22 Burst results for "Julia Alexander"

Startup Streamer Quibi Quits

Business Wars Daily

05:04 min | Last month

Startup Streamer Quibi Quits

"A huge Hollywood experiment ended its life in a way that seems somehow fitting qube accompany designed to bring miniature Netflix's quality shows to your smartphone call. It quits earlier this month like it's programs which were no longer than ten minutes apiece. quickies vary life was itself short only about six months long the infant media company hit attracted almost two billion dollars from investors about one hundred, fifty, million dollars in advertising and some big name actors and directors. As a result quibbles dramatic closure has spawned no end of speculative criticism about what the startup did wrong and whether it's leaders Hollywood powerhouse, Jeffrey Katzenberg and former HP. CEO Meg Whitman did anything right? In case you haven't heard of it. The original idea behind Qube was to make high quality programs that were short enough to watch from start to finish. While waiting to do something else say riding the subway were standing at checkout line. These wouldn't be user generated youtube like videos but what qube envisioned as the quote next generation of storytelling dramas comedies a non-fiction programs cut into quick bites the origin of the company's name you get the idea. QUBE had the bad luck to launch during the pandemic that meant the service designed explicitly for people out and about debuted when people were in definitely not out and about position as another streamer. But Not at first on your TV quickly did what most streamers and new apps do when it launched in early April it offered a ninety day free trial about a million and a half people signed up and presumably began watching quickies original shows thrillers like. Wireless about a drunk man caught in a New Year's Eve snowstorm free Ray Sean drama about a black man accused of killing a police officer and last looks a series about scandals in the fashion world. As I said earlier at launch, you can only watch on a smartphone despite the fact that most viewers were quarantined in their homes with perfectly usable TV's at their disposal. It took a few more months for quick to make the TV leap. The question back in May and June was how many of those initial free viewers would convert to paying customers quickies price was high five month with ads were eight dollars without them as the verge points out apple TV plus costs four, ninety, nine a month worse quickies higher prices more expensive than Disney plus. The answer on those conversions was clear. Qube didn't get anywhere near enough money or viewers, and with that dearth viewers, some advertisers threatened to canceled on October Twenty Second Katzenberg Whitman published an open letter on medium announcing queries collapse. The founders laid some of the blame on Covid nineteen but not all in addition to timing they said, another likely reason could be. That the idea itself wasn't strong enough to justify a standalone streaming service. Indeed. A great deal of the criticism says exactly that the format itself was flawed from the start ten minutes may have been far too long for some content and far too short for others. A sort of nether world that works for user generated youtube content, but not for expensive productions that aspire to be the next Netflix. As one example, the Guardian reporter. Jack Bernhardt commended free ratio on actors Steffan Jones Laurence Fishburne an emmy winner. Jasmine Safest Jones for spectacular performances in powerful production. But he added quote it feels almost offensive to everyone involved that I can only watch it on tiny phone screen. Furthermore, he said it should have been a two hour film not fifteen quick bites. The company is exploring selling the rights to some content screenwriters and producers with shows underdevelopment or left to try to sell them elsewhere a tough sell given that most media companies can't use five or ten minute episodes. is returning about three hundred, fifty million dollars to investors and giving severance to two hundred employees. The Wall Street Journal reports, Katzenberg and Whitman's letter puts quickies. Of the entire very busy streaming media ecosystem the executives would never have imagined launching during a pandemic they said, but they admitted other businesses have faced these unprecedented challenges and have found their way through it. Indeed, we've reported here on boom times for Netflix's and Disney plus among others all of benefited enormously from lockdowns. The mistake Qube made lies in a different sphere altogether says verge critic Julia Alexander Qube didn't fail because TIKTOK. existed she says, it failed because executives refuse to see Tiktok its biggest competition she wrote tick tock has exploded globally with an ever growing mountain of user generated short form video video that is virtually free to produce free to consume. But qube had its I trained on net flicks if Alexander is correct quimby was looking for threats or a role model in the wrong direction. In an already struggling Hollywood, it's hard to watch the layoffs of employees and the suffering of artists who shows are now killed. A great deal of talent converged around quipping remains to be seen. We're all that talent. Finding out.

Qube Katzenberg Whitman Netflix Julia Alexander Qube Jeffrey Katzenberg Hollywood Disney HP Jasmine Safest Jones Guardian Apple Covid Emmy Steffan Jones Ray Sean Jack Bernhardt Officer
'Keeping Up with the Kardashians' is ending after 20 seasons

All Things Considered

03:50 min | 2 months ago

'Keeping Up with the Kardashians' is ending after 20 seasons

"You either loved it or you loved to hate it. But after 20 seasons and 14 years, the reality TV show keeping up with the Kardashians will come to an end in 2021. If you are in the love to hate it Category, the show follows the lives of Kim Kardashian West, her mother, Kris Jenner, and an ever expanding cast of characters and its subjects. Became more famous and more well known as the show continued in a statement Kim Kardashian West posted to social media, she said, quote without keeping up with the Kardashians, I wouldn't be where I am today. Unquote. Well, we asked Julia Alexander of the verge to explain to us just where Kim Kardashian is today. Here's what keeping up with the Kardashians really did is led to a family monetizing themselves. They were the people that you were willing to watching. You wanted to watch, but then you are also buying their products You were signing up for meet and greets and the idea of With the Kardashians are able accomplish was born out of this concept of Web 2.0 of blog's and the tablets that came from blood on the rise of social media. They were able to dominate that market and turned themselves into a product even more. So in the show. The show just kind of acted as a vessel to get them toward. They are today. But what was it specifically about this family? Like, what was it about their relationships, their dynamics that kept sucking people in when the show first started, there was this beautiful Sisterhood with them all, And I think what I really claim to what I really came to was no matter what was happening in this show. In the early seasons, Kim and Kourtney and Khloe had each other and always came back to each other in their mom. And that was what their life was, as the show progressed, and as they became more influential as became bigger celebrities, the show became this really sorrowful. Strange kind of connection of people that there was no choice but to kind of watch because their lives were so dramatic and so public and in many ways very sad and I feel like we were so tuned into this family that we had this kind of para social relationship with which is a one way connection between us and then because we believe We knew who they were. Well, I am having trouble imagining the Kardashians suddenly disappearing after the show is over. So what do you think they're going to do next? The beauty of the Kardashians and this is what they inspired Entire culture of instrument. Looters and tic tac creators and even YouTubers to really understand is that they are in many ways bigger than their name. Even they are individually if their own brand so they can come out and go. I am Kim Kardashian. Kylie Jenner, and I don't need to have this show in order, Tio elevate my celebrity and using that slowly there no going to monetize every aspect of themselves. So what they're gonna do next is just be them. Well, if you had to sum up the legacy of this show, and I am surprised I am even using that word. But if you had to, What would that legacy B. This is going to sound outlandish, and I know it's going to sound that way. But there's a fascination to the family ethos of the Kardashian's. That is very Or reminds me I should say specifically and personally to me of my obsession with the Kennedys in a lot of ways, which is this family that is a form of American celebrity that you you just can't turn away from. They were able to create that for themselves out of nothing because they were B list celebrities at best, and now they are Global celebrity in a way that we have not seen in a very long time because the Kardashians and the Kardashian Jenner clan at large, is

