16 Burst results for "Julia Carrie Wong"

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:59 min | 5 d ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"If America. Has It gone beyond America? Has It reached Europe? It has it. It's really gone international Latin. America's some parts of Asia and Europe have all kind of seen growing, queue it on movements. I know that. In Europe save our children marches started to take off in recent weeks. And, there has been again kind of this confluence between that and then other kind of far right groups. Another one that is from Mike Collusion Liverpool. Hello, James. Everywhere, I go on a lot of people that I may a talking about queuing a non child trafficking child abuse and the dynamic being used against us some even believe the viruses fake but nobody in the media seems to be addressing any of the above subject I kinda of got the reply Upset are kind of based on conspiracy theories about five G. have have kind of adopted this and such that you had thousands of people in London that were gathering some of whom were carrying. On. Signs or Cunanan flags also had a very large protests in Germany. March in Berlin is mostly against corona virus restrictions but there are a lot of Cunanan supporters here. Thanks to the corona virus that Cunanan conspiracy theory is spreading around the world like a pandemic. You may not know the answer to this but do you have any sense of whether the German or British or European supporters of Cunanan also buy into the trump theory? All they worshiping trump through this. I think that in general it is adapting toward local politics. I think that in these different kind of closed networks, people can pick and choose the aspects of the conspiracy theory that worked for them within the broad narrative of the powerful ball. So it sounds like is bigger than trump which brings me to the next question I was going to ask, does this come to an end if he's no longer in office? One hopes. You know I spoke to a a man who lives in Texas whose wife has become a true believer in Cunanan and he is not a believer and you know he he was telling me that you know he feels very confident that once trump is no longer in office that this will disappear And I would love to believe that but when you look at kind of the longer view. Of what this fundamental narrative is I mean the blood libel conspiracy theory has existed for a thousand years. You know we all want to believe that World War Two ended any false belief that US actually control the world, and yet here we are again with a new spin on the same old conspiracy theories so. It's possible that whoever is posting his cue could be exposed. It's possible that trump gets voted out of office, but I don't have a huge amount of optimism that this is something that's just going to go away. Genia. Thank you very much. Thank you. That was Julia Carrie Wong. You can follow her reporting on cue and on and Silicon Valley at the Guardian Dot Com. My thanks to her and to might rains. That set for today this episode was produced by mightily row. Sound design was by Nicholas. Cox the Executive Producers Unequal Jackson and Phil Maynard. We'll be. Back Tomorrow.

Cunanan Europe America Julia Carrie Wong US Berlin James Nicholas London Germany Executive Unequal Jackson Texas Silicon Valley Asia Phil Maynard
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"About voting related to the Corona virus. It will also limit political ads in the week before the election a week the new regulations amount to fixing a nuclear reactor with duct tape and some spit. Facebook, which runs on money generating algorithms is hazardous to our collective health says its former VP for user growth Palihapitiya. Because the quote short term dopamine driven feedback loops that we have created are destroying how society works. Julia Carrie Wong is a senior technology reporter for The Guardian. She says that the violence that spilled into the streets of Kenosha had its origins on Facebook. Of course it did. The Kenosha guard was almost exclusively a creation of Facebook itself. The militia leader. Quote unquote is a man named Kevin Matheson. He basically set up a Facebook page during the George Flake protests, but the page didn't really go anywhere. Up until the police shooting of Jacob Blake. That's when this Facebook event kind of snowballed was the use of Facebook by the Kenosha guard. Typical of these vigilante groups, you know, and not entirely short. But they think it might have been one week before this all happened. Facebook announced that they were going to crack down on us based malicious that we're using it sight to organize. They said that they were taking down 980 groups 520 pages. Starting with the militias that head used language that suggested that they were encouraging violence. But Facebook did have some basic rules in place for a while banning organizations from the site that we're explicitly violent like terrorist organizations, criminal cartels. What were the contours of those regulations? If you have a violent mission, and if you're not state based, you're not allowed to use its platform in other countries. Facebook has also banned armed ethnic organizations that might be recognised under international law. Facebook said, because they're not state actors. They should not be allowed on the platform. But these rules are clearly problematic. If you look at history, the African National Congress would not have been allowed to use Facebook's tools to connect people that we're fighting against the impressive racist regime. If you look at Rwanda, they would have prevented the Tutsi rebels from using their tools while allowing the Hutu genocidaires because one was in state power, and one was There's been, I think a bit of a double standard. I'm sure that Facebook is full of double standards. But in the U. S. We have this thriving subculture of Militia movements for a long time allowed to remain on Facebook. The three percenters the oath keepers, these non governmental groups that are nevertheless armed and whose rhetoric at least if not, their actions, for the most part, includes a lot of discussion of potential violence. So These are very difficult rules to enforce their very difficult calls to make. Yeah. Isn't that the problem that when the catchall category of Facebook is quote, dangerous organization? Who gets to determine what that is. It's up concern. You know, here in the United States. We have a lot of criticism about how Facebook is making these decisions. How Facebook is drawing its lines. 90% of these books users aren't even here in the U. S. Where we have the most attention from Facebook staff. So when we're calling out Facebook for making a mistake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, you have to recognize that Facebook put more effort into getting that decision. Right then they possibly could have been any other country around the world. Because this is where they have the vast majority of the policy, people paying attention to the potential backlash and even still there, often making the wrong call. And recently, Facebook has been trying to figure out howto camp down on groups that aren't explicitly violent but could provoke violence. What prompted them to go further. It was a lot of pressure over how they were going to start dealing with Q and on cue and has been exploding on Facebook. It's consistently been tied to vigilante violent acts. And at the same time you can't look at Q and on and say that it falls into the same category as Isis or Rapada, so they were trying to straddle the line between The aspects of kun on which our political speech and the parts that are deeply committed to a false interpretation of reality. To the extent that they might be interested in inciting violence. The fact that Cuban on is a pro trump movement, and that we've seen Facebook show very little appetite for challenging Right? And in the U. S. Probably plays into their decision to chart a middle ground here. Nora's Facebook banning the groups that it flags as malicious. It's more like You know they're on notice. They've created this separate category for groups like you and on militias and antifa to the extent that Antifa used his Facebook, which I think is pretty absurd. They basically said that all of thes groups are on notice. So a normal group like neighborhood soccer team or pita that uses Facebook if one person says something violent in that group because they lost their temper. Soccer game goes really bad or something really outrageous happens at the people meeting. The group itself will not be banned its possible that Facebook would remove that single post and might put the user that set it in, like 24, hour, time out or something. But for human on groups and for militia groups, it's one strike and you're out. You can set up the Kenosha guard and you can say this is a militia were all about safety. But the moment that you start talking about encouraging violence. That's when you're done After the violence you saw on Facebook and Instagram, which it owns. Depictions of the alleged shooter as a saint is a marker As soon as this shooting happened, Facebook's policy team designated this shooting as a mass shooting. It means Nobody is allowed to represent in a positive manner, the shooter or the shooting itself because we've seen mass killers lionized by extremist groups, and what was really just deeply disturbing was that there was ah lot of groups and pages that were posting means of this alleged shooter. Photos of him with his gun. There were taglines, saying that he was a hero. One of the ones that just really upset me was a mean that showed a photo of him and it said three Commies down. There were also three separate fundraisers for the alleged shooter. Those fundraisers, which are technically banned by Facebook, garnered more than 20,000 shares over a couple of days. Facebook had very little to say for itself. It took them. More than 24 hours to get back to my questions and then took down the things that I had specifically linked them to. Then there's the problem. Facebook's removal of the posts, reinforcing the You're censoring my right to say things that whole deal, right? Exactly How do you thread that needle? It's a very, very complicated one, right? Because within the first day of this shooting taking place, we saw Tucker Carlson on Fox News, offering a justification, really surprised that looting and arson accelerated to murder. How shocked are we? That 17 year olds with rifles decided they had to maintain order when no one else would That kind of set the tone for The way that the Wright was going to justify this. I don't envy Facebook having to deal with that situation when you have the ruling party, offering up a justification for an extrajudicial killing in a video that was released from an internal meeting at Facebook. CEO Mark Zuckerberg responded to criticism over the company's impotence in the face of militia organizing the contractors and the reviewers who the initial complaints were funneled to basically didn't pick this up and on. Second review, doing it more sensitively. The team that was that's responsible for dangerous organizations recognize that thiss violated the policies and and we took it down. He played it on the contractors, which was interesting. The contractors being people that don't actually work for Facebook don't actually get any of the perks of working for Facebook, but are kind of tasked with dealing with The worst detritus of the Internet every day at low wages, often in other countries. Yeah. You recently spoke to Ellen Pao, the former CEO of Reddit. He said. Basically that you subcontract things you don't care about and you don't care about things you subcontract. Alan Powell was the CEO of a reddit trying really hard to clean up that platform..

