5 Burst results for "Julia Gallo"

"julia gallo" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"julia gallo" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"And. The agency worked for Gallo winery. In Gallo Again in the in that in that time was run by Ernest and Giulio. I mean they ran the company. Giulio essentially grew the grapes. He he was that side of the business and earnest ran the business including the marketing. And notoriously difficult client. You know poor stories read, there's just. Like all over the place well. How. Who ultimately walked away from the business. I will say but. For about a period of I'll say six years. He transformed and I when I say he I mean He. because it was his drive and his leadership that convinced Ernest to listen to him, and he was able to build The Gallo brand itself, but also some some other brands came along like like bottles and James Coolers wine coolers at the time. Ian J Brandy Andre Champagne some other brands, but the gala brand itself. which was All was better than people realized. Because the gallows knew how to make good wine, they still do gala. Wines are very good wines There's and it's a private company, and they they. It's it's. winds that are branded Gallo are are quite good, but they weren't given any credit for that at all. Part of the reason was. They weren't presented in a way that bespoke quality. So al. gets involved. In he very painstakingly. Starts to take steps. that. Resulted after about three or four years ago, this was a lot of television advertising at the time in those days. You could do that if you had the money. And and so, how was able to use the vehicle TV advertising complemented with magazines and things like that. Too. Slowly elevate the way. That brand was presented in the way that brand was perceived, and he did things like to talk about the awards that at one end, how many what percentage of the grapes were grown in Napa and Sonoma counties and and everything else and at the end he was able to say. They were able to say in the ads, and actually it was house. Voiceover these these gorgeous. Ads. Talking about the role that gala warnings play or showing the role that gallons play in in a good life and at the end. It just said from Ernest and Julia Gallo all the best. And people believed it because it, because it was true and b because it was, it was story well told. And that was that was how sort of taking something that. Nobody else had been able to succeed at. and. Turn it into something very very successful now. It was still a tough difficult client and eventually house said I'm done. For a whole bunch of different reasons, but the body of work. was incredible and I say and I believe that the effects of that how that brand is perceived lingered to this day, which is over thirty years ago thirty five years ago that he stopped working on. On, Gallo, but you know it was. It was amazing. Stuff that to me is a great example of. Of Where others? Probably just mailed it in. Let's just let's just get the money that they're paying us and we'll do what they say. They say as opposed to having to kind of convincing them to do something better and bigger and more ambitious, and he did it worked. And it was true it was it was you know an earnest proud of it because that's his name. Schools Great Story. And when you eventually became CEO of Ogilvy. In Chicago right and what? How'd your I? Guess what? What what? What was it like to work? Be. The. And I hate to. Think of the madman thing, but my wife's been watching that that's probably rich Eisen show. I get asked all the time, but not as much anymore, but. What Did. Did you feel like that was? Like this kid who started writing and wanted to be an advertising, and then you know you fast forward all these years and here you are. You're top person. That's pretty amazing. Yeah! Yes it was I was very very grateful I was very It was not lost on me. and again when you're CEO of an office. That's a big title, and it's Great but year effectively the general manager of of the office, and and that's okay. That's you know 'cause Ogilvy and there which was called the time now it's just called local. is party WPP, so there's actually a couple of layers of management, but. but I you know I was the person who led that office And then you're responsible for its financial performance, and you're responsible for every function that goes on HR and finance and and production and everything else so it's wonderful, it's that. was great an end and yes, I was I was I was. I was humbled by it every day. It was not my agency. It wasn't my name wasn't on the door so I very much was aware of the fact that I was taking care of it along with our team. Eventually it would pass the somebody else in another team. In of course, it has but the legacy of David Ogilvy. In the legacy of that, that agency brand is powerful I'd say more powerful than any other agency brand. over time since the founding of the agency in the late forties so. I was very inspired by that, and we leveraged those that that that substance of culture. That's still to this day. is present in Ogilby in the David Ogilvy died in nineteen, ninety, nine I believe. in a You know his the way in which he established the agency. It's still keeps. That's still part of what keeps the blood pumping through the place, and that's twenty twenty, which is amazing. And he you know there was one he had many many many many many sayings quotes. `ISMs. But one that he said that that. has influenced me in kind of sums things up as he used to say, we want to be the agency most valued by those who most value brands. And that is a great way for the agency to be positioned because it's not just your ability to do stuff. Know to crank out social media campaigns to be able to produce you know a ton of content every hour. Any of the other things that go on. That's all great and you need to be able to do that. Those are the functional things that are just part of of operating a company, but. To aspire to loftier. Reason, for, being. That you might be able to do a lot of this stuff by yourself, but ultimately. Great ideas that helped to nurture great brands. that's where the action is, and and I'll give you one more example so I actually was at goofy. not in in in actually worked in. Technically in the Chicago office, but spent so the equal amounts of time in the New York and London offices. Working at BP. I've been left. Ogilby just for reasons of the fact that I was constantly gone, and we had four young children at the time. But? Then I came back to Ogilvie as head of the Chicago. Office but while I was there this after I left Miller. We. I was I had global responsibility for part of the BP business. And this was a classic example of the things that can be done the things that we can do in the things that that could be done for a brand. At the time BP. Had just had a new CEO. By the name of John Brown Sir John, Brown at the time and they had they had made some big acquisitions they were, so they were British. Petroleum had very little presence in the United States. they had acquired so high. Oh, so BP and Cleveland was known but. Other than that. It wasn't than they acquired Arco in the West. And then they acquired amical. Big huge standard oil right of of of of Indiana Standard Oil. Amoco. and. John Brown really wanted to give bp its own point view in its own identity in its own footprint. And that's to our story, which will not going to get into, but we wound up. At ogilvy being huge contributors. To a tremendously.