Kardashians Kim Kardashian Kim Kardashian West Kris Jenner Kylie Jenner Kardashian Jenner KIM Kennedys Julia Alexander Khloe Kourtney
How This Massive YouTuber Got Banned For Life

theScore Esports Podcasts

06:01 min | 3 months ago

How This Massive YouTuber Got Banned For Life

"Get back to. This leafy situation. So if you don't know who he is, Calvin Leafy is here Aka leafy Lee Vail can only be described as well. A drama Youtuber he started uploading in twenty thirteen and got popular around twenty fifteen for making videos about other content creators, their lives, their personalities, their various beliefs, and what he saw as wrong with them you really never know with youtubers one day they could be completely fine next fucking. Oil issues that youtubers can't cancer just sitting here like, yeah, I am cancer but the best fucking cancer on this website maybe he's most notorious video from that era is a now deleted video making fun of another smaller content creator who has a learning disability. It's safe to say that after that he established himself as a bill in pretty quickly that said, he did have a falling Levi's fans saws, videos just harmless jokes and before he got. Banned. He had almost five million subscribers on youtube around two thousand, seventeen leafy took a pretty long break from youtube and it wasn't until recently that he got back to making the videos, he was known for videos about other very dramatic content creators like h h three, Keam Star, and I dubs that said the story of his eventual banning started in July when he turned his attention to poke over the course of several videos, leafy criticize polk means. Content, her appearance and even went as far as to say that she was hiding a secret boyfriend from her fans and that's specific topic became so popular after his videos that the Hashtag pokey main boyfriend was trending on twitter and that prompted this joke from pokey main who said in the past that she's not interested in making her love life public on the Internet leafy spokesman videos all went viral and around that time pokemon announced that she'd be. Taking a long break from streaming and content creation in general, and then recently pokey released an apology video discussing topics that range all the way back to twenty eight eighteen. But she did talk about some of Leakey's criticisms directly. Specifically, her relationship status and comments about her appearance if video is to address freezing comments, criticisms that I perceived I know this video is long overdue. I've seen a lot of people talk about the way that I look recently. There's WanNa. PUT It out there. I don't think I'm the prettiest person in the world. But I think that's okay everyone's entitled to an opinion I personally made the decision seven years ago whenever I got into streaming that I don't want my personal life to the part of my content and that's just what I'm GonNa stick by until I and whoever I'm dating whatever time decide otherwise that video was released on August eighteenth and then three days later on August twenty first Levi's entire youtube channel was gone. Now you choose policy when it comes to violating the rules Is very similar to twitches that we talk about all the time on this show it's three strikes, and then you're at each of the first times violated a policy you get one, and then the third time the channel is just deleted. Youtube cited quote multiple severe violations of Youtube policy prohibiting content designed to harass bully or threatened end quote as the reason for Levi's ban according to tweet from slasher. Now, when the story about lease Van I broke, there was some speculation about. Whether or not he was notified. But as I two strikes at all a representative from Youtube told Julia Alexander a report from the verge debt quote, his channel was terminated because it violated the company's harassment policy three times over a period of ninety days. No specific videos were identified, but they did confirm its permanent when I asked specifically about length of Ban and quote on August twenty first after he was banned leafy tweeted a youtube asking how he could get his account reinstated. In response to the news another Youtuber Cabos tweeted that leafy had never been notified about his first two strikes at all and that his account had just been banned out of knowing leafy himself also claimed keep never been given any strikes in a later comment that said back on June fourth leafy actually tweeted that he'd received two strikes on his account for harassment. There have been some people commenting that those strikes were reverted but that hasn't been confirmed by leafy himself or Youtube. On August twenty fourth leafy tweeted this still looking for his account to be reinstated. And when team Youtube responded, he had some choice words as recording this video leafy channel still nowhere to be found on Youtube and he's actually started to stream on twitch. So I, guess he's trading places but dr disrespect. Now with this whole story mind it's worth noting that Youtube has recently made massive changes to its policy requirements for users. Specifically, the way that content creators are supposed to treat other content creators. issue. In, many different ways and I think we have seen many we've seen some high-profile examples that we know have been Alec and that has caused us to take really hurt look at our harassment Halsey as I'm sure many of you know since like the beginning of time, one of the easiest ways to become popular on youtube is to make you videos about other youtubers. This is specifically true about what we would call drama content where creators be for call each other out. An extremely cringe boxing matches. With. That said, this latest situation involving leafy really seems to show that Youtube is taking stuff seriously and trying to figure out what's fair game the what constitutes harassment at this point with this story I? Think we're just GONNA have to wait and see if Lee will ever get back on Youtube if he'll be able to stay on twitch and if this new stricter policy is going to have long term implications for other creators as well.

Youtube Levi Harassment Content Creator Lee Vail Twitter Boxing Leakey Van I Wanna LEE Keam Star Representative Julia Alexander Alec Halsey
Apple acquires the full Fraggle Rock collection in first major licensing play

Techmeme Ride Home

03:05 min | 6 months ago

Apple acquires the full Fraggle Rock collection in first major licensing play

"And here's another interesting apple acquisition if you will. Apparently apple is involved in a reboot of the once popular kids TV Staple Frugal Rock. That's been under development at apple for a while now to be released on Apple. Tv plus it's involving a full partnership with the Jim Henson Company and it makes sense as Netflix's and Disney plus have shown having kids programming is key to getting families to lock into your streaming service. But what is new and potentially interesting because it suggests a strategy shift on. Apple's part is the further news. That apple has also quietly acquired frugal rocks back catalogue. All Ninety six original episodes of the TV show aired between Nineteen Eighty. Three and nineteen eighty. Seven have been quietly made available to stream on Apple. Tv plus so is apple shifting its original strategy of creating original content into a mix strategy of also licensing existing Ip. If so might that be a tall order because I mean since everyone in their mother is investing in streaming plays right now. Why would anyone be willing to part with valuable? Ip that they could leverage to make their own efforts viable quoting the Great Julia Alexander in the verge as Joseph adhaline reported in vulture this week with big studios like Disney Warner media and NBC UNIVERSAL. Quote looking to keep their best and brightest titles for their own streaming platforms. There simply aren't enough great titles around to justify making a play for a traditional library of licensed content instead it makes more sense for apple to look at acquiring full libraries for shows wants to reboot keeping everything in one place makes for a better consumer experience quote so were apple to end up doing a deal for the rights to the James Bond Franchise something which has been buzzed about. Since at least two thousand seventeen the company would also likely try to get the back library of bond films so it could market itself as the home for all things 007 at Elaine wrote apple like all streaming players. Right now is making licensing bets where they make sense. Apple isn't about to try to use NETFLIX's licensing strategy which helped the general entertainment platform catapult into a behemoth for its own gain as apple figures out which properties make the most sense to either resurrects remake or reboot building out. Full collections is also a smart play. Apple isn't calling this a strategy shift but it is one apple. Tv plus launched without any license content and CEO. Tim Cook reiterated at a shareholders meeting in February that Apple. Tv plus wasn't about hosting older series or films specifically saying that's not what Apple TV pluses about cook. Restated that Apple. Tv plus is about original programming and quote. It doesn't feel right for apple to just go out and take a rerun. Cook said now. The caveat seems to be if that original program is based on an older series or movie. It's likely that collection will wind up on Apple.

Apple Nineteen Eighty Tim Cook Netflix Jim Henson Company Disney CEO Elaine Disney Warner Julia Alexander General Entertainment Nbc Universal Joseph Adhaline
"julia alexander" Discussed on Reset