Facebook Kenosha guard Kenosha militia dopamine CEO Mark Zuckerberg Julia Carrie Wong soccer Rwanda VP George Flake reporter Kevin Matheson Ellen Pao United States Jacob Blake Alan Powell Reddit thiss
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"<Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> ooh! That <Speech_Male> was Julia <Speech_Music_Female> Carrie, Wong. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> wanted to do this episode <Speech_Male> with her. <Speech_Female> Because <Speech_Female> the amazing <Speech_Female> piece, she wrote <Speech_Male> about what she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> has gone through. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Do look <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> up at the Guardian <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Dot. com, <Speech_Female> it's title <Speech_Music_Female> is the hate facebook <Speech_Female> fosters <Speech_Female> destroys lives. <Speech_Female> Here's what <Speech_Female> it did to me. <Speech_Female> And while <Speech_Female> you're bad, do read <Speech_Female> all of her <Speech_Female> brilliant reporting <Speech_Female> on their stretching <Speech_Music_Female> back <Speech_Music_Female> years. <Speech_Music_Female> We went to facebook <Speech_Female> about this episode <Speech_Female> and a spokesperson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> side. We are <Speech_Female> making progress keeping <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> activity off our <Speech_Music_Female> platform. <Speech_Female> We've found over two hundred <Speech_Female> and fifty white supremacist <Speech_Female> organizations <Speech_Female> and removed <Speech_Female> four point seven million <Speech_Female> pieces of content <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to organize <Speech_Female> hate globally <Speech_Music_Female> in the first quarter <Speech_Female> of twenty twenty <Speech_Female> over ninety <Speech_Female> six percent of which <Speech_Female> we found before some <Speech_Music_Female> reported it. <Speech_Female> This is an increase <Speech_Female> from three months earlier <Speech_Male> when we removed one point, <Speech_Female> six million posts <Speech_Female> over eighty <Speech_Music_Female> nine percent of which <Speech_Music_Female> we found before someone <Speech_Music_Female> reported to us. <Speech_Female> We are committed <Speech_Music_Female> to keeping hate of <Speech_Music_Female> our platform. <Speech_Music_Female> FACEBOOK <Speech_Female> also said <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that they remove any <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> content that celebrates <Speech_Female> defense <Speech_Female> or attempts <Speech_Female> to justify the Holocaust, <Speech_Female> or mocks <Speech_Female> Holocaust victims <Speech_Female> or accuses <Speech_Female> them of lying about <Speech_Female> the atrocities <Speech_Female> or hate against <Speech_Music_Female> Jewish people in <Speech_Female> any way. <Speech_Female> They said that <Speech_Female> they had commissioned an <Speech_Female> independent human <Speech_Music_Female> rights impact assessment <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> the role of their services <Speech_Female> in Myanmar <Speech_Music_Female> that have been published <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in two thousand <Speech_Music_Female> and eighteen. <Speech_Female> They said the progress <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was being made <Speech_Female> across five key areas, <Speech_Female> including accountability, <Speech_Female> improving <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> enforcement <Speech_Female> of content <SpeakerChange> policies, <Speech_Music_Male> engagement, trust <Speech_Music_Female> and transparency. That <Speech_Female> set today. <Speech_Female> This episode was produced <Speech_Female> by Serena <Speech_Female> Boxing. <Speech_Female> Sound design <Speech_Female> was by Axel Kukuchi <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> executive producers <Speech_Female> on coal. Jackson <Speech_Music_Female> and Phil <Speech_Music_Female> may not. <SpeakerChange>

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Few days later, we saw kind of the debut of. Another kind of aggressive move in this PR campaign, Nick Clegg, who is now facebook's top executives for policy and communications, and formerly our Deputy Prime Minister of course, of course he published an OP. Ed In a trade publication for the advertising industry where he was making the case that actually facebook is a hate and kind of attempting to recast our kind of general consideration of facebook to say. Let's stop focusing so much on what's bad and start really calculating and paying attention to all of the good things that happen on facebook, which to me kind of suggests that they have come up with some kind of moral calculus and moral algorithm. And that that on balance facebook is is coming out on top. How did you imagine that working when I was reading? The Clegg's Abed just have this a mental image of him. You know sitting down with his balance sheet at the end of the quarter, and saying well I see that in the red. We have this murder of a security officer who allegedly was carried out by extremists who met and coordinated their attack on facebook. But look here's one for the black and adorable grandmother just liked a photo posted by grandson who lives five hundred miles away I'm sort of joking, but there is a very serious side to this the the most kind of notable being that face, because actually been implicated by the United Nations for playing a role in the genocide of the Rohingya in Myanmar has been used to incite violence against Rohingya refugees living in the country's routine state. Rohingyas are a Muslim minority group. Myanmar's Buddhists led military launch brutal crackdown on the group last summer, forcing around seven hundred thousand Rohingyas to flee their homes. FACEBOOK is trying to deal with this blow to its reputation. It's not just appetizers themselves it some of the groups you mentioned the NGOs who are cooling on appetizers to boycott, a platform groups like color of change and. They actually have had a meeting with. Zia Mark Zuckerberg I. How did that guy? Yes so they had a meeting with Sucker Berg. You know the number one word that the leaders who were part of that meeting kept repeating after it was just disappointing. These groups have been talking and talking and talking and talking with facebook facebook. Keep saying well. Let's keep having a dialogue. Let's keep having a dialogue and at this point they seem pretty pretty fed up and kind of just over the idea that dialogue is going to is going to move the needle because they've been in dialogue for several years now it seems to me that the maybe many reasons why facebook don't act more on this I'm just interested in whether. In their minds, it's a practical thing that they think it's too hard to do because of the size of their platform, or if it's a conscious moral decision, they think it's not their job to intervene I think that with facebook and this this is just speculation, but I do think that there is a way in which they have taken a pragmatic approach, and then kind of Jerry rigged a moral argument on top of it at scale that facebook operates. It is probably impossible for facebook to be. Responsible and vigilant about hate on the platform. You know they are in more than one hundred countries. This is more than a hundred languages every single. kind of local context is different and hate. Speech is not something that can be algorithm. Mickley determined it is. You know in almost every case. It is expressed through context so there are plenty of kind of you know statements that would sound completely benign if they were made in a context of total equality that suddenly become very frightening. If you can understand the historic racist dog whistles, for example in the US, where there's you know, there's a whole vocabulary of how racism in the US can be expressed without using slurs. The idea that facebook could do an effective job of being a a moderator of of all of those different communities. Is probably just fundamentally unrealistic. It should not be controversial among people that are thinking seriously about free expression that if you only pay attention to not censoring and don't pay any attention to the ways in which those you are choosing not to censor might be using speech to silence others. You are failing to protect the freedom of expression of vulnerable groups, because there are groups that are subject to harassment campaigns and subject to pressure to be silenced. And facebook has time and time again. Just kind of fill to acknowledge. That failed to see that. If you have white nationalist on your platform that are doing everything they can to silence people that say that white nationalism is bad. That you're not creating an environment for free expression. You're actually just letting your platform behind jacked by hate. And Julia that sounds. Like exactly what happened to you that groups who you spoke up against sought to silence you in the most horrifying way. All Ye sometimes tempted to pull back and not right about this. Yes. We haven't done not yet..