Julia Gallo Ernest CEO BP David Ogilvy Chicago Gallo winery John Brown Ogilvy Giulio Ian J Brandy Andre Champagne Ogilby Arco James Coolers Indiana Standard Oil WPP twenty twenty Napa
"julia gallo" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"julia gallo" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"And. The agency worked for Gallo winery. In Gallo Again in the in that in that time was run by Ernest and Giulio. I mean they ran the company. Giulio essentially grew the grapes. He he was that side of the business and earnest ran the business including the marketing. And notoriously difficult client. You know poor stories read, there's just. Like all over the place well. How. Who ultimately walked away from the business. I will say but. For about a period of I'll say six years. He transformed and I when I say he I mean He. because it was his drive and his leadership that convinced Ernest to listen to him, and he was able to build The Gallo brand itself, but also some some other brands came along like like bottles and James Coolers wine coolers at the time. Ian J Brandy Andre Champagne some other brands, but the gala brand itself. which was All was better than people realized. Because the gallows knew how to make good wine, they still do gala. Wines are very good wines There's and it's a private company, and they they. It's it's. winds that are branded Gallo are are quite good, but they weren't given any credit for that at all. Part of the reason was. They weren't presented in a way that bespoke quality. So al. gets involved. In he very painstakingly. Starts to take steps. that. Resulted after about three or four years ago, this was a lot of television advertising at the time in those days. You could do that if you had the money. And and so, how was able to use the vehicle TV advertising complemented with magazines and things like that. Too. Slowly elevate the way. That brand was presented in the way that brand was perceived, and he did things like to talk about the awards that at one end, how many what percentage of the grapes were grown in Napa and Sonoma counties and and everything else and at the end he was able to say. They were able to say in the ads, and actually it was house. Voiceover these these gorgeous. Ads. Talking about the role that gala warnings play or showing the role that gallons play in in a good life and at the end. It just said from Ernest and Julia Gallo all the best. And people believed it because it, because it was true and b because it was, it was story well told. And that was that was how sort of taking something that. Nobody else had been able to succeed at. and. Turn it into something very very successful now. It was still a tough difficult client and eventually house said I'm done. For a whole bunch of different reasons, but the body of work. was incredible and I say and I believe that the effects of that how that brand is perceived lingered to this day, which is over thirty years ago thirty five years ago that he stopped working on. On, Gallo, but you know it was. It was amazing. Stuff that to me is a great example of. Of Where others? Probably just mailed it in. Let's just let's just get the money that they're paying us and we'll do what they say. They say as opposed to having to kind of convincing them to do something better and bigger and more ambitious, and he did it worked. And it was true it was it was you know an earnest proud of it because that's his name. Schools Great Story. And when you eventually became CEO of Ogilvy. In Chicago right and what? How'd your I? Guess what? What what? What was it like to work? Be. The. And I hate to. Think of the madman thing, but my wife's been watching that that's probably rich Eisen show. I get asked all the time, but not as much anymore, but. What Did. Did you feel like that was? Like this kid who started writing and wanted to be an advertising, and then you know you fast forward all these years and here you are. You're top person. That's pretty amazing. Yeah! Yes it was I was very very grateful I was very It was not lost on me. and again when you're CEO of an office. That's a big title, and it's Great but year effectively the general manager of of the office, and and that's okay. That's you know 'cause Ogilvy and there which was called the time now it's just called local. is party WPP, so there's actually a couple of layers of management, but. but I you know I was the person who led that office And then you're responsible for its financial performance, and you're responsible for every function that goes on HR and finance and and production and everything else so it's wonderful, it's that. was great an end and yes, I was I was I was. I was humbled by it every day. It was not my agency. It wasn't my name wasn't on the door so I very much was aware of the fact that I was taking care of it along with our team. Eventually it would pass the somebody else in another team. In of course, it has but the legacy of David Ogilvy. In the legacy of that, that agency brand is powerful I'd say more powerful than any other agency brand. over time since the founding of the agency in the late forties so. I was very inspired by that, and we leveraged those that that that substance of culture. That's still to this day. is present in Ogilby in the David Ogilvy died in nineteen, ninety, nine I believe. in a You know his the way in which he established the agency. It's still keeps. That's still part of what keeps the blood pumping through the place, and that's twenty twenty, which is amazing. And he you know there was one he had many many many many many sayings quotes. `ISMs. But one that he said that that. has influenced me in kind of sums things up as he used to say, we want to be the agency most valued by those who most value brands..