Reset

10:50 min | 10 months ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Reset

"The best thing I heard from a CR- I spoke to was when youtubers I started creating content. They became accidental entrepreneurs. Julia Alexander is a reporter for the verge. She's had a lot of conversations with youtubers because for them when they started uploading a lot of them weren't expecting to be paid. They were uploading to Youtube. And the way that we upload to tick Talker instagram. The minute that Youtube started handing out avenue and that editor of new started to grow they became accidental entrepreneurs when it becomes your fulltime job so that the conversation summer season changes from. Hey I really love uploading content and making videos to. I'm being screwed over by this company that I never intended to work on or four in the first place so it's become a really interesting cultural shift. That has happened so incredibly fast. Like we're talking seven eight years Julia Alexander Zander you cover youtube and you wrote about this fifteen billion dollar figure that was announced this week and in your store you had a great line that I really liked and it read. Creators creators are the beating heart of Youtube but advertising is the blood that flows throughout so how have creators reacted to this fifteen billion dollar number. There's been a little bit of a mixture action but I would say the strongest is that now that they can see the fifteen billion dollar ad revenue. The biggest complaint complaint is. Why haven't we seen that? They want more of it. Is I think the best way to put it. They saw tim billion dollars in revenue and they said did we are the reason that has coming to your platform. We create the videos that bring viewers in and yet. I'm still struggling to pay rent or I'm still figuring out how to pay for meals so youtube give me more money okay. So content creators were like fifteen billion dollars. This is great. Why aren't we getting more? The feeling for a lot of the creators of coming in the last few years is we are driving one of the greatest And biggest video platforms sites on the Internet. Youtube is monopolized video-on-demand the on demand video on the Internet and that's all because of content creation that they put in only are they saying. Hey we deserve more. You need to give us more because we create the content that brings effort has to you. But they've also dealt with a lot of major issues that they're saying hey you've also kind of screwed us over a lot in the the last four years. What exactly do you mean when you say that creators are saying you've screwed us over the last four years? What what has youtube done to change the way that content creators make their money right so the best way to a two yard kind of run through it is People never paid attention to Youtube Peterson's to as a company. They paid attention to his big website but they never really looking at where. Advertisers ads were landing on youtube videos. Coz Thousand Sixteen late two thousand sixteen early two thousand seventeen a number of stories out that are saying their ads on videos related to terrorism content there are decides on kind of really disturbing children's videos and then in early tillerson seventeen the biggest youtube creator of all time Pudi Pie the whilst journalist that comes out and says hey there's an ad running on these videos he's making lots of money and he just put up with antisemitic. Imagery from that point forward. Youtube is kind of living in this dated gate crisis situation work every single day. Now that people are paying attention. They're noticing their advertisements on videos. That shouldn't shouldn't have advertisements because of ethical moral reasons so youtube starts to integrate new policies. I mean we're talking. Ton Policies Thirty forty policies that they're in implementing being in order to ensure that advertisers feel comfortable running ads on their platform. So it's prioritizing advertisers comfort as opposed to content creators and how much money they're bringing in right and this is the head to head that youtube executives including ceus ski and creators themselves have constantly we had where the executives have said we care about our creators but also we need advertised on the platform. Big thing that happened was called the apocalypse so it looks like there's this this thing called at Pakalitha Youtube Apocalypse is here. Oh no the ad pockets effectively shutdown advertising on their main enchants. This is apparently how youtube sauce problems by panicking and either demonetizing or banning people in order to cater to a few and this is what the creators refer to twenty seventeen after you tomato changes creators. Were talking big and middle saw haege fluctuations in the revenue pulling seventy to eighty percent of revenues gone and so they had to start figuring out how to supplement. It's a lot of them. Went to pitch you on lower than we're looking at brand deals which is now the state of Youtube existent because from that period too now the reality is is that many creators have said to themselves and publicly to their viewers. You have to subscribe to me. You have to have to do these brand deals. Here's what you're gonNA see more ads that I'm talking about because I can't live off advertising going youtube because it's changed and when you say brand deals you mean content creators talking about products in their videos as opposed to just relying on the ads that run either in the middle of a video or at the beginning at the end right one of the most popular creators right now. Is this flogger named David Dope wreck. If you don't know me because I'm a piece of shit he was just recently Jimmy Fallon check out on Youtube Channel Donald. He's kind of one of the most mainstream youtubers right now. He lost a huge one of his ad revenue because his videos were deemed advertiser unfriendly friendly fraud. Fact about every time record my always have to record or from the waist up because he's always giving a blowjob. She swears them. Sometimes they do stunts which are a big big deal now on youtube in terms of what advertisers feel comfortable with He's parties a lot and so while that was okay when he started. He could make attribute that no longer is sued if you look at his videos over the last year he's got deals with seatgeek which is a company that does concert tickets He's got deals with everyone else and he will stop in the middle of the video to go. Okay Hey this is the only reason we can do this video because we're being sponsored by this company. That's how he supplementary living what's up guys before this video continues super excited announce that I'm officially partnering with. EA on their new game need for speed heat. They just launched a new APP called very wealthy. He's very successful. He's kind of the top top one percent but it just goes to show that if David Hilbert who is. Who's making these videos? Does that bring in ten or eleven. Million views can't make it off advertising revenue alone anymore. What does that say for youtubers? Who Bring in fifty thousand views or one hundred thousand views? They just can't live often so juliette take back to the beginnings of Youtube Partner Program. How did content creators make money back then? So Youtube First Entries Partner Program back in two thousand seven. This was after a youtube. Just kind of launched Google had just acquired them and what happened was viral videos started becoming viral viral and Youtube said. You know we're going to give you a penny for you. Doing this and people are like I want money. If I'm getting thirty million views on David after dentist it's Oh live. This is real life kind of an old school video. Charlie bit my finger when you say I love those videos by twenty twelve. I would argue twenty twenty two creator start becoming fulltime and they start realizing there's enough advertisement revenue coming into the platform. There's enough interest that the top hop creators could say. Hey I'm making enough. That can get an apartment or I can get a house somewhere in the Midwest so the best way to think of how. U2 creators make money and how it all works to think of it as as a cycle Creators upload videos to Youtube viewers than flock to the platform advertisers. Come to you. Because that's where the audiences youtube gives creators a portion of that advertising revenue extremely important to entice them to continue uploading on Youtube and not anywhere else And Creator stay on Youtube because it's the best platform to receive advertising money even though the actual may they're getting is not as great as it could be and does everybody get the same amount of money per views across the board or does or is it different depending on the crater. Yeah it fluctuates. So the term is c. p. m. refers to how much you get per thousand views and it changes depending on the Creator top creators who get a lot more than smaller creators. The thing that we talked about a lot I talk a lot with creators. That I talked to is is the one percent of critters. Top one percent get the most advertising revenue. They tend to get the best advertisements. They're part of what's known as Google's preferred program They're getting in top top deals and all the creatures talked to understand that it's they're driving the majority of us Pity Pie who's not in go preferred. Because he's very controversial and to actually doesn't make a lot of advertising revenue because these are not advertisement friendly. He drove like four billion views to youtube last year alone. So there's a there's a section of critters that youtube goes. We want them to down site. We need them to produce because we can show them off and advertisers can advertise on on their videos and has that changed over time. Is it still that kind of tiered. System and in a payment intended to keep these content creators on Youtube one hundred percent is for. I would argue the vast majority of craters the the issue that we talk about a lot In the space ace is that critters want to leave youtube there. They would leave tomorrow if they could. There's just no competition Amazon which owns twitch so do they have twitches a platform but that's live streaming it's two different skills their crypto currency video platforms where you go and you kinda earn bitcoin and it just gets really complicated Youtube Youtube for all the negative about it still pays creators quite frankly the most and the most efficiently to just upload videos But because they have this anomaly the get to what creators view as take advantage of them and they can. Will you have to be here. 'cause there's nowhere else for you to go. Julia Alexander is a reporter for the verge. This is reset and I'm Arial Ross. If you WANNA follow me on twitter you can find me at eighty or s you can also reach the reset team by emailing reset at. Vox Dot Com. We publish episodes three times a week on Tuesdays Thursdays and Sundays. So if you haven't already subscribe to the Pod you can find us on apple podcasts. Stitcher or in your favorite podcast APP. And if you like what you hear your rate and review us on Apple podcasts. It really helps. We'll be back on Thursday later nerds and that really hurt..