facebook Nick Clegg Sucker Berg Myanmar Zia Mark Zuckerberg Deputy Prime Minister United Nations Rohingyas US Abed murder Julia Mickley officer harassment Jerry
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

08:15 min | 2 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Of the Jew. In the meticulous math, mathematical mind of a Chink, the creativity that these people have when it comes to just saying the most hateful and disgusting things about. Race and gender is it's just a strange thing to know that I exist that. My family exists that we have what I think of as a very beautiful mixed family with you know different heritage's and that is something that I've always been. Crowd, of because I love my family and I love our story in the fact that my parents got together at a time when interracial marriage was not that common in that you know my grandparents became friends and you know there's all this. Stuff that to me is very beautiful about my family, and so to have that be twisted into something that is so disgusting, ugly to other people to have that part of me be. The subject of somebody's disgust, not anything that I've done as an actual. You know actor as an agent. Things that I've done in my life, you know it's just difficult to kind of be face to face with that just kind of base discussed with my own existence. I mean of me wants to say to you. Don't listen to a word of there S. Beautiful Image of of your family life as well. The vast vast vast majority of the people in the world would say, and these are disgusting people on the extreme on the other hand. You know I've never even one hundred of what you're describing and I've sat in my lounge and cried my eyes out literally about streams of Abuse Online, it is very very difficult for you to deal with and it must. Must have been incredibly scary as well. It's I. Mean this is. This is just something that I'm continuing to kind of deal. With as a reporter I used to report on police I used to report on protests and I would go out, and and the threat that I would be aware of something that was physical, and that was one kind of threat, and this other type of threat has just been. it's it's. It's just difficult to to deal with, because it is predominantly just demento thing right like they. This is a tactic to get people to stop reporting on them. It's a tactic to get people to stop trying to stop them from gaining more supporters. They stream of. Came to you through all sorts of different platforms, but it began because of your reporting on how some of these grapes were not being banned. From facebook. Did you go to facebook. Did you tell them? The group's still operating on their site targeting Eli this? It's interesting because with other platforms there have been instances where staff have noticed a harassment campaign and have actually reached out proactively. Facebook has never done that with me. I don't really want or need facebook to to deal with my personal situation, so I'm not sure what I would even want facebook to do what I mean besides what these articles are about. which is that I want facebook to actually enforce its policies against white nationalism on its platform. Want facebook to stop providing its tools to hateful extremists, and even if he didn't go to them on a personal level, you have been gained to them about. What you found in November. They acted in one case, but not others. Did anything further happened beyond that no. I mean no, so even just in the in the past couple of months and knew explicitly violent far right. Arose on facebook called the Blue Group and despite being alerted over and over again throughout this spring, facebook did nothing until after there had been multiple. Criminal violent acts linked to the group and again facebook finally took action on those groups, but only after somebody had died. COMING UP! The pressure mounts on facebook as a campaign to stop hate for profit is noticed by the world's biggest appetizers. Since you and of as become hiding, pressure onto facebook about some of these graves, a lot has happened to the social media giant. We've of course had pandemic The black lives matter protests that began in the wake of George Floyd's death. FACEBOOK didn't add against Donald Trump's post. The one where he wrote wants the looting starts shooting stars and. That became a flashpoint around failure by the platform to tackle hate at one point mess. Staff staged virtual walkout. We covered this period where it all UK technology editor Alex, hearn! But really it feels like the turning point for facebook. Seems to have come when appetizer started to pull out. Tell me how that took shape. The controversy over the the looting shooting threat that trump posted. It seems that that helped to coalesce This coalition of organizations that came together to say all right enough is enough we need to. We need to go after facebook's bottom line, groups, color, change and NWC, EP the anti-defamation League. Some other organizations came together. They called this boycott. And they were asking advertisers to stop running ads on facebook platform for the month of July, it started to gather steam. It was getting a lot of support from the outdoors industry, and then it was a Friday, just at the end of June was kind of first thing in the morning on that Friday Unilever, which is one of the largest consumer brands kind of holding companies in the world and and I think one of. Of the largest advertisers in the world they announced that they were pulling all their advertisements from facebook, instagram and twitter, and not just for a month, but actually for six months so shortly after that announcement, you know all of the reporters on the facebook. beat got an email from facebook. Saying just wanted to let you know that. Literally in twelve minutes from now mark, Zuckerberg will be going live on facebook with an update Twelve minute won't. AMMO I did I. I was like wow. Much notice. This doesn't seem just doesn't seem like. It was hastily thrown together in any way. I know I've got this kind of an image in my mind. Just panicking. FACEBOOK's will I assume are incredibly shiny headquarters in Silicon Valley running around. Yeah, believer of God. What can we do so so can? You must have sat down at your computer. I'm watched what happened? Sadly I think that probably the the mental images that everybody was running around in their own homes, because we're so under lockdown here Mark Zuckerberg appeared on this video stream he. I have to be honest. I mean he's not. He's not comfortable public speaker, but he seemed particularly uncomfortable and kind of on the defensive. We determine the content may lead to violence or deprive people of their right to vote. We're GONNA take that content down. Who says it or Anada cropped? He announced some very league minor tweaks to some face, but policies which seemed they seemed. To appease certain criticisms, but they were quite narrow. It didn't really work. You know I think it was just a few hours after a Coburg appearance that coca-cola another massive advertiser of course also pulled out and joined the boycott a.

