a follow up over the phone just a couple of days ago since she is a lot of new stuff going on in early. Hope you guys enjoy episode so happy that your hair. I'm happy to be here last time I spoke to it was during me American idol and I saw you on inner monologue heart tours and I have to say. I think that was the best concert I've ever been to. I have never cried. Laughed screamed all in the same caller. That makes me so happy. It was like after the concerts is the weirdest thing I felt like took a big breath in it was like a refreshing feels so interesting. I've never felt that before it a concert but is the most beautiful thing anyone could ever say to me. So thank you so much like. It was the most amazing energy. It was just Karaoke. Basically what I know. I'm I really am grateful. My my fans. Are you know. I like to say that like you attract like minded people. So if you're a very open vulnerable honest person you're going to attract those open vulnerable honest people and that's the that's the kind of energy that comes to my shows and that's kind of energy that I wanted my shows. I want people to feel free to have these beautiful Cathartic experiences and cry and laugh and scream and like really scream you know. Yeah like I was I loved. Oh they're up Uday. Yeah because it's also with their -Peutic for me you know like I love to help people. That's my thing you know. I'm like I'm a songwriter. I like a love to help people so when I get to see. I'm hoping people in the crowd like they're helping me too. So it's like it's just a full circle thing for me for those who don't know you've written for some of the biggest stars you've written for. Selena Gomez Justin Bieber Britney Spears. And that's just a few so I'm curious. What is it like you know writing for so many different artists that have so many different styles? How do you Connect them individually. You know. I think I think it's a personal sort of connection. And then the sonics sort of form around what we right You Know I. I've found that a majority of people all sort of have the same problems. And you know we all think the same things and you know even if you know like take heartbreak for example like it's something that everybody can talk about. The experiences may be different. But it's something that we've all experienced you know if it's not love it's you know losing a friend. It's losing a dog or something like that. Yeah so there's always something that you can connect to somebody with so it's easy to sort of crush on rest because you can you? Can you can do that with anybody. Well before you were your own artists you work for these people. Was there like a specific moment. You're like I'M GONNA be my own heart is I'm not behind the stage anymore and yeah front and center. I shouldn't I wrote issues. That was like the first time where I was like I think I want something. Actually I written a song for somebody and I was sort of supposed to be on it and I wasn't signed to a label at the time and The label that the song was attached to decided to go with another person To be really right at two I did. And and yeah you know like it wasn't something that I originally wanted. And when they told me just for political purposes they wanted someone that was on their label to be a part of the song. I got really sad and immediate realize. You're like yeah so I was in a session with a good friend of mine just and transfer and I had been in the bathroom for a while and he was like. Wow Julie's been gone for about forty five minutes. This is not like her and he knocked on the door and he and I let him in and I was crying and he's like what's going on and I was like I don't know I'm I'm just like sad and he was like well. Maybe this is your brain saying you know you want something more than you think you do. When you're just scared you're scared of it and so when I wrote issues I was like I'm never doing that again now. You're now that you've rent issue. I know it's about a break up. How long after the song did you break up with that guy? Because he did not seem like he's supported you the way you're so right we broke up. Oh dear we've got to hear the song of the news like I'm in trouble. Yes but he wasn't too upset with me because I had written it on the on a day where where like it was acceptable for him to be like okay. I deserve this. You know it was like one of those. We're GONNA PASS PASSING JULIA. Ten different all these songs. Do you regret ever like Jewish. He kept one for you. Know wish that you say that one for yourself You know there's songs that feel more special to me than others but If I'm in the studio with that person even if I love it like that's there's like I'm not how do you separate that only you know? I guess you could you Sorta don't you know? Writing for other people is my first love. That's something that I started with and there's something so incredible to me about having somebody that you just meet trust you so much to you. Know get their thoughts and feelings out on paper and put it together like a little puzzle in on the not built this beautiful relationship with somebody and I just love that so much So like for me writing for someone not someone else and you know even if I love this song it's like I know that you're GonNa love this song just as much as I do and you're GonNa do it just as much justice if I did think given when you're on your kids for adopt yeah but you know that your kid is going to a good home you know when I came up with the idea for this podcast. I was going through a really rough time. The school and I listened to exile. It just came on because I ever on talking and for some reason. I just burst into tears. What an I've never felt a connection to lyrics like I felt with your music. It's truly incredible and you know there are two songs in particular that especially live and happy. No songs were amazing. How Fun One? Yeah I'm sure some curious your song. Anxiety which features Selena Gomez. You've talked openly about you having anxiety. What was the story about creating that song in particular well when I was about nine? I'm twenty five now. I used to have panic attacks. Every panic attacks are the worst thing shows every yeah terrifying young one hundred percent and you saw them all the time literally like every day fetal position. Thought if I stopped talking I yeah I would pass out or like something would happen to me. Do feel like the word like when I've had it before it feels like like things are just like closing. It is that you feel like claustrophobic. My hands shake markets. Where do you like? It's the weirdest feeling and it's all in your mind. It's so wild and I was having them so much and you know I always try to be honest with everybody you know like about how I'm feeling and what I'm going through and I always knew I wanted to write a song about anxiety. I think it just took being in the right place with the right people and me feeling comfortable to talk about it with those people and you know I wanted it to be sort of like I didn't want it to be super heavy. You know I wanted it to be slightly comedic like yeah 'cause like I just sort of went into like laugh at myself. I am the kind of person that will like get ready. And and you know I don't want to go and then like I see all my friends out having a good time. It was like they went without me. Why you're doing that. You're so ridiculous you were invited so like I just wanted to talk about those silly things that you do when you have anxiety and it seems like a big deal in the moment when you look back catalog. This is comedic. Yeah it doesn't logically make sense okay. You're I I can using it. You know it or I can read it. It's my I just tried to be social. I make all these friends with plans and hope they call and cancelled then over. Think about things I missing. Now I'm wishing I was with them to a logical person that does not make sense at all. But the person you're like. Oh I totally get that. That been there done that. That line like it depicts it so perfectly cute. It doesn't make sense when you go out. What did you just did it? Just like come out like out of like it was so easy to those lines. Hard to figure out no it's sort of was pieced together pretty fast. I think because it's something that I deal with on a daily basis. We were just sort of talking about and all the people that I wrote it with two or like highly neurotic so I think like perfect made it so easy for us to just go back and forth with things that we do on a daily basis that were read it just like. Why do we do those things? How would you describe anxiety to someone who doesn't have it? It sort of feels like well. You know everybody experiences anxiety completely different versions but for me. It sort of feels like an earthquake. That just won't stop like and an almost like there's like a million natural disasters going on in your body and there's no cure for chess of no idea how to fix it and it's it can be so overwhelming but therapy and it change my life. Same Yeah I think it's so underrated. It's sauna rated. I think people are like afraid to go because it makes them think they're crazy. Yes something wrong with them but it's opposite because you're just wanting to better yourself what strategies that have helped you. I have learned mostly to talk myself out of things. That's hard to do. Especially when you're in your own head it's hard to do Like when I get really anxious before I go on stage or something I go okay. Why am I nervous or like why do I feel like this? It's probably because you know like X Y and Z from when I was eight and that was then and that's not now and I'm okay now you know or like if I've been doing so much and I'm just like super anxious mike why it's like. Oh okay I haven't slept bobble okay. I'm I need to let people know that I need a second to sleep. And take a breather and then. I can come about this much better. You know. So it's yeah. I've learned a lot of like little baby coping mechanisms. Yeah I feel like those. Are The little things that help you get through the day and I think of anxiety is like okay like when you have it like you always have it some degree. I think I think of it like a glass of water and the water's filled and that's just it being moderated when something that makes you anxious. It's like the water overflow out in that picture and that's a really good mental picture right. I feel like he doesn't like okay. Good Yeah do you remember the first time you ever experienced it You know I was about seventeen I had just signed my first publishing deal and I think I experienced like this immense pressure.

