17 Burst results for "Julia Greenspan"

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

06:14 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"We should not part of the problem and not even goes hostile people because we've all experienced it. There's sometimes hostile people at the front desk or whatever and again go back to that pressure. She like you have no idea what they dealt with that day. Okay how Kennedy part of your solution today because thinking about that in your head like what can I do to make this person's day that her and from there you know I I've never really had a bad experience after that once I get in with the staff and they know that I'm actually? There was her to make their day smoother And treat them well and set them up for success. Then you know it's usually actually a pretty fun at work so now turn turning to distributor relationships are. Are those a little bit different? How do you handle those Or direct for the most part So luckily I don't have to you know like I'm not part of a distributorship So Jean was my competition or military. That's a gift if the question is doesn't really apply. Then that's that's fine we can move ahead So what would be the one piece of advice? You'd give someone trying to break into the device sales industry and I think you you mentioned this a little bit earlier so I'm curious about the one piece that you would say. Focus know what you're going for and go after it You know don't take. Don't take the first job that has an opening just to get experience Sometimes you'll find yourself stuck with the wrong company for five years dot kind of attitude and that's really hard for people to hear because it's you know easy for you to say you know you've already found your job like I. I totally get it but like you're GonNa hate medical device if you don't focus on the passion that you have or that topic. That really really gets you excited. Just because he's settle for something different like. Oh well. I really wanted orthopedic trauma that I settled for. You know whatever. Obgyn ablation products or something and then all of a sudden five years later you're like Like medical device You know focus on what you want. You know like initially learn everything you about. Getting trauma talked orthopedic trauma wrapped. You know if you need to go to hospital hanging outside the waiting room you'll see rats all the time like talk to them. Hey question. This is awkward. I know I just met you but Connecticut question about your job You know like you can do that And I think to me. That's a little more effective to actually your your eventual happiness. Because you know you need to be happy. You're your worst day happy. You know just because you're new doesn't mean that you need to settle for something that you paid now. What does the future look like for device? Sales is a whole DC risk or do you see Opportunity Unity You know there's been. Some hospitals have attempted to go up with And I think it's been pretty quickly proven that we are absolutely critical to surgical sales. It's really important. We do Even if it's not always respected or not well understood. I think there's a lot of like education that needs to happen about what we actually do. and you know not all of us are making like you know seven figures Like that's not the case or all you know. We worked really hard and we. We had him court job I don't see medical device going down I just adapting and I think you're already seeing that you're seeing robotics you know happening in total joints and spine You know people are starting to adapt You know to the new billing practices where you know. It's definitely GonNa be easier fine and we're gonNA might be some you know things that might tweak a little bit in the future but I certainly don't see it going away You know I certainly wouldn't want it to. I think it's a really important important field. Expect change analyzed. The landscape take the opportunities. Stop being the Chesapeake. Become the player. It's your move Tony Robbins. All right. So we we've done all the heavy lifting now. It's time for the speed round. These do quick questions answers to wrap it up Do you consider success Related to lock or hard work. I'll say hard work. What career would you have chosen if not for device definitely orthopedic Trauma Surgeon? What is your favorite influence or book or Speaker for the industry? Oh there's this really great book about media it's not completely connected with great about trauma stewardship. it's actually about how to manage your Sort of emotions in stress while dealing with taking care of people in Trauma Yeah. Do you have a favorite medical facility that you've supported Highland Hospital in Oakland California hands down and finally what advice would give someone trying to get into the industry? Oh definitely work hard. Work Harder than anyone tells you. You have to read constantly and keep your Chin up all right. That'll that'll do it. Julia Greenspan's thank you for joining us today on the dock style. Podcast this is so much fun awesome. Thanks for listening to today's episode of the dock style reps podcast stay tuned for more episodes each month featuring how to get started in medical sales and tales from the. Or if you have questions or topics suggestions for the show please email INFO at dock style dot com. That's I N. F. O. T. O. C. S. D. A. L. DOT COM. Let us know what you think..

orthopedic Trauma Surgeon Kennedy Julia Greenspan Tony Robbins Jean Highland Hospital Connecticut Chesapeake N. F. O. T. O. C. S. D. A. Oakland California
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"Relationships are a little bit different right I'm a little more formal. I'm a little more You know a little more careful until I really know someone Christianity especially the female on orthopedics has to be you know a little more caution can be you know Maybe making some of the the the bluer jokes with people. I don't know very well And so it's just a more formal service you know based resource based relationship And was surgeon to have known for a long time. Then obviously it's more casual. We can relax. You can talk to each other. We can giggle which in make fun of each other And then get right down to visit for. Release you Of course you know. And if it's the case that you know I still have to. You know we pull that back during the case because you have to be focused on the case no matter what but you know I go on a medical mission with some of my third jains and you know yeah is going to be slightly different relationship you bonded. We've been adventure together and Scrubbed in together And so it's a little bit more casual theory of just knocking around the holidays together. versus the new surgeon. So let's say for for instance you are someone who is looking for a new company to work for you transition from from your old company striker How do you? How do you go about that? Do you mean the like. How do we get the interview order? I look for new company. Let's let's say how do you get the interview You Know Lincoln's awesome I would say that lengthen is Probably one of the greatest resources for the people Including Me. I've made a lot of really NEAT CONNECTION. You know through that pathway Someone who interests me face your profile that I like like you know maybe bully great manager. you know I might reach? I just usually reach out to the manager personally I tend to go through recruiters. It's it's fine if it's like you have to really go from the outside But I tend to look for the people that I would be working directly under Because that matters more to me than almost unlike entire company culture like no no no who am I directly going to be under and do I believe in them And then from then if they respond to you you almost like K. Why should I work for you? You tell me why you're awesome and why should come over I think it's okay to have that mindset because of the big the big choice to move companies. Why is linked in important? Lincoln allows you to access important articles in posts which are relevant to you through your daily feed. It helps you develop a strong digital footprint which is essentially your personal brand it helps you research companies and industries find and apply for jobs and build a strong professional network if you were searching her job in medical device sales it is paramount to be on linked in. I think that's that's great advice and something. A lot of people might not have thought about So in terms of relationships. How do you manage your relationships with hospitals? Ooh hospitals are totally different animal than you're starting relationships I do a ton of the EU which are like Continuing Education Unit events for my staff. I think that you know you get from your stock what you put in and you know. It's not something that's going to be you know for the the super sale people out there. It's not like you're gonNA see a media our life from like one educational event But you're not trying to get that that is your fostering you know you're fostering sense of goodwill your Imparting knowledge which is critical for some of these people Thirty technologist and their current textbook. They don't actually go in-depth at all into orthopedics and so when you have these newer surgical taxes some of these newer. Rn's circulating you know you have to realize like nobody actually sat them down and explain some of the basics of Ortho so one of my least favorite moment. Because if I hear a competitive rapper someone around the kind of all that surgical-type with terrible or like oh she didn't know what she's doing. It's like well wait a minute. Go be part of the solution. Grab A whiteboard. Grab a pen and talk to them like we know so much and can impart so much knowledge That it only takes care basically. It is hard work. It Elbow Grease To actually do a lab or to DO MORNING TRAUMA. Talk or things like that and for me. That's how I engage the best staff because I love teaching and I think that having also been a surgical tech and you know sort of been one of the staff I can speak to both sides of the table Which I think is sort of you know. I think it's pretty critical when you're talking to those to those newer tax Who might not know about things like.

Lincoln EU Rn
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

10:53 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"Oh how to be a good rep. That is like the holy grail question. Yeah I think it's a constellation of factors and ultimately is going to be different for some people than others You know everyone has different skill sets that they can capitalize on. I think Staying in your strengths and planning to your strength is a really big one As you kind of work on the things that you need to improve on maybe if you hate public speaking like work on that quietly you know like always be looking to improve yourself But if you're a great public speaker than recognize that and use that get out there and talk to people and you know. Give morning in services and give lecture play those strengths and hone those skills. I'm you should always be looking for improvement Be One hundred percents. Thinking about what? The other person is stressing on We did this workshop a long time ago. I one of my favorite things that I took away from. That workshop was people's pressure sheets like all in any conversation whether it's negotiation or whether it's just an interaction with staff or your surgeon or the guy stocks you know whatever be thinking of the other person's pressure sheet. Were they thinking about? What are they stressing about? Is it money family? Are They not aware of this case or are they not educated enough about it and how that could be impacting their reactions? And what you can do to neutralize it That's been really big for me. I think always thinking of the other person's position and that's kept it from being A reactionary position for me because I think a lot of reps especially when they're young if they're not treated well at a hospital. His owned time to retreat. It as you know the out fighter can take a personally and say man Lee was really mean to me at the front desk And it's like yeah that's kind of part of the but also keep in mind her pressure she don't take it personally. Maybe she's having a terrible day like it's not about you That will keep you steady and able to perform at your highest level and not kind of dive into the gossip and dive into the dark side Because it's not gonNA help you. It's it's just GonNa make your date worse Also keep you focused. On the case like I can't stress enough focus on the case like if you're a new rep and let's say you have a tubular plateau. The next day you know focus on the case today before. Do you have the equipment? Don't trust other people to take the equipment to the hospital if you do have them take pictures ultimately paranoid about everything. That's going into that case and triple check. Everything steadier technique guide that he the clinical side You know do whatever you can soak up every bit of information and then when you're in the case stop put your phone down and focus I can't tell you how many times even as a surgical tech that I had rats trying to learn on the fly and it's hard and trauma because we don't always know about our cases but oftentimes you have enough time to pick someone's brain that you know who's been around longer than you or be able to look up something in a journal look at a text book To get more information but once you're in the room you have to be. You have to be in that room. It people see you on your phone. Even if we're doing business like maybe a traumatised came into another hospital and your team working to communicate. That's a really tough situation. You know maybe you can shoot off a quick text but you have to put it down and that's always a really hard moment for a wrap because everyone thinks you're on facebook or something it's like no no no. I cover other hospitals and something really important happened But you know you have to see how that looks from the outside so be focused and then follow up you know. I think it's always okay to talk to the surgeon later and say hey you know how their house Monday? Sh okay. How's she doing And Kerr show that you care about your patients because ultimately like you're responsible for their hardware and that is no small matter and I think treating it with respect acting interested learning constantly. Learning is the only way to stay really happy in the job And you need that to be functional because if you don't love it you're you're gonNA WANNA leave it. It's too hard of a job not to love it. One Who gained strength by overcoming obstacles possesses the only strength which can overcome adversity right. Now when you are when you're working you prefer service or product when you're selling service. Okay now service. I think that in Orthopedic Trauma and a lot of companies now he'll products are becoming slightly more commodities. And you know I know that luckily I have. You know the fortune of of being the business a little bit longer I would always I would always like the prize. My service above everything else You know you're not going to necessarily use my this will play. You mean maybe it has something extra special that you know pick company Agriculture Company. Why But at the end of the day you can have the best hard rock planet and if the service is awful it doesn't matter you're GonNa get screw wrecks that aren't full. Maybe the plate that you used on Monday has not been restocked because the service is bad. And you don't have a Wednesday so it's kind of crazy. It's like the best service can still sell slightly. You know whatever less awesome eastern equipment but you can never have a strong commitment with horrible survey I would rather have my service absolutely down to a t and be honest about new products. And I'm very lucky. I have a great bag. I don't have anything to complain about But there's doubt who's like man I just don't know how I feel about. You know this product that we carry. We'll be honest about that if you're if you're wondering you're wondering and have an honest conversation and don't be afraid of that. I think that's what's so funny from times. People are afraid of like Oh. He can't know that I secretly heat. You know whatever your anger. It's like he totally wants to have that conversation like this habit. You know you'll learn something from it if anything. No you been good server. You might have the best quality product but that only gets you into the game even if you have a great product. It's impossible to win without great service and you probably covered a little bit of this in the key to being good rap but What do you think is the key to a long career and device sales? Oh it's getting harder and harder these days that it's so demanding but I really think you'd have to love you have to love your specialty There's people who say I want to get into medical device right and we'll medical devices as all encompassing Every specialty you imagine from Obgyn products to you know narrow You know biologic everything. So you really have to find your specialty I've had some people trying to break into the business. Who will contact me and say look. I'm trying to break into medical device. It's like you're thinking about this the wrong way to break into what specialty like. What piques your interest because I know for a fact that if I went to go I don't try to sell Davinci robot or something for me. Look for some people that is like the pinnacle under super excited and I think that the main thing for me is just not. It's just never really been my bag when I was scrubbing or even offered a position being offered an interview opportunity forgiven she. I'll just let robot cow you know But I know that about myself because I know that I wouldn't be passionate about it as I am about competing trauma key finding a niche finding people finding the topics that are gonNa make you stay late finding topics that are gonNA have like searching for white paper on Ovid That that is the key to the long career and golden your team. You have to love your team. You can weather a lot of storms if you have good people around you And that for me was absolutely critical. Got Very lucky. In every situation I had to have amazing people around me now. A lot of a lot of being in device sales is about relationships and building relationships. How do you engage with the new doctor? That's a good question Actually one that I get a fair amount from some sort of newer wraps tour like Nan and trying to get and find this guy And you know when I do what do I say and I think for me Honesty honesty is the route. And that's with any relationship personal or business You know you're not going to go up to someone on the street and try to like you know swindling and the hanging out with you know an ideal and like what are you interested in like you know what topics you know. Did you study like you? WanNa actually truly curious and interested in the personal view and that doesn't change when it comes to sales it's the same thing And I think being a hundred percent honest about your experience you know i. It's critical one of the ways that I think. Oh successful in forming relationships with recognizing particular surgeons who likes to teach and recognizing they were kindred spirit and okay I can ask him questions and just say I am so curious because I read this White Paper Day I want to get your take on it. and having meaningful conversation so it's not an excuse to get products in front of them. It's not an excuse to have a conversation. Actually curious and I am truly looking to them as a resource and then they would start to a community resource and it warms this symbiotic relationship between the two of you. Were you are truly helping each other in your careers and that is sort of like my idea of how to form a good relationship. Because I don't want IT TO BE PRODUCT BASE. I want that relationship to extend beyond product Because if you do the right thing the money will follow. That's what J wizner always told me And he's he's like just do thing. Don't worry about. Don't worry about a quarter right now. You're just starting out like you know we all think about it and it's always there but your surgeon should never see that stress on your face ever. That shouldn't ever enter your relationship with surgeon. In medical device sales it takes months maybe years to work with the customer and truly seconds to lose one now from a new relationship to existing relationships. How how do you maintain those.

