Audioburst Search

20 Burst results for "Jules Verne"

"jules verne" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:09 min | Last month

"jules verne" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Those same for Paul if those same percentages are correct about describing the future as the twenty fifty data suggests is the case then we'll be able to we will be able to know that you get through that twenty sixty data and yes my hope is and the reason I undertook this experiment other than you know just scientific knowledge was I can see with the climate change that's coming all up with things like code red velvet is you know just the first they're going to be a lot of these I mean climate change is going to cause viruses and bacteria to mutate things are common date of their new circumstances and Shelby that's basically what they call the nineteen is it some kind of mutations and mutation and it's still reported four yeah exactly so if I could tell you George if you want to invest in something or you are are an inventor or you're an engineer and if you will do the best you will save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people that absolutely if I could that's the point so I'm going to see out of the twenty six the data and comparing it with the twenty fifty data I'm going to be able to put forward a series of predictions based on which I believe about the somewhere between seventy five ninety two percent of the material will be correct well now let me ask you Stephen because these these dates twenty fifty twenty sixty or thirty to forty years out yet it seems like you're getting data from these and you're garnering that much earlier so why do you why why do you put it out to twenty fifty or twenty sixty when you're getting stuff right now when they do that when you do the studies because I want to get out yup it's it's it's very important I want to get out further and Josh great intellectual projection can give you the answer but I don't want to get too far out twenty sixty forty years in the future I don't want to get too far out because you don't understand what they're talking about I mean yeah in eighteen sixty five you and I have been having this conversation as I told you that everybody was describing for me that was a kind of picture that you hung on your wall and you could watch people dancing saying all over the world I mean what the hell would you make of that right I wouldn't your what if I could give you a specific example Jules Verne rug twenty thousand leagues under the sea which was hugely successful at the time and he did this in Paris and the nineteenth century he then wrote.

Paul Shelby George engineer Stephen Paris Josh Jules Verne
"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mortgage I'm Jules Verne WBC bosses is radio twelve thirteen time for traffic and weather together the super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes that is to be given whatever problem coming into the city the lower deck of ninety three is starting to back up back to Solomon's square we have reports of a crash coming in at the end of the second just before the entrance to the o'neill tunnel southbound the Leverett connector in bounties busy with volume most of the way down onto sterile sterile drive west is heavy to Charles circle eastbound is slow and leverage circle and on soldiers field road eastbound watch out for work near western out of Dublin airport tunnels you're okay north bound on the expressway sluggish she's built it up to the pond sitting around Columbia road southbound side of the expressway is slow at the Braintree split route three south is fine along the south shore one twenty eight south once for a restriction over the left shoulder near route one A. in Dedham from an earlier crash out west and tell the pike is in good shape north of the city three ninety three ninety five refined to and from New Hampshire this report is sponsored by indeed dot com you only want to use the best route to drive across town to do the same when you need a higher indeed provides hiring managers the straightest path to the best new employees customized solutions like screener questions and skills test will help you see beyond the resume post your next job indeed dot com slash higher Rebecca WBZ's traffic on the threes in the forecast it's going to get some here this afternoon up to forty four but windy feeling like it's in the twenties tonight partly cloudy down thirty tomorrow is.

New England Solomon o'neill tunnel Dedham New Hampshire Rebecca WBZ Jules Verne Dublin
Difference Between a Maker and an Engineer in the Maker Movement