Selena Gomez Jillian Michaels Julie Britney Spears Justin Bieber
"julia i" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"julia i" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Hey, Queiroz Cami here. I am a little bit sick. But that doesn't mean I'm not excited about this current episode with guest cookbook author. Julia Tertia man, we have some good chats about like queer nece in chef and food are really like this person. And I hope you like this episode. Julia take it away feeling. Still. No, no, no careless. Will I always have folks that are on the podcast introduce themselves, which you introduce yourself star. I am Juliette Tertia n- cookbook author. And yeah. L up sued, and I love people. Are you? Are you also a chef is that what you call yourself? Like, what do you call yourself Grena? Yeah. So I do not come selfish chef lieu, and and when someone does I like look over my shoulder like who were they talking about? Okay. Because to me that means someone who runs a restaurant kitchen, okay? And like in a restaurant and sort of cooking professionally in that way. Like, I very much consider myself a home cook. Like, a proud home cook. What is your and you can call me, whatever, you know. I think that was a great answer because I don't know that. So that's why I asked and then I'm curious to hear more about your background in terms of 'cause like straight up your food. Always looks amazing. And I was just saying before we started recording that something that like just your social media tells me is that you also do a lot of social good with your cooking. You do some. Some work with organizations in the community where you live very regularly time project angel food is out it's called. So it's just called angel food. But I think it should be called project angel food. You know, what I didn't have to look at anything. Do you see that? There's no notes. No, that's impressive. I'm I into a. Seems like you. I I like your life your life seems good because seem like it's like did. That's the dream, right? If you're like, I figured out what I'm good at. I know that I can do it to make money. And then also no way I can involve myself in the community with like that's like the is not what you do. Oh, fuck am. I living the dream shit. The first. Oh, it honestly in the first person that told me that. Oh, okay. Yeah. That's what I do. I mean. Yeah. I don't know I've been thinking because I've been excited that you asked me to come on the show because I'm a big fan of the show. I think to all of them, and I was just thinking today, I feel like we do such different stuff. I mean, our work is like very different. But I was thinking there are a lot of parallels. Tell me about thing that like I think exactly what you said like finding something you love to do and getting to do it in a way that like supports you financially. But then also getting to kind of give back to community. I'm trying to kind of gather community river you go. That's like definitely something. That's really important to me. So yeah, I've just been dying to know what you eat. We're on the road on my God. I love this question. Finally, someone good questions. I'm so curious. I got pretty specific about this a couple years ago because. It really is. I find as I'm aging and unlike I'm still like, I'm a young person. I think I'm thirty seven I want to do this job for another several decades as I'm aging I find that your your body, actually, nobody talks about how much your Bod is not suited for touring like hotel is like, yeah. 'cause when people travel very often, they think of vacation like or they're about to take a man. So they're like getting on a plane, you know, once or twice to go there and back they're staying in a hotel, but they don't have to necessarily. Prepare for work in that hotel travel for work. I know that you do to promote your cookbooks you'll tour, but yeah. Food on the road. It's like you can't make silly decisions ate a lot of my writer my contract. The thing that what's in..