Orthopedic Trauma facebook Lee Kerr Agriculture Company Davinci Nan
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

09:52 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"Yeah I think that you know. Management can sort of recommend whoever they think might be appropriate for a position but at the end of the day when it comes to entry level. Like if this if this is sort of new listening and her a female and they're like how do I? How do I break into that? Or who facilitate that I have to everything I have to my to my old senior Jake Wizner You Know He. He was the one who green lighted Rian said. Hey you know she seems quick. Seems like you've got something He was the one who believed in me. And I think it really takes that person. Just say hey you know. They have something special in there You know and some companies have personality tests and strength finders that they use to try to like hone in on those personality qualities that might be successful. There's different ways to go about it But for me at the end of the day I think you have to have a personal champion? You know you have to have someone who's willing to mentor you and train you But I mean most companies. Now I think they really try to look for ways to routine male grabs It's just a difficult task and trauma. Sure now in terms of medical facilities have they helped facility the rule for you or not at all not really I in some ways but I think at the end of the day our not. They're concerned they then only care If it's a female or a male they just want they want the set sterile they want everything complete like you know they care about the logistics like is my patient taking care of is Is My staff treated with respect? I will say that some of my surgeons actually wound up the some of my biggest champions during pregnancy. You know I was fine. I was happy to go. Sixteen hours could be like Jubilo. Sit Down Fine what are you doing? Everything's okay And they wound up really through taking care of me And in that way I felt very protected and cared for by my surgeons. Kind of actually carrying weather may feature. It's always nice. Most people don't care But as far as like stop themselves I kind of like to gender out of it I don't want them thinking about me as a female or a male up. I want them to be like. Oh man our strike rep is awesome like long they see my jersey. You know I don't really want them. Being concerned about the politics are bad. Okay now talking about your current role. What is it like working for? Striker striker. Straighter is unexpected. I think coming in as a seasoned sort of You know traditional Cynthia Rep. I was incredibly. You know I drink the KOOL aid. I didn't like straker. At first I had spent a decade sort of working against them and I I had an interview and I met this incredible. Gm Who just totally time at around for me. It's like everybody. I met surprise me because they were exactly my type of person who was so funny. Every time I ran into somebody at you know through the striker give cross us. I was just constantly like turn it. I do WANNA light. He that much and I quickly found out. Okay this might be actually a really good move for me this after the JJ acquisition fees. And I think that you know it had It wasn't really where I wanted to be anymore and I think I definitely found a home and I think it goes to show that I did because I was shocked they you. They've really listened to me and they've really they've really made me feel supported and You know allowed me to start working until leadership which you know. I was not expecting. What does a striker trauma? Sales Rep look like hard working winners. You love driving in the Fast Lane and live out your mission to change lives by selling striker products. That are making healthcare. Better mission driven sales people. You live your work feeding off. The extreme demands of trauma not counting hours but rather lives impacted energetic achievers upbeat associates who love being busy and never hesitate to help a customer or team member when needed so. That's the good. What what if any are the bad aspects about the company that you with now or things that might need to be. I think that every company has things to work on You know I think for me. H is a a process of the medical industry. As a whole I think every single company working on leaning out their business and reps don't like that all the time but that's every company I've never I've never really seen it as a company specific issue. I think that the more that you know reimbursements go down for hospitals and we start to see you know a tougher and tougher contract negotiations but all trickle down so I don't think there's any specific negative I'm actually at the Home Office this week and So you're getting me on a very like sunny positive day because I went into her medical library which we actually have a physical medical library which I don't think anybody has one anymore and I saw like you know journals journal Joint Surgery from Nineteen fifty-nine sitting on the show. I'm in heaven so I you know right now. I don't know I don't think we face anymore. Negative but another company dog. Good right now getting the on the day where. I got to see that. So that's andy that's fantastic so this is a special day But let's talk about what a day to day. is like in your current role. Yeah so my current role is interesting. So you know I just transitioned into it You know specifically from the trauma outside so so as a trauma rapids a little bit different right. Because that's just your phone is constantly on twenty four seven running and gunning Even your text alerts or honor ringtone. You know 'cause everybody texts now including surgeons who were letting you know about urgent emergent cases and so that's you know you're always on call And I'm still on called because I'm still kind of connected to my old territory but it is nicer now. That actually have a team in place so if something comes up. I'm allowed to if I'M DEALING WITH AN EDUCATION ISSUE. I can now sort of paying my team. And they will take care of the emerging case. So that's kind of a sort of new for me Sort of being in a more of a position a level being able to delegate But there's also a function of having you know people who are competent So I love my team do anything But usually up early I am talking to the East Coast a lot. And they're three hours ahead so usually up by six. At least usually already you know going And then dealing with you know a lot of logistics for education on one side and then case logistics on the other so it's kind of a bizarre hybrid role but But I love it so trauma is you have. No you have no outlined. You have no day to day. It is you wake up. You see what happens? You might have kind of skeleton sort of backbone idea what your day looks like Whether it's responding to case coverage case logistics needs to be handled or you know calls that I have as far as education goes or meetings and then whatever happens. Change could change the entire day so you have to stay really flexible now. What is the most challenging part of the current role? You have I think for me it. Is You know kind of getting people to drink the KOOL aid about. Just how important. Medical Education is I'm technically you know handling some of the educational duties for ten states. And that's that's a big patch of dirt covering And I'm a true believer and Just how impactful. We are as an industry to connect people so connecting Resonance to attending outside of their residency. I think is really important getting them. Different ideas getting them to the right meeting. health and get different skill down to that might not be able to get their residency program And that's just for me like my ultimate mission is to get education in every spot that I can cover what's hard. I'll be absolute ten states absolutely So that being said what's next for you. Oh man just started in this new role. So that is that is going to public. Need busy for the next couple of years. At least I tend to like to hunker down and you know especially when I have a big project. I really want to work on it as much as Canon perfect. It usually takes me at least a few years to do that though. I see myself in this role for early next couple of years You know and I'm happy to do that. Ultimately like if going into leadership with something that you know they were looking at for me. Then I'd have to really think about that. I love staying connected to the field But I worry about that when it comes for now I'll just you know. Try to stay above water talent. So let's turn our focus a little bit for for a moment. What do you think is the key to being a good rep?.

Jake Wizner Rian Medical Education Jubilo Gm Home Office JJ KOOL Canon East Coast andy Joint Surgery
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

09:23 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"The associate sales representative a SR actively assists more senior sales representatives and their day to day activities servicing surgeons and surgical facilities the SR covers cases daily deliveries returns inventory to and from surgical facilities and conduct sales activities at the direction of the more senior representatives. In the territory many device reps start as associates and it can be helpful to almost think of it as an apprenticeship usually an individual stays in this role for a minimum of one to two years. Now how did those experiences shape your view on device sales I say it's a mixed bag especially coming from someone in the operating room on the other side of the table right so I think I got very I got very frustrated when orthopedic trauma CEOS was mixed in with other divisions like Pharma gets wildly different. We have a totally different call scheduled at twenty four seven incredibly demanding I didn't do as many like Dora. Cold CEO calls as some other divisions either And I think for me. I felt like I felt very proud of being trauma. That was a badge that we were As a resource not just a rep and so you know for me. I think that that was probably one of the deciding factors to stay in trauma because it had a really clear ethical path for myself I never been like a car salesman tape like. He's my stove like I can't do that. I would see that sometimes and Kinda cringe And it's not to say that it's not a method you know it's definitely some people style and they have personality and like it actually works they get in front of people and they wind up being great But for me I really had to come from the education Standpoint of teach me everything. I WanNa know everything. Help me like help. You get there because I was managing residents So I needed to help them on their path as well and for me you know. I didn't notice it when I was a surgical tech I was I was just scrubbing in. The wreck was telling me what to do. I ain't no concept of the depth of knowledge And I gained a lot of respect for medical device after I became a rap. Because there's so much that we have to deal with and so much that we know that that has to be behind the scenes in order for it to function And so you never really. You don't know what you don't know And so I have high respect for medical device particularly traumas buying. Cmf Like in sports. It's a tough GIG now. Historically speaking medical device sales tend to be male dominated? Now do you see that? Changing at all Her tough question. I I would like to say yes. I think. There's more awareness I can say that for. Sure there is definitely more awareness with the need for diversity. Medical Device Particularly Female I don't necessarily see it changing as quickly as I'd like to. But that's not necessarily a function of the companies. I don't think I think some of that is a function of the job itself. But you're asking someone who does trauma and anyone who's in China will tell you. It's probably the most unforgiving schedule so if you're a woman. I had a pregnancy while at disease trauma and that is pretty. It's almost unheard of to have a pregnant female trauma and someone who actually come back to the job. very very very rare. I remember emailing the country trying to find all the female trauma up. I think I found thirteen Just to get their experiences of a pregnancy Only two of them had had a pregnancy and only one of them has stayed in trauma. So that's pretty bad if that's the entire country. I'm pleased that they're another woman. I can talk to you about this So you know because of that demanding schedule. I think that sometimes there is a you know. Either it's a lack of interest or a lack of sort of the social support to be able to have this job like I have to have a stay at home husband in order to have this job And that's pretty rare these days and so until I think that you know a woman gets supported aspects to be able to have that pager on You know the retention is not going to be high but that's not necessarily the fault of the company that's a function of the job. Did you know that striker created the striker women's network the S. W. N. is committed to encouraging a more inclusive work environment and providing a forum that offers women new opportunities to grow as professionals leaders and individuals S. W. N. Initiatives include a sale subcommittee. That is dedicated to attracting developing and retaining women in the salesforce and a mentor ship subcommittee which is focused on enriching mentorship programs across striker. Currently there are over fifteen hundred plus members across the globe. Way To go striker right now. I'm sort of expanding on that. Because you are one of the few women who've had that experience do you feel a sense of responsibility to be a leader for women coming along behind you in that aspect? Oh a hundred and ten percent Yes yes I actually often get get paying Especially from colleagues who may have a female rap in their branch you know. Sometimes as far forward as New York Gotten contacted from other countries of FEMALE TRAUMA REPS. Who were looking for some support I mean you know. And that's that's pretty impressive if I think that we're having to reach that far to get Not just a device but seasons advice and that. I think the difference is they're looking for someone who's been doing this long enough to actually offer a seasoned outlet gone. Hey He's interested you know. Here's my advice or here's how. I feel about that And you know Stryker completely lost their mind and they decided. I should be a part of the striker women's network which is really cool. I didn't really know that we had something like that until recently And so they decided I'd be the West area Sort of lead for that for that initiative which I think is great But it's also again you know. How do we make trauma? More accessible to females You know and that's going to be something that we look at over the next. You know five years. I'm sure now. What is it like being a female in an industry? That's historically had a lot more male reps than If different and I felt and coach the mail manager about. Hey you know you might. You might have to coach your your female associates and your female rep a little bit differently In that I think we have to come from a different place. Where some male reps you know. They may be able to get away with a little bit more socializing or kind of buddy buddy You know sort of persona with their surgeons when they first start I think for me and for from most females we feel can not be successful. You really have to lead with her knowledge And it's not necessarily fair but I think it's a reality that we get judged Everybody gets touched when they first met. And we're not special but I think that females in particular you know sometimes from hospital staff sometimes surgeons themselves It just becomes a slightly more lenient. We're a little bit more under a microscope with do you know your product knowledge. Are you going to be responsive Because that's kind of you know we have to leave with that. We I think when you lead with Any kind of third of social You know charisma you have to be careful there to make sure it's not taking an advance or you know you don't WanNa be the DC girl I remember when I vary. I got hired one of my surgeons at my old hospital said Jules don't be the hot rap Peter Smart rat and it was a really weird thing to say to me. At the time I was very taken aback but as soon as I got into the industry I was like all man. That's what he meant And I think it's really critical. You know you have to get yourself in situations where they can see how much knowledge you have and left that lead. So they trust you now. How companies helped facilitate The role that you have or have they You mean a female trauma general. Yes as as clean. I think that basically what your experiences..