Julia Gallo David Ogilvy Ernest Gallo winery CEO Ogilvy Giulio Ian J Brandy Andre Champagne Ogilby twenty twenty James Coolers Chicago Napa Sonoma WPP general manager
"julia gallo" Discussed on CXR Podcast

CXR Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"julia gallo" Discussed on CXR Podcast

"Not Enough are. Yeah. He has just a wait and see what everybody comes back with. You guys see you seeing stuff. Come back already all everybody I think. The survey results were in, and the people were okay with with staying home, basically for the time being which is totally different for our consultants, not not that incredibly different for somebody like me in a support role, but but different for the consultants and clients seemed to be okay with. With it as well with us, not being there for the time being and they're not. They're either and there were so they'll be some protocols in place for clients that ask to have our consultants on site to make sure they're safe and comfortable. Our numbers are damn both in Europe in New Jersey by want by law, but is still higher than most states, so it's not making anybody feel real comfortable wandering around. But I wonder, Fo- circa other now. I was GONNA. Say so at one of these meetings that we had or you guys hosted for us. There's been so many I remember. When I got. Who is it from a Ernest Julia Gallo the head of recruiting. Ryan. Ryan! He was talking about the employment branding your. How do you recruit and attract? It's GonNa be how you keep employees safe and so I've been talking a lot with our branding team around like really starting to do like targeted messaging when we're trying to attract people to show like the safety measures. Were a little bit more fortunate because we have a clean room environment, so we can show people bully. In masks and gloves in the whole bunny suit, but It was really you kind of an Aha moment because it's true like it's not now about. How much you pay or what your snacks are to offer, are some of the things you know it's really like safety requirements that an. Can offer so. We're getting ready to put it in our job descriptions that we have..