Julia Tertia Juliette Tertia Queiroz Cami community river writer
"julia i" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Volunteer your time and money or more money and for them in your own neighborhood if you see animal you can not necessarily call the because the dog would have a short time a home argue trying to find a home for all of those things all kinds of animals masticated animals animal with your own animal yes great thank you well you know we don't have an don't have an animal briana has a dog bit love her kind of yeah it's kind of a broker yeah yeah but you have animal i have one cat left i inherited my other i've had my life to my last in my last died and she left me her calves sweetest cat you've ever and i've been caring for her and i'm hoping to get another cat in another yeah is your cat personally patients very good relax good thing for me celebrity yeah thank you so much for what you do for the animals thank you lily on our that night is a comedian crazy starring julia i've been let you up with your wait wait me.

julia i
"julia i" Discussed on Great Women of Business

Great Women of Business

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Great Women of Business

"The year was nineteen fifty julia child had attended a few meetings of la circa deg or met one of these nineteen fifty meetings would prove to be the catalyst for the rest of julius career at this particular meeting julia met to french women the proud and skilled simone beck fishbachur nicknamed sympa and the charming lewis at berthold both were married women like julia but they were engaged in a herculean effort of editing together a book of recipes made up of the secrets and legacies pass down by their families from the french countryside however symtas last cookbook what's cooking in france sold poorly in the us to boost the appeal of the next book the women needed to bring in an american perspective julia child was a perfect fit this was julius dream an american and a french woman working together trying to bridge their cultures and expand fine cuisines influence across the world by january nineteen fifty two julia had solidified this into her first business plan julius sympa and louis set began holding cooking lessons to female american pats they called it let cold twat or moan or the school of the three food lovers julius business instinct was taking over before she even knew she wanted to be a businesswoman again we return to investing in oneself julius certainly wasn't making a fortune from running these informal lessons they weren't out on the streets marketing this as a true business in other words she wasn't in this to make money instead these classes help julia to enhance their own skills to share her skills and to pinpoint any weaknesses in her thinking about her goals one such weakness revealed itself very quickly many american women had no idea how to find or identify french ingredients there was a vast difference innovator bility and use between french and american ingredients julia later wrote quote from that time on i never lost sight of the fact that my sole purpose was to teach cooking to americans not the french i had to find a way to translate everything into a pleasurable experience that typical housewife could execute without fuss americans were enamored with canned goods and frozen food that's all they wanted to do and sort of prided themselves not being in.