sales representative salesman CEO Peter Smart China Jules Stryker New York W. N. S. W. N. Initiatives
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

10:30 min | 11 months ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"Welcome to the dock style reps podcast where we talked with medical device sales reps about how they got started how to support docs and tales from the or. If you're interested in asking a question on the show please email info at dock. Style DOT COM. Welcome to the dock style podcast. I'm your host nate. Darling we're here. Today with Julia Greenspan a super experienced device. Professional would stryker now. Julia serves as the West area. Education Specialist Teeny as senior Orthopedic Trauma Consultant Julia. It is great to have you on the show. We're excited to learn about what is life in the real world. Oh are from the perspective of a female in the device industry are thank you for having me awesome. So let's let's start at the beginning. Why did you get into medical? I was super lucky home. I was you know right place right time. Right attitude As kind of my favorite way to put it so I started in high school Sort OF IN A. There's a program that we had for students who wanted Um and there was an rn. Running the program. I was super lucky to have that in Oakland California and I quickly learned that most kids were using it to ditch school but I was one of the year I was one of the few very interested I wanted to go to medical school. And I didn't WANNA I was Gonna be on my art and so I didn't want to go through all the time and energy and expense if I couldn't handle it and so I looked into the program and it turned out. I was the only one who actually cared about where we've played And so the operating room was actually an option so I started in sterile processing at fifteen And I was very very lucky. I had some people there who are really rooting for me. And so instead of staying the two hours that I was required I wound up quickly seeing that like if I just didn't extra four or whatever I became quickly one of the staff there and then I got hired on While I went to college I stayed. There is a surgical technology and then I just graduated. Uc Davis and I got approach places. These trauma just finished Tibia Nail and the record asking me. Hey degree and I said yeah I just got it You know Kinda starting school and he said well if you ever want to think about a medical device And I still remember looking at him. Brian Murray Amazing Guy. And saying I don't know what you do your magical creature. Who Comes in here children? What to do? And you leave but beyond that I have no clue and so he kinda giggled. Whatever give it a shot and so I kinda went down the rabbit hole and I wound up getting a position with some trauma in Oakland under like the godfather of something's trauma and the bay area so I got really lucky. His name is Jay Wizner. He's a legend eleven. I mean he's like my second God And so I worked you know for since these for almost a decade and then went back to surgical technology for a couple of years and then the Lakers so pretty crazy like right place right time sort of situation for me. Surgical technicians assist surgeons and other medical professionals in hospital operating rooms and similar environments chiefly. They prepare patients rooms and equipment for pending surgical procedures. They also assist during those procedures. As part of a team of operating room professionals. Many successful medical device reps started out as surgical technologists absolutely so in terms. So that. That's how you did it. But what was what was the motivating factor behind it to begin with. Why did you want to get into medical? You'd mentioned going to medical school may be what was what was the drive behind all of that at that time you know. I had friends that were also applying for medical school or looking into it and the expenses pretty intense so I even have a friend. Now you know she's out finisher obgyn residency and she's got four hundred and fifty thousand dollars in debt. And so I was looking at medical device and after that interview with these and met J. I was like wait a minute. Let me get this straight so I can continually learn for the rest of my career. I just I get paid to go to industry meetings. I get paid to see lectures. I will get to specialize in a field and then I'm like I don't have to pay for it was it was pretty gobsmacked when I realized I don't know the opportunity that was in front of me and so I figured if I don't like it I can always go back to school and if I do like it then I made probably one of the best financial decisions while still getting the satisfaction of getting specialized in a really interesting field has Ortho was always made. I love And specifically Ortho trauma so it was a pretty perfect fit I couldn't pass it up and it's proved very like correct for my personality. I really the the constant learning part of it has has not failed me now. You mentioned you. You got your first opportunity out of school in Oakland. What was that initial experience like for you? Yeah I think I was very fortunate that since I grew up in the. Or 'cause I mean by the time Got Barrett Twenty Four. I'd already been in the operating room for seven years. I I knew the the culture and I think when new reps come and it can be really difficult because they don't understand the culture of the lar. And so for me. That was not so much of a leak. Tell you the hardest thing was not scrubbing in Anyone who has been part of the team or has ever been a surgical technologist And all of a sudden being told don't touch anything blue and did you sign in Is Incredibly hard. 'cause he realized okay. That's now outside my scope of practice and that adjustment for me was difficult and it's still difficult You know I still miss it so I go and medical mission so that Hart an Orthopedic Trauma. Sales representative is primarily responsible for providing technical advice to customers to help achieve the sales directives in assigned geography as a trauma sales representative. You work with a high degree of intensity and commitment to sell orthopedic trauma products that meet the need of the Orthopedic Trauma Surgeon in that. First Opportunity. What did you learn man so so so much I think Even searchable text. But I thought you now nurses that I talked to you now. I think that they don't quite realize just how much goes into making a case. Go well You know you have to be incredibly detail oriented to be successful and you have to truly care about your patient your surgeon and your staff and how the case goes and in order to make that happen sometime. Great efforts taken so for instance if a surgeon called me When I was a Cynthia's and they'd say hey evil rink late well at the time. That was a very. You know. Sort of niche. That wasn't really common in our area. I would just say sure. I'll have there tomorrow and what that meant was I was saying. Sure dropping the phone texting a million people trying to find the plate driving to Sacramento. Which ones you know a two hour schlep getting the plate driving to the hospital minutes? This whole back end process that I can either tell the surgeon. Yes I'm going to have it Or No I can't get it but if I can. I'm not gonNA worry with logistics. It's my job to worry about the logistics and worn the hospital of my ETA. And all of that and back another through to go check. I didn't know I go to my case cartons. See that the loners were there or not there right right not you know. How do they get here? Is The trayful all these other questions? you know. All of a sudden were my responsibility. And so that's certainly huge huge learning experience for me. Now how did the experiences not first job help you get to the next step? Well I mean even the heyday Was you know a renowned way to learn how to do trauma The associate ships were two years. I was under an incredibly senior person. So I don't really fortunate in my position In that I had a really traditional very thorough so there was no hazing there was no like I mean I was in the. Or twenty four seven of course but You know sometimes. There are horror stories of associates that some companies are in some situations but wash my car I never had that. I had a very respectful senior. Who truly cared about me. Educational experience and growing Sort of my respect and my career so I got lucky there But I think that ultimately was really proving to myself that I had it in me to do And that may senior gave me the freedom to learn that about myself because I think when you get in a young associate sometimes you wonder. Gee I do this. This is a pretty adult job. This is a lot And Can I learn everything that I need to learn to do? Everything didn't need to do can I? You know Sort of foster might independence while keeping my patients safe. You know there's a lot that goes into those first couple years But if you're set up correctly I think that that really Enrich of your career. In a way that few other situations can so. That first job was paramount. But it's also 'cause I stuck it out. I think you to have that first experience. You need to be at your first company. A for as long as it's the right situation at least five years and I think that that is what made me a great rap. Was I have the time to get comfortable to fully sees end And that for me was really you know got with probably the best move I ever made was to really commit For almost a decade. And.

Oakland Orthopedic Trauma Consultant Julia Greenspan Orthopedic Trauma Surgeon nate Darling Lakers California Um Uc Davis Jay Wizner Ortho Brian Murray Sales representative J. I Hart sales representative Cynthia Sacramento
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Do the chemical ones you tick checks treat your yard put your caller in your dog where lights light clothings you can see them i'm on you at you know those types of all those things make a huge difference just having the awareness you know and and so but but not so much that you're outside without having having any protection at all you know interesting oh well just you know whatever limes on issue it's fine i can do you know how my hunters are my biggest patient population that don't wear anything 'cause they don't want to scare game away have sent on their body that's going to be triggered so they sit out there under a tree in a practically so they're my frequent flyers but we also you no we cannot isolate ourselves you know like you said nature's a healing place in one of my patients refers to it as dirt church you know that and being able to go outside and be the peace in nature that into actually kinda heal your relationship with that she's she's not against you you know this wasn't a personal attack that what happened is that you got sick and it was dealt with right away or looked at more thoroughly treated properly and so then that's when advocacy and things need to change more in regards to the the social structure and like the the larger governmental bodies with that and again that's a very big issue i know i i know we can't go down that road but but it just just saying that's right and there's a lot of things you could nitpick about what what needs to change in order for that to happen ended up probably going to be for a little while so i'm anytime you yumi other doctors you know that do recognize this as an issue which is is gonna keep showing up for work every day and doing what we do and and then help people through it the best way right it's it's spreading the word and i always always write to somebody who says something about oh i didn't know you know you had a podcast this is great i'm gonna tell my friend who has lime disease and i'm like you're being being part of the solution instead of being part of the problem you are now part of the solution because it takes a village and i know i'm coining a phrase as from ms clinton but it does it's not a one person job and your information asian today was fabulous but you know i wanted to say for all you who are watching do want to commend my my pupil who sponsor this podcast and i wanna talk about master supplements i wanna talk about half kington pharmacy i wanna send a shout out to bio sidon all of these people make it make it the ability for me to put this stuff out out there and i i do want to thank them and i also wanna thank pursue wellness that's kind of thinking myself but pursue dot US if you want more information about that please see my website we do help people who are kind of in that chronic tick nest and we're trying to help them improve their health with nutrition and you know good guidance but julia where where do people find you you what would you have a website where you know give us some information so people know where you are yeah the website is greenhouse medicine dot com and i'm practicing here an ambitious new hampshire new hampshire and he'd answer it's it's that whole were socked in you know this whole eastern eastern upper eastern area is is terrible as really it's unfortunate but i'm thrilled with all of the information you gave us today today because it's really it's really important for people to hear those positive stories that you just talked about i mean we can't always have everybody you know with smiles and sunshine and rainbows and unicorns because my granddaughter loves uniforms but but certainly hearing more about the positive is is really important and i wish you well and i wanna thank you for being part of this podcast and i usually ask silly question but a couple of times i ask what's on your bucket list let us know what what is it on your bucket list share with us well let's see egypt so going to egypt in october and i'm excited about that how i i love to travel so i like to go to different places on the planet so that that would fill up my my bucket list okay yeah places peru to yeah yeah i'm not much of an adventurous like i jumped out of a plane before i've done that i did that before kids so that that's crossed off and so i wrote a book that's crossed off so yeah yeah i wanna go see stuff okay okay how do the kids now my kids are nine and eleven okay okay yeah they can you take care of themselves almost i'll take him willie you can take them all with you to egypt oh no that one that one i'm doing my my buddy's going with me on that one but the but yeah so but other places i wanna go as they get a little bit older guests yeah yeah it's fun it's kids are.