Ryan Ernest Julia Gallo Europe New Jersey
"julia gallo" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

Hollywood Babble-On

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"julia gallo" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

"Pronounce you did pronounce it right safe. Right on man. Thank you. I know fucking props. Did you look it up or something? You just take a shot. He said in his Email imprint imprint sees pronounce safe. Thank you for. Help. Liz and Andrew Stotz. We know Liz is here Andro come on man. Gave a very modest. I'm here to. Liz, the wanna talk for both of us. My husband really thirteen years, Andrew, and that's why you're so quiet. Coming to see you on the twenty eighth fans. If you're both for a long time, excited to see you. We've had some health scares over the years most recently, Andrew being hospitalized twice for pneumonia this year, breathe better fucker. This is not talking. Yeah, realize this experience was terrifying to me. He is my world and I love him so much. Can sexy Kevin, tell him how to stay healthier so we can grow old together. It would mean so much to me sexy Kevin, could you please tell Andro how to stay out of the hospital, how to stay healthy. Oh, true. You just got to have a healthy guy. You got to eat. What you got to eat is Bizet's footsie. That's my. Now give her yours. Well, done, sir. And Leslie Julio you in the house Julio. The whole, fuck me the, oh, down by the security. Dang, jank. Jank jank jank agenda, Julio and Julia. And or is that Julia? Probably right. Julia. Hey, it's an easy mistake, one, fuck, and Julio one, Julia. It's easy to get those two mixed. Adam is my saying that correctly. And lorraina. Lorraina. Yeah. Not Lorena Bobbitt though. Right? That ruler. I was thinking Lorena Bobbitt when I hear the Raina she cut up guys peanuts member. I remember now Julio and Julia is an excellent fucking title of a movie and or a cheap knockoff wine. Julio and Julia Gallo. My name is Julio and I'll be attending the show with my friends, Julia Adam and the Raina we've been trying to attend for wild, but couldn't work it out for one reason or another. We'll try fucking harder next time. Fuck your first world problems. Right? We finally made it after all this time to celebrate my twenty fifth birthday. I was wondering you, David Bowie could sing me a happy birthday. Well, of course Julio of course he could do. That's what he does now. David. To you. To you. Glad y'all bright teen the day. But day to you. What's so glad that you. Thank you. Chick peas. Difference between the chickpeas garbanzo beam? No, I've never paid garbanzo to be non me. Did you. Trying to go vegan here..

Leslie Julio Julia Julia Adam Julio one Andrew Stotz Liz Lorena Bobbitt Julia Gallo Raina Andro Kevin David Bowie Bizet pneumonia thirteen years twenty fifth
"julia gallo" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