julia lewis france us julius sympa simone beck louis
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Understand where there's turbulence being generated and so you're sort of figuring out how air molecules move around roughly right then the you're doing all of this with floating point numbers and you need to do a lot of them because there are many many many things to be evaluated all at one time and so that's where having these supercomputer clusters measured in pedophile is you're basically running one gigantic distributed computation that is like this isn't exactly right but but imagine if you were going to actually simulate every air molecule right so the simulation wants to advance one millisecond and you need to four every air molecule in the volume of interest you need to figure out where that air molecule would go would it bounce off of an object would it bounce off of another air molecule in this sort of one millisecond interval and do that forever air molecule and then you update now you have the new state and now you need to keep doing that except when you bump into another molecule you sort of have this cascade effect is very complicated right so that's sort of contrived example that's not how they do it but if you sort of think about that if you were running a simulation that did that that would be enormously computational expensive and so when you have these things measured in pedophile the supercomputers for some things you can let them run really long but if you're trying to do weather forecasting you know if it takes you five days to forecast what the weather's going to be tomorrow that's actually not useful i guess it kind of but it's not useful for four cats makes sense i guess the thing i'm not sure about is if julia is cpos plus and see under the hood like does it but it's not seen as plus what do you mean by under the hood so in other words like the julia perations i mean obviously the farming to other machines and things like that are are written and julia or maybe written in some high level language but under the hood that thing is doing the computation it's still amazing to some blase library or something i mean it's openly calling machine code right but the program itself the thing that is doing the high that is not scripting but doing the high level hooking together of all of the pieces is written in julie i think is what they're trying to say but i guess my question is why isn't every language on that list because with any language that has a cpa was binding you could use you could run the code really fast because you wouldn't actually be running i dunno java code you'd be running c plus plus just called from jolla you know what i mean but that's not i mean you're it is the difference between libraries calling a library and your actual code so sure if you wrote one big library that was do really complex math for my problem in its totality and all i did is ready to a program that said call library do my gigantic program yes you could do that sure i guess maybe another way of saying it is wise in matlab on this list because it doesn't is nobody describes the computations in matlab for supercomputers that running or hasn't according to this thing oh i see because it's it's so big that it's related to strict that's does right so there's no single machine that has one point five it's a whole bunch of things right it's so matlab has no or at least not built in tcp if you wanted to do it in java you're going to have to like well again if you're not going to do it in an sort of hacky cheat way you would need java to handle all of the networking communication back and forth you would have to have doing the computations sure at the lowest level you say like transpose this matrix maybe it runs machine code that originally came from c plus plus but i mean so does everything else right right i guess but the reason why they're not all on this list is is because of the.

five days
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"You have a license there's a phone number or something maybe i'm not maybe i'm making i know making it up your wrong but i mean i guess to point out to we've talked about this in matlab episode but for a one to one replacement for amount knob style stuff i guess you'd probably consider octave so julia isn't going to be drop in one to one replacement but for the style of work that is often done in mail that would be where you consider julia yep exactly in terms of like you know one of the hesitations easing julia might be that it doesn't necessarily have so much support in terms of library like for example let's say you need to load outta know some geospatial data that's in some gi custom format or something like that or you call buffers or whatever right you might say all i'm taking a risk using language like julia because it's not going to support something i really need they do have julia pie library which lets you run python code inside of julia it is pretty good it actually they wrote a bunch of logic there to handle num pie arrays so if you create a numb pie array in pipe on part of some process part of this julia pie process and they bring that back to julia they'll actually just do a pointer pointer assignment they're not gonna actually copy archie i think they yeah if you if you create an empire rate using the pie data or the the julia pie data objects a little bit of soap you have to do that's a little special but basically it's very performance you can call into python if you need to and that shouldn't stop you from trying it out so one of the cool things that i've found about julia was that they're only four languages for high level languages that have ever been used to write computer programs executed at greater than one peta flop sort of compute compute power and so those are sie plus four tran and julia so those are pretty good accomplishment and you were talking about the you know support for distributed messaging and working and that kind of stuff and right i mean this is sort of evidence of that that that you know isn't every language that you would use in such an environment and one day i guess everybody will have a pedophile under their desk right but that days not today and it was interesting that i have thought the number of languages would have been higher but at least according to your pd this is yeah it's only four languages for high level languages that have ever been used to build programs that have run it that that processing so i have to i have to confess terrible which is like i don't actually no i don't have an intuition as to how flops relates to like make gigahertz can you put it if okay ready for this flops is floating point operations per second so a pet of flop is ten to fifteen floating point operations in one second so that is if you think about a million gigaflops gigaflop is tend to the nine million gigaflops yes so if you think of gigahertz computer doing that many instructions and if you could soon that you do like a flop in one hurts than this would be a million gigahertz i didn't follow them but i mean the the ideas that each so floating point operations can take longer and often do take longer than injure calculation so and your computers ale you right you might be able to say i want to increase this number by one in for an integer that's straightforward like there are literal like gates that just execute that not instantaneously but within one clock cycle and handle the results but to increase a floating point number by integer value of one you can't just sort of directly manipulate some bits like the amount of logic you need to do for the various parts of the floating point number mean that it takes a little longer often so depending on your architecture and the exact computers and this is why you have things like high performance computer clusters that often always often run different hardware or might run certain kinds of processors that are different is because of this ability to focus on floating point operations so if you're doing something like computational fluid dynamics where you're say modeling how airflows over an airplane wing and you're trying to.