youtube Youtube Peterson Julia Alexander Google reporter Julia Alexander Zander apple David Hilbert editor Jimmy Fallon seatgeek Amazon Midwest friendly fraud Arial Ross David Dope Partner
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"All that said do you want to build a censored search engine, and I don't think congress like did that like we just had a deeper conversation about Google in China than than anyone in congress has had? So they asked the question and they walked away from it. And then someone else waived its industries the other thing they asked about which I think is interesting to talk about in rarely comes up. I think I don't think the average youtuber things have seemed arbitrary being the guy in charge of YouTube. But is right. Even though Susan which is the CEO of YouTube YouTube is part of Google soon are. Runs cuco. He doesn't really have a great answer for why like YouTube works the way it does. Well, YouTube moderation is still so like bad, fundamentally, why UT recommendations quickly re lead down radicalization holes on you know, whatever you want to be radicalized on he starts just kinda like we're working on it. We have policies we take down as we see it. And I don't think I think that answer is quickly going to be not good enough. And I think the idea that soon Dr is insulated from YouTube is that needs to change a little bit. Even though he does have deputies it'll Google still runs you too. It's the second largest search engine in the world. So that was the other thing that congress touchdown yesterday. I think Julia Alexander wrote a great piece about for us. But it's just it's just weird that it's still everybody thinks about is two different things. It's almost like Facebook and Instagram like, no one really considers fact the Facebook Instagram. I I do now because what I use Instagram. I could just feel it that it wants to make every other image in the main the main feed an ad, but it. It doesn't it isn't quite well, he just go there. And so, but like I like as you scroll you like, oh, there's another. So now, I'm counting the number of posts between ads just like because I know it's going to get down to one and that just mills really Facebook to me. Yeah. And stories in particulars. Just add city. Yeah. Let's take a break marine add to that. And let's talk about some gadgets..

YouTube Google Facebook congress Julia Alexander Susan China CEO
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And her YouTube channel and working with agencies and you'd hear them talk about it these like sixteen seventeen year olds. And they're like, Nope, I understand how I have to run my business on YouTube and how You Tube is just a platform for me to pick up an audience. They understand the importance of like collaborating with other people and the importance of like market share stuff, and it's wild to hear them talk about it because when people think of YouTube creators just think people sitting in front of a camera and talking and it's become just a huge, huge, huge factory for turning out people who are just as big as media executives. I like actual media executives. So this is really, you obviously know far more YouTubers than I do. But I know if you and I always think of it as the darkness, there's the person you mean. And there are often lovely people and they hang out and what do I do? You know, talk shit about cameras with them like I can do like that's like an easy way to make friends than eat Uber for me. And then there's sort of like YouTube persona, which is often that same persona just like turned up a few notches and much louder. They're all yelling now. And then there's what I think is the darkness which is there's like a ruthless business person just waiting to talk to you about CPM's and branded content deals and how they grow the channel to a certain size, the unlock another category of business deal that they can do. I understand it. But again, we work at a media company that we helped start. So I see it, but we are insulated from it because we make journalism at no point is like our revenue tied the same thing. And so I'm like, I can't tell if I should be extraordinarily impressed because this is a whole set of skills that I just don't have and was. Ever asked to to build or if I should just be terrified that like another twenty two year old I'm hanging out with is basically the world's Smith Roussel ruthless media executives. And it's, I think it's good or bad. I just always think of it is dark. The craziest thing to sunny bring that up. When I think about the fact that like I care to know about what a company's revenue is or like how they're using certain things to increase page views. It's such a New York media subject like, oh, no, one else cares about this other than other journalists on YouTube, the audiences care so much about like CPM in like social blade, statistics, social tracks in, it's basically to analyst from it because it's in every video, like its creators are very open about when they're getting paid when they're not getting paid, how they're getting paid, how much other people are getting paid. So one of the big topics with like Logan, Paul, when it popped off with all these you to careers talking out his CPM Google preferred, what this man is sponsored like. And you've got these fourteen year olds commenting, and they understand what's going on and look, I wouldn't have given a crap, but I was fourteen about house was getting paid. And so it's so interesting because YouTube is its own little insular world where everyone understands the lingo of the company and the business model, and it's just a ongoing daily conversation with like everyone's open about their CPM..

YouTube Smith Roussel analyst New York Google Paul Logan sixteen seventeen year twenty two year fourteen year
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Wanna say, well, YouTube is messy. It's got all these great people. They're not in love with it. We actually had Casey nice dot on this podcast earlier this year, and he spent most of the time talking to each and twitch. Yeah. And so you have this feeling here's much people there on YouTube. They love you to have this relationship with YouTube. They don't actually have a very personal relationship with the company. They don't seem very handled by. You know, there's not like an army of sort of like suit guys being like they great. Great. You know. Thank you know they don't have like a personal connection to this company. It's just a platform that they run that is kind of mysterious. So it always shows like, well, they'll just all gonna leave, but there's is there somewhere to go down, doesn't even exist. The number one thing to creators to talk about is why they hate YouTube does so well, all those videos do so incredibly well yet. I think that's the thing, right? My favorite person talked about this. Another godfather of YouTube is full to Franco into Franco. We'll talk about this over and over again and he'll say, there is nowhere else to go like as much as we hate YouTube. No one else has figured out advertising, like you said, right? Google so much of it. No one else has figured out the audience is which is huge. No one else has figured out how to actually directly pay creators in the way that is sustainable, which is another big deal. The thing that we, I'm beginning to see more of, and I think it says more about our political climate over the last two years. But especially over the last four years, if you consider gamer gate turning point for a lot of stuff. Is you'll see block chain type video sites opening up. So like bit shoot will run and bit. You basically saying, hey, come to us. We don't do censorship. We don't all this kind of very keyword stuff freedom. And so you'll see a lot of people on YouTube kind of tell their audience to go there and watch their videos there, and then they can use like digital wallets to pay for stuff, but they're still uploading videos on YouTube because they're still getting most of their hundreds of thousands millions of us from you to in that still works out to be a decent amount of money depending on your CPM with YouTube, depending on who you are, you've got really, really, really great and you can live off at sense, independent type of topics you cover. You've got to expand someone. We felt different guy who talks about war in the Middle East gets democratized every single day because advertisers get to choose what they want to put their ads on and sensitive content includes news a lot of the time. So people talk about news often get dinged by democratization issues, which is upsetting. So he he's got like nine other ventures that he has. He's got rogue Rocco, which is this company and he's working on making sure that he has his income coming in from different places because he can't rely on YouTube and he arguably one of the biggest creators in the platform. But then you've got someone like a David dope brick who every time he makes video. There's two or three million views of the a couple of hours in a day I should say, and he's doing pretty well on just add sense and like sponsorships through seatgeek. Let's it seems like all these trainers are actually running a business of their own. Yeah, the relies on YouTube managing an advertising business over there that they have no visibility into. And that to me is a guy who like built a media business here, and I don't even have visibility. Like I, I'm, I think we have a good CEO like trust that guy, and I think we have a decent sales team like your great. You just you just stay over there? No bother us like, but I would never say you should. You should build a business where another giant. Company can literally just turn off your body whenever they want. And so I think everybody figured that out kind of intuitively and so they're doing branded content. They're doing these weird merch deals. It's interesting because sometimes that blows up, right..