facebook Donald Trump Mark Zuckerberg reporter Coburg George Floyd Unilever harassment anti-defamation League UK coca-cola Eli Blue Group editor twitter Alex instagram hearn
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

07:13 min | 2 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Julia this started in late twenty nineteen. When as a tech reporter, you're covering the controversy around the launch facebook news, and in particular the decision to include the highly controversial Breitbart News as a trusted source. That lead you onto another story. Didn't it being a tech reporter guests? At in this day and age to include this intersection with. Him and hate in the context of that. I decided to take a look at how facebook was doing. When it came to keeping explicit and openly white nationalist groups off of its platform with facebook the there's always a huge gap between what the stated policy is, and what the actual reality is when it comes to them. Actually! Putting in the resources to police their own platforms, so I decided to just go take a look and see what was out there among the groups that I found was read ice TV which is a a really violently hateful Neo Nazi Organization v Dare which is one of the oldest and kind of more, established, vehemently anti immigrant. Organizations these were just some of the groups that were still existing on the platform in in November, twenty, nineteen. You know which is two and a half years after you know. We had seen killing by white nationalists in Charlottesville more than six months after facebook had said that they had banned white nationalism that this stuff was still on their platform I mean that was pretty shocking. What happened when you alerted facebook tour? What happened when I learned facebook to? It was what normally happens when I have alerted facebook to these in the past, which is that they did nothing a will tend to respond by saying. You know yes, that like we do. Do have a policy against white nationalism, but then they will start to argue around the edges and simply say you know our policies don't apply here. We published our articles a couple of days later. I think maybe five or six days after publication they did come back to me and say that they had decided that red ice TV that they were going to ban that group. They did not take the same action against V dare. Vedra remained on the platform until actually this May when they kicked them off for violating a completely different policy and other groups such as Holocaust denial groups that I had also fled to them. We're using the platform. They just said explicitly actually that they don't have any policy against coastal. I mean you set the? facebook reacted in the way that they've reacted before. What happened before, so this is. This is not the first time that I've that I've gone to to facebook with information about far right extremist hate groups using their platform to organize. It's actually the third time. Know just in three years. That I've done this. It's kind of turned into an annual tradition and one that I wish it didn't have to to do. In twenty seventeen I started working on a story about what I was observing, which was that there are a lot of extremist groups and a lot of extremist organisations were popping up in the real world that had their roots in organizing on facebook. This is not snot. People that are kind of hiding themselves as like a men's club, this was. People that were using the language of Jim Crow. Groups that were existing openly on the platform. And when I took that to facebook, you know they. They had no problem with I. Think anything more than a couple. I you know I think that they took down the ones that actually had kkk in the name, but many of the most dangerous groups that would a couple of weeks later become kind of national and international news because of their involvement in the Charlottesville unite the right protests that resulted in the death of heather higher, many of those organizations facebook looked at them and said yeah. We have no problem with them using our platform. You know they're. They're not using the platform because they WANNA. Share pictures of their kits. Extremist. Groups use facebook because they want to recruit new members. They want to organize line events, and they want to spread their propaganda. Either you know by finding a new audience or by a harassing and going after the people that they hate so there's no kind of. Neutral positive use of facebook as a tool by hate groups. That's not what they're there for. And, that was facebook, but of course the next thing that happened was the white nationalist groups using the platform began to target you. Tell me how they responded. They they they responded with a lot of anger and I guess not surprisingly a lot of hate. When we published an article that points out that you know. These groups are on facebook against facebook's stated rules. The the perception rate is that you know. I'm saying that these groups should come off of facebook, and when it comes to white nationalist hate groups. Yes, I think that those groups should come off facebook with the November story. What was kind surprising was that. Breitbart which I had also discussed in my article, decided to assign a reporter to write about me and started sending emails to me me, emailing my editor, trying to assert that I am the real racist. And at the same time, the white nationalist groups started to attack me on social media and start to spread the word that I was this evil leftists mainstream reporter that was trying to censor them. That was trying to get them kicked off the Internet I. think that they kind of worked in tandem and it just kind of unleashed this massive harassment campaign that was quite ugly and difficult. You know just. Tons and tons and tons of you know just websites blogs kind of pseudo publications that I don't really WanNa name because I don't send people to their websites, but. They've started writing articles about me, Kind of dissecting my particular racial background, which is half, Chinese and half Jewish and that. Of course is something that is just disgusting and appalling to to white nationalists into racists. I think we all try to or I. Try to pretend like this. Stuff doesn't bother me, you know. I'm a reporter, I. You know. I went looking at this stuff, but. At the same time you know, it is deeply kind of. Disturbing to look at an article written on some website that talks about me by my full name. includes a picture of me and then says you know that I I am the result of a of a racial Molotov cocktail that you know it's so frightening because. The. You know that that unite the cunning.

facebook tech reporter reporter Breitbart Charlottesville Julia Vedra Jim Crow harassment heather editor
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today, how white nationalist groups that were allowed to operate on facebook launched a campaign of hate against Guardian Journalist Julia Carrie one. Before, we start this episode. I just want to warn you that it does begin with distressing personal account. Went home last November to visit my family for Thanksgiving McGregor, one hundred and five years old, and she was starting to really decline in her health. We knew that it was the last Thanksgiving that we were gonNA have with her and my family always cooks. This kind of traditional Chinese American stuffing I and my sister-in-law, both picks the the sausage out the sticky rice because we eat sausage, I just have this vivid memory of her kind of. Reaching across to take the sausage herself, and saying what you don't know how to live and thinking to myself that nobody could ever say her that she didn't know how to live. The other really strong memories that I have from that Thanksgiving though a moment when I had kind of gone into the kitchen, my phone was in there and I looked down and I had an had a new email. And I it up in. It was a horrifying racist slur filled rape threat. I don't remember precisely what but I do remember that there was the expressing a desire, not just to rape me, but also I think took cut me up into pieces and kill me and I remember just kind of like dropping. Dropping my phone and kind of you looking away like realizing that I just had to not say anything that I had to pretend that nothing had happened because this was the last Thanksgiving that we were going to spend with. My my Popa my grandmother. and. I didn't want us to spend it talking about the the Nazis that at the time were were trying to scare me. It's really harrowing to hear about that message that my colleague. Julia Carrie Wong was forced to read during a family dinner and even more distressing when you find out that it was one of dozens of hateful messages sent to her. Happened after Julia reported on her attempt to get white, nationalist organizations removed from facebook. What happened next was weeks of racist and sexist harassment by supporters of those groups. From, The Guardian I'm initiative Astana. Today focus. Becoming the target of a campaign.