million gigahertz one second one day
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Company it's eight hundred sixty dollars wow that's wild i don't yeah i mean there's probably more like i think many companies they have like sort of network licenses that get checked out and stuff so maybe shaper but i mean there's a lot of money yeah it's insane and the open source community has caught up feel as if might not be might not have a sustainable business i mean but mouth is really good to be fair like it's not like some stuff you know all this is some arcane package but if you really needed you'll pay the money i mean not love you know i don't know it's hard to say you get your money's worth when you compare money's worth of free this divide by zero thing right you get good support problems do and but mallet is is a really good piece of software and i think we should be willing to pay sometimes but if you're not gonna use it a lie it's hard to be like i'm going to pay this money and i'm not sure if i'm going to use it yeah exactly keep in mind like if you're if you're an enterprise customer you're invariably going to run into some problem and you're going to have millions of dollars on the line and you're going to just pay someone a lot of money to fix that problem and so even though people might say why is this free what's the catch we'll that's the catch the catch is you know that i'm sure this company is is charging for support and things like that with that said it's it's not a trap in the sense that the software is extremely professionally done very worth the for but it's it's a bit of a question mark like with matt lauer pay the hundred dollars but presumably you get some level of support for free deforms and you're the forums the matlab i no i'm assuming if.

matt lauer eight hundred sixty dollars hundred dollars
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Of length a million each and you want to add them together well if you write a for loop in matlab for one to a million see of isaiah via via vi that's going to get longtime i mean like maybe a minute right but if you do see goals plus b you know fisher's one line in the interpreter that line can be very complicated and time consuming and matt level do that just extremely fast like i don't know not even a millisecond like a fraction of second right and so the way that that these things work is under the hood for each instruction each instruction maps to a bunch of really complicated but extremely fast logic so there's blah's libraries we've talked about in the past of laws means basic linear algebra system so for example there's there's sort of an api that you can adhere to to be of laws library it says things like you know add two vectors at two matrices multiply matrices so and so forth implement all of these functions than you support blah's level one or whatever right and so you know the best these these blah's libraries tradeoffs too has all of them and it knows us the right way right time there's things like f f t w we shan't for fastest for you transform in the west which is just as says super fast for a transfer library things like open mp for multi processor support things like that and so you don't have to know how any of these things work or that even any of them are happening because it's all kind of behind the scenes but you know the price you pay there is that each instruction now requires a lot of thinking has really think about what to do and so things like four loops kinda kill your performance so the last go ahead so the when you said that you know the realm of scientific programming or whatever i mean this is one of those places where that there's actually still a lot of people using fortran using see eight sometimes i think like scientific program people using scifi numb pie but i mean there's still a lot of people using language as much older than that yeah i mean like i feel you you're more in that realm i guess than i am so i mean is like of the mindshare is julia competing against these old ones or competing against something like python i think julia's really competing with matt latin so work there there's some people using julia not really on my team but it's a huge company and there's a whole group of people on using julia and i noticed almost all of them are ex are ex matlab people so yeah i think so yeah to your point i mean when you say scientific program of course like you can do scientific programming in anything but but typically like scientific programming languages are ones that are more high level that that make it easy to experiment so that's why like most of these languages will have like an id belted so for example you'll not loud has as matlab like you start matlab and it pops up this whole developer environment where you can see the status of variables and look at plots and things like that while you're coding and so for for julia or known pie or any of these you've easing jupiter which jupiter's what is the rebranding of i on notebook and so one of the reasons that rebranding jupiter supports julia supports torch which is in lua and a bunch of other things supports what's it called spark you can do spark in jupiter now so what are the for juliette self though what are the features that that really questions like why does julia like really standout right so let's say you're matlab user or are easer what's really the the reason to switch right one of the biggest things about julia is an embraces the sort of a synchronous paradigm which we talked a lot about in back appetite forty one which is probably years ago but in the know jay us episode we talked earlier about this hoisting paradigm and ideal basic is pretty simple it's just you call a function but instead of doing what it's supposed to do it just goes off and starts working and it gives you a future so.