3D Printing Today

07:24 min | 5 months ago

Difference Between a Maker and an Engineer in the Maker Movement

"Been this series of articles by a fellow who we've talked about on the show before Michael Mola's Hugh who's thankfully been around for quite a while and has not walked away like so many others have because they didn't get rich quick or something But he he's sticking to it and he's been writing a series of articles about the maker movement since make media went kind of bankrupt. They've re the make media folks have reinvented themselves into nonprofit and from what we hear Dale dougherty the guy who He didn't actually started. He started with The fellows O'Reilly Timaru Riley and Tim O'Reilly said ticket. And he got up and left and made his own little thing and and he and from what we hear. He has taken his own money and purchased from the holders. The people that owned the the properties to everything To get at the content and the titles and the names and things so supposedly Dale dougherty. Now Kinda owns it and what we hear. He's looking at making it into a nonprofit which sounds good. I think that might be the better way to go. And we'll talk about why in a second but mister you has kind of featured What's been happening to this? I'm using my finger. Air Quotes Maker Movement One thing about Mr use articles that he's never really stated explicitly and we would like to is the distinct and explicit difference between a maker and an engineer. So let's make something clear. People have been making things for quite a while. We've had the wheel for a while. Now it's just a few years. I didn't get invented when make make magazine came out. You know the fact. We've had these people. These strange beings go by the handle engineer for quite a while. Now but what's the difference between an engineer and a maker and there is a difference. I mean you can be an engineer and a maker of course sure but we believe that. There is an explicit distinction. That makes a person a maker versus engineer. And that's a person who's making something just for the sake of making it. They're not making it to meet a specific objective for some external pressure. Thing like you got to make this. They're not they're not. There's no gold. There's no necessarily a contract or a thing that has to be fixed because nobody really needs a life-size animated giraffe that they can drive around make refer cool and nobody really needs a giant statue with flames coming out of who knows what orphans. You really don't have. Don't give them any ideas. And if we look at the roots of the even the maker Faire and make media they themselves went to the artists from the burning men community and brought them in along with the folks who were the. What do you call them again? The the Jules Verne fanatics that water steam pulse team. And they do things just for the sake doing for the fun of it for the art of it for their motion of it and and we believe that defines a maker. That's what makes them maker and there's some differences in that in that light because now a maker does not necessarily mean they're an engineer. They could be an artist. Could be musician. They could just be a ten year old kid. Who's not sure what? What are your she wants to be or do that. But it sounds like fun to make this thing. That could be fun. It would be cool water. Some of the more impressive things you see more. Technically complex things you see are being made by people who are in their day jobs engineers and some of the ten year old kids grow up to become engineers because they were inspired by it in their in their youth. But but yeah. I think you're right in the. The central motivation is different now. Going to a university and interviewing some engineering. Phd's about the maker Movement. Is that kind of problematic? Because are they makers well? Yeah they're makers doing things for the fun of it. Some of them are the market. They've they've got their their budgets. They have to meet. They've got their students that got to teach the their goal directed there. I mean they could be makers they monto sit back and develop something fun. That's well within the realm of reality for them but that's not that's not their career. They're not making a career as a quote maker. Very few people do right. And as such what has to question if the whole idea of a maker movement makes sense for a financial endeavor probably not Does the maker Movement make sense as the basis for stem Maybe to get the initial interest. Yeah it's motivating that would be great but as the foundation for Stem I. I don't I don't think so. I think traditional education environments are essential for stem. You still have to learn the basics you still have to have the foundations all right and to be an engineer. You still have to know details that most makers just don't want to sweat sure but you can you can when you're trying to get kids motivated to learn stuff showing them you know some application of it that that interests them. Yes is much much more important. Oh Yeah Oh sure I mean I. It's it's in my opinion. It's a lot more fun than shooting at Aliens on screen sure area. But but I mean I I I show my kids. You know something that they're interested in. They're interested in building. Somebody I say okay well. Here's here's you know how you start but then you need your math. You Gotta learn this math in order to do this process. You know all right. So there's some motivation to learn some math skills that ordinarily most young folks say. Why do I need this? Yeah well you need it. In order to make the bullet go further right exactly. The Little Arrow go further at that. Get that piece to fit better. Whatever and this was never made clear by Mr you in any of his articles each simply kind of like most of the make media related kind of stuff just kind of glossed over the fact that there is a big difference between Disciplined Foundation Engineering and shoot from the hip having fun maker. Let solder it together and see if it works. It doesn't make is not synonymous with open source. No I don't agree with that Open source has a strong engineering foundation. All Open source came came from the software world. I mean I remember the early. Pdp Lebanon's they. The deck people sat here. It's open source that you could play with it and do whatever you want with it. But in the end we want in right and a lot of that is happening in this commune. This word. Yeah we do see that So it's not automatically you know. Open source equals maker. No I don't agree with that But there is overlap. Yeah definite overlap But that doesn't equate open source does not equate to the maker.

Engineer Maker Faire Dale Dougherty Tim O'reilly Timaru Riley Jules Verne Michael Mola Disciplined Foundation Enginee Lebanon Hugh PHD
"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 7 months ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On Jules Verne WBZ bosses whose radio it's twelve thirteen time for the Super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the three is rob a lot of folks around the shopping malls this afternoon yeah there certainly are dug we're seeing a lot of volume down near the south shore plaza for example that's one of the tough spots here that's causing delays on route three north bound in Braintree also bid on ninety three on the northbound side approaching route thirty seven now the bottom into the expressway that be busy as well the reason it is in his ears are crash show up on an expressway back near Squantum street in that is traffic backed up almost to the o'neill tunnel it is to forty two minute drive time from Boston down to Braintree getting down to their crash near Squantum street northbound is slow from furnace broke up towards east Milton then again for massive up into the deal tunnel there was a crash earlier in the tunnel it's gone now straw drive east is lowered leverage circle north of town we one busy near route sixty in Linn street again up by the Saugus area near Lin fails and walnut street one twenty eight south bound is slow from one twenty nine in Wakefield down to the cloverleaf again some pockets through wall Sam the pike west is slow from one forty six to two ninety and both sides everyone getting jammed down in Foxborough near the stadium this report sponsored by staples staples printed marketing services makes connecting with clients and loved ones easy with hundreds of holiday template you can customize and right now get twenty percent off select custom cards and invitations ends December twenty eight twenty nineteen limit one visit staples dot com slash holiday cards or store for details staples rob Pacolli WBZ's traffic on the three.

New England Braintree Boston Lin Wakefield Sam Foxborough Jules Verne WBZ Saugus rob Pacolli WBZ
"jules verne" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