Thanksgiving McGregor Julia Carrie Wong facebook Julia Carrie rape Julia Astana harassment
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Emma

Emma

15:28 min | 5 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Emma

"And hello welcome back to the PODCAST. Podcast that is still locked. Down and pair of podcasters. You still haven't seen each other now for several weeks several weeks. It does feel like that as well as time. Strange right now they face it Nehal. Yeah we've not been having our campuses being close to a snow for water week. I think There was two. I've I'm losing track me. Two at time has become strange. Tying feel suspended I feel suspended in time. We probably describe our circumstance. Right now sat in a car. This podcast down the line Because obviously we ought to be in the same place we are. We are social distancing from one another. So yes I in the car outside my dogs because everybody is sleep. It's quite late night. I don't have the luxury of any kind of guarantee or anything cars. A very good record in because they're very very dead inside their designed to kind of debt and old road noise and the engine noise. They're great space to record and But I am literally parked on the side of the road outside my house. I can pick up my Wifi from outside the House and Yeah it's Dark. It's cold and some people just won't pass but addicting. They sold me the link. We go to bring you this podcast. I feel I feel with surpassing ourselves. I think this is good. Yeah it's I I imagine you're probably you're comfortable high so you. My surroundings are nowhere near as as Quirky as yours right. Now I'm in the The tranquility of my study and Yeah I have no cocker Spaniel. You'll be pleased to hear a wandering around me. 'cause he's tie-dyed to walks. Because these self-isolating times we take the dog different shifts so got levingston walked to within an inch of his life or I'm just wondering if all the coding skin to be interrupted by the police coming past asked me whether my journey from my front door to my car was essential or not. The answer is yes it is. We hope that it might feel like proper journalists than some police manno tapping on your window. You Talk I live so we are going to bring you our traditional holiday light edition of Blogs tweets and stories from the news that we've gathered together Mine certainly are not particularly education related as usual. We haven't told each other what we've got an advanced but I can tell you that minor pretty far removed from the world of education deliberately so well one of mine is education related Quite short but the other one is definitely not related. Although I'm sure I'll I'll make some tenuous links But yeah hopefully you will find them of interest and if not you can always switch off. Please don't just stay with us if you can't stay with it. Just it can be freezing in the dark car recorded this. That's worthwhile yeah. Stick it out. Go the long distance for Tom. I'm going I'm going to start this off. You're going to start off with something. Work related this tweet. That came out on a very ominous day. Actually on the sixteenth of March twenty twenty which. I'm pretty sure was the day. That are poor Stevens. We're told that they could no longer be Going into school on their place but anyway this is not related to that. This comes from an a twitter handle at our S and school network. Which is an abbreviation of Research Schools Network? Which is an England based organization? I think have lots of connections with other organizations that we talked about on this podcast such as the Education Endowment Foundation. They have tweeted a quote from a guest blog on the education. Endowment Foundation's website And Quote at reeds treating implementation as a process not an event and seeking to answer the question. Does it work? Hia is how we believe. Our school can best improve. Student outcomes. it sounds quite dry. Leon are light episode but so I just thought I'd I'd mentioned white grabbed me and Tom and I have been an all of our co workers. Colleagues academic had been reading Mary. Miot book of late and She talks a lot about do wing more with less spending more time going deeper allowing teachers more time to think deeply. We've talked about this law in relation to quicken foils just rut really liked this this idea it. The the blog is speaking to senior leaders school leaders mainly but it just makes a refreshing point in the context of evidence informed practice in schools. Who Evidence informed. I dislike this idea that you know implementation is a slow burn Uninvolved a lot of collaboration discussion. Tiny get people on board and also that that really good question that's quoted in that tweet which is does it work here Because there are a lot of fire side than there are a lot of you know really important evidence strategies areas of focus that regain a lot of Menton in education. But I just struck me with this tweet that amidst so of some slightly more vitriolic tweets out there by you know retrieval practice cognitive science which is absolutely Acknowledged to be very very important in the world of education but I dislike the idea that you know with everything we should be asking. Does this work here. And how can we best? You know integrate this in a way. That's going to be right for us and Fowler kids. This is the theme. That would come up all the ones has next. We've talked about this move towards evidence. Informed research informed practice in schools and general. I think a lot of US welcome. I think it's a a real shot in the arm for the profession. But we've we've said more than once said with our friends from impact Wales. We'll said With Professor David James. It's so tempting for that to become the next management stick for beating people with all the next kind of quick fix or or you know sort of thing that the new broom imposes on everybody when they get appointed to a school. And you're and you're absolutely right. There are no shortcuts with this stuff and there are no black and white cut and dried ounces as much as some people might want them to be. Yeah absolutely and when I when I then sort of drill down into the block itself which is quite sure read actually. There was some nice reflect refreshing messages to to school leaders In how they how they grow leadership capacity and how they lead on on change implementation and you know change culture change mindsets and one of the big things that they talk about In this blog with this person talks in this blog by should name him. His name's Roger Higgins Director of Norwich Research School part of the education endowment foundations for search schools network and he talks about the platform for Good School. Implementation is to create the right lead ship environment and carefully plan for implementation as a process not event and he talks about the importance of Senior leadership teams teams working as teams Rather than You know as individuals sort of going around policing everything is. It was just refreshing and for any student teachers out there who have got aspirations for senior leadership roles on the nine. I think is a lot to be found by looking into sort of school culture and implementation of of research informed practice house interesting. I think are sort of mentality building up a little. A little kind of metaphorical drawer marked really controversial. Podcast episodes we should do. I know we said to be recorded. Christmas. Didn't we gonNA really let ripon creativity at some point after Kepler stiff drinks. I think I'm going to add to that. Draw school leadership culture Yeah yeah he said. He says that he says the changes. We're making twenty. Chip habits aren't easy so it's just nice. It's nice to hear that and I hope that it may be nice for any senior leader listeners out there to to hear that two and two You know to to know that we don't see the enemy we see is very very important. Leaders of change in definitely make the occasional Kind of spiky comments about senior leaders sometimes better you know I. I always was aware even even when I was perhaps as a as a teacher. The chalk face kind of cursing the latest Thing to hit my email inbox that they were only being hammered by somebody above them in the same way. Anna wonder whether perhaps it might be worth just putting out their open invitation for any senior leader. Who would like to maybe come on and discuss The complexities and the sort of the pros and cons of different ways of being a senior leader with us. Because I think that could be a really interesting episode. I agree and there's an offer if after I heard done Tom. Okay Kamata senior leaders really WANNA speak to you now. You're up you're okay. So I know we always say blogs and I think I've done this before ended up with a sort of online newspaper column instead but it it's it's effectively a bit like a blog. I suppose I'm cheating slightly This column in. The Guardian called the network which deals with technology and. This is an article that came out. It's written by John Naughton then. It came out on Saturday the twenty eighth of March so just a couple of short days ago. And I'll spare you the sort of fooling the to cope with the bit. That really grabbed me. was a comment that they're making about Amazon. The enormous online giant company Amazon and the role they played in this corona virus pandemic. That's hit us all And just to kind of quickly give you the the punchline of the article the last couple of paragraphs it says that this whole kind of situation with the corona virus pandemic reveals an important truth back to our economies namely the extent to which Amazon has become so central and so powerful he named checks and other journalists at this point. Julia Carrie Wong and says that she's pointed out the Amazon in the US is beginning to behave more. Like a government than the trump administration itself. the author likens the hiring by Amazon of hundred thousand staff and their two dollar an hour. Pay Rice that they've given their staff to twenty-first-century version of F Diaz famous works Progress Administration In in the Great Depression the company sudden support for small businesses around Seattle headquarters so that they might live to serve Amazon. Another Day is. She says akin to a government stimulus package on its decision to stop accepting non essential products from third party. Saleh's who uses warehouses essentially Mites to government style market regulation so the pandemic will radically transform. The Industrial and commercial landscaper Western societies loss of companies. Large and small will go to the wall. No matter how fervent government promises of support our but when the smoke clears in some kind of normality returns a small number of corporations ones that have played a central role in keeping things going will emerge strengthened and more dominant and chief among them will be Amazon. What will then have to come to terms with is. The Amazon is becoming part of the critical infrastructure of Western states. So to perhaps a Google and Microsoft apple is more like a luxury good nice but not essential and the only reason for keeping facebook is what's up in which case one of the big questions to be answered a society's rebuild once the virus is finally being tamed will be. Really difficult one. How should Amazon be regulated? I just found that really interesting because it is absolutely true to to see that Amazon is now becoming so big. It is almost like a kind of like a small country or a government or something in itself and those points about some of the things that he's doing over in America. It's almost kind of taking the reins of of certain things that are traditionally the role of governments And it's just kind of really interesting to think whether this is one of the things that that will come out of this situation a kind of realization that some of these companies are now. I mean you. You just couldn't imagine being without the they have an enormous enormous amount of power and there was. There's been some really scary articles by Amazon. Those are a really terrifying one about Alexa. Outsourced data didn't send you because I know you've got one in your swell just about to say before we started this podcast. I asked Alexa to switch on my steady lights. I'm going to say it's you know she'll switch off okay and funnily enough it some. You know it's something that my half and I've been mindful of since we've been working at home out today because you can you can mute Alexa Stop Her from listening because she does should took speaking speaking about like she actually exist. It does records you. Obviously you can you can. You can look at all your review it you can. You can delete all but does transcribe everything that you've said. Kind of create. It creates micro con recordings of things that it thinks. You're saying to her. It's bizarre so yes an aunt..