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

10:07 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Stay above everything and kids with some of these you know i mean we have we have brain fog you know i mean in general but i can't imagine what these little kids because dr brad's failed once told me me as because they're so loaded the ground wherever they get bit it's it's more likely to manifest itself in in the head a lotta kids do get bites in the in the hairline so the yeah they with kiddos it's difficult because right now as we know they there's so many diagnoses of different behavioral issues in the classrooms eighty one of them is a lot of times it they don't lime gets missed because again child is is just gonna be acting out based on how they feel and not necessarily being able to verbalize it and then all of a sudden grades will change or plummets you they'll be less focused in class and then they in it gets even more difficult if a teacher is just they're overwhelmed we all know teachers are overburdened and overwhelmed the classrooms are or billowing over with with children so they're doing the best they can but let's say shame student for you know thinking that they're not paying attention they don't care and they making me get punished for that than that just changes i'd say the hardest thing is when a kid has been dealing with it for a long time in their confidence is they just think they're stupid you know they think that they're failures failures and in in even moving into junior high and high school it's really hard to help them get that confidence back because they even if they start to feel better socially they've been a little bit there got some PTSD you know from putting themselves out there and facing ridicule and also trying to get more socialized let's say they have to miss school and parents that whole you know issue of parents missing on a work because of having a sick child at home so financially that's a burden on the family anna stressor watching your child suffer and then the time period i do have students that are out for an entire year or more and now amazingly i've been been a practice long enough to see these kids you know starting at ten even younger than that and you know now these kids are twenty then twenty one and their graduate you know they're getting close to graduating college and watching when you'd see them as a kid thinking oh my gosh how you know when i was first starting out how is this kid to make it they're already so the mentally emotionally physically neurologically having a terrible time especially make with bartonella with ticks and all sorts of psychiatric issues going on and you just i just wonder are they going to be able to function and it's amazing once they start feeling better at these kids almost all of them just shot out like a cannon over and pushed their way through school and are just doing amazing once they got that opportunity so there are there are so so many of those success stories where you would look at somebody being in a situation where there might be maybe getting eating labeled as ADHD autism spectrum issues antisocial saikia psychotic and then you start to treat retrieve them and then all of a sudden they blossom you know they're able to just be themselves and being their bodies and that's that's pretty amazing i like that because that's is a wonderful fall outcome story we hear so many things about you know this has gone on for years and jimmy or joey just there you know the parents are worn out out at all that it's very hard so hearing these really good stories is got to be very reassuring for people who are listening you know i don't know we we have these two new kittens i was talking to you before anyways and dan so right now i'm at in cape cod and it's it's endemic it's i mean where isn't it a problem really but anyways i treat my dog were were careful we do tick checks and one of the kittens was doing something on the floor it was a tech how it got in here and it and now we've become especially people who have been sick with lime disease and you know are up to our eyeballs and about lyme disease were i don't know about you but i get a little like is there just one or were you know so we take the dog and we search all over her and we're feeling the kittens and they don't go outside so now we're looking at us and it it's it's a thing it it really is and people have to just kind of be aware you know i not only these kids with everything that they can't play outside as well as they could have when i was growing up we spent hours days in the woods making forts and things like that i would be afraid to send somebody to play and do something that would be really fun because well we now know that it's a big problem and you know people like to camp people the outdoors is such a healing space yeah do you what do you tell people i'm sure you don't say stay home you know cover up don't know so the core the the core issue is that is that a cute i always say that cute lime is on the dick so when it bites us and we get infected needed to feed that's just their natural you know they're they're predilection there that's what they need to do predisposition and they do what they need to do they feed they they move on they leave there's nothing personal they're not trying to cause harm right now if you find a tick on on your person you pull it out you to send it out and test it and there are places a tick report dot com through umass amherst is probably the closest you know in the new england area here you're going to get the quickest outcome and i just find them to be very reliable liable and but that that being said chronic lyme is more of a manmade issue so you know when we don't start to really make this inclusive inclusive in the differential diagnosis we don't listen to patients that are coming in with you know symptoms that don't seem to make any sense and then we labeled psychosomatic you you know and and and we look at everything else but lime then we ended up missing something that is just so in plain sight and such you know it is so in plain view here here it is a problem that we're missing that and i you know i mean i say we but you know as a as a larger medical establishment that's what's going on right now and there are a lot the different motivations for that but that's that's another podcast so the but the main thing is that if somebody in a household a few different things so you you can have outfits that you treat for your kids with breath and you can send it out to companies that will like treat like if you took five or six year kids outfits for the summer and then put it in a box near the door i haven't been able to access those close it they're going outside educating the kids about ticks talking to them about it because a lot of times kids will also see taking this pull it off night even think anything of it if they know that's what that is they'll come and tell tell their parrot but really you know having a dialogue about what it can do in it starting very early age and not from a fear based just more like okay this is about this is what it does this is what it can do you need to tell me if you see this on you you know try to keep the bugs come and tell me give me the bug and we can send it out for testing and also doing thorough tick checks on on your on your on your child is well and yourself which we all try to do but again some of the techs are going to be so small they're not going to be able to be found so the main ain't thing is that if a ticket found on the body and it sent out its pull it went into the skin you send it out for testing and comes back positive or you start to see a elision asian around it that needs to be dealt with right away and then you can significantly reduce your you know your chances of getting a chronic illness but you know it let's say i've never found a tic take on me ever that i had lime i had babies and so you know without finding tick then all of a sudden symptoms start to show up and you don't really know oh why all of a sudden one day just woke up and you felt like he got hit by a truck and you haven't been right sense but those types of stories are more relatable to an infection shen and the environment you know something coming in a big change that doesn't make any other sense for it to be there and in at least to be thoroughly tested for and treated so most of the time though unfortunately as we know and other doctors have talked about on your on your show and you know as well that people get funneled into seeing rheumatologist gastroenterologist just a neurologist the list goes on infectious disease specialist it gets it gets missed and then time goes by in i and ends up being a chronic condition or the treatment that is given isn't long enough and then it's decided instead of allowing the body to tell us when it's done being treated needed you know we're making the decision is made because of an intellectual decision that oh based on this criteria it in you've had this medication for two weeks or three weeks you don't have it anymore so whatever you have leftover post lyme syndrome then you know that's just what you got you know and that that's it go the home in it eventually will go away so we're making an intellectual decision in this case when really as a doctor you have to start you have to listen to win the body is done with if the treatment so i know i kind of went off no question with ticks and practical but i stay more in the middle with this i think the a middle road we we cannot we need to we when we live in we live in the new england area it's just a fact of life we're going to have to be real about the fact that this is where where we live and this is what we are exposed to and so now what do we what's the best we can do with that we can wear clothing that can protect us we can spray and put natural substances on our bodies or or if you choose to.

dr brad three weeks two weeks six year one day
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

13:20 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Let's talk about the energy you know our our ourselves with our might have qendra and we we need to enhance and help the might aqa andrea function so that we can have that energy that we need because notoriously people who are dealing with anything use me chronic or persistent there might qendra is it can be very effective so how do we help our mitochondria well first of all so might akande back to like basic cell biology is an actual whole all separate living being they integrated with us way back when in our evolution they're actually a whole different like like great like consciousness or entity living within ourselves and they get very depleted with how you know depending on how one has what has been exposed to illness toxins uh-huh emotional stress throughout their lives they get depleted and their main purpose one of the main purposes is to create ATP which is cellular energy a lot of people may no ATP is based on like watching you know early oil cans and things like that because that's kinda used as a as a metaphor cars having energy and having but that's that's us that's dr gasoline that's the main energy in ourselves so if they get depleted what do you know again there's another resource another major huge resource that we need for cell functioning for cognitive functioning or energy overall energy so there are nutrients that can help with that co q. ten is one of them alpha lipoic acid is another NHCD is another you know there are different you know there are different products that will be more geared towards mcconnell the function we'll we'll see like combinations of of those nutrients in it in order to help detoxify them and help them work better so that's important to take a look at as well if you're feeling a lot of fatigue right that the fatigue is a problem because people need to function and they we need to take care of their children or the kids need to go to school or people need to go to work and that that is critical and i have to say and the way i was cared for even by a lime literate doctor there was it never any talk about any of this information that we're talking talking about today there was just antibiotics and take a probiotic but at a different time than you taking your biotic will what type of probiotic it doesn't really matt just take a profile see does matter of course it is bad it's true it's true and no oh i mean this this cost me a lot a lot of money a lot of time et cetera and i am now know that that is not i'm not really a holistic care and i'm thrilled that i'm on the other side of it at this point but it was a very rough road and people just need to be able to learn and i'm hoping to podcast how people just learn information and know what task and have some resources to say hey you know what i heard this word might qendra i went to dr google now i understand it's this little powerhouse in the cells and they need to all communicate and they need to have this function and for me to feel better in i heard something about co q. ten can you tell me more about co q. ten and it'll maybe somebody's gonna tell you about co q. chen or somebody's gonna say hey you know need that you're fine just eat your pork and beans and you're gonna be just fine and that may not be what you need it all yeah yeah yeah and and also for more of an energetic slant and kind of a self empowering slant that there is so much coming out right now about how much power we have in regards to tuning in to ourselves and tuning into our bodies and how much how much much more power we have than we think in regards to healing and so often tell people okay so we're taking this substance taking steps to help your krebs cycle and magnesium easy amon riboflavin and all these things in these in these key lates these mineral relates to help out your mitochondria but how about just talk to them to you know when you're in that tsk when you're in that time of quiet and stillness you can just talk to them and just say i love you i appreciate you thank you for all you do for me you know what is it and and ask your body oh please guide me in craving what it is it is healthy for me we can start having a dialogue with ourselves they do respond in our body has an intelligence that can respond and so that's another step of you know taking this to the next level that you know we can take physical substances inside ourselves but we can also have that dialogue with our bodies and a lot of times it's not easy to do because a lot of things have happened to these bodies and you know our perception of illness too so it's i think it's good to start creating cultivating that relationship i know this sounds a bit it sounds different to talk about your body instead of just us being whole and talking about your mind and your emotions and then all of that in your your psyche having a conversation with your body but your body has its own unique intelligence so i think that's also important especially regards to medical andrea because you're in relationship with them night right sprite fight to improve your relationship with them in the whole part of you have control over a certain amount of what goes on within your body my starting starting in your mind yeah by thinking positively and i you know i guess like i heard about it a long time ago but i i didn't know how to do it or like is there something special you have to like bless yourself first or whatever but generally speaking by saying positive things things are even starting that gratitude journal you're you know but i sometimes it's very difficult to have gratefulness when you don't having an emotional support system and a lot of people who are struggling don't have that emotional support you see people all the time i'm sure you see women and men and you know maybe in the beginning they had a partner spouse boyfriend girlfriend and then all of a sudden they're coming in alone and you know that's hard but you really we need to have that conversation we need to open up the lines of communication and say hey you know your girlfriend whatever hasn't been here the last couple times is everything okay and let them tell you and it's very difficult it's the the illnesses isolating because you don't some people we'll get it you know they don't get it and it just it's like a it's like a ripple effect people don't get it then those people don't get it and then and those people don't get it and so you end up becoming isolated and it's hard to explain to people it's it's very difficult especially especially the longer people are sick the harder it is for people to believe that there's really something going on do you have do you have a way to encourage the people to seek out help or support well it starts here in my office you know this is a place that that they can come and you know to get your somebody's physical complaints and ailments doesn't you know and kind of look at the physical exam things like that i can get through that pretty pretty quickly what takes majority time in my office is is really giving people space who several kleenex boxes in a week because they they need to just have a space where they can just let it go and not have to explain anything not have to you know and and have me basically you know hold space for them mm-hmm and say you know this is all normal you're an in it's always i'm always telling the truth that you're not the first person to speak about this today you know you're like you're not alone and this is really normal and also that in their community so who were they talking about who they who they talk to you about lime you know who they feel free to share the swiss who is supporting them and most of the time time unless someone else in the family has it you know that's gonna be found like let's say support groups and a lot of those sprout up you know almost kind of a grass roots thing that you know individuals who've had lyme they get through it they get over in the area i live in it's pretty infected the you know if somebody hears about somebody who had lime and then they get over and they're looking really good like they looked sick now may look better than you start having the neighbors come over and you know people you know giving your name out and patience of mine have flaked had their phones flooded with people trying to call who did you go see what have you done how did you get over it and so a collection of my patients actually created a support group out of that and it's continued to grow and evolve and has been pretty amazing to watch them them do that but that's happening that happens that's happening all over the place and that is where people can i feel safe or their safest and being able to just go and just not have to explain defend lime but just go hey today sought today was i was in a lot of pain today you know i'm not sleeping well marriage is doing well my husband or my my wife doesn't understand they're sick of hearing it and you know so you know there's there's many different issues that come up with an relationship or their children they can't be the parent they wanna be all that source hard oh it's hard hard because you really you don't wanna miss a day now right and if your if your kids are struggling especially if you've got sick children with lime disease you know that's that's that yet is a whole nother issue because not only are you feeling isolated about that but now you have to deal with the schools calls and you know that's a problem how do you you know children children are not just little adults are they what what is different about taking care children other than dosages when they're sick with a tick borne infection well most of the time i tell parents and in it is usually really the case that kiddos get over the stuff a lot easier than adults do just because they they don't they haven't built up a bunch of other issues if they if they're under the age of ten you know if they've had a pretty typical household loving supportive household if there's other issues going on it can make it definitely more difficult especially if there's a divorce situation in one parent thinks that live is there and the other one doesn't then the kid does not get the child doesn't medication but children also will manifest the disease aziz in in different ways prior to puberty there seems to be that threshold when puberty happens where it starts to become more like what you would see with a chronic adult as but the children usually are when it comes to lime or knees bellies and heads is usually how i you know if a parent comes in in and i'm treating them and they're like well i'm wondering if my child has this like well did they complain about knee pain belly pain or head pain they're like yes and like okay so we need to have them in and be tested and so that's it and usually it's not just one member of the household so having conversations with people it's like well okay you know anybody else in the household have they been diagnosed what are they being treated your children have been bit by tex well yeah but that just you know just happened you know all the time and you know nothing big has happened or this or that but then they get so used i used to you know having their children complain a lot of them a lot of parents not because they're trying to you know not take care of their children but heff hillary conflicted that the child is trying to get attention or that the child doesn't know because she's like let's say seven or under that they if they're complaining about having pain that they're just just you know the there might just be saying it to to get mom to pay attention to them and not really know that they're feeling it but i actually find children to be more liable in that situation because they don't have a filter you know they if they're feeling pain there's gonna tell you my leg hurts right now you know they don't care whether it'd be the grocery store they could be in the middle of somewhere completely you know really are you wouldn't just talk about yourself and they'll just say it 'cause it's happening and you know whereas we tend to kind of as we get older we tend to we tend to become more socially restricted in that way so when when shoulder do complain about that stuff it's really important to listen because they're going to be more pure about what it is they're experiencing yet it's going to be more about the symptoms and also about the emotional reaction to the symptom them not so much that they have the words say mom you know if if they're four they're going to be like mom you know back when i was two now realizing leising that there's something going on right now you know they're gonna be they're gonna be tired they're not gonna go to bed as easily they're going to be more difficult sued they're going to be maybe going to bed it cutting themselves to bed early complaining of leg pain you know not being able to run around as much as they used to when out school what about you you know doing their homework and trying to.