YouTube Franco Casey Middle East Wan Google CEO Rocco David four years two years
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And you have to come up with some way to make money that isn't ads because you can't peel snapshot has this snapshot is a big platform that can't make money because they haven't figured out how to steal add money away from Facebook, Google. So YouTube Polaris Lee has this problem where competitor start, people get famous, the competitor's fail and the people flood on the YouTube apart from vine which they seem to be like, Yep, you're videos can be longer net like same idea, just longer apart from buying. They haven't really figured out how to do that. Well, it doesn't seem like how to bring other communities onto their community in have the same set of values. Yeah, and I think the only reason that vine, the vine creators referred to as the vine invasion. The reason I think the by invasion went as well as it did for a lot of people was it's hard to monetize buying because bads, but it's also hard. It was hard for creators who were getting like agents through vine to continue living in LA and continue doing what they were doing, but just being on vine. So they went to YouTube and suddenly they are recording. Dogs with Will Smith, and they're getting Nike ads and it's like they're making law oughta money around the same time. You see a bunch of vine kids realize we can all live in a big house together and just log together and create content twenty four, seven, and make a lot of money. So you see this kind of huge explosion of light vlag squads, which is happening in LA all the time more. So in LA the New York, there's a really big difference in the New York and LA log scenes. And I think that's particularly interesting, but LA it's a lot of twenty year olds who like dropped out of college and high school and a fulltime YouTubers. Now, I think tick talk musically rolled into tick tock. It's interesting because when I went to vid con and Tennakon which was failed with did not go, well, it was you go to. I went to a hotel. I went to hotel. I went, I was. The lobby of. Probably got kicked out. We, there's all these take talking event that doesn't happen. Sorry, there's a all these musically. Kids were there and he's musically kids, thirteen fourteen and talking about how their parents moved them out. Tell lay and trying to get into YouTube and how you to the next step, or a lot of them are just like, well, we'll go to twitch. Twitch has this like actual subscribers and they're like, well, we can just stream for ten hours. And so you see this a lot with different platforms where they start off somewhere and they built in audience. But the goal is to move to you too, because it's the only way to get money really. And now that's loud even twitch. People are really intimidated by twitch and I totally understand why I live streamed before, and I hated it talking for eight hours and interacting with people is insane. It's exhausting. It's difficult if you're playing a game to keep that going. I get someone like ninja a lot of credit Caesar, good gaming. These also very good, entertaining, and twitch. Twitch is lake fraternity. Twitches community. If you're not. In it. It's really hard to break into it because there's like a whole secret language handshake. The understand more as YouTube. You can look out if you've got not maybe of an audience, something goes by roll, your your clapping with someone else. Like there's a way to kind of break in and form a community around yourself. So I think if you can make it on twitch, having subscribers is better because it's direct money coming in to that, you know, you're gonna get versus YouTube, you're relying on that sense. And that differs especially if there's a demonitization monetization wave which we've seen. But YouTube is kind of like it's still the golden platform become a YouTube star. And now that like Will Smith is on Reese Witherspoon saw like it's just the next that in-between wave of Hollywood. Brought to you betterment. They've got an advertiser segment for you to listen to check this out right now ten years ago, the great recession sent shockwaves through the global economy and in that uncertain economic environment, consumers regret with fear and doubt two thousand eight. It was, you know, the great recession, people in general, had lost trust in the incumbents. And I thought there really ought to be an obvious best answer to the question..

YouTube LA Will Smith Facebook bads Google Nike Tennakon lake fraternity New York Reese Witherspoon Hollywood eight hours twenty year ten hours ten years
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Ads which are top tier ads for you to if you're offering someone incentives, you do have a relationship with them and you are asking them to stay with you and work with you on something. We're going to offer you a YouTube premium show like LIZA Koshi, for example, and it's very much like she's a YouTube product self. And I think it's interesting. When something like Logan, Paul happens YouTube like, oh, well, we don't have control over what they do, and which is true, but you're also using their faces and their views and their channels to sell advertisements or to get advertisements. And it's insane to see how quickly they go from. We don't represent our creators to our creators, absolutely represent our platform Broberg Kinko who's the head of YouTube? Susan's. Like wrote a book. Yeah, he was very proud of being like, look at all the great all a great things that YouTube is enabled right? And you read it and he's very clearly picked. I mean, he picked right creators. I can't. Green is in there like sheriff. Here are the people that YouTube wants to hold out and so much very positive role models. And there's a dark side to that which they kind of studiously ignore in then when they're chosen few do something wrong, they tend to run in the other direction. Yeah, the joke that I have ongoing, which 'cause I don't think it would ever happen. But like if Casey nice ever did something, YouTube would just not know what to do because he's like the godfather of YouTube. At this point. When I was at Polycom, we were figuring out how to cover YouTube and December thirty. First, I was getting ready to go out for new years and I got an push notification for Logans video from watching. I'm like, that's a dead body pre shirts, dead body emailed you to PR and they're like, oh yeah, we'll maybe we'll look into it. Got you in France, and they're like, oh, well, it's not New Year's Eve. And then two days later, like Aaron, Paul tweeted about it and became whole thing. It was a situation where I was like, Robert Kinkel likes to talk a lot about how you doesn't want to incentivize certain things. When YouTube algorithm does the complete opposite. So you get conversations about burnout and people feeling if you have to upload everyday people feeling like they have to compete for ads creators refer to ads as limited resources. Now there's not enough ads for everyone sleet compete for them. It means they have to do further. I can't confirm it, but there's been a lot of creators who were like Azra limited resource that being said, there seems to be as videos that I watch. So I'm not sure. I feel like you watch a lot of videos. Haven't Haven't reached reached the the end. end of the advertising, and I don't use YouTube red or premium because I need to know if there's at home. Oh, how do you suffer for your art. A lot of that stuff as fast as like. BSO. I think it's interesting because creators constantly feel like now more than ever that they are competing gainst YouTube in order to profit off YouTube in they're competing with kids coming in from new platforms like vine, all the vine kids went to you to invite shut down and they brought over with the millions of subscribers that's like your David Dobrica. Paul's the next one will be tick tock which is big out and wants to talk become passe people move over to YouTube. It's monetize -able. So this feels like a big trend that YouTube hasn't really contended with other social platform. Start social video platform start. They burn bright and then they failed because honestly, they cannot extract advertising dollars because YouTube has them all. Yeah, I'm sure we're Chessel no, but Facebook and Google control like eighty five ninety percent of the digital ad money that exists in the world. There's duopoly. So you start a vine or Ta-talk or musically..

YouTube Paul Chessel LIZA Koshi Polycom Robert Kinkel France Logan Logans Susan Azra limited Aaron Casey Facebook David Dobrica Google eighty five ninety percent two days
"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on The Vergecast

"So just give me the one like quick overview of what's going on with you too, because it seems more controversial more problem oriented than most people might suspect it think. The interesting thing with YouTube is that people are paying attention to it. So I think these issues of always been there, especially with creators doing ludicrous things that's been going on since the dawn of YouTube, but suddenly because of disturbing children's content and the alt-right being on YouTube and kind of YouTube terrible recommendation algorithm and the radicalization. You've got a lot of people paying attention to it. And I think you to wasn't aware that this many people were suddenly paying attention to them or their creators. So they're trying to figure out how to put on a good PR face while fixing their platform. Well, quote, unquote, fixing their platform, what's broken with the platform. So the number one issue I think is what we've seen in conversation while as the recommendation algorithm, it's radicalizing so many people. I spoke to a lot of kids, for example, who came up through gamer gate. There were like thirteen fourteen when gamer gate. I happened in like twenty fourteen who are now eighteen nineteen and they were saying YouTube. Is the main reason that they believe loss of. They believed because they would watch video from like someone like Sargon, and that would give them recommendations into this whole era of people or area. People rather disturbing. And it's just opinions mytalk high school teachers a lot. And it's like the kids that we talked to. They just use you to infer news. They're getting really bad sources to backup their opinions. So I think that's the most disturbing part of you to in. It's not swing. They know how to fix. It's not something it's they're interested in fixing. It's just not something they're capable fixing. I think that's a Google problem, not just a u two problem whether you think they're not capable of fixing, I think you've been trying some things, right? They're doing things in different ways. I think the Wikipedia links there now adding or adorable, and their way through moon landing happened. I remember I won't. I won't name names at CS one year end of the day long day, everyone's having a drink, and I just remember suddenly the conversation became about whether or nine eleven was an inside job is like he do. What are you talking like? I, I was an adult when that happened. That was one hundred percent real. I promise you in every journalist in America would be chasing that story forever if it hadn't yet. But he's like, while I watch YouTube videos and I just remember thinking to myself, oh, this is like a lot. There is a moment with kyri Kyrie Irving. He's on stage somewhere and they brought up the fact that Kyrie believe the earth was flat and he very explicitly said, I was watching him on YouTube videos, and I got into this whole and it's like, yeah, you too. It's super easy to find something in. It starts off really fun with like, oh, is the moon landing? Real gonna watch conspiracy, but you. But that quickly becomes topics that aren't as ludicrous that are even scarier. See us keywords like liberals feminism or. Or conservatives. And it gets into scary territory where people have spent twenty spend a day, formulating a very well put twenty minute argument that is based on bad faith and it travels well and then spreads to Twitter threats to Instagram. And it's like this cross promotional thing. And I don't think YouTube knows how to stop people from gaming their system which is upsetting. And that's the conversation with creators a lot where they out. Thank you to all the time abusive tags abuse of metadata is something that websites are aware of, and YouTube doesn't know to fix it. And it's like the most blatant issue that is facing a lot of creators is like they'd just put in however many tags they want. You could put Google or Android into a YouTube search and you're going to get far right conspiracy theories. Yeah, because people just realize that you're searching for enjoying the game that previously, it's funny because on main Google search, they know about the issue games. Yeah, in YouTube is the second biggest. Search engine in the world may appear not to and owned by Google. It's funny joke I kept using was that up until eighteen months ago, Google forgot YouTube existed. And then suddenly they were like, oh, there's a lot of problems with YouTube..