isaiah
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"And they'll give you a one month trial which is good for a free book it's pretty much any book in their whole catalogue which they have just like tons of stuff and so you could check out jason's economics is comic books i won't even bother looking and seeing that the black prism or look back to our show notes as many books recommended or whatever your favorite might be and enjoy that so that so that's like one do us a favor if you do want a book that we have on the show and you have let's say audible credits if you click on the link and then you you buy the book even using your audible credits that's still helps the show by the way so no that so yeah all our audible listeners can still sort of help the show and get the book they want so it's kind of free for you it's like no effort by clicking on our link and then choosing audible so i didn't know good cool cool you could also if you are already an audible customer or want to help up the show in other way you could subscribe patriotic just to give you an update on the patriots patrick has made all of the christmas prizes woefully late but i still have all the addresses also by the way if you we only have addresses for about half of the patriotic subscribers so if you don't have your address on patriotic at this point just emailed me so sending email just give me your name your address your social security nogueria credit just give me your name and your address and i will connect the dots and i will make sure that you get at christmas present but yeah i mean we actually have extras because so many people didn't don't have their address you should post something on yon feed to just as it did already yeah but if you if you did see that or maybe you don't want your address on patriotic solely fide he could just send me an email and we'll mitch find if you are like i don't want to give these guys my address and i don't want to prize that's fine too oh yeah of course you want to be anonymous mysterious if you don't want of looking at them right now a whole stack of they're pretty cool unexcited actually my my son loves it him one way i don't know that those are childproof last i think they have sharp corners now actually i think he broke one oh don't let him eat it i would feel terrible if your son no and he's five years always i could eat it tool of this show to the show is forceps to get things out of your out after the told his show is brutal brutal this is really really cool so here's how it works i you have to buy do step you either get one or two she sorry you have to buy two then you get this brutal doom so what this does it's kind of brutal built on top of layers layers so it's there's a lot going on here but i'll try break out civilised possible basically doom the source code for doom was released by its offer a longtime ago it'd maybe like fifteen years ago or something right and maybe not that long ago but a long time ago and someone just went through and took the parts of the source code that load all of the data in brought that over but then they rewrote the whole game engine and so you can use the mouse to look around it's just faster there's no limit to the number of enemies that could be on the screen at one time you know all these older tations are gone and it looks better exeter so it plays just like a water and if ps now right and so then there's this thing called brutal do which is where somebody has modified the engine to just make the game basically more intense and so the way it works is it it kind of sits on top of the existing game content and it kind of patches it and then also patches the.

fifteen years five years one month
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Sixty dot dot o four right and so eighteen thousand four zero version which means a lot of people who been waiting update update and you know you go from i g five to seven or something like as a huge update right out it came out today i have an updated yet either machines house rate thing but looking forward to it i think it's going to it looks a lot nicer lot of the graph goes use of been fixed i think they were using light dm they switched back to nome so it's going to look pretty different unless you what the upgrade path is but if the upgrade paths which is back to nome it's going to it's going pretty different via it's a pretty big announcement compared to getting getting run on there do you run into at home yes i have basically have to media centerpiece one per television and they both run onto my desktop dual boots but typically just stayed windows for that but i do have a bunch on the desktop what about you are you running down to run windows i'm a horrible person you're just getting windows i mean i my wife uses the computers and so it's good to have windows on this what she's used to and then i do it for some gaming and i yeah i think it's probably a lot further and last time i used it was way better than the time had used it before so i'm sure it works pretty well i just find myself not using desktops and laptops as often anymore so yeah yeah i just don't have them up very often and so they're just on windows because that's what they've always been so like do you have pc's hooked up to your television so i have like chrome cast hooked up to my tv oh god and i haven't seen ahead ahead i i like predate chrome cast so they just have computers reach tv belykh yeah when they break absolutely going to chrome cast but for now chrome cows like the fire tv's i think these ones were pretty well having a media does allow you to do some stuff i just found the hassle of dealing with it wasn't worth the few extra features i wasn't using very often and then i have a nass that has the ability to do stuff like have applied server on it and stuff but it runs a custom from what i think it's sinology or whatever run some version of lennox under the hood i don't know which one but i've i've not like jail broken it i'm sure i grow good just run whatever on it whatever it came because i just wanted to be stable and you know keep itself happy so boring set up i'm sorry crazy cool cool i had i mean we talked about this before the show but you know we talked about our networking setup if you shows ago and i had this totally jacked up neck year route or the tact and had all these extra services on basically died so so pretty much voided the warranty by diaz crazy stuff so i'm just running stock stuff as well time for book of the show joe my book gonna show is a kana economics booth and x so i think my last book of the show is basic economics by thomas soul i've actually still reading that it's a very long book it's like thirty chapters and it's also pretty dense so i have to kinda keep going back and re reading some church through that but there's a person on my team who is actual condiments and he recommended this book as as kind of book for getting in tech and this one is actually a comic book style so if you're like graphic novels and things like that you'll like this i haven't read it yet so so i can't vouch for directly but i've been so people know way more economics in the said this is the book to get people started get lay people started definitely be reading it once i finished the topsoil very nice yeah you've been really into 'economics recently yeah i think it's it's it's really you're got hold of me i think it's fascinating i'm not so interested in like the stock market or anything like that you know but yet the way the.