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Life cycle within the body and they'll go dormant sometimes in the wake up and be more active and moving around and and what's unique about the spark is its ability to move through the body ano- and basically swim and be very fast it can outrun our own immune cells and they can get into certain areas of our body that our bodies not accustomed to having microbes then so the presence of them in in our tissues they you can go dormant be kinda quiet so then our immune systems like okay cool like nothing going on there we can back off a little bit and then you know they can have a flair and there's many many different colonies throughout the body so when people have those sensations of feeling pain in the left knee and then it moves to the hip and then tomorrow will be the shoulder and then the elbows and some of the fingers you know those colonies or those areas can be more activated based on the activity of the microbes and also your own stress it's going to also change how your body's going to respond to that but basically you're going to up regulate what gets the most disgust in regards inflammation of something called signs which are proteins expressed that that basically create all of those reactions with that discomfort that we feel inflammation actually is a very positive thing in a sense it's very important in our healing process so you know when we slam are some with a hammer or we hurt ourselves you know we break a limb you know like if we go oh you know into a serious injuries we need to have pain we need to have swelling we need to have more blood in that area we need to have more heat in that area and we need to be immobilized that our body can have a chance to heal but that you know we have a injury that has you know an acute moment where it happens you know like you i was working in the garden and i was basically impaled by something when i was digging through the dirt and my finger so it bled at hurt it's swollen and now over the past few weeks it's gone through its healing process and now my fingers pretty much back to normal and it's fine but with tick borne diseases or these more chronic infections we don't have that you know that tip a the goal you know like a cute and then you know that rise and then that fall and resolution so we keep having these these flares and rises in these you you know the infections making themselves known but we don't our body can't quite get us to that point of resolving the infection so we keep just basically having these immune pathways ways spill out the side kinds and all different types of proteins that create pain that heat up the area and over time with this repeated cycle of inflammation that's when we start to see tissue changes you know enlarge enlarged nachos and our fingers or you know knees that start to instead of being swollen hot and red they start to crack and pop and start to get changes in ligaments joint capsules you know things starting to age prematurely age in the body because of this continuous inflammation cycle they just keeps happening over and over again without any resolution so he idea is to obviously remove the cause which which is what we're trying to do we're talking about infections is to either lower the load of the infection or try to eradicate it or try to clear it from the body and i don't ever typically use the word cure with patients when it comes to line because i don't know that line is out of my system i don't you know and that's not something i can guarantee anybody what we're trying to do is return a person to a quality of life but everything that they're experiencing as a symptom is inflammation and so then it's like okay if we if we don't have control over how fast aspire keats leave or other infections go if the virus it's really not going anywhere because viruses with you forever but they can be calmed down and not being a state where they're not triggered we also have to look at what we have control over so okay so we can't control how quickly this goes infection leaves the body but we can't control the the the amount of sugar that you're eating and the types of food that you're eating that are creating more inflammation in the body what are you exposed to in the workplace you know mold in your home do you have emotional emotionally toxic relationships you know that are causing this problem right there's a whole are you are you you know our eating mcdonalds onnell's every day or you know are you trying your best to sort of have a clean eating in a clean diet are you most patients become gluten intolerant you know after developing being after having lime where they didn't have it before so that it becomes okay do we take these how do we you know start to remove these things out of the diet which that's actually the harder piece that's where you start to see the emotional attachment to these things and the frustration and being real kind of angry about what limes making you have to do like you didn't want to give that up you didn't want to give up the the you know that you weren't ready and sometimes people aren't ready and then the infection drags out a really long time until they become ready you know until they become so uncomfortable that they you just are forced to have to make a change so when it comes to inflammation again there we also look at heavy metals we look at all you know i i look at that here and just look at all the different causes what's the body burden you know and and try to eliminate as much as we have control over and that i can change and that's again by taking things internally in order to calm down inflammation listen as well as changing things in the diet and lifestyle right i mean that's the basis of how people should heal but it's a process you can't can't work on everything all at the same time now so we picked the you know like let's say someone's gotta package smoking habit that's going to be my first you know like at of all the things that could be you know i'm less us worried about the button on your burger than i am about smoking so we got to pick our battles you know so the you know i i would say that let's say they have a bread addiction or sugar addiction i mean that doesn't get talked about very much how you know white flour white sugar the addictive potential and when we know we have a crisis with you know illegal drugs and this culture with the opioid crisis and other things but you know the the addiction to sugar is actually more pervasive and slowly destructive not not damaging as the opioid crisis we can see it in its visibly you know damaging it's more of the slow gradual chronic process but that gets talked i mean that gets discussed in a lot of different different forums and and is becoming more awareness but it doesn't change the fact that we're addicted and so i've had grown men in here you know grownups crying over having to give up luton gluten or sugar because it's just like a so i'm starting to get his eight really it can make you very cranky just like taking cigarettes out or something like that or something you know that we would think of as being terribly ably addictive it's amazing to see the behavioral changes and individuals over taking out sure it's very difficult we have one of our our patients now how and we're trying to remove him it started off with diet coke and it just was an even though we're talking diet in risen sugar sugar it's still an addictive behavior and we tried to instill you know something is it is it the sweetness you need is it you know is it the bubbles roles and oh lord it is been a struggle and i helped him to his car and he says oh just put i had given him a test this kit and he's a just put it in the back and it opened up the back door on the floor was about five bottles of diet coke and i said i thought you were we're getting rid of these we're giving you all these options ya-ya trying cutting down cutting down but but people do people will are totally addicted and i and i really fault this soda craze that that's where one of the worst things you can do and yeah find something different i mean my go-to now i really never was a big soda person anyway but in my go-to is spin drift i don't know if you've ever tried that it's it's awesome it's it's only has fruit in it and it's a carbonated water and there isn't any sugar and it's really it's good because my daughter kara is a registered dietitian and you know she has to be able should tell people exactly what to do and she's very precise us you're not going to give the wrong information unless she's researched it to to prove that it's not wrong so that's what she's that's one of our goto for people yeah yeah and you know i'll own it i i had a definitely a soda addiction when i was a kid in my teenage years but i think you know the the main thing is you know helping them understand that they're going to go through a process almost like treating it like it is like like trying to get over an an addictive substance that they would think of as being addictive if they were trying to stop drinking or stop smoking that they need to be prepared that they're you know that it goes beyond just their own personal choice and addiction it's it is the microbes in the belly so there's tons of research now about the micro bayada you know our own our own gut got flora is very is very much in relationship with our cravings they they get used to what we eat them they grow you know certain strains will grow and and might lipstick candida you know just a candidate gets a lot of discussion and a lot of a lot of different opinions about candida yeast overgrowth in it is a problem and so they love sugar they thrive off sugar so of course they're going to send signals from your belly to your brain and save blotch her we watch her and it and so you're just like i just have to have sugary nine he chocolate i need something i when i was sick with lyman i didn't know it if my if ah time if i didn't have one of those trader joe's ice cream cookies at the end of the day i i would go mental i didn't know i was sick at the time at this point and this was after going through medical school cool naturopathic medical school and doing all these fast diet stuff in like taking care of myself knowing how to eat knowing how to be and i just had this you know patients come in with this incredible sugar craving just stuffing it in their face and i think that a big part of it is again the immune system also being out of balance that they're microbes in their gut or out of balance impacting their neurotransmitters transmitters so we kind of start to crave stuff that is not healthy for us because we're trying to feed something else cisco that's also within us but we don't know how to you don't know that we just know we want it it and also when we get sick you know when we get sick too we need quick energy a lot of people are fatigued go back to the adrenal fatigue if if somebody is you know just looking for something to keep them going and they're exhausted their body's gonna look for quick sugar quick burn right and that's not the best thing but again the bodies dislike okay we don't have the juice is to maintain you so go grab that cookie we'd like to take a moment to thank our sponsors botanical medicines are important part of the integrative lime disease program bio sidon from bio botanical research is a professional strength broad based program that has been extensively.