YouTube Google Kyrie Irving Twitter America Wikipedia one hundred percent eighteen months twenty minute one year
E3 2018 was full of games

Q

02:06 min | 2 years ago

E3 2018 was full of games

"Of the biggest outdoor live video game tournaments ever in north america but to give you an even better idea everything that went down and what it all means for the world of video games julia alexander is here over the line from los angeles where she's been spending the last week taking in everything at e three julia senior internet culture reporter for the video game outlive polygon hedge julia how's it going three it's kind of like aig conglomerate of every single major video game publisher and developer coming out and showing their biggest titles to both if you hundred lucky fans who've managed to get tickets and video game so what does it look like tickets they what does it paints the picture it's a major convention center in downtown los angeles ever the rooms are incredibly dark because there are vibrant neon signs leading up publishers like sony and microsoft and intendo people are running around and darting trust trying to get their hands on the newest game games like super smash brothers which you mentioned people just want to get their hands on it there's a lot of people walking around and pointing at games if they can't wait to actually get their hands on it's kind of like a beautiful chaotic mess you've also said it's like the oscars of the video game world right yeah i think or comic con is another great example if this is the big event for the video game industry this is where everyone comes out and shows up the biggest games that they're working on or into where all the executives can talk to them about what's coming up i mean this is kind of like chris christmas comes early every year of the video game industry in june so you mentioned super smash brothers earlier a favorite game of mine i'll see that and you said it was one of the biggest titles of the year of one of the biggest moments d three was the unveiling of super smash brothers what super brothers all about julia she collects a bunch of like to characters think mario and donkey kong and in santa's from the metro games and puts them all in one game where.

North America Julia Alexander Los Angeles Reporter Publisher Sony Chris Christmas Mario Santa AIG Developer Microsoft
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Kids a lot of many many kids just really really anxious to get the chance to either take sophie or high five some of their favorite fortnight players so there's that's like ninja is absolutely the biggest star we don't get into the stadium and we're fortunate enough to be on the field level and it's a rare moment where you have actual superstars like paul george who's an nba all star pete wentz who's in follow boy and these guys don't really matter at this moment because they just wanna hang it with ninja other fortnight players so they're trading numbers fortnight kids being like hey let's like match up after this plane later on and then we get onto when the competition started off the best explain it is really beatle mania type stuff i mean they're security guards around joe and his partner marshmallow who's a very popular dj and these kids are darting out of their chairs running across the field just to get a chance to really see their favorite i really their favorite player in action i think the best way to talk about it it's like watching the kid on your street play street hockey for so long and then they're in the nhl and you're like that's my guy gonna go wherever he is in support him do i'm always kind of embarrassed to say this to you but watching fortnight on twitch like watching ninja play ford native kind of my first ever real addictive streaming experience like i watched it a lot and i've never really watched a lot of twitch before if you don't know twitches is a platform in which you can watch people play video games in many other things does fortnight's seemed to represent like a real crossover moment for east boards that it's about to become super mainstream does in north america so east sports has been huge in a lot of asian countries especially there's a big part of europe and certain games definitely have a presence in north america but in terms of like mainstream recognition of this being a sport as opposed to a pastime i think four night is kind of a lot of people plan to me player as acceptable each fourth right now you kind of figure it out as you'd go like all duty in that way like even if you're watching it you know what's going on but i think what makes fortnight grease it's it's fun streamer themselves become as new tip of video game god and they're also pro athletes now i think what we're seeing is the mainstream public really acknowledge and accept that this is an sport and not just a pastime that kids watch after school are we going to start looking at people like ninja the same way we look at like lebron james or wayne gretzky i think we've already started i think it's people are gonna catch it up to think ninja is playing nightly with drake he's playing with paul george like he's he's on that level he's he's a recognizable household name at this point i think people really recognize them as talk player along with thing very entertaining streamer i think you know he represents kind of the future when eastport star should look like in the sense that he's a good role model for kids but he's also a hungry competitor whose puts an effort he streams twelve hours a day practices and so yeah i think i think we're only there i think he's already superstar he in alexander's thanks so much for calling us from three laying know what's going on since you're in los angeles thanks so much for waking up at like five in the morning to do that thank you having me it's a pleasure julia exile exander is a senior internet culture reporter for the video game outlet polygon currently in la for three the big electronic entertainment expo and i guarantee most week nights and weekend nights as well he'll be.

twelve hours
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Game companies unveiled their new games and plan for the next big thing in gaming technology this year xbox playstation nintendo were all their eastport were huge as they held one of the biggest outdoor live video game tournaments ever in north america but to give you an even better idea every thing that went down and what it all means for the world video games julia alexander is here over the line from los angeles where she's spending the last week taking in everything at e three jill excuse me julia senior internet culture reporter for the video game outlet polygon julia going i'm good i mean i'm out of breath a little bit from trying to describe each how would you describe your there three is kind of like aig conglomerate of every single major video game publisher and developer coming out and showing their biggest titles to both if you hundred lucky fans who manage to get tickets and video game so what does it look like what does it paints a picture a major convention center in downtown los angeles ever the rooms are incredibly dark because there are vibrant neon signs lighting up publishers like sony and microsoft and intend to people are running around and darting trust trying to get their hands on the newest game games like super smash brothers which you mentioned people just wanna get their hands on it there's a lot of people walking around and pointing at games that they can't wait to actually get their hints on it's kind of like a beautiful chaotic mess you've also said it's like the oscars of the video game world right yeah i think or comic con is another great example if this is the big event for the game industry this is where everyone comes out and shows up the biggest games that they're working on or into where all the base executives you can talk to them but what's coming up i mean this is kind of like chris christmas comes early every year of the view game industry in june you mentioned super smash brothers earlier a favorite game of mine l say that and you said it was one of the biggest titles of the year one of the biggest moment that he three was the unveiling of super smash brothers what super brothers all about julia correct bunches like conic characters think mario and donkey tongue and and sam from the metro games and puts them all in one game where players can come together and fight each other basically just a fighting game but it's really cute and it takes place in a bunch of very recognizable intended game seems and all these characters that you really grew up with another game it's getting a lot of attention is cyberpunk twenty seven seven what's that all about guess 'cause i couldn't twenty seven seven is a game we waiting years for it's a futuristic rpg kind of has varied cyberpunk vibe well the cyberpunk vibe to it it's very cool aesthetic i think this game really was one of the top contenders for winning the show they show up trailer for it and it is studying and the question was whether we'll get our hands on it but it is a beautiful beautiful game that in this kind of just open future that people who like any hippo cyberpunk type movies will really enjoy just sitting in i'm tom power i'm speaking with julia alexander about this year's electronic entertainment expo e three so outside the of the big as you said like nondescript convention center was one of the biggest if not the biggest game exhibitions of the year for pretty much the biggest game of the decade call fortnight there's a tournament held in a football stadium thousands of fans people watching online some of the world's best fortnight players including a guy named ninja we've talked about on this show before again this sounds more like the super bowl then video game tournament julia you were there can you set the scene for us what was it like yes so when i first arrived it was incredibly hot the sun was beating down pretty hard and people were lined up around bank stadium in los angeles where the los angeles football club play and it was a lot of.