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"A whole binary and part of it is because you know working on like a rocket ship for something where you can't do that but yeah we've been really burned lately where for example we have this issue where this library was reading rows of data and if the data didn't fit the data had errors basically just skipped the row but it didn't anything and so we've found that only ten percent of our data is being read which of course it wasn't a random ten percent so totally skewed you know all of our results and just stuff like is the worst so yeah that's that's especially being this is cool especially bad you if you're doing something where you're building statistics or measuring something because you could easily be missing like you said ninety percent of your data and it wouldn't be immediately obvious you were yup yeah went on for a long time in my article is one to eighteen dot four is available so this is a big deal so to has what's called lts versions longterm support versions and these are basically versions that have been vetted very carefully and also if you're a paid you know you're a corporate sponsor of about two or if you pay to their customer support all of that they will support the has versions for years and years and years so if you're on you know seventeen dot ten after maybe twelve months they're like done like if you need help i mean i'm sure you could pay somebody to help you but but you know it's going to be much harder but if you're on sixteen for you can get help for a long time even years from now right and so they'll tius versions are pretty rare because the amount of you know customer support that goes with it also you allow to libraries so if you need proprietary libraries such as the khuda library from invidia nvidia is actually pretty good about having it for different versions but a lot of people just support version so if you have some custom driver you're stuck on.

nvidia ten percent ninety percent twelve months
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"The total value of the cards you had were always sellable for less than the packer price you would by infinitely many right you're expected value is high up so we know that's not true we know the expected value of an open packet of magic the gathering cards is different than the expected value before you open it right and it's going to be less on yes we're alderwood by infinitely many right you would always take that gamble okay yes it's interesting i mean that's that's the rules i mean we'll see i mean i'm sure the video game companies are lobbyists hard as they can and they probably have a case my thing is i think any type of any type of thing where you buy and there's no element of chance like this should probably be age restricted i've a feeling like if you're twelve you probably can't really you know grasped this like concept you know like you're probably waste a lot of money i i always a lot of money at the ara cades and not a lot of money but relative these people might be spending hundreds of dollars and see i feel like you probably should be a certain age or pared i will say for certain regardless of my feelings or the ethics morality of it is that it's going to huge impact on the profitability of games of this becomes widespread yeah that's true although to fair first of all you're totally right but but second like the i think the these kind of games rely on these people called wales who are just like a few people who spend incredible of money so they could get it age restricted i think they would still get ninety nine percent of their money probably knows yeah so that's that's a pretty controversial article off to see what happens i mean it's just one country in the us so it could be the whole you beds it could be that it gets overturned we'll find out next article is on the taxonomy of tech debt and this is was posted on the right games engineering blog famous for making league of legends right yeah and talks about actually some of the work behind league of legends and you know everybody talks about technical debt and i tend to go is one of those things it is unavoidable if you always work to have no technical debt then you're probably not going fast enough you're probably going into his love but this is an interesting approach with some real world examples and i won't go through all of it because you should just read article but he basically comes up with some measures that he thinks it's important to measure like impact the cost of fix and then when he calls contagion like the likeliness that the problem will spread throughout the whole system and sort of caused us russian and then also whether the sort of local to an area or global whether it's like somebody came in and did something crazy just sort of like what would you call those arch types arch types like prototype archetypes there you go thank you inflate my brain's not working well archetypes you know here's the kind of things that would cause various styles and he kinda writes about it so i encourage you to read it and i thought it was pretty well put and it's always struggled to talk about technical debt and instead of shipping a new feature taking time to fix something that is probably not broken but is either has a risk to make something broken or is causing problems slow down or hurting you know the joy of working in the code whatever it might be it's always difficult psychopath so having more thoughts on how to think about and describe that is always welcome yeah totally makes sense the worst kind of technical debt experiencing a lot of lately is where things just fail silently an it's one thing over the years of god more and more loud with failures like there's an input and it should be team one in ten and it comes in his eleven just crashed.

ninety nine percent
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Official rule imagine gathering i i'm not saying this is right but i'm saying this is what is apparently because you're getting something physical it's okay and so i think the idea there is you know let's say you buy a car and i by car and your car ends up being classic let's say like you buy the first model tesla and i buy honda civic and your tesla of being worth a lot of money just because it was the first one hundred civic doesn't right like it doesn't that's not gambling and so i think the claim is you're buying these magic gathering cards and you're you're paying really hard yeah even though you don't really know what you're getting they also don't know what you're getting they don't know in advance that something's going to be valuable he's another kind of do that seems that seems right it seems like convenient but because if you say that i mean in reality what's the difference between the digital games then because sure the company can artificially just make more or less matching the gathering could just make more or less of any card past present or future they could just reprint a car right and i think i don't think it's a sensible argument but that is the logic yeah so i do understand that it does seem an awful lot like gambling right like oh i put money in and sometimes i get big stuff out and sometimes i get something that's not worth the money i put him but not worth the money i put in applicable for lots of things like the if you bought magic the gathering cards and we're guaranteed to be able to sell every card if.