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

10:45 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Proper blood sugar balance so so it's yeah if that is that's depleted before you even get the infections then of course that's going to be taken down and even more difficult to recover so adrenal adrenal support is very important in in kind of a part of treatment for every patient like that's just like a no-brainer got any i don't even think i mean i i do i do salivary retesting for adrenal hormone testing here and i do a lot of other specialty labs that are real patient specific depending on their story and their situation but i had a certain point i i don't do the salivary hormone testing anymore for the journals because just about everybody has some fatigue so i i just make that kind of a standard part of the care right it's a given it's a given given and save you the one hundred fifty bucks or other and sixty bucks and let's just let's just call it like it is this is what's going on right right do do use herbal support like ashwell gonda what what is your go-to for helping those poorer adrenal glands yeah well usually it depends there's a couple of different formulations some that are can be purely plant-based based on others that are going to have you know typically bovine or cow usually adrenal cortex and and things that we referred to kind of crossley in the natural medicine world ABC bits but they do help i know it's awfully all the vegans never so but that that is but most of the time people are on plant based so it's going to be a combination typically of holy basil rodeo woah oshawa gonda eliecer lisa caucus liquorice licorice root guevara so those are the go-to and typically that'll be blended in with some b. six 'cause b. six is a very very important vitamin cofactor for the adrenal glands and for the neurotransmitters of the brain yeah it's it's true the vast majority of people that i've tested their b vitamins edelman's are just not where they need to be and for people trying to stay healthy it's pretty it's pretty much a problem and i i don't know if it's because our food sources so great or people aren't eating what they need to eat on a regular basis or we're just so fast paced and it's just so so much easier to not cook in to get something prepared and what not in in it's just an it's hard for the people who are sick to also you so make what they need and take care of themselves so really i truly believe that we all need those vitamins yes yes now i will say there are some people people with when they get be six about they get a little revved up and have a hard time so that's not an abnormal it's rare but it's not an abnormal side effects so just if somebody takes internal support and it ends at reading them up and making them more aggravated or anxious it's probably the b. six and they're so then you just want a product that didn't have that in their right and you can test your b. six levels with your yeah that's also something that that doctor can look into for you right and i do that i do like looking at where we're starting can i tell people all the time we need a roadmap you know you're coming in here and you've got a process i know kind of where we are now but i know where you you wanna go and there's a bunch of roads we take so let's put this all out on paper let's get this roadmap established and then we can determine what we need to they do it's tough with adrenals i i really have to say it's it's difficult because we never know how long it's gonna take them to recover yeah and so it's not just about so when i talk to people about their adrenal it's not just about the capsules that they're taking in or the herbs taking it's about creating regularity in their life so the adrenal glands really thrive on things being regular they don't do well on people who have you know people who do shift work or travel ally these changing schedules also if there's a lot of different stressors in life and people have a hard time saying no to things and are trying to be everything for everybody and you know feel that sense of discomfort comfort and guilt if they're not doing it and you know that struggle you know if they're stressors at home you know trying to reduce any other external oh you know issues that are going on there as well as introducing lifestyle changes that are going to calm things down meditation for things speaking to people people about that or implementing it into if they have prayer time you know that's that's that's more where they are spending their time during the day just trying to do things is to be able to calm and be able to kind of neuro detox innocence and to be in in the quiet and calm because we have to repeat like our nervous system in our adrenal system has to learn again how to be calm and the only way to do that is to practice it but it can be very uncomfortable if you're used to being you know l. on your phone and go go and chaos and business and you know and then when things calm down that's usually when people start to go a little stir crazy and have a hard time with that so we have to unlearn unlearn and relearn and so it's not you know it is helpful it is amazingly helpful to have the the herbals but there also has to be a behavioral component there because the herbals i can only take you so far right and you know one of the things that i tell people all the time is you've really gotta get this whole bedtime thing yes sound pack uh-huh yes yes it's gotta be pretty much the same time to bed and pretty much the same time to get up and you know i wrote a post to our are pursue wellness subscribers and i talked to them primarily about the hours between ten and two you're almost getting time and and a half for what you're sleeping that is a really prime time right there but you really gotta get yourself ready to go to sleep and you know racing around and and folding clothes and doing things you gotta have a process and i and i say this all the time and it's redundant i know but maybe somebody hasn't heard this before i do the thirty thirty thirty rule my sister-in-law the first thirty is getting ready for tomorrow so it's last minute things it's figuring out you know maybe what we're going to have for dinner tomorrow night getting lunches you gotta shutdown that computer shut shut down the phone the next thirty self care and that means you know you're either taking your shower you're sitting in an epsom salt bath your cooking your eyebrows you know whatever you gotta do and then that lasts thirty minutes is that real quiet time meditation listen journaling writing gratefulness kind of things i don't care or reading a paper book and then it's really lights lights out and by that time your body has had that time to read down another practice introduced by rudolf steiner for the steiner peter enthusiasts is tell us is before bed at night basically replaying your day from the basically from where you're starting at that point wait nine my husband's now we're talking about trying to be calm her represented here the partaking in the festivities here but yeah he just came in going cow me it reminds me of the CNN broadcasts our cast where the woman in the kids the kids a little baby came in with the guy that was trying to do the interview and his wife came crawling on the floor i kill that's like what was seen millions of time time 'cause you love it running in and lived in grab the walker grabbed it she's trying to shut the door where she's laying on the floor yeah yeah yeah favorites best ask i mean if you don't have humor in your life i did a podcast like the last i think it's the last one we did and it was on laughter yoga and mindfulness and laughing oh how good it is to laugh yes i'm i'm a proponent of that and share a lot of laughter with patients and jada brain of eh but before i forget let me let me talk about this one little practice here will and then we'll move but basically it's before you go to bed at night we playing your your day from the minute that you lay down until backwards all the way to the point where you woke up in the morning so basically going through your day and just not judging it not analyzing it not over thinking it just letting a thread through and just try to you know put yourself back in those situations and a backward motion bringing yourself back to the morning and that kind of clears out the day it sort of helps you evaluate in and to see if anything came up or what happened that day so you have like a consciousness about what happened before you enter into sleep and that way it also also helps with sleep it helps sleep be more resolved and to get a deeper more restful sleep i believe especially when that practice is done on a regular basis so that's something something to that could be very meditative and probably people apply it to like a third of the day or halfway through the day before they fall asleep themselves so in that sense it's also sort of like a asleep practicing tense up their muscles and work their way down from their toes all the way up to their their head it's just another method of doing that so i've never heard of that that's yeah that's hard to start and work backwards the best you can yeah isn't that right you can't put a lot of pressure on yourself because that defeats the purpose of what you're trying to accomplish there yeah let's let's spend a little time on inflammation because the whole process of resolving inflammation is is a problem and when people have had lime or tick borne illness for any period of time time there is a a level of inflammation and people can have a whole run with daily inflammation they can have pain they can also oh have surges of inflammation tell us what's going on when people have been doing okay and then all of a sudden they're not doing okay they don't feel well they either you're have pain or their digestive tracts off their nauseous or they feel flu like what what's happening at that time well there's many different causes for why someone's in that state depending on where the inflammation is landing so from a spire keat from the the lime spire keep they they all actually all of the infections they sort of have a.

thirty minutes
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"To a episode of living with lime and if you're fortunate enough to find us on health means you're actually seeing us and everybody likes to see things thanks so here we are today we're talking with dr julia greenspan she is a new england natural pass she is very lime literate um and we are going to talk about her book and show you this beautiful book and it's rising above lime disease and it is filled with so much information we're real excited about this she herself was a lime suffer at one point and she is recovered and that probably put her in the area of treatment for other people because you know all of us that have had lyme disease feel very very compassionate and and we feel we really need to help people with tick borne illness anyways for the rest of her bio you can see it on the website i want want to welcome dr julia how are you today i'm good thank you thanks for having me oh this is great this is great so you know tell me why the book what what what did you have inside you that said i can't write a book well honestly they the publishers came to me and asked me to do it it they're asked me wow i would do that and so i sat with forbid and pondered it but i thought i to not do it you know i would've always regretted not not jumping in that pool so and then the motivation that i pictured in re in writing the book was honestly the picture i held in my mind a lot of my patients in the middle of the night having a harsh reaction or being stuck at home by themselves and the needing having my book be some sort of a resource that they could read read and go okay this is normal it's okay if it could do anything to ease somebody's misconceptions there suffering from anxiety or fear that that what they're going through isn't is abnormal or there's something wrong with it and feel inclusive so i've been in practice for over a decade and and i think it just all came from day after day conversation after conversation with patients and then from my own experience as a patient as you mentioned myself so sort of just a combination it was something that was i guess i wrote it in about a year and a half or two but it was actually about ten or eleven twelve years in the making with patient experience so actually actually they're probably they're more than than myself for educating me we do we do get a lot of information from our from our patients and one of the things that i find is that you know you can explain things to people but what happens is that in the midst of taking in the information information or not feeling well it kinda go so when you and you can only write so many protocols and what your office i'm in you know like little pieces of paper or you know you email them stuff but having a book like this is is in an incredible resource and it's an incredible resource i for people who are always looking for some more information because you know we there is a lot of information out there and that's why i i began this podcast because i didn't know right from wrong i didn't know what to believe there was a lot of information out there will this help me this help me but in terms of having it concise and in a paper you know it's important and i tell people all the time please put your kindles away at least a few hours before go to bed this however pick up and you can read it and whatnot before for you go to bed so so that's great you know when people come to you what's your protocol for testing what kind of things do you say okay hey i need an overall view of what's going on i need your footprint what what is the things that you tell people listen this is what we need a well i i would say with just about everybody i test for tick borne diseases so that includes the co infections so it's not just lime that's an attack i'm sure as you know people who've been listening into your podcasts have realized that at this point that there's other infections being carried and most the time in the conventional medical establishment the look at lime a look at a particular test test for lime but they won't actually look at co-infections so and so a lot of times people will be tested for lime that'll be negative and test them for something like rocky mountain spotted fever and that's what they've had all along so typically test for visa bartonella or look llosa's anna plasmas this at rocky mountain spotted fever excuse excuse me and and then also test viruses so we can't just look at tick borne diseases we need to look at the other things that are also in the system that could be co contributing into the symptoms we don't wanna call everything disease i kind of want to look at everything that's going on so a look at typically epstein barr human happy fifty six parvo virus cytomegalovirus and then i'll look at autoimmune disease because there is a relationship there between lime and and an autoimmune and i wanna make sure to someone have a real booming infection with are real booming process going on planetary process with rheumatoid arthritis and i'm completely missing and and if i don't look at that then i missing something you know while i'm treating for lima missing other ways that i could help them and also their hormones so both men and women will have hormone dysregulation with lime with chronic lyme typically so women they'll have depending on their age they'll have different changes in their cycles men will have low hormone status so low testosterone even in their twenty s i just got a test back on a twenty two year old with a hormone status it looks like he's in his eighties and he also has lime so we have to look at all those variables of what's contributing to someone being unwell and how lime has sort of treaded on those different areas of interrelated with the whole picture so those are the typical tested i look at yeah right because it it does such a number on your whole body especially if you've had it awhile maybe you got it early yet you know the antibiotics didn't take care of it completely in here we are you know three four six months a year later and you haven't been feeling right and all of a sudden the whole body is in crisis isis and yeah in the hormone levels are really really really typical and you know i learned about mimicry and how you you know without immunity issues you've got things that are going on and then your immune status is like takes a hard left or hard right and it's now a tacky something that it wasn't even intended to do you find that a lot yeah so if we see an increased an a antinuclear antibody or a rheumatoid factor i'll tell people that if there's no other signs that look like the autoimmune disease a lot of times these proteins are expressed because the tissues are stressed and the nature of limes- barricades they like go and hide in the joint spaces in the muscle the muscular tissue and when they're they're the body isn't stupid the immune system is this is quite highly evolved an intelligent and so these proteins showing up when you say autoimmune typically it's like well the bodies attack itself will be don't know why and so we we you think of it in terms of a microbe being present that may be is not being acknowledged fully in a in what's considered a differential diagnosis or you know trying to include that and possible reasons why somebody is sick oftentimes it's that the body is trying to clear the pathogen out of the joint capsule is trying to clear that and so thus your immune system starts to attack back that's face and then what you're gonna do it's gonna start expressing these proteins under stress and inflamed so but what's the initial cause is is it just doing it because it just is having an inappropriate response in for no known reason or is your immune system really trying to accomplish something there so that's that's that's that's where you would see those elevation of those proteins for somebody it's it gets kind of confusing because you really have to say if the people say well we'll do i have matured arthritis or you know do i have shimao does what do i have and i guess the answer zor to that is will find out later on once we clean up all of the mess that going on then we will find out what we're kind of left with and it was thyroid issues more times in women than in men but have a really difficult time stabilizing thyroid with if somebody with lime disease as well so you'll find that you'll take the dosage just a little bit up on their medication and they'll go hyper thyroid which means that it'll be too overmedicated and then you'll be okay may take it down i'm just an inch down and all of a sudden it's full blown hypo low functioning thyroid and just by taking it one edge to left or the writer you know up and down so oh and typically though that i've seen that instability with the hormone system when there is another cause not just because it's just hashi motos but those issues do need to be ah addressed because your hormones really are the governor like hormone system is the governor of the body and if that is not functioning on on all cylinders than it is going to be really hard for me to to communicate properly with the immune system and to kind of judge what's going on there and rebuild you know really the hormone system is maintaining and rebuilding a continuously early and and modulating all of our behaviors and actions and our responses to things so it's super important that needs to be looked at oftentimes i find why not sometimes overlooked or that that's all that's looked at oh all you have is is you're going into menopause all you have is a thyroid issue this is all fibroid so again we're straying you know there there's one side it's very polarized you know it's either this or that but then we look at tick borne diseases starts to get a little messy anaerobic gray in the middle you know and and so that's that's for dr getting creative right right the adrenal gland is or gland 'cause there's two of them they get affected very quickly right because of just the stress of being l. justice stresa being human even if we just took it we just took lime disease out of it and and just really just so let's picture that you know someone before they got lime and then all the things that happened has happened to people plus just all the digestion of the data and how a fast the world moves right now and then someone gets lime that comes in to a system that's already been depleted and fatigued yeah definitely the adrenals are managing your flam your inflammation levels you know they're trying to keep things heat the body stable you know and in homies basis you know in balance and and trying to manage everything and provide us with that energy through the day to get up in the morning helpless digest our food help with insulin.