Amazon Tom US Education Endowment Foundation Alexa Nehal Menton Endowment Foundation Research Schools Network John Naughton Saleh Stevens Miot Mary Fowler Professor David James Wales
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On The Media

"And I say it. What do you say to get? What do you have to lose on Saturday? President trump again touted the use of hydroxy chloroquine an anti-malaria drug as a potential treatment for covert nineteen the USC announced has stockpiled. Twenty nine million doses. Though the basis for using the drug to treat the disease is entirely anecdotal. Some doctors are already using it in hospitals around the country. Some report that it might be useful in the early stages of covert nineteen. But we really don't know. And what do we have to lose? There are side effects. Experts warn and it is potentially fatal for patients with heart problems or who are on certain antidepressants. And then there's the side effect of a shortage for people who are actually prescribed drugs clerk in four illnesses like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis yet. We have to be careful Laura that we don't assume something works based on an anecdotal report. That's not controlled and I refers specifically to hydroxy chloroquine. Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has been urging caution in White House briefings and in media interviews such as this one with Fox's Laura Ingram. There's a lot of buzz out there on the Internet on the social media about that. Oh there are many eccentric way. Well those studies. Some of them were not control. So why the intense media interest in hydroxy chloroquine even before the president's started talking it up reporting this week for the Guardian Julia. Carrie Wong traced the not so winding path from Fox News. The trump's ears. It's become kind of a mean within the news cycle and.

Laura Ingram National Institute of Allergy chloroquine president Fox News Carrie Wong Dr Anthony FAUCI USC lupus Julia arthritis White House Fox Director
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

13:29 min | 6 months ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on This Week In Google