11:34 min | 8 months ago

"jules verne" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Emerson who has written a rather thrilling book it's autobiographical but he could read like a novel the right kind of crazy is the name of this book and it is published by atria subtitled my life as a navy seal covert operative and boy scout from hell well that covers a lot Clint yeah I was trying to get all in there on the cover thank you for having me absolutely let's start with the what is the right kind of crazy well it's very you know there's there's several different things in the book but the right kind of crazy the combination of a person who enjoys risk so don't worry too much about consequence you know like someone towards gunfire like skin firefights jumping on a airplane blowing things up you know that's the right kind of crazy and hopefully you're doing all that on behalf of you know on the side of good not on the side of bad so the book is certainly a also has the personal aspects right so you know you live a lifestyle and professionally is almost all risk and sometimes that bleeds over into your personal life and I pretty much lay out all my bad decisions in the book and you know like they say bad decisions make for great stories yeah we're your voice got from hell yeah I probably took some of the scouting information and use that for trouble making by you know walking grandma across the street yeah well aid you know we we all have our our our road path that we choose it to follow what were you the kind where you daredevil kind of kid were you the kind of kid who would would go out and do crazy stuff yeah yeah we having trouble making definitely over the past time growing up overseas you know you don't have much supervision and we did nothing but cause trouble dressed up as ninja's in its whatever was in our path we figured out some way to either break it mess with it you know yeah difficult voice stuff that these days if you did that you forget trouble yeah absolutely it when you we're we're growing up of course some of us one of the things we are often think of is maybe being career goals were you the kind of guy growing up the saying I'm going to be a navy seal I mean I met my first seal I was ten years old so you know and I just mention Ollie up tell then I wanted to be and right now I feel yeah even cooler field goal making stories and I was sold right off the bat and plus you know you kill people and injured called murder you kill people as a seal and it's it's okay so you just gotta make sure you pick the right by the line now I would dare say a tricky line I'm sure now that eat you you may indeed have had the desires of growing up to be a navy seal I doubt that you had the thoughts of growing up to be the only navy seal ever inducted into the international spy museum no not at all I mean who would have predicted that I mean I I I didn't even know about the spy museum grow older you know and question five five eight years now I guess and and the first time I visit was blown away turns out it's like one of the most visited spot in BC and in here this whole time I hadn't heard of it but once I walked in a letter or yeah now I know why people come here can we just we just of a new building and Janice set up like MI six or eight cores and it's cool yeah it is it is quite quite interesting I had some espionage background but but strictly sit on my but nerd type of background although I I was in Vietnam but my job was to go out and and killed these and blow up things my job was to tell other people what to kill and blow up so an important role and it is really is but discerning not as as code exciting is as all of this the the the the the the transition first of all to be a seal in and of itself it is pretty remarkable what's the the attrition rate of those who apply to be maybe seals how many wind up actually what percentage they wind up actually being a seal actually making it years sooner than numbers always changers somewhere between twenty and thirty percent who will make it right and sometimes it's last seen there's there's very bold right if you like a winter class there you know you end up with less people summer classes are usually bigger so you'll end up having more graduates and that's mainly because of the academy's everybody graduates may go into the navy so plays a role but you know for example my class starts with a hundred and eighty guys and we graduate with twenty eight originals so well the biggest thing I said that's definitely attrition all right one eight six six Jimbo one eight six six Bible five four six two six as a we have a call from David in San Francisco hello David Jim our guest two things I was going to raise in a Jules Verne and if you remember him he had a whole bunch and we're spending inventions right and so sometimes great invention like a submarine could be turned into a weapon of death right we have twenty thousand leagues under the sea right now the scientists of the world for me only back to Leonardo da Vinci he was weapons maker in the king would never let him leave the area you know so he was like what do they call it again bird in a gilded cage he he was not be allowed to escape because he knew too much about the okay arts right so if your guest is serious about freeing or working on the right side how much reading all of that the captured scientists that are working on weapons project sign in so mean the of wood which side is are you talking about well isn't isn't the world's history of of the weapons of the world were made by slaves scientific slaves well I would dare say the vast majority were not but for whatever you thought you may have client yeah I mean sometimes people consider enlisting you know like you're automatically telling us yeah already of the more more or less voluntary I mean sure I'll grant you that yeah that Hitler's scientists operated under a certain shall we say succeed or die probably mandate but but for the most part you're talking about of people who who fairly voluntarily offer to to help out because they it there they have a government funding for all kinds of of toys to play with I would have closed a couple of things attributed to you at which I a are described as your two codes if you are cheating you are trying and it's only illegal if you get caught really wouldn't fly these days right I don't know yeah Lucille community for a very long time he would probably here you know if you're not cheating on trying more often can you hear our actual motto which is the only easy day was yesterday and it's gone away because they feel like okay that she if you're not you know try and my you know secure people's moral or ethical codes and so they're not allowed to say anymore but the reality here's users Hey do whatever it takes to win over your adversaries and that's really the take away from it unfortunately when real does something wrong whether it's you know legally or makes the news or whatever then immediately try to figure out like okay what why why did he do this and knows a little bit of a knee jerk reaction if you ask me but because these are things that apply to the battlefield in applied to everyday life but anytime somebody does some wrong you know leadership usually has a little bit of a knee jerk and then I. changed everything but the reality is is culture culture you know and the fuel communities definitely a bunch of guys that like taking risks and like I said before sometimes taking risk please over in your personal life and you get in trouble I'm wondering about the personal lives of seals as we go to a break here I would think that the the danger perhaps even maybe what sounds like a bit of of the drenalin addiction that these might be things that that were not conducive to a happy home life I think it varies you know and for I mean personally I talk about in the book that I'm taking risks and then all of a sudden you find yourself you know talking to other women in your married or you can lead to a number of things and some guys know how to deal with it better than others and sometimes it is adrenalin right there's guys that they get a lot of all that risk in in in our off time they're doing based jobs you know off the top of a skyscraper I had a buddy do that injured himself several times internally finally guy doing it but he was just so you know we just love the risk and that much that he's willing to risk his life all the time not just at work wow thank you each guy is is different on how they deal with some of the stuff and you know the you know there's a lot of mentors dinners guys that be just fine search codependent person upbringing and who they are does this require shall we say a special management and oversight on the part of the navy so it's starting to write I mean for a long time we've then Mavericks income awoke within the navy you know we we symbolize ourselves with iris and you know of course warriors and everything else in history in anything anything merit time is obviously we embrace but yeah I think big navy has started to you know put the microscope on naval special warfare when you've got you know Eddie Gallagher and some of the things that made the Nutri selling but the reality is if you take any demographic of people there's always gonna be ten percent of regardless of the vetting process you know that has the potential of you know doing something wrong so you only so much you can do the rest of the rest of it is a human behavior raised a certain way born a certain way and you're gonna act out a certain way.