dr julia greenspan three four six months eleven twelve years twenty two year
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"Greetings this is sydney kennedy and i'd like to invite you to subscribe to the podcast series at WWW dot living with live the US this will keep you up to date on all our new releases living with line podcast maybe discussing very controversial topics is the information contained in these podcasts are from the guests personal experiences and are their own opinions these podcasts are intended for information the opinions expressed are solely the guests zone please discuss treatment options with your personal healthcare providers before changing for adding treatments enjoy the podcast living with live is brought to you in part by dr fired formulations a supplement company offering products such as labor civil harvested life assemble oregano oil and the most patients can purchase without a prescription and practitioners can open a wholesale account and carry the products it's an office to learn more visit dr inspired formulations dot com that's doctor it's fired formulations dot com we'd also like to thank hopkinton drug many people people have to be healthcare needs that mass produce pharmaceutical medications just can't meet that's why more people turn to hopkinton drugs of base counting and wellness pharmacy whether it's lime disease please fold illness thyroid hormone replacement therapy paediatrics dermatology hopkinton drugs specially trained and licensed pharmacists had great customize compounded medications occasions to the your specific needs shipping is available nationwide go to our x and health dot com that's part x and health dot com or call eight hundred four three nine forty four forty one visit drugs compounds with men.

sydney kennedy US
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"On WWW greenhouse medicine dot com, and I would say, yeah, I do tend to wanna meet with people that are a little closer in here to where I practice versus doing something where I'm treating somebody across the country. So don't tend to do phone consults per se as a as a practice with, like telemedicine at this point, because I will on case by case basis with patients, but typically need to meet with somebody in person. I. In. Let's see here as far as the book the book is rising above lime disease in its, but it's available on Amazon, kindle and Barnes and noble. And it's not an audio book, yet, I've been trying to get my publishers to have been talking with them. So we're in discussions with that. Because main motivation for wanting audio book, is that a lot of line patients have a hard time reading do better with audio so I've been trying to, to push for that to happen. So hopefully that will happen. And yeah. Side of that them they go. There's me. But the book it sells really is meant for patients families. Doctors, there's a you know, I did a ton of research on the latest research on herbs. And you know what's, what's happening with lime disease? I try to stay current as I could. So it definitely could be helpful with practitioners that are treating us or those that are just getting started, or those just wanna take a look and see what, what I'm up to. There's a lot of tables in the back that have the different herbs in how they should be used in, in dosages also what they're, they're helpful for as far as citations, as well on that. So it's really just the main motivation for the book was that what I pictured in my mind was somebody who's by themselves. Let's say in the middle in having just anxious in frayed feeling very alone that, you know, they had my book in could read it that it would help them feel better. And or if they wanna have their family member understand, or their friends. I understand what they're going through, and they don't have it in them to try to explain it all, or maybe their families, or friends are don't wanna hear it from them, necessarily, or kind of not falling on deaf ears. But if the hero from somebody else, so sort of as an advocate at spreading, what I feel is really solid information on what's going on. And so that, that was my main motivation for writing it. It's amazing book in what I love about it is backup here. Just a little second little context is. So we've been doing this podcast now for going, it's almost five years, you'll be like the two hundred thirty fifth interview or something like that. By the time it comes out and. Kind of started off just well, let's kinda just get started end in interviewing people, both patients researchers practitioners what became very clear is. There's no clear path in you get cancer and doctors like in. You said the earlier, there's no cancer. There's a path like you may not like the path that doctors Jews for you. Right. But there's a very clear path in these are the steps you do. And these are the people we bring in here treatment options lime disease like you said, once you get past the first two three weeks month to month and you're still sick. There's nothing out there. So people aren't really and doctors don't have this to practitioners have, there's no road Pap, and your book is the closest we've seen to really feeling in what we believe the steps for the roadmap. And that's that's remarkable. So you know, it takes you from the very beginning takes you get. Your mind, right? It takes you through diagnosis possible, other diagnosis preparing for treatment. You know that's so very important. And you can kind of prepare for treatment as you're getting treatment. And then, you know, the different ways to treatment treatment, and you really begin to break this all down, and then, you know, Reids resetting your expectations what to do and how to keep going. So it's really it's fabulous. It's a fabulous book, and I really can't recommend it highly enough. I'm touched. That's, that's an amazing explanation of the book. I thank you so much. You're welcome. You can tell that this. I get this, you know, lime disease is kind of on the edge right now where five years ago. And you've you've been here long enough that it was just one of those fringe diagnosis things. And now there's enough attention that it's -tracting the kind of the second generation and the people who wanna get in on the, the gray. Train so to speak. Right. So that a lot of people throwing their hats into the ring with say half baked, but they don't have the full understanding of the disease yet. They've got some good ideas that good people, but it's incomplete and you clearly have probably closer patient to right at and been through really time. You really see. Everything that's connected to it. It really. So I'm, I'm glad you you're you're able to hear my compliment that take it in because it's sear. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I'm gonna I'm gonna keep you all keep this on tape. So when I'm having a bad day, I'll just be like, okay, here you go. Outlay this back. Lovely to hear. Thank you so much. You're very welcome. Aurora clip it for you. We'll send it along. My positive affirmation. Well, we all I just heard a story as somebody who's kept a treasure chest of thank you notes. And I think that's a we all we all need to do that to be reminded from time to time Dr Greenspan you've been incredibly generous with your time. And thank you for all the time and effort, putting your book together, it's going to help a lot of people. For taking the time to speak with me pre-stated. Thanks burned biting me on your show..

Amazon Barnes Dr Greenspan kindle five years two hundred thirty fifth two three weeks
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"The right treatment. That's why you're not better yet. Maybe you're not try this my aunt my aunt Josie. Tried this, this is gonna cure, you it made her better, you know, or and, and then it gets to point where people get isolated because then if they do share how they feel after a while they're not getting a very supportive response, because people's expectations socially that you should be over something or done with something don't match with somebody's actually experiencing. So then they, they, they become more withdrawn, and you know, kind of more isolated. So I know I kind of went off on a lot of chances on that. But that's, that's the discussion very interested in and you bring up a very interesting point, I haven't. Said this explicitly on this podcast podcast yet. But I'm going to start encouraging people to go on information. Hyatt. Into into limit you really don't need to know fifty different lime treatments, you need to know the one you're working on now and then plan b if that doesn't work. And after that, stop, you know, if you do have to go to plan B, then, you know that you can research, another one or whether to practice you whether you're doing it yourself or whether you're working with the practitioner and end I there, there is so much out there and in everything has worked once for everybody, and everything has not worked for somebody, and you will find all that information on the internet, and you can't ride more than one horse at a time, unless you're in a circus, and we don't want to be in a circuits. We wanna get cured from from y disease, so with that in your practice in your experience, how and I know that another is no straight answer for this. But in general gross generalities here. How long for treatment dally do give before you start thinking, well, maybe it's time to try something else? So. A typical average treatment time we're talking about chronic Lyme chronic tick borne diseases yet, I'm not even talking about from, like from coming into your office to be completely cured. Thank you very much. I'm talking about when, when should you begin to see some positive feedback yet. So if I'm just starting off with a patient and getting them started on a medication. Typically in this may be their first time attempting to treat line, usually the first two to four months, or the most difficult with something called her timer response. Time reaction or a Yar ash hurt simul reaction named after scientists that discovered that people were having reactions with certain infections, where inflammation would go up and have they'd have more difficulty while while treating those infections. And it in that same that typically that must've happens with Spira Kate infections like syphilis in there, of course, with lime diseases fire, Keith infection. So people typically were kinda be on up and down roller coaster. After the first two to four months, usually meet with patients, every two months, unless they need me sooner in between hand depending on an urgent situation and the reason why the time period seem so long as because I, I need people to be on the meds for certain period of time in order for me to be able to give them information and give them feedback. That, hey, y'all K know by the first visit let's say two months in, I usually tell people that I expect to see something improve some things are going to be worse. And then something's, you might get some new symptoms, you didn't have before, or you know, but there's gonna be some shift there somewhere the other end, that's in the next pretty much to me, that's like a good prognosis that they're running with the pack. If somebody comes into see me, two months in there on medication A medication regime natural medicine blended with antibiotics or just natural medicine alone. And I'm not seeing any change has been no change in symptoms. Then, you know, then I usually will end up changing what has what it is. I'm doing so as long as I'm still seeing change as people move along and come back and see me. It's sort of taken by case by case basis with every kind of chunk of time that I see someone but if we're still seeing progress in their symptoms. I'll usually keep them where they're at maybe tweak, a few things depending on if something's coming up with their digestive system. Were, you know, their, their hormones or something of that ager and get to a point appoint a plateau, where things kinda stay the same or regress, pretty negatively in? Stay pretty consistently have symptoms that are more difficult than they stay more persistently consistently versus just like a flare like a hurt time response that obviously, I change change the medication regime, again, that might be adding different changing the antibiotic that might be changing the natural medicine that might be taking away the antibiotics today for two or three patients, you know that I saw today about twelve patients today for two or three patients You know, it it was. was saying, hey, you know, your antibody storm really seem to be working very well. Let's try doing all natural only. And then had if you follow patients, where I've done that by that, if you couple months ago when they're doing fabulous. So, you know that that's typically how it goes is far as as treatment goes with patients. It is more of an individual basis. But I hope that gives a good idea kind of what I expect to see what other doctors, you know, I think kind of I from what I gather follow that same, sort of patterning. In the two month window, that's long enough and to allow things to run the course of long enough for your body to respond and to get to get some idea. And again, I'm not looking for total cure, but I think we do run into I'm sure you've had those patients to where they've been on a treatment regimen for six months or a year. And there's been very little shift in anything and, you know, they're being told well just hanging there at some point that you just it doesn't make sense now. That's not the I have there are, you know, that particular style of docs that treat this in not mine. I you're still diplomatic. And there's probably don't agree with how I you know, would treat something. I have I have to be very humble because, you know, we'll of course, aided, I'm gonna get schooled somewhere along the line if I right when whenever we got for your God sends a patient, along just to remind us, right? And it does happen. Yeah. So I understand that. But, but the, the point the point is and, and, you know, in your case, you've got the you've got the personal experiment experience clinical experience, and your that helps definitely I think, really people begin to struggle, and then can go down the rabbit hole of trying to find the perfect the perfect solution, the silver bullet that's going to cure the line, which we all know that, for the most part, once it's chronic it isn't cut. You're not just dealing with lime. You're dealing with eighteen other things as a. Hardwood says, but, but I think there needs to be some realistic understandable. I need to be taking another close. Look at myself in my health, and, and tracking it to, you know. So when you're take notes, so you, you can look at patient, look back. Okay. This is improved a two months. You may not remember it. But when I came in, and they'll say, oh, yeah, I remember that, that has gotten better. And so I think it's important that, that people do that as well. And not to track, I think tracking every day makes you crazy. There's just you know, once a week, it's probably too much to. So, you know, once a month, once every two months, something like that taking some form of assessment has visiting your practitioners is it sounds like really smart thing to do. So thank you for being willing to put an even though yet qualifications on putting a, a timeframe on that. And in that also want to kind of bring this conversation toward close. But before we do that, one of the things you bring up in your book is a blocked to healing and it, you label it as a spiritual block. And that area is. So, you know, we throw around the words spirit, and really, it's kinda like energy in my world. It's, it's, it's used in so many ways by so many people that's almost become meaningless. But you mean something quite specific by it? Yeah. Well, I think so we are way more than we know about ourselves like we, you know, we're we are bigger than we than we understand. And we are more powerful than we understand, and part of what's happening on many spiritual fronts with different religions also with the new age movement is people trying to wake up to that trying to find their way back to that. And trying to find that way back to understanding having communication with our bodies in having communication, with higher aspects of ourselves, you know, with the whole community with feeling connected. You know, with ourselves and with the greater the greater picture. And so when it comes to our, there are decisions that get made that are not even conscious decisions on, on a on a soul level, I believe, than I've experienced enough with patients. I practice Shimada keeling arts as well as other energy medicine modalities, in have been training in that for several years and continue to in probably will continue to Volve that for the rest of my life, as it is just it's a practice just like you know, just as medicine is the practice in it's different form of medicine. But it goes more into, you know where, where are we not hearing ourselves where we not consciously aware where we have actually made a choice, and again, not a choice. It's it, it's a very delicate place to go and have a conversation, a lot of times when you start going into this conversation, people might jump to thank are you saying choosing to be sick? Or are you saying, you know? This is my fault, you know, earned off by the idea of having the conversation, especially the very angry in, you know, have a lot of trauma around being told that they're making this up, and that, they're, you know, so, but it's about getting into the unconscious in subconscious level of what is what kind of decisions are we making in that kind of Behi behind the curtain, you know, but in, in the more in the shadows in bringing that more to the forefront and this isn't just stuff that it's, it's incorporating stuff that's happened to us in this lifetime here since birth, you know, traumas, things like that, that we didn't even know that decisions were sort of made that now a disease comes into the body in lands in the body, and we have certain ways, we think, feel in energies, that we carry frequencies that we carry based on things that we've experienced in that choices we've made out of surviving those experiences because I mean, you know. Varying degrees, people have more traumatizing lives versus less versus others. But what somebody views as being traumatizing, what's important..