12:13 min | 3 years ago

"julia gallo" Discussed on In The Thick

"This episode of in the thick is brought to you by a way for twenty dollars off a suitcase, visit away travel dot com. Slash in the thick and use promo code in the thick during checkout. The president of the United States is keeping children incarcerated for the sake of his own political goals in gains. Y'all, what's up welcome to in the thick. This is a podcast about politics, race and culture from a POC perspective on money, wholesome, and I'm Julia Gallo very LA and joining us in our Harlem studio isn't in the all-star Jamila, king race, Justice reporter at mother Jones jump de LA own. Oh, nice. Nice to have you back and joining us all the way from the other end of the world. Okay. Other under the country, Los Angeles, another in the thick all-star Jameel Smith senior writer at Rolling Stone magazine. Welcome back to meal. Thank you very much. It's been too long. Okay. So we've got these two amazing in the all stars in the house, and we're going to dive into some of the recent headlines. Okay. Seriously, you guys truth be told, I disconnected the whole weekend. I literally, I went into the country. I was looking at deer and birds and swimming in the league and try not to feel guilty about it and then you know, insanity, right? We have to talk about the latest with immigration, which is really complicated because as you guys know, I've been covering this story, the horrible parts of this story for the entirety of my career. So it's kind of like everybody's like, oh my God. Oh my God. I'm like, been trying to tell you. Okay. But there are of course developments with this administration. Last Wednesday, the nation's Catholic leaders spoke out against the separation of migrant children from their parents of the border. Following this twenty four hours later attorney general sessions quoted the bible to defend the department of Justice, zero tolerance policy of separating immigrant families at the US Mexico border policy, which he instituted I would cite you to the apostle Paul and his clear and wise command Romans thirteen to obey the laws of the government because God is obtain or Dame the government. For his purposes, our policies that can result in short term separation of of families is not unusual or unjustified. And it's really a very short period of time and the Versi cited that used to be used to support slavery in the United States yet press secretary. Sarah Huckabee. Sanders pretty much had sessions is back when she was called out in the briefing room last week during the press conference are. Administration has had the same position since we started and actually do something about it. Jill EMMY MTO go on sir, and your apparent don't have any empathy for what these people are going to have less Ryan's, God's settle down. These people have nothing they ran. I know you wanna get some more TV Tom, and that's I want to recognize you. Go ahead, Jill dude. You know, the other thing is that like Laura Bush was out, you know, writing about how this looks like Erie, like the imprisonment of American citizens during the Japanese internment. And then you had over the weekend Father's Day weekend. A lot of protests at these detention centers and camps along the border, what's essentially getting lost in the national dialogue and how do we report on this because you have homeland security, secretary, Kirsten, Nielsen sane quote. We do not have a policy of separating families at the border period, but her same department has confirmed that the US government has separated almost two thousand children from there. Parents at the border since the zero tolerance policy began. Okay. Jamila. So pick it up. So I feel like one thing that's getting losses that the US government separating children is not a new phenomenon, right? If anything is very much in line with what has happened to various communities over the course of the founding of this country. And before, I think what makes this particularly unique is that it's falling within this narrative of just outrageous things at the Trump administration is doing. And so if played correctly by Democrats, right? Like it could be something that's galvanizing it could be something that's finally bipartisan and that you know, sparks outrage. But I think the question is, where does that outrage get us? As we've seen with so many things in the Trump administration, you can be really, really angry about something and it won't change. So as someone who is not covered immigration heavily but is seeing this play out, right? It's heartbreaking, but it is interesting to look at it from the perspective of how this plays into the calculation. Of both the Trump administration and the Trump administration's critics Djamil I think that you know, you have issues that are, you know extensively outrageous to everybody, mass incarceration lead poisoning police brutality, and those don't attract the kind of outrage in horror. Despite the fact that you you have twelve year old kids like Tamir rice being killed on the street for playing with a toy. You don't see widespread outrage that you see here is in. That's because they are staging a an atrocity that everyone can understand. Yeah, that everyone can empathize with like there aren't many families in this country that can't understand the pain of what would be like to have a child ripped away from a parent child who doesn't understand that, you know, no matter how young they are, how badly that they would miss their mom and dad, if they were telling torn away from them, this is an issue that everyone at a very base level can understand. And relate to and not just understand, but just to really grasp the horror of, I hope that this momentum will carry forth and can be applied to other offenses and other injustices that don't necessarily attract the attention of the large audience. Right? And I don't know if you guys heard or saw this, but Nielsen was also speaking to a sheriff's association nor in Orleans on Monday morning and kind of double down there. Some would like us to look the other way when dealing with