Emerson Clint twenty thousand leagues five five eight years thirty percent ten percent ten years
"jules verne" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Throughline

"Hey I'm Rhonda staff I'm rotting Arab Louis and today's show the secret operation that shape the space race and made the moon landing possible so these were hearing a lot about how humans have to go back to space and reach the next Frontier Mars private companies are getting into the game of space travel some even have plans to bring tourists to the moon and it feels like a new kind of space race as emerging boot removed human history the thought of people flying into space not to mention landing on the moon was pure fantasy if they thought about it at all and even then it was usually confined to the home science fiction the reading at the top is an excerpt from Jules Verne's eighteen sixty five novel from the Earth to the moon describing what he imagined moon expedition might look like it was written when the civil war was just coming to a net at that time people still got around by horse and Buggy and most people lived on farms or in small towns many didn't travel far from where they were born so space travel was a wild farfetched idea but just about injury later the idea became a reality. Here's what you probably know about the moon landing the Cold War was raging the Americans and the Soviets had been engage in a space race for years and then on July twentieth nineteen sixty-nine Neil Armstrong and buzz Aldrin became the first humans to land on the Moon Orlando there's that iconic image of Armstrong stepping off the lunar module a quorum and then planting the American flag on the surface it was a triumphant moment for the US. We beat the Soviets to the moon reached a new frontier here made the seemingly impossible possible but like the moon there's a dark side to this story because it turns out that moment probably wouldn't have happened without the help of a group of former Nazi scientists and engineers and in particular one engineer whose lifelong dream of space travel guided them in into the mood.

Moon Orlando Neil Armstrong Jules Verne buzz Aldrin US engineer
An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

Hijacking History

05:18 min | 10 months ago

An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

"We're going to look at the consequences of this revolution first and then you'll see how important it is to understand first of all. Here's a definition of the industrial revolution. It's the use of steam engines to produce power instead of the ways going back thousands of years wind water and muscle and the second definition of the industrial revolution is it's the rapid social change that flows from that introductory machine in other words. The steam engine is quite literal definition of the industrial revolution but what were the consequences consequences of using the steam engine instead of wind water and muscle rapid social change was the answer the industrial revolution's chief product product was a world in constant change mainly in the areas of transportation and communications think about it this way at the beginning of the nineteenth century that is the eighteen hundreds the army of Napoleon did not move faster really then the armies of Julius Caesar Two thousand years earlier so in terms of transportation you couldn't get from Point A. Point B. Any faster Mr in one thousand nine hundred then you could in say five hundred. BC however by the end of the eighteen hundreds it was possible to go around the world in eighty days which was of course the title of Jules Verne's famous novel and you could send Semaphore. I four messages in a flash from one continent to another so that gives you a sense of the rapid changes in technology to just use one example news in eighteen hundred was very slow and very selective. It was only available to the rich in order to buy a newspaper. You had to have enough money to buy a newspaper which was certainly not cheap and news production production was quite slow and in fact the the whole concept of news did not exist until the industrial revolution brought it into existence in order to have news. You have to have change in society but if people were living in eighteen hundred you're pretty much the way they lived in say five hundred they would not be expecting to read much in a newspaper. Even if they could afford one they couldn't afford one but they didn't even have the concept of news. News requires a society that changes and the society never really changed changed not for the common people that's why when we study history we tend to study kings and generals and statesmen and what they do because at the level of the common people there's not much historical change to talk about so there was no concept of news news but by the eighteen thirty s and eighteen forties thanks to the industrial revolution which started in England news production began to increase and also thanks to the Industrial Revolution Printing presses were produced which were so advanced that they could produce a newspaper for only a penny and for example in eighteen thirty two. You have the first Penny newspaper The New York Sun in the United States of America now that was going to revolutionize politics because for the first time relatively poor people could afford to buy a newspaper for only a penny and once they could read the news once they purchase it. They could read it and once they could read it. They knew what was going on and then it became a factor in politics. newspaper editors would have to pay attention to the opinions of the poor whereas before the poor never had an opinion because they could not know what was going on and in the nineteenth century in Europe and America newspaper Editors Editors Editors were the political kingmakers who could select candidates and mobilize people to support them so the industrial revolution created the technology that gave people a reason to look for news and the means to look for the news because of the relatively cheap cost of the printing press and the ability to turn out a newspaper for just a penny any so this is one way in which the industrial revolution was going to revolutionize society in the next podcast. We're going to be looking at the first country to experience an industrial revolution.

America Jules Verne Julius Caesar Napoleon Europe BC England United States The New York Two Thousand Years Eighty Days
An Interview with Space Historian, Rod Pyle

Jay Talking

10:29 min | 1 year ago

An Interview with Space Historian, Rod Pyle

"Here with our next guest rod pile space historian he's worked with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Johnson Space Center and as written a lot as well he was written for PBS and well you also can involve with Deep Space Nine and Battlestar Galactica say if engine interesting stuff thanks for being with us thanks for having me and it's you know some people would call me a diverse career background person other people would call me a dilettante but yeah I'll check whatever well you can choose how you decide so let's start with what you did and have done for NASA so I had it kind of worked around the edges of that off and on back in that the ninety is mostly doing television production so occasionally we'd cross over into what NASA was doing but I was the car the employee of theirs but then about two thousand nine I got hired to write this really interesting program they wanted an executive training program the partnership between NASA and this group called the copper toward other York so I got together with the guy from IBM and we wrote up this training program and did that for a couple years I was great fun because if you're gonna talk you gonna give people lectures about how great space age was having a standard five behind with the profits but it's cool the gastric salute that was really fun and then finally the on time about two thousand twelve I guess two thousand thirteen I started working for Jeff horse migratory Pasadena on as needed basis writing books and articles for them and that that was really cool because now you're sitting there talking with the guys they call this stuff happens so this guy worked on many relator arm the rover and this guy over here worked on some kind of inflatable antenna system for CubeSats they're just brilliant really dedicated people that are so passionate excited about what they do and of course that that translates into you if you're listening to open hopefully the writing he's on a little bit about Mars making contact and also the blueprint for a battle star Margaret your contact was a cooperative they're both coffee table books in the sense Mars make contact was I'd written two books before the kind of looked over the Mars missions from mostly the American perspective somewhat from the Russian perspectives albeit perspective but they didn't have the kind of like we did so there's much more of an American story there and then as we got about twenty fifteen twenty sixteen won the publishers I work with said you know we really like to look at everybody's projects so that means the United States and Europe and Japan's made the Tampa and and India actually succeeded with their very first try a couple years ago and they want to do a picture book of it so I thought well this is great and actually got paid to do so I got to go hang out the archive your post laboratory and a few other places in big draw the old photos and interview the folks that worked on so forth so it's just really fun kind of a broad look at that basically everything that's happened since about nineteen sixty four four I think all the NSS what's that actual spaces ID at the group the oldest prose base human spaceflight group out there it was actually founded as a wage to organizations that merge one of them was founded by Werner von Braun the father the Saturn five back in nineteen seventy is and then the other group sub group was formed by a guy got to the office of the guiding Jerry o'neill was big the space colonies use a visionary at Princeton so those two groups merged a few years later and form the society so it's just a huge pros based advocacy group they have some political action they do I edit a magazine called ad astra which is a nice splashy quarterly periodical and then we got your the conventions and education programs in stem programs and so forth that you just really good good group of people I listened to I don't know who's a podcast of some broadcast of some kind that you were involved in and it was I learned a lot from it and you talked about whether it would make more sense next to go to the moon again or to try to go to Mars can you talk about the the risk reward present kinds of each of those so this is the longest you want to start a food fight one of the space advocacy groups just an argument going up moreover Mars or vice versa and it's been going on for a long time we've been talking about going to the moon sense Jules Verne wrote about it the eighteen hundreds with talk about going to Mars at least since the nineteen forties one or one about brown started writing seriously about it really before that with the various other visionaries and the question always been you know which ones cheaper wall so we did the moon in the nineteen sixties with their power projects so we know that that's doable and I would say it's behind us but we kind of picked the low hanging fruit there so the question now is what limited budgets and limited frankly attention span with both the public and Congress which one do you pick well Mars program is a very ambitious goal would be very inspiring for people but it could be anywhere from hundreds of billions to by some estimates as much as a trillion dollars and it's a long trip you know by the time you go out do you think there and come back it could be a year and a half two years and we just don't yet quite know enough about the effects of extended space flight on people both in terms of no gravity and also the radiation out there I'm kind of understand it but we need to know more about how to mediate it now to keep her from damaging people so the moon just makes an awful lot of sense in terms of something that's cheaper ball there's a lot of science rewards there there's a lot of training and work we could do towards getting to Mars and probably most importantly as it turns out recently discovered that in the last decade there's a lot of frozen water water on the south for the modem the ice and where you got water you can melt that make rockets you'll need make readable aired you can make drinking water you can go all kinds of stuff there's also metal and glass and some other elements on the moon that are very useful so for every bit of that you find there and can use their or used to go beyond to Mars let's say that's a whole bunch of stuff you don't have to watch in the space so you can use smaller rockets you save money at all just gets much much much easier so for my money the moon the next logical step and plus the the reward of going to Mars is more strictly scientific not so much commercial writing like did there's a possibility at least in a distant fantasy to manufacture on the moon maybe it will be cheaper somehow and you just kick the stuff back to earth and you can have a an earth the type of crowded and dying because of so much industry on a you can have all the industry up there I mean is that a crazy crazy I'm think of a thing or is that at least something you could end that might be a reason to go to the moon well I think that's what the settlement discussion comes and that's one of the things the national space society is very focused on so that you know it's not a fantasy it's doable it's workable we know that we've got everything in place with today's technology if we just get off our behind the bill what separates those founder of Amazon is so keen about he formed a rocket company actually before you on must did the SpaceX based Basil's former tropical blue origin back in two thousand and gives express purpose was to move heavy manufacturing off over do it in space or is not going to hurt anybody allow the plant to heal you go back to it you know like state if you well and give people options to live and work awesome first because there's a lot more resources even the local solar system then there is honor if you just have to go out and get up so this pretty compelling financial argument here and as you know as well as I do when there's a profit to be made suddenly things start moving a lot faster so I think that or on the cusp of right now so wouldn't it be my got would say be prohibitively expensive to manufacture stuff on the moon but that's not the case it doesn't have to be the case the thing is is to make getting there for the first few dozen times less expensive than what we're doing it with the Saturn five back in the nineteen sixties it cost a bundle you know in today's dollars the proper Graham would have been about a hundred and fifty billion under sixty billion she so that was expensive for six landings but nowadays when you have you on must flying as rockets for in some cases virtually a bird or or less than the other commercial providers are in there already cheaper than it was the nineteen sixties and their reusable they fly back to home base robotic we all by themselves and landed the refuelling be used again and Bayless is doing something very similar and other companies trying to get in on the act now you're reducing costs down by be be a factor of ten or alternately a hundred when you start reaching those numbers suddenly going out and doing stuff on the moon it's very affordable makes a lot of sense on the other side of that is once you're there you got these manufactories going your commoditized the stuff they put a price on it so whether it's U. S. government or private industry restore be international sector that matter saying al all by that gallon of liquid oxygen for this many dollars space credit or whatever we call them at that point now you've got a really calm me out there it becomes very much like how the free market works on earth and again but there's money to be made people will go so you in fact have kind of a gold rush out there so it's really not as far fetched as one might think this other minerals out there that it would make it worth any chances oil on the moon the if you gotta have you gonna have I you have animals sorry all rights are you got of the dinosaurs you got to have plant matter all right right sorry sorry to be down there what no but there is there is healing and three which is a form helium that can be very useful for fusion we're still struggling to get to work but if you can get yours no work at what times work a lot of money only now going up there get that stuff you're gonna make a bundle so yeah very

Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Johnson Space Center Battlestar Trillion Dollars Two Years
"jules verne" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Jonah? What say? That show. My parents were two different worlds in. I was a product of the love that they shared a son of pod and a son of the cast. That's right. Yeah. What did you quote, Jules Verne? Like this movie does Jules Verne one said tooth Rin once said the ocean master needs four of the seven ocean kingdoms Jews Vern one said, you haven't lived until you fucked a fish. Hello. My name's Griffin Newman. Hello. My name is David sim. This is blank check with Griffin David's a podcast about Maga Fay's directors have massive success early on in their career and are able to unite the land in the sea. Exactly, right. That's what James one is done. He's united. See? But also we've been doing this weird stealth piecemeal many series where recover every DC universe film. And we're are we only missing man of steel in regard. We've done every other one right? Correct. And I'll get to that in one second. Oh k when giving. But yes, that is that is correct. And we've been covering these part of it is that we were kind of fascinated by how ramshackle this sort of franchise building seemed to be how much Warner Brothers was putting into it. And you how a blank check had been written. Right. And it was one director kind of kick starting this whole thing. But there seemed to be a lack of Likud vision for how this whole thing was going to be built out there. And now now they've starts become more individualistic. I mean like suicide squad is very much David air movie, but it's a super compromise David air move, more compromise, but wonder woman, aquaman and the other one. Yeah. These are the two, but it's like this is starting to be like, I guess this may be where the thing is going. It certainly seems that anytime there's less interference and pressure on the director the better, you're doing. I mean, here's something that. I don't think anyone can dispute about this film. It is pure. This is not a movie that was mental. Yeah. That might sound backhanded. I don't mean it that way. But even if you were like this movie, give me a fucking headache. Sure. You can't be like studio hackery. Right. Like this movie is insanity. So today, of course, talk about aqua, my man knuckle, my man, he doesn't say it at. Yeah. So that's just the Justice league thing. Yes. That they were like someone was like, no you need to catchphrase Ellen Ben, and I were going up, the escalator producer, Ben producer band. Benckiser port laureate. The Hawes peoper finds some critic personal friend Dan Lewis dirt by Bennie smoking, wet so can wipe any way hot Benny, right? I active meat lover. The graduates are certain tells over the course of different miniseries such Kylo. Ben producer kanobi bench on Benson aliens with a dollar sign war, Hawes produer bane. Ben nineteen fennel maker rebel h-has fucking Bangladesh. Mr Ben credible. Eat drink Benghazi and the holiday Jesus Christ. Okay. Wow. We were going up the escalator. And Ben said, how many times do you think they say it in the movie, mom, man? And my prediction was even if they don't say it with that sort of like in victory lap. I think he will offer to people as my man a bunch because that was the one thing that worked. Justice. So they're gonna have to be like one, you can do whatever you want. Give us four my man's. So I thought it was going to go like ocean master, my man, listen, sure, you know, I thought he was gonna work at into the conversation doesn't say at once. Good. None of that stuff. From the Justice league's in this. There was a point in the movie, and we'll get to work. I thought is this movie pretending that Justice league didn't happen. But the amber heard was in Justice, right? It takes a while for them to acknowledge they've met before. And when she first comes up to land. I was are they pretending? This is the first time they met are. They actually trying to just like condemning movie ignore the fact that these say max is because here's what Justice league gave us an argument. He's my man. He's my man he has a five point to try to which is nothing..

director Justice league Ellen Ben David sim Jules Verne Jonah Griffin David Griffin Newman Likud Warner Brothers James Benghazi Maga Fay producer Dan Lewis Benny Bennie smoking Benson one second
"jules verne" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"It's a small world after all scans the pen secret hatch now he's into marlon he's almost vomiting you yes right we're transportation but i love all this stuff i love using iconography of like sixties theme park rides we'll we're gonna talk about yeah do you know okay so disney was supposed to be two things one on the blu ray there's the option to watch this with a cartoon short before the film weird and the golkar sort of like sixties like man and like that it's a two d animated short film that's supposed to look like it's from the sixties and it was supposed to be in the world's fair sequence as one of the videos on one of the rides jurassic park you were like sets a lot of stuff up for you and i think it's really good and it should have been in the movie well i mean at one hundred thirty minutes but this movie feels like has lost yes but but this if you put this scene and you're able to cut four other scenes later on where people have to explain what tomorrowland is right this idea of this movie never really explains tomorrowland this video that is my problem with this movie right so this does a perfectly which is plus oltra was right jules verne a secret society comprise of i believe jules verne homicide hamas said as soon nikola tesla which is insane because they hated each other they got along and gustav fell and initially movie was going to include walt disney is the fifth member of this they decided to strip him out of it probably i'm assuming because someone said like disney's legacies way too complicated to just make him simple dreamy guy i'm not sure they shot that stuff though i know and it's interesting to me because what is fascinating about this movie to me is that it is so invested in the sixties fifties sixties walt disney legacy of the few.

disney tomorrowland hamas nikola tesla gustav walt disney jules verne one hundred thirty minutes
"jules verne" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WTMA

"We use the lava tubes for habitation plastic or some material make it impermeable that way and then they have a whole volume of lava tube is the regular permeable can we put can we put an atmosphere inside of a lava tube if we seal it yes we think we can that would be a very attractive solution you all of the huge volume now by almost like a small city the lava tubes we've seen them from orbit and there's one extremely fetching photograph of an opening of what looks to be at lava tube it looks exactly like jules verne would descend to the center of the earth do we think that there are passageways into the moon to have has anybody done any guessing about that the close the closest are these surface lava tubes that maybe go a few hundred that are a few hundred feet below the surface they really can't sense anything below that so that's been tested sense using some kind of x rays and radars and so the challenge that is we need water which we can extract and we need energy and infinite amount of energy i've got the sun and i've got radiation from nuclear energy rice right so we can build plants as big as i don't really think the epa is going to initially be a problem for regulating the nuclear energy that we need i don't think so and those are the two sources that were counting on so two weeks of sun on the moon and that that energy can be stored the japanese have an interesting concept where they they string a belt around the equator of the moon of solar panels so at any time half the sun half the moon has solar power coming into it so they're generating sun solar energy all the time so there are there are sources of energy that we can have so energy won't be are in order to create an aluminum manufacturing facility because i note that at one point you say aluminum in the professor has a chapter that i you know i struggled with it had a lot of formulas in it but it had to do engineers love formulas something equals something else.

epa professor jules verne hundred feet two weeks
"jules verne" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KGO 810

"I said well i have some spare time early three books so i wrote it i borrowed from jules verne during the center of the earth and and the amboise dukes and ted nugent with his nineteen sixty nine song what i put the article in front up so it's technically zone title and it's just about a kid growing up in philadelphia and that's my first book my second book is my eleven years as a police officer outside of the philadelphia my third year my third book is the first ten years of my fbi career it ends with a long chapter on my role in the unabomber case which complimentary mini series very well anyone is so interested zero you're profiling capacity and we have we're having trouble not asking about oj simpson firmly dying do it let's go you want to learn title would you mind if we go there jim i wasn't for this but let's go i didn't watch the entire special but i saw clips of it rapid point where oj is like sort of laughing and smiling wait almost sounded like to me he was saying what actually happened because maybe he was there maybe topping high speaking hypothetically but searching his memory branks for what he saw so as a as a former fbi guy i mean when you hear that is there any doubt in your mind i mean what does that say to you well first of all i put my toe piling in my behavioral had on earth and i mean it's pretty clear jay is a narcissist he's very self centered and i'm sure he was paid for this who knows exactly how much back in the day and yeah no doubt and and you know you gotta make it somewhat interesting or maybe the check wouldn't have cleared so he lays out this hypothetical thing by judith regan right and and he he said well here's what could have happened here's what i did and again i don't want the entire special but i was aware of some of this read some of the transcripts from it and this is a guy just likes to hear himself talk he knows he can't be rearrested with the whole double jeopardy thing in in the uso hey why not put something out there cash the check and.

philadelphia officer jay jules verne ted nugent fbi oj simpson jim i judith regan uso eleven years ten years
"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Psycho i guess he had it coming well no in this move use great in this movie he felt sorry for him if he showed up shown up in psycho or than that would that would be a different thing all together now i have probably got to go to the movie chopping mall lawyer is a 80s robots lascher set in a shopping mall at night where security robots go haywire i think they're computer get struck by lightning or something and then they decide well they've got to kill the people who were hanging out overnight in the in the mall that is a delicious movie yeah but also how 'bout you'll brenner in the original westworld he had he superministry and i'm up until his face falls off a us but before westworld was like a thoughtful hbo series it was a cheesy old movie with you'll you'll brenner pulling guns on people yeah yeah he was he was terrifying he any new brennan was always entertaining but if he was come made to play a killer emotionless robot i would say some of the best killer robot stuff in movies when killer robots are scary the facts that there scary comes not from malice or ill intent lick it might in a monster or in a human villain or something like that the great thing about a killer robot in a scary movie is that its terror is derived from the fact that it has no will of its own or no intention it's just sort of like a an efficient emotionless killing machine yeah all it has his directive and it to it absolutely will not stop until it achieves it now we obviously think of themes like this emerging in the fiction primarily of the 20th century right that's when we think science fiction in earnest really shows up the way we know it now in a jules verne before that but the 20th centuries when you really started near killer robots everywhere but today we're going to go back oh yes we're going to go back to a fabulous example of what is perhaps the very first killer robot that humans ever dreamt up and it it's not from the 20th century is not from the 19th reading the eighteenth.

brennan jules verne brenner
"jules verne" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on The Science Hour

"And they said to me oh ugo appetite to say about that and they said to me don't worry about it you just got to live with it try not to drink and this is one of the problems with hepatitis c is that in the beginning people did not think it was a serious virus whereas we know now for many people at least test psoriasis and canvas oddly to live a cats i talk to people die for it so to start with i didn't even know takes but once had been curative aid which i was in two thousand two i realized that actually i'd been very todd run down to trashed for many years but i told of adjusted to it blamed it on other things and being killed was like being given a whole new lease of life yeah go what fantastic difference that must in amazing tests at of now this is highest buys to fail and it's tremendous last year we treated over one and a half million people and but she every single one of us had this transformational experience it's not enough to reach our target to eta's arbiter treating about five million people globally but at least i will one and a half million people got that feeling of wow all of my life ahead of me got my life back at charles goal with a message of hope there i think now let's probe deep very very deep let's look inside the whole planet i mean how can you ignore a new volume called the atlas of the underworld much is this might make you think of orpheus his trip to haiti's old jules verne's journey to the center of the earth this is really an atlas that has more to do with the plate tectonics anniversary that we celebrated a few weeks back the great discovery walls how new ocean floors continuously created at volcanoes along the midocean ridge and how the spreading plates crash up against the continent's causing earthquakes and building mountains but won't goes up must also go down and on a continually cycling earth many features end up sinking back into the earth deep mantle there what dole they find the media has been mapping.

haiti jules verne midocean ridge todd
"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Sansei combo even help you decide the best class of male based on your needs there's no need to lease inexpensive posted meter now here at house of works dot com we use stamp side common we need a may rbi bit of merger correspondence and right now you too can enjoy the stamp service with a special offer that includes a fourweek trial plus postage in a digital scale without longterm commitments go to stamps dot com click on the microphone at the top of the home page and type in stuff that stamps dot com enter stu ff stuff stamps dot com never go to the post office ruler rowell so all right we discussed that kuhn showed a pa graffiti wasn't feasible even he himself came to this conclusion but the idea still took hold and it still leptin the fiction people continued to claim that they were using the technique there was a hope that the technique would be allowed to determine a murder victims assailant and you see this across the century you've gotta jules verne wrote a story about it they're they've used it in dr who a couple of times and there's an episode of that tv show fringe that uh they used up tiger in as well it seems like a missed opportunity for the the tv series hannibal oh can i can clearly imagine a scenario where the killer tries to uh to to put his own image on the retina of a murder victim and then he lake mix a specific meal with that i ball like a on the top of it like a lawyer why would help the episode ends the i with hannibal eating killers i exact one would hope yeah we'll that maybe if they get a fourth season will see that up a surfeit of by the way of anyone out there wants to cut check out the kipling story it's title is at the end of the passage and the jules verne story from nineteen or two is the kept brothers that's interesting i wonder if he named it after kipling.

home page rowell kuhn jules verne murder fourweek
"jules verne" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Asking what has got to do with us why are we taking the the pain for this uh wide on the local suited out from celta it becomes much harder to develop a rush now and draw the cave art sitting in today for leonard lopate and i'm speaking with lawrence friedman about his new book the future of war i a history at present when did we start to talk about wars future well i think it's always been an issue but it became a prominent form of literary fiction if you like and propaganda in the late nineteenth century particularly after the francoprussian war and aitken seventy one because a particular books came out got a lot of attention and they would design in britain anyway to show that if reform wasn't undertaken if if if measures were put in motion of the country would be at risk described in vivid tubes the the sort of wolves that might be faced a man you've got the people that jules verne um but particularly h g wells who's looking still well known who described future woes uh well into the future but you know can be credited thoughts rogge way to put it of thinking first about an atomic bomb thinking through the implications of military aircraft identified the possibility of a tank so all of these came a quite is sort of um acted immagination that uh they just you will sought so i think the these two factors together worrying about the rise of germany uh more about might do to international bounce of pa and seeing new technologies come alone created quite an industry or future will right have you discuss competing visions of warfare classical as opposed to modernise the explain while i am the the classical view which people are wells who challenging was uh the idea of a decisive battle uh the wall was really about regular armies fighting each other um whoever won the battle on the day an of was going to be in the day um they have the right to decide the political terms of.

leonard lopate lawrence friedman britain jules verne rogge germany
"jules verne" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"From two coups geez please lands sting and hey native houses here so we're taking your calls uh in our next segment larry taunton is going to be calling in from someplace across the pacific ocean we don't know where he's doing one is doing eighty dead wrong laurel jules verne he's our own gene actually use our own phileas fogg okay right yes it's true really as host recording as he goes and he's okay so he's phillies fight and jules verne he's a little so we're going to go to a callers than waiting a long time here israel is calling from hillsborough new jersey israel welcome to their contacts his show hair eric of ago and swell what's on your mind a if just wondering there the t shirts were out if that though the thing you you get a tshirt just for calling in just for ask for calling in all you have to do is wait thirty minutes and you get a beautiful these duscher tshirts are so beautiful i just want you to be aware uh envy is going to creep into your life people are gonna look at you differently they can a dislike winning the lottery and you're going to find out who your real friends are now israel in honest with you get a triple extralarge d just boil it a few times you have a couple of times outdoor small and it will shrink great down because this is very cotton very very cheap where do you listen to this program unusual us on the air or do you listen online at listen on like i don't i don't cap delilah non the podcast and how how did you ever discovered this always curious how people find their way here the story is a little store we have fun though i had a roommate uh in college the name of mike like i get i give a shout out uh he used to listen to you all of all your book and he would always talking about.

larry taunton jules verne israel mike phillies thirty minutes
"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Unlucky cast on holly and i'm tracy me wilson and the idea for today's episode actually came from fiction keeper jules verne to be precise in his book mysterious island readers finally get the backstory on captain nemo us you may or may not know mysterious island came out after 20000 leagues out of the sea and a vernes enigmatic villain is explained in this as a a runaway royal of an indian state name princeton car and in the book vern weaves real events from history in with his fiction in the book the car supported and fought in the seaport rebellion and ended up losing everything because of it which capitalised his running away from india forever and becoming captain demo but the simply rebellion was a very real events it's also part of the second sherlock holmes novel called the side of the four yeah which in a weird confluence of events i was listening to sign of the four on the way to seneca falls and back as you were stumbling across it in a in jules verne simultaneously this happened yeah and i was like that thing we should talk about uh in it's one of those incidents that when you look it up it has many different names we are going to use sukhoi rebellion but if you look at it from things written from the british point of view it's usually called the savoy mutiny or the indian mutiny in india it is called the first war of independence.

jules verne india wilson princeton vern sherlock holmes seneca falls sukhoi 20000 leagues
"jules verne" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"The senate majority leader as the rats were taken off the revised a republican healthcare bill today majority leader mitch mcconnell has threatened that if is integration of obama you're replacement does not move forward he'll turned to working with democrats to patch up the system it's something president trump has hinted at a couple of