eastport
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"At a concert and the newest crop of nominees for the polaris music prize lots to get to today chiming in today is lisa christiansen arts reporter and associate producer for cbc vancouver's on the coast and co host of the pop this podcast she's in our vancouver studio at lisa good morning tom at sitting right across from me right now is the host of cbc music's reclaimed jared martineau making his cue this debut hi jared your morning has it gone that's going well good good let's start with this fifty thousand disrespect so offended that i had to double check i'm always taking the money over swatting need me the way would expect so that's drake with his most recent single i'm upset from his highly anticipated new album scorpion which is coming out june twentyninth we think yesterday he put out a video for that song directed by toronto's owned corinna evans at the twenty two year old filmmaker who's working with a lot this year she also directed the god's plan video jeb for people who haven't seen the new video tell us about it i mean he continues in the tradition of making the most ken con can con possible video opens with him waking up in the middle of the air canada centre with giant toronto raptors logo there in the middle on a bed with a girl and then gets a phone notification that he has to go to his high school reunion which ends up being the actual set of degrassi with the entire cast we should point out that drake was a cast member of degrassi the next generation if you'd every canadian should know that that's a rule heritage moments yes it is i'm looking forward to the next littlest hobo themed drake video we should say the drake is the only one wrapping this video take a listen to this oh yeah yeah they wanna boto but you already know you're live that d'amoto genie ow so that's actors stephan bro grin also known as snake from grassy who's clearly evolved musically his dave ramsey i will say this drake has a reputation all jokes aside to making music videos that really captivate a culture that's not known for monoculture anymore it seems like everyone can talk about a music video how do you think this video measures up to that legacy well in terms of can con i have to go back to twenty thirteen we're being in a shoppers drug mart to me being the high water mark of watching him by life products was like i felt so seen you know this is me but of course this was fantastic this was lots of fun and i also like the fact that as much as it was degrassi the had sort of real high school reunion because apparently drake did drive up in his own ferrari which i would do at a higher school reunion if i had a and make sure that i tell everyone that is my ferrari so this was a lot of fun this was greatness daljit for canadians and also for the other fans a chance to have to look back at the grassy and spend some time this is interesting video especially because the last time you heard from drake was essentially him getting roasted by push t on this story of added on we're not gonna get into that we talked about that a couple of weeks ago but there have been all these rumors jarrett that this was going to be drake's response but yet it's it's a pretty light hearted lovely video what do you make of that i mean i think there's a bigger play going on with drake which is around trying to maintain a the best possible self image the sort of going hi instead of going low of this that in a way i mean i was reading something recently that was saying about the video that that kind of a pres like the pixar of rap in the sense that he knows how to manipulate everybody's emotions back into his favor and i feel like this video is like a really good play on that level so on one level he's trying to sit us i'm not even i'm not even responding so i'm taking a higher ground but at another level i'm gonna actually redirect the conversation entirely into exactly what lisa said this realm of the nostalgic the realm of the soccer in the realm of the motion heartstrings get pulled which completely takes takes it in a different direction and just to sound like a high school kid i mean drake started this elevated it to a place to.

reporter vancouver polaris music producer twenty two year
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The nanotubes wall opened up with the last name first name how man that's do the bartman i will say i'm one of those people who love the simpsons a lot like i'm one of those people who quotes the same i know i know of your involvement with before i knew coming in here not know you're involved in i was the sucker that that took on that assignment how do you feel about it now you know it's it's a quirky thing to have in your resume you know it it did very well it was the number one video in the world for a couple of weeks so we would we were you proud of it tom meet look it was the hardest thing i've ever done because i had to go to hungary we couldn't produce it in the united states because everyone was working on the show so they asked me a couple of times and i turned it down and finally they bagged me and and you know said this is really important so i said all right i'll do it and i went over to hungary and in hungary they had only had the tracey ullman one minutes so they thought that simpson's was supercrew i should be clear so if you don't know this before the simpsons was the simpsons the cultural icon that it is right now and how to half hour show it was a series of shorts on variety show called the tracey ullman show that's right and they were like a minute long to two minutes long yeah they were just little interstitial 's mine don't matter what is matter never mind what what is badgering is every mind anyway they thought that that was what we were going to do so they were very confident that they could pull that off and i got i landed and i said okay here's what it is it's big dance thing and we have almost every character that's ever been in the simpsons is going to be seen in at some point or another and it's all original animation it's full animation it's not limited and their their their faces are going white and they're going no simpson's is this and they show me one of the one minutes and i said no man that's like two years ago this has to be you know a real video and that means the characters are going to move around and dance and do all we have a hundred characters and and they just started going and you know we had to do it in in about two and a half weeks of five minute film with a crew that primarily did not speak english and you know it was being advertised as it's going to be a premiered globally at the same moment all over the planet and so they were making these announcements and we didn't even have a film so it was it was really really really hard to pull off and you wouldn't know it from looking at it it looks like a trifle but we basically got every animator in hungary involved i love this story i now thirty years later here you are still feeling the pain thanks for coming in you bet bradbury's or splenectomy nice to meet you brad bird is the writer and director of incredible to also did the frozen go see it on a giant screen order yourself some popcorn don't go don't watch it in your computer you don't need a little kid is a beard to explain why you're going to hell just go with some of your fellow adults and and enjoy enjoy and then afterwards maybe do the bartman maybe maybe if you can incredible to open today as with any disney pixar film and you go to see it in theaters you get to see a pixar short right before the main event the latest one playing right before incredible to it's called bowel it's by toronto filmmaker domi she you might have caught her on the show earlier this week but if you missed that conversation you can catch up by subscribing to the q podcast and i should also mention that if you are under i'm willing to say probably thirty five you might have no idea what i'm talking about referring to the bartman which was simpson's video music video just go on youtube do yourself a favor q hugh hugh hi i'm fred penner in you're listening to q.

one minutes thirty years five minute two minutes two years
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Be strong so bob superstrong right mothers were pulled in ten different directions at once so i have her be elastic teenagers are defensive and insecure so i had her be invisible and have forced fields in ten year old boys or energy balls who wanna open every door impress everybody now and babies are unknown they could have no powers or they could have all the powers this is what's remarkable to me because i wanna point out that the film's about a time where superheroes are outlawed big conversation about whether superheroes should come back but as much as it's about that it's also about like you said it's about family it's about parenthood right how much of this is informed by your own parenthood it's half influenced by the family that i grew up in with my sisters and my parents how many of you five in my family six in the family that i grew up in and and half of it is based on the family i have with my wife and sons so it's all of that combined into a gumbo of spy movies and superhero things in action adventures i loved when i was a kid any specific things any real life things come from your own life make it into the film yeah all over the place i mean an argument that is in the first incredible where bob and helen argue about one of their kids graduation in quotes is argument my wife and i add you know guess which part i was do you do you play around with the voices at home to your kids about how old are they they're all in their twenties now yeah they were they were young when the first one came out yes and my middle boy jack was a baby when i first came up with the ideas and we called him jack jack so yeah he made it was exciting for them to have the dad behind the big film of the year behind the film that well it was weird because you know i was working on this thing but i didn't really show them any of it until the wrap party you know and so i like to do that because i like it to be all spiff he and finished when when they see it i would have thought you know a lot of directors if they make films like this they would be shown to the kids give feedback halfway through no not no i always go it's not ready yet it's kind of like saying hey check out my new car it's all in parts across the front yard but it's really cool to be great when you're gonna love it yeah yeah so i always wait till the cars together and you know that was one of the highlights of my life sitting there with my boys leaning forward with is wide open going wow take me back to when you were eleven years old stories you went to went to walt disney you're inspired to become an animator can you can you paint me a picture for people listening to this what you what you saw that inspired you so much well i mean like any normal kid i loved cartoons i mean i loved animation i was particularly fascinated by the disney films because of the thoroughness of the imagination when i saw jungle book something inside me snapped because i recognized the distinctness of the vision meaning that when i saw the panther jumping across onto a branch it didn't just look like a cat i mean somebody had studied cats it looked like a panther versus other cats and it didn't just look like a panther it looked like a panther that was sort of stuffy i realized that someone did that someone's job on the face of the earth was to figure out how a stuffy panther would move and i thought that is the coolest job in the world i love how why do your eyes got when you talked about the panther like i can i can tell you still i'm still impressed by that but you know what i mean i don't think you lose that no and in that particular movie the same animators who did the stuffy panther had to figure out how a old over the.