"That's when I stayed at his data. Our focus your treatment but numbers. You don't need a special degree to understand what the data says. It doesn't say numbers are universal evening. this guy was just awful medium. Took it out good. So meanwhile the Times has one that has similar contrarian. Things used to be associated with Yale. But he's a sugar Schill and he's a member of the Advisory Board for the California Walnut Board. They say it had more walnuts the New York Times to chose to give this major thing. Which now the president and others. According and so- Greg Gonzalez. Who's a brilliant guy at? Yale who's really at Yale Consol vets. Go NSA lvs look up twitter? He just went properly Berserk on this. And then on Brad Stevens who quoted the same thing and then on Tom Friedman quarter of the two of them and you have what they call armchair FDR epidemiologists. That's right Stacey. It's a hard word to say you stumbled before Who numbers I can look at these numbers to an epidemiologist are just bloody brilliant. And they they have experienced that matters and we don't listen to people like me. People listen to the scientists listened to the experts. Doctors Barale Gis people who know what they're talking about journalists. Don't we find experts? Yeah Find the people who matter and and and we've got him out there now. They're talking directly to the public on on the web. It's a wonderful things. Once one thing this shows is that this is it. This is water cooler conversation. And we've always had this. A humans have always done this. You know I talked to my buddy Joe and he says and we and we kind of it's kind of like gossip it's It's how we deal with anxiety. It's how we look for information and avoid We've always done this but now we have these tools that can make water cooler conversation. Give it more weight because it's published online and then unfortunately we have a government where they embrace this the they also like us share water cooler conversation. We expect them to have a higher standard but they don't and But I think he's a natural human. I mean we do it to some extent we all. Yeah Yeah you can call them the experts now. I can go on my list now and I can ask them a question. Can you explain that to me? And they're busy trying to save lives and I don't WanNa get in their way but they will take a moment to make sure they. They want people to get this right right. The experts are there and they're easy to find. Yeah if you sign up for Jeff's list and sign up for. That was the whole point of that. Usually this thing that kind of floats down Andrew could help you and just says sign up for my list. That was the believe laying all my posts on my posts are also on buzzmachine cut so I I put them over there. I don't have to pay five dollars to read. Com- BUZZMACHINE DOT COM thank you. I believe it's in your lower. Yes I wanted to just kind of goes serio so so the other for my walk which I'm trying to do every day now. I didn't take as many damn calls when I went for a walk out. I'm walking along and there's a guy looks about my age. Who goes zooming by on a electric scooter And then he comes back and he says are you Jeff Jarvis and I said Yeah and of course. He's a Fan Nice. I'LL DO THE O. Eill the shows and George who works audible came back by. We had a nice little chat six feet apart. Oh that's great but it's we've lived half mile each other for God knows how many years all the time I've been on the show and we didn't know it until he came by because we're opened up. This is what you're saying before. There are things we should take advantage of in this weird time. I also steer you to a guy I've known for years Vince Rennell who is a virologist and actually hosts a really good podcast that is very timely right now this week in urology he named it kind of and maybe even looks a little bit like the twitter well. That's Okay Vincent. I know Jason. Yeah yeah come on. No it's great and it's a really useful So I don't know how well known This is a lot of twitter fans know about it because it kind of ran parallel to to it for a long time but if that's all they're talking about. I'm actually and I bet you stacey you are too fascinated now by viruses The the viruses are very interesting. Little beasts aren't they they are. Yeah that's one of the reasons why I wanted to be a genetic engineer. I Love I love. I never knew organisms. Oh Yeah Oh man. Biology was my first love. There is a A great video which Steve Gibson recommended. It's a it must be German. Because it's a it's a youtube video the translates to nutshell and I highly recommended on the corona virus and its mechanism. And it's pretty easy to understand. Let me let me pull it up for you. Have It on my I have a whole I already. I already had listen. Yeah he's there he's there he's yeah he's a he's very good analyst. Yes I have a A whole page says my my Cova nineteen pages including our temperatures my journal of the plague year links and so forth. But here's this video Yeah I think you would think you would like this. It's a scout. Yeah Yeah I think it's a German Hillary. Go to the Youtube page because I can see his You would you would recognize this word Jeff. It's it's Kurz Kurz Kazakh te in another former student of mine. This looks like the this looks like the style of a former student of mine. No kidding. It's beautifully illustrated and he talks about you. Know one of the reasons that corona virus is so susceptible soap and water is is it as like I think all viruses it has a lipid shell fat Shell And so that of course as you know. That's what soap does is. It breaks down fat And so it's really cute little video. I think suitable for the whole family. Because it's so colorful but it's as far as I can tell very accurate scientifically and it It's Really well done. I think you know you see my favorite handwashing video the black Goo on the on the On Yeah isn't that good? Yeah that's the best. Yeah so but yeah. I've gotten very interested in this whole thing. And of course there is some some speculation. Because what a virus does it. Injects its are in a into a host cell and gets an tricks. The hotel transcribing it and making more of the virus Thinking it's reproducing itself. There's some evidence that these that this this viral are in a has something to do with our own evolution. That that without it we might not have evolved or it's certainly it's affected our own DNA. So I think that's kind of there's IT'S A. It's a more symbiotic relationship than one would think and I I find it fascinating. Yeah not all viruses have lipid membranes. Okay thank you and they call. I didn't know this. The Corona Virus. The Coronas little spikes on the outside of the virus. That's why Flus a corona virus and that's how it It takes a spike. It goes into the cell. Says HERE HAS A. That's my crown. That's it's crown is a crown with spikes all right back to back to Google According to Dr Moebius your DNA is mostly indigenous retroviruses. So thank you very much Amazon interesting what? Amazon's up to actually there's this is that larger story which is And I'm you know how I like to bring up philosophical topics on this show. Some have said that the tech industry is taking advantage of this and of course we know the DOJ is trying to take advantage of it as well This is an opportunity for the tech industry. Become even more powerful. I think it was an editorial in The New York Times. Even more powerful Amazon apple bound in The Atlantic cafe the Atlanta. Okay yeah could be Atlantic's been doing some really good stuff on this. Yeah pay for them. I do And they're put all their. Kobe praised them. Even though there's all my outside the pay all their coleman stove outside the paywall on that may be decided to try. A lot of people are doing that I think the Atlantic is spectacular. Yeah Julia Carrie Wong. It's in the Guardian Which also is putting its All its covert stuff. Well it's doesn't have a pay wall How the corona viruses created a governance vacuum. The tech giant Amazon is quickly filling. It's calling up love this lead. It's calling up. One hundred thousand troops extending grants to small businesses prioritizing essential goods and cracking down on profiteers no not the US federal government Amazon. It's doing the things that a government might do And it's not just Amazon. Walmart's hiring one hundred fifty thousand new workers What she what she says is It's less and less far fetched to imagine the everything store becoming the only store this is. This is something I've been thinking about because I don't know about you guys but with Amazon. Having delivery issues I just switched to target to buy some things that I needed. I'm not getting to shipping. But I am getting my stuff. Let's see you Amazon's prioritizing only essential so if you WANNA get a Christmas. We could order any cameras for hosts or headsets because they won't come till next month yeah. I ordered something on target. That will get to me on the thirtieth so that's four or five days from now Which feels totally reasonable Not so bad as Kim. I'm picking different retailers so the for a long time it's true my gut response was. Oh I need this. Let's go get it on Amazon and I'm like oh I need this. Let's put it on another. Are you worried that this will adjust? Increase the dominance of the tech giant's And they will just take advantage of this or I for one. Welcome my new lords and Masters I. I think they're being smart. I think there's a couple of things here. They're being smart to be like. Oh it's GonNa be a lot harder to hate us after we donate all our masks but we do after we but I do think that they're in a position to help there also in a position to profit from this and I think smart business dictates that you would take these opportunities as does compassion and I do think. The Tech Industry likes to consider itself Compassionate in ways that I don't think Exxon Mobil deludes itself into thinking so they're losing money to reinstall so there's a story in the rundown that that they're going to lose is not the right word. Forty four billion in anadromous versus the growth is going to have so it's not like they lose money but they're but they're yeah well they're they're losing. The opportunity cost of losing an opportunity at the same time. Facebook is up for all those who think off as a well. Look where you need him. Now folks the traffic there is up fifty percent. This is keeping their nose above water. This is a fine and good thing on twitter but like Stacey In this respect I don't use facebook but I'm finding many other ways so it isn't it doesn't necessarily create a dominant force just like you using target instead of Amazon I'm using facetime or Or what's well what's absent is what's happened is still facebook but no they're plenty of other options and I don't use any of the facebook tools and I don't feel less any less connected although can I tell you the like probably a week ago android. I were hiking and I was like Dang it everyone should probably get a portal and then the buzzfeed story about F. You should get a portal and the fact that they're sold out facebook video portal. Yes the Oh you could make bank. Getting rid of your. Where's my portal? I have two of them. I think I let burke take him apart which means they're probably not very cheap so but the idea like when it came out. I did think the portal has a really interesting hardware like that using the AI to follow people automatically is really compelling museum. Now does that by the way right but so so I I do with my daughter. Because she's on Andrew facetime with my mom. 'cause she's in an iphone. I don't feel like I need a portal. You my father who's ninety four who basically doesn't use a computer at all and would never use a smartphone..