cure Josie Shimada keeling ager syphilis Volve Keith Hardwood two months four months six months two month
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

10:57 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"That I am covered by insurance because, you know anybody who's been dealing with lime disease knows that it definitely can be very expensive process to try to recover from lime so anything that we can do to help make that easier. National physician. Where's white says? Gee, I wonder if I can if they're licensed natural paths in my state where can they find out that info at the American Association of naturopathic physicians? No here in New York, it's we're not there yet. Now keep trying though. Yeah, there's a few states that are that are still kind of struggling with trying to get that to go through and gain acceptance. What it does when that happens is it provides more safety for the public because if you know if people don't know, and they're going to see somebody who calls themselves in after Pathak doctor in, in somebody doesn't know that there are programs out there that it, we're individuals might go school for just a couple of months, take classes online, and if they're working at a state where they don't have to have any type of credentialing or a degree or prove that they've passed boards and olive added that there are continuing their training, you know, they can just hang shingle on. Sam naturopathic doctor. So you really there are people who are practicing unlicensed states that are from for your medical programs. You really want to ask somebody if you're gonna go see a naturopathic where did you graduate from how many years, did you go to school may be licensed in other states where there is licensure where they're maintaining that. But it really is safety for the public. You want someone who's working with you that has a medical background that's gonna be giving you medical advice and providing care Besters, one of the schools. And what are the others yet? I went to the national college of natural medicine, and there is also the southwest college of natural medicine or naturopathic medicine in Zona, and then investor also has a satellite school in, in California, as well. And there is also a school up in Vancouver BC, but there's, there's just a few of us than there is a school in on the west coast in Connecticut, but I think that it is actually closing, but it was a Bridgeport, which port university, so. Yeah, there you go. There's a little bit of background. They're not think that's important because it's we hear sometimes actually it's like Audi pronounce it right into its nature, Natura Pam as you start. You start there's like, how do you pronounce that thing? And then it's kinda like, well, what exactly is start talking to two different practitioners. And some of them are such MD's like you said, and then others are just like experts in supplements. So it does make it may. A huge difference in, in California. They can prescribe medicine as well, right? And here in New Hampshire. That's well, yeah. So it's, it's really, you know, you guys are the first than now, the trying to will not try to, but the functional medicine movement on the MD side of things is really trying to bridge that gap. But a why reinvent the wheel? You've got this wonderful training and education already in places like just become a natural path. Well, and it's a different type of training. So there's things I, I know what I know. I know what I don't know. And there are things that are going to be perfect for someone to come see after path for, they're gonna be things that are going to be more suited for seeing a conventional medical practitioner, that has hospital writes, in that can escalate things in a way that, that I can't that might training dozen involved. But when it comes to the chronic disease model naturopathic are really, we're, we're really trained from day, one to be managing a chronic illness, and that really is the, the number one issue, over acute disease, you know, over cute infections, the chronic illness is the one that's really putting a strain on human quality of life, and on, really the medical system in general, both financially, and, you know, in all respects so, speaking here and really focusing in on the patient in their whole story. So our goal is to really look at all aspects of, you know what a patient has been through up until the point that they are sitting down in. Our office. And then my job is to try to help them build themselves back into being healthy over the course of time in with lime disease. That is especially true, that there is a there's a whole rebuilding in restoration process along with trying to get over the infection speaking of that. Why lime disease? Why did I specialize in that when I first moved here, I grew up in Portland, Oregon actually I I'm not actually what east coast girl on the west coast girl, but I've lived here for about twelve years, and twelve or thirteen years. And I when I first moved here, my goal was to start a clinic for general practice, general family medicine, and environmental medicine was my main medical school. So cleaning people out toxins out of them getting helping them restore their health with how they eat in with our what's in their homes in their bodies. So doing key Latian in heavy metal Latian detox and people started to show up I growing up the reason why. Growing up in Portland, Oregon or growing up in an area where there isn't really much lime. Or at least there, wasn't for me growing up, and it was nothing compared to what it is here on the east coast. You know, it was I had no idea of what it really meant to live somewhere with a epidemic. You know, having to go outside. I mean, we had bugs in all sorts of stuff, and things like that in Oregon, but not not like it is here with ticks, and so people started to show up with illnesses, and I, you know, by hearing, their story, I tested them for lime are positive. I'd say we'll go in go into your PCP this positive for lime. It's an infectious disease at the time I wasn't how, how hard can it be? Gertie again. And, and I don't really like to anybody attics, it's not my thing. You know, I just graduated it was I that wasn't my focus or my comfort zone, so people came back patients come back by the week or two later and say, you know, I tried and they refused, they used to treat me so Mike. What am I coming from a social work background? I have a real problem with disenfranchisement and people not getting the care that they need. And so I started treating in this area once people here that you treat Lyme disease. They, you know, the word get quickly. And then. So we'd been a few years that I started to treat lime just because it kept showing up. So the practice chose me. And then I found out I had it. A line I had lime disease, Fabio sus. And so the patient as well. Yeah. So that was very life changing and helped me, a better doctor have those. Yeah. So where what did you turn to, to begin learning about line, the first packet, the first thing I ever read, and actually I'm going to be doing a lecture with him in a few weeks? I'm I'm a little nervous about that because he's like my lame superhero. But is a Joseph I gone. Oh, yes, of course, he has a packet out online called advanced topics online disease. And, and when I was, I thinking, all right. Maybe I'll do this lime thing, but many doctors doing it and people need help, and I gotta get myself like I gotta get some idea of what to do. What's going with that handle this? So it's about a forty five forty forty page document, and I have recommended over the years, because it was for a long time before other books that come out online that was. A really nice resource for people that could be reliable because it's a big issue with people trying to find reliable information around Lyme disease with the internet, especially with everything out there. And all the fear and kind of the, you know, the opinions about it. So I would say that was my very first resource that really helped me in, then, of course, I've been training, a member of eyelids. And, and I've been doing their trainings for years in some going yearly to the conferences the best, I can in the knife, started off by taking their they have courses that they teach every year for new doctors that are treating lime to kinda give them a primer on idea of how to get started. So I started with that about a decade ago or a little over a decade. Awesome. Just curious. Why? I mean that kind of the answer already my head. But I wanna ask you, why not the idea say. Well, you're going there. Okay. But really? So you're gonna call you dock your doctor? Right. And Lyme disease is kind of new to you. And the only reason I feel you would not lean that way, because you're Natura path in, you kinda low more open minded, but why not go to the experts because treatment appears people being denied care. Okay. It doesn't match the model that's currently out there and I realized that early on the model that's currently out there as far as guiding in my opinion. Okay. If our guiding doctors as to how to treat lime didn't match what I was seeing in the patient population as far as what was being offered for treatment, what people how people are being turned away that had obvious symptoms lab results that, you know, that treatment time one of the major differences, I find between the idea say I ladder is treatment time, you know, that, that we treat longer in. We treat until we see symptoms. Coming to a time of being in a place of remission or recovery. And, and many times in the current the current limitations set out by the idea say it's sort of like the well we've treated you for lime. That's it, you're done. And it has to be something else now. And then they have post Lyme syndrome in, you know, if you look at the literature, there, even doctors who are in alignment, more with the conventional model, but they'll say in, you know, instead, he's that, okay? We have the definition of post Lyme syndrome for individuals who pad lime in now have, you know, continued joint pain, headaches fatigue, will, how are we serving that population? You know, that was really important question of somebody who falls more the idea say, model when I was doing research for the book they, you know, like, how do we serve this population? We don't even have they didn't even have guidelines as to how to really serve this population that had all these chronic issues after having line. We label then call it something. But there's really no fall. Oh, through with how to manage care for these individuals. So I think those are some big distinctions in why that model didn't work well for me. And also, you'll find that the islets model is very integrative with natural medicines in weaving that in, and that's a really big part in a really popular part, when you when you go to the conferences in things you see, allow the doctors, the MD's Dios nurse practitioners natural as are all talking about conventional.

Lyme disease Oregon California Lyme syndrome Portland American Association of naturo New York Pathak Gee New Hampshire Audi Vancouver MD Besters Natura Pam Zona Bridgeport Fabio sus Gertie
"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"julia greenspan" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"All, it's free. Just head on over to Lyman into radio. Dot com slash tracker. And sign up that's lime an injured radio dot com slash tracker. You'll be glad you did. Join us every Thursday night tunes for the latest episode of lime ninja radio. Hello I'm your lime journey guide. Mckay Ripi, and this is episode number two hundred thirty five with the author of rising above lime disease. Naturopathic doctor, Julia Greenspan. Also welcome our show producer and the brains behind lime ninja radio Aurora everybody. And in this episode you're going to learn three main. Thanks, number one. How much time should you wait for new protocol to work before you? Give up on it. Number two, why developing healthy mindset starts with setting boundaries. And how putting yourself I is the most unselfish thing you can do. Thanks ROY, and a big shoutout to all you longtime a lime ninjas. You're the reason we have more than half a million downloads Aurora. And I really appreciate you tuning in, and we'd like to welcome all those new listeners out there. Welcome to. Lime ninja radio. You're now officially alignment, you welcome everybody. And as you know, lime disease is an international problem each week. We have listeners join you from all over the world. And this past week, we've had listeners, tune in from Colombia to Canada, and from India to Estonia, or tell us a little bit about today's guests Julia Greenspan doctor. Julia Greenspan is a natural path who graduated from the university of natural medicine in two thousand six she founded her practice in New Hampshire and quickly started trading lime disease..

Julia Greenspan Lyman Mckay Ripi New Hampshire university of natural medicine producer ROY Colombia Estonia India Canada