honda Official civic
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Of work i normally do but you know through this podcast through you know just reading about computer science stuff through having gone through school it was something that allowed to pull twelve the toolbox and allowed me to map problem i had onto to sort of well studied something and and a couple of google searches later you know led me to pseudo code that i wrote up in a couple of hours into a couple hundred lines of code and had my longtime to run actually run overnight but had running overnight and cranking away at trying to improve my answer very cool yeah the next step now it'd be detri to export your problem to tsp and see like some get hub project has i don't know like gallium process or something that's going to like really blowing yeah i saw there were some some like toolbox out there that are specifically for solving this but my data's i was actually bigger than most of them sort of had listed so i'm sure they might work but okay i wanted to find one that was like yeah i give it much data you want because i had kind of a long to find ones written in julia that's that's next next time i come back to spending some time on this problem very cool man so the first news and this is microsoft releases their training for artificial intelligence we've seen a lot of recent releases of videos and materials for training about machine learning and artificial intelligence these ones look pretty well produced been to be full disclosure haven't actually watched any of them yet but they seem well done and their free like free and microsoft stated that they did this because they feel there's a gap in being able to hire people for doing machine learning rolls on probably also as an advertisement although i don't know i think are in their cloud platform rolling out some stuff for supporting people doing machine learning tasks so i'm sure it's like a multi faceted reason that they're they're releasing this but if you're interested in you haven't found something that really clicked with you yet check it out and see if if you can learn machine learning if you can learn okay i haven't seen the videos either but subscribe to like a bunch of newsletters and this is very very popular and so usually things that are popular just tend to be good that's gotta how it works cream rises to the top or whatever so yeah i mean i i haven't seen the videos but they come highly recommended yeah my niece is pretty interesting there's a lot of these video games some of them cost money some of them are free but but they all have loot boxes and so people don't know loot box is this box or you open it up and he gets something random it's usually something that doesn't affect the gameplay it just caused medic so for example you could get a suit of arbor for character different suit of arm relatives of your character looking black they look purple you could get your new helmet or something but generally the these items they're just caused medic and that way you don't really have regret like if you open the loop box and it's a scarf and you wanted to hat you know it sucks but you know it's a bummer but it's it's like doesn't affect your game at all but the thing about it is you know people like anything you know the associates show value to it and so there's there's there's value to some of these items are very rare so i think on counterstrike there's a knife that's like a golden knife it's just extremely rare.

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Like c plus plus or see where you can have you know need to be careful about how you use your memory but the the classic computer science i wanna talk about is that there's a lot of work done in academia and understanding problems and and thinking about things things like n p complete peeve irs in what are the problems there what are all the kinds of things that you maybe read blurbs about in your textbook or come across and you kind of file them away in your head for later and what i ran across this week and instance of this and i was thinking about it that you know wow i had never really used the tending some talk about in a minute before but you know having come across them by keeping abreast of the like world of computer science even though in my day to day we always talk about this how that tech companies love giving interviews where the ask you about like absurd doubly linked list manipulation you're like yeah that never do that in my real real job in this weird math yet you think you need to learn and in reality you're never gonna use it and another moseley true but it does come up so i was working on a problem at work that was it was really quite difficult and we're having a discussion with my colleagues and what is that why colleagues in quotation i don't know just because like sounds like really sophisticated but sound cool my comrades yeah so my the people at work were discussing this problem and we had something that was really not doing well the code was really slow everybody's like hey we should do better so i came up with some way of kind of organizing stuff to be better and the question came up which was sort of like okay well how do we test this code and how do we know if can we do even better like how do we know if it's sort of doing what it's supposed to do which was helping us out with some stuff and i spent really kind of bothered me and i tried to convince him other people like i don't i don't really know what sort of the lower bound is on like how fastest code can run so i don't know whether or not to keep spending time on it and kind of bring this full circle when it up happening is one night or whatever it just sort of got in my head but have you a bee in your bonnet that's not the right thing and it was just like it just sort of like nagged at my head and i couldn't stop thinking about the whole drive home i normally listen to my audio book and actually just paused it and like drove in silence just like thinking in my love done that too you definitely had nights like okay so like really bothering me like just like distracted at dinner with my family the whole nine yards this happens to me every so often and finally this up this happens to be to not have to my wife will be she'll say something like are you either listening to me and i think to myself that's a really weird way to start a conversation.

nine yards
"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"julia i" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Programming grow campuses seventy seven julia takeaway patrick welcome everyone to episode seventy seven you know we have a lot of discussions with people emailing in who aren't an university anymore or are thinking about what the study and the question always comes up about the importance of of computer science in i don't maybe it's not a classical term but how i always thought about computer science now it'd be relative to just programming or software engineering which i don't keep up on the kind of subtleties of all the different words and i know we've probably talked about the differences back and forth several times on the show but what i mean here is the things you would find in a textbook like data structures and algorithms pick your favorite yeah i mean it's like you know computer science on sorta list tender for ways and you built a tree and etc etc and the thing is that even if you're going to you know go to some sort of boot camp if you're watching online courses learning how to code a website i mean these things are awesome and actually the mechanics of using an e telling you computer what to do how programs work all that is important in i'm also a huge of understanding actually architecture how computers work for me that's a big help in the work i do about getting programs to run into run quickly and debugging when there's problems especially in languages.

julia