Amazon twitter Jeff Jarvis Facebook youtube Andrew facetime Stacey Yale Brad Stevens The New York Times Yale Consol Greg Gonzalez Tom Friedman FDR Times president Advisory Board Kurz Kurz Kazakh te California Walnut Board Atlantic
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"It uses in DC hillman key exchange which would be known about for decades and it's a way of you can't break is laws of mathematics is aware of Exchan- key some you know the bad guys would discover it is like leaving the key under the mat once somebody knows it's there they'll find it we'll be back after this alternates I'm bring clarity to the world's most complex issues we can help our readers understand the world say together we can fight for a better one hope is power ooh welcome back to chips with everything I'm Jordan Erika Weber this week we're looking at one of the biggest questions of the digital era how do you protect people's privacy also ensuring that safety before the break the Guardians Tech reporter in San Francisco Julia Carrie Wong told us about an open letter signed by represents tips the US UK and Australian governments to facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg the intention of the latter was to encourage him to create quote a means for lawful access to the content of communications in other words a backdoor option for authorities to access fully encrypted data from the company's messaging this is if and when those authorities deem it necessary I asked security expert Alan Woodward to explain what that might look like basic cable too the things were before the snowden revelations before they put into ending corruption I you would have encrypted into the server and from the server to the recipient but actually you could sit on the server and read the things in an unencrypted way there there are a number of potential ways you can tackle these things people is the generic phrase of back door but the most likely in terms of a messenger system he's going to be as we've just discussed something that you sit on the server but there are other ways of colling encryption because it isn't just the messaging APP so low this open letter was to facebook about the messaging APPs of course as we've talked about you know things like iphones accent tre there are other techniques other methods that people have discussed in the past try and give lawful so-called lawful access there are limited and for example encryption is based on having a secret key if you've got secret key you know how things encrypted you can use the same album and decrypted so one of the ways that very early on people said in order to protect ourselves and be able to do forensic work for example law enforcement to frenzy people should have lodge back key somewhere so-called key escrow I mean one of the key problems with key escrow is who has access is very well saying well we'll put these things escrow so that when someone needs lawful access they can get it but of course who's to say that it's just the US and the UK and the Australian government what about if Russians or the Chinese or the Iranians wanted to come along and say well I want access to your these keys now it becomes a bit of a nightmare for the organization and again bearing in mind the US based global even though they are American oriented Dave got to decide eight or become the keeper of who they give these keys too so that that's one big home with kids grow the other way of doing it is an I suppose this is what some people again call a back door is to weaken the encryption so you make it so that it is relatively daybreak not necessarily for you of me but you know for somebody with significant resources they could break the encryption one of the is about weakening encryption is that you may weaken it so you can track and conduct surveillance on you enemies but of course allows the bad guys to have a go at your friends as well because we're all using the same encryption the other way of doing it is to have some kind of mass Turkey but that's a very good example of where now you can go online and you come back opuses keys so you actually render the lock useless and the same thing would happen if you know if you had ask the key some you know the bad guys would discover it is like leaving the key under the Mat wants somebody knows it's there they'll find it so we've got another key analogy ask you about say the government gets access to one of these master keys that lets them gain access to encrypted messages so if we compare that to and sure physical key is it more like a key that Ernie opens one door or is it like a key to the city could it Arnie be used once or basically whenever a government decided they wanted to do well that's actually one of the other issues about most do you have a master key that opens a whole range of locks orgy habit so that every instance of a particula encryption algorithm has his own master.

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on Here & Now

"To customers we mississippi ninety i'm every person he's working in america the this is just gone crazy and schlossberg towns oh touted his own fluency in spanish on his website of his law office what's happening here the there's lots of video now of that particular thirty being followed around new york by people in the press asking him is he sorry does he take back any of his comments tool and greg hogan comments on a one little bit of video where our suspect is trying to hide from the press and greg says it must be awful to be accosted by stranger when you're just trying to work and go about your day little bit of snark there but the big conversation is going on about once somebody ends up on social media and berated things start to happen without them paps having a right to reply seen his emeny many instances so judy lafi on twitter says unslinging doesn't seem to be a very nice person but doesn't marry her harassing him in the street kicking him out of his workspace having people tried to revoke his legal license all of these things happen now and julia carrie wong says in response and this really sums up the debate on twitter right now about him this is an interesting way to frame what is happening to slush berg since it is so precisely mirrors what he has done or trying to do to others we should say yeah the company that leases office space to him is terminated that agreement so a loss going on with arouse for wrath of netizens unleashed on him family okay hosted the stream on eljazeera english on what's filtering through social media thank you.

new york twitter julia carrie wong mississippi america greg hogan judy lafi unslinging
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"There is a united this is an issue that that term that is is not easy to seoul but i do think that the political dimension is is a really important placed to start spend just thinking about the kind of a resources we allocate to the problem it is a really important thing to do roger rights on twitter increases in poverty and homelessness are the direct result of concentration of wealth in the capitalist class a comment from our website from dave i don't know what to do to solve the problem but i know we can give to shelters food clothing blankets money time whatever and cutthroats our rights my experiences with homeless people in new york city and boston are that homelessness is the result of mental illness neurological disorders like autism spectrum and other disabilities which often lead to selfmedication and addiction ray and vermont rights with the recent cold weather vpr vermont public radio did some reporting on homelessness locally and even though there were a the opening up shelters and other locations to accommodate everyone there were some who were deciding to still sleep outside in their vehicles i wanna say thanks for joining us to our guests this hour julia carrie wong reporter for the guardian great to have you with us thank you so much for having me and alastair g the same to you as well thank you very much ray.

reporter seoul roger twitter class a new york boston vermont
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We we spend a lot of time trying to connect them to services here in the community um we have uh we we get male for about eighteen 100 people here that they've star and we're in less than four thousand square foot building but often because people use our mailing address will get calls from relatives looking for somebody and there are actually seeking out their loved one to reconnect sometimes that works sometimes it's uh the issues with the person on this and are they don't care about me you know there's some mental health issues things like that so so but we actually have family members seeking out you know i haven't seen my relative sometimes it's um i want them to come home but i'm in recovery this is a recent one i'm in recovery so if i guess if they are actively using that's not gonna work for me and he ended up not going back so um and then a lot of times uh a lot of times the the relatives once we make the phone call they're willing to pay for it we're just making the connection that i i guess is a is a signal that there's a there's a home that's ready to hand at person crane walker executive director of day star life center thanks for joining us thank you of you from the trenches there from jane walker alastair g and julia carrie wong are with us for the rest of the way callers thank you for being so patient will begin in black river falls wisconsin matt welcome do on point.

executive director black river wisconsin crane walker jane walker alastair g carrie wong
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"In michigan but he did have uh a chance to have a job in other situations we spoke to family members who said you know yes this is my son yes this is my nephew but he burned us bridge years ago um you know which is something that i think is very probably very common for folks who are experiencing homelessness is that there are you know complicated family relationships and that might be part of the reason that somebody ended up homeless in the first place and we also were able to find some family members who were still um carrying foreign hosting um the the formerly homeless people and and kind of had very um candid things to say about the challenges of try it you know of being that providing that level of support to somebody who had you know been going through such a difficult time men and had been living on the streets before they got a ticket back julia carrie wong in ellis through g guardian stand by i wanna bring another voice into the conversation joining us from st petersburg florida is jane walker she's the executive director of day star life center a nonprofit organization that works with the homeless one of the services they provide is travelers aid a ticket that connects a person with a family or friend out of town jane welcomed one point highway iraq you've heard of from our reporters of some of the shortcomings of these programmes how how does day star do it.

michigan executive director jane st petersburg florida iraq
"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"julia carrie wong" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm steve annexed time cardis garcia and we are here with a new shells indicators provided money on every show we take some number in the news and we dive into it to find the big idea of get it on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts this is on point i'm ray juarez we're looking this hour at homelessness in america and how each year us cities give thousands of homeless people oneway bus tickets out of town you can join the conversation does buzzing homeless people from one city to another sound like a solution or just passing the buck is it naive to think connecting a homeless person with a relative in a different city will get them off the streets you can follow us on twitter and find us on facebook at on point radio with me from san francisco's alastair g homelessness editor for the guardian he's now joined by his reporting partner julia carrie wong front also from the guardian they worked on an eighteen month long investigation looking at how american cities relocate their homeless as part of their outside in america series you can linked to it on our website on point radio dot org julia carrie wong welcome to the program thank you so much for having us is was there on our harm moment in this reporting project a moment where you thought you had a pretty good handle on what the story is you had been covering it for a while and then suddenly you see something here something or meet somebody and it kinda blows your mind.

ray juarez twitter facebook san francisco editor julia carrie cardis garcia npr america alastair g partner eighteen month