bob superstrong eleven years ten year
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The show i don't know how much animation i'll tell you one thing i don't know a whole lot of animation but if you know anything about animation brad bird is i'll say he's like he's on the mount rushmore of animation he's a really big deal and he has a new film out called the incredible too so he comes by to talk about why animated isn't just for kids why the jungle book and peter pan changed the game when it came to animation when we also surprise him by dropping some narda worrying information that we knew about him that he was responsible for the bartman the simpsons music video so that's really good time on q this lisa christiansen jerem martineau talk a little bit about the new drake video that talk about the players music prize and we argue about whether you should be able to take your phone to concerts and how we feel about locking them up in our pockets i i'm kind of into what i went to jack white concert the other day and i had locked my phone up i really enjoyed the concert a lot more i have to say at julia alexsandr talks about how ninja if you don't know who ninja is ask your nephew niece or child the biggest twits dreamer in the world the biggest four nights creamer in the world i'll give an example how famous this guy is we tweeted out that julia lexander is gonna at e3 talking about ninja ninja re tweeted it are mentioned on q are just blown up it's it's insane how many people my phone is buzzing this guy has so much power and we talk a little bit about how he's lebron james slash wayne gretzky of the new generation of video games and pulitzer prize winning author michael shea bonn talks a little bit about fathers day being father and being assan joe starts now you don't have to be a gigantic fan of animated movies to maybe recognized some of these i can't help myself i i like good food okay good food is hard for a rat to find wouldn't be so hard to find at your words picking i don't wanna eat garbage dad to put a four field around the point listen to what i'm saying now this engage repeat this games do you recognize those so right off the bat you had the iron giant then you had a remmy from ratatouille and then a last girl from the incredible by the way i can hear parents yelling at the radio saying i've watched them on dvd enough i've watched them on netflix enough of their all popular movies from the last twenty years all from the mind fella named brad bird brad bird oscar winning director and writer he's also behind the latest disney pixar film that hits theatres today incredible to it's the long awaited sequel to incredible 's you guessed it one that is fourteen years in the making but it picks up right where the first movie left off following the per family as they balanced real life with superhero life as you're about to hear brad bird has been passionate about animation for a very long time ever since he was mesmerized by a certain panther in the jungle book but before he takes you back to those early days brad bird one of the greatest maters one of the greatest animation directors in history is going to reintroduce you to the world of the incredible audi nice to have you here great to be here feels like it's a it's a good time for superheroes black panther coming out you have a ventures coming out what makes the incredible special you throw a rock and you hit a superhero now i think what i think the little place that we staked out was not superpowers for superpowers sake but to use them to comment on roles within the family and and certain periods of your life i mean that's how i picked the powers i picked him around the positions in the family let me well men are expected to.

fourteen years twenty years
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

59:08 min | 3 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"We think youtubers was just a guy with a camera film himself in putting it up on line he has a team how does no one catch this may he has a professional team and there's a lot of factors that go into the video that make it extremely dubious there is the fact that they do not monetize it which means that logan knew what he was putting up was offensive he basically said i'm not going to get ad revenue from this because use who will not give it to me because the video will be flagged for a content that violates community guidelines so he knew that and his team knew that and they still uploaded it is there you what you're talking about here is like sort of a culture of people doing things and putting up things for views cut a desensitize from the real world just kind of thinking about two in terms of using numbers right absolutely enemy in if you'll get where logan paul came from looking paul started on the platform called vine which twitter eventually purchased and then got rid of in january 2017 a and he was one of the biggest vine stars and so in went away he went to you too been found a whole new audience i'm and figure out a way that he can make even more money but what he learned from his time on vine and then even more so on youtube is that he can get away with whatever he does because as long as it's for content as long as it reviews he will remain relevant he will remain rich and he will remain at the top of conversation russell you're listening to queue julia alexander is my guess she's a senior reporter with the internet culture website polygon we're talking about the controversy around youtuber locum paul after he posted a video of himself discovering a dead body in japan so like as we heard earlier a lot of logan paul fans tend to be quite young and they.

logan paul youtube russell julia alexander twitter japan
"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Radio so you know when you hear song on the radio or on your phone or actually just more like you're out and about somewhere and you're kinda hit with dejavu because you realize this song you're listening to the may be like your kids are showing you or something like that sounds like almost entirely like another piece of music that you've heard before maybe the melody sounds familiar maybe there's a a rhythm or change that sounds familiar with his one pretty big case of this that's making headlines this week it involves three songs each from a different decade and a potential lawsuit you might have heard a bit about this on cuba earlier this week just bring you up to speed the songs i'm talking about our from linux del rey radiohead and the third is this tune from the 70s by holly's there are lawyers involved in depending on who you ask there's a lawsuit in the works to we have our own judge and jury we have our we have our own matlock and what's another tv lawyer the guy from law and order santa what many and waterston ray here the queue this means mannal they'll deliver their own verdict on this case and fill un on the new song for bruno mars in cardi be the seems to be absolutely everywhere this week with me in the studio as always has rain doris host of radio to morning and our daria williams the host of after dark on cbc radio to high guys high alert so there's been plenty of twists and turns plenty of them with wilander del rey radiohead story this week rain at tells what happened okay on sunday landed ellerey made this post and she said that radiohead was asking for one hundred percent of the publishing for her song get free she said that she offered up to forty the only accept a hundred there lorries have been relentless they're going to deal with it in court to head of the hallways get involved in this well that's coming up in a second we made we made a little clip i want to play next i'll share that involves the hall okay well then basically this is kind of interesting because radiohead was actually accused of of stealing creep back in seven loved not back in the '70s from a song that israelis back in a.

cuba linux holly matlock radiohead bruno daria williams one hundred percent
"julia alexander" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"julia alexander" Discussed on Upgrade

"Julia alexander from polygon in natalie jarvi from the hollywood reporter and we basically talked the whole hour about what like the disney fox merger would mean for streaming and i'm really happy without that turned out so people like us talking about this they should check out that episode and i'm hoping to have them on again to talk about in the future because i think it's very interesting topic whatever we call it here so david let minimum net flex the show is called my next guest needs no introduction there was a couple of resume went to bring us up one is that i know that you love david let him do the other is the fact that this is really interesting from the way that this show is going to be distributed its monthly yeah one episode a time which is very strange for net flux yeah lay they made this announcement that they were doing a deal with letterman to do these specials and the way they described it as that the that he was going to do a series of specials and it the way it was going to drop was not described and i kind of figured that they might do a you know here are three episodes or hero 6 episodes come thing because it's very nath legs but they're doing is that there is a precedent for this they're doing what they did with chelsea handlers talk show which drop it was a you know they're they're foray into like we're going to do a talk show and they dropped those or kind of a talk show sort of but they drop those regularly not.

Julia alexander natalie jarvi reporter letterman hollywood disney fox david chelsea