families at the border and not enforced the law passed by congress, including, unfortunately, some members of congress has administrations may have done so, but we will not. We do not have the luxury of pretending that all individuals coming to this country as a family unit are in fact a family. We have to do our job. We will not apologize for doing for job. The language is being used as well to seems to be completely dehumanizing. Shamila I agree with you that I don't think it matters. You can be all this outrage, but does it really matter? Yeah, no. So I was actually struck by something that Susan Collins. He's a Republican from Maine said over the weekend on face the nation, which was that these children are innocent victims, which obviously their children they are, but I think that points to something, but he had that. You've talked a lot about which is that you know, in this debate over immigration, we often have to characterize folks as criminals, right? We all thin have to say that the parents are guilty of bringing their children here, but the children are innocent and it's how we deal with, you know, innocent kids who are just needlessly put in this situation and that's the deeply problematic issue. Right? It's that's was not getting. We're not getting to the core of unpacking that of talking about, well, no folks are coming here for a reason and let's talk about that. You cannot see your own humanity in them to say that if you were terrified about your child. Being slaughtered or recruited into a gang or raped, you'd be running as fast as you could to wear ever country that you could or any place, but it's like you look at them and you're like, but they're just like a legal, right? And that's like the insidious part of the dehumanisation. There's a lot of like if you listen to the department of homeland security secretary, you're gonna think, oh, well, if people commit a crime, they serve their sentence and their children have to be alone that happens and it's like, no, no, no. You need to understand that these are people who are coming with their children to apply for refugee status to actually ask for asylum. And it's in that moment when the government is saying, if you have come into this country without any permission whatsoever, you are now committing an illegal act and we're charging you with a crime. They've essentially created a new mass of people who they are labeling as criminals. As you said. Milan now they're criminals. They're illegal, therefore they've got to serve their sentence. They've got to be charged, therefore their children have to be taken away. Therefore, this is all part of the law right? Djamil I mean, if you heard that and you have no sensibility, you're kind of like, wait, that makes sense, right? You touch on something I think is really important Trump in his defense of this policy keeps calling it a law. Civically a law passed by the Democrats not shown that apparently Democrats only despite not being in the majority in either house of congress are the only ones who can do something about it. And that's important because when people believe that people are breaking the law. You know, that is a different way to think about it as opposed to weird choosing to do this to people. And instead, you know, it's almost like they're saying that we have this involuntary response that we need to carry out which involves separating children from their families. Yeah, yeah. And either not hearing them at this being done to white immigrants. Right. You're just not. You're hearing about this being done to specifically immigrants from Mexico Central America and from the African diaspora. So does this law apply to white immigrants as well? We don't see any evidence of that. I actually bet it is happening Jameel, but the thing is, is that again as journalists we can't get in right? We don't have axes. We can't take pictures. We can't see anything so. And as a journalist, you, if you're going to get inside, you have to actually be looking for the the kid who looks like he could be the child of a Russian immigrant or of a polish McGrane before. We move onto our next segment though. I just want to. So everybody's upset. You know, I've heard some immigration activists just be like, we know the problem is is that everybody's just going to say about Trump, but this is a much bigger issue, but just take me to the midterms. Does this move anything in terms of electoral politics at all? Jamila. I'm optimistic, I think so, yeah. Do you think do not expecting that? I think that people who are not necessarily folks who may have voted Republican, but folks who may have sat this one right, menfolk sword. It's like, you know what? I don't care about politics. I don't care about Trump. They're going to be activated. They're going to be activated in places that are growing populations of immigrants. I would hope right. Like this is all contingent upon, like obviously what the Democratic Party does, and that's a whole nother issue. But my hope is that people are activated, people are outraged Nuff. Right? What do you do with the outrage in the story of America? Vote Jameel? Are you in green -ment. I'm in full agreement actually. I think that by the time those elections roll around if Trump sticks to his guns, you're going to see tens of thousands of these children in these camps. You're going to see lots of them outdoors in camps, like the one Antonio, Texas, that just was established in one hundred degree heat also that Trump can try to extract concessions from the Democrats for his border wall, which if the Democrats have any sense, they will not give him if the Democrats play their cards, right? They should be painting this as what it is which is a hostage crisis. The president of the United States is keeping children incarcerated for the sake of his own political goals in gains that is a real problem. And that's what's actually happening.

United States Trump administration Jameel Smith Jamila Trump Los Angeles congress president secretary Mexico Nielsen Rolling Stone magazine Jill EMMY Harlem Julia Gallo Laura Bush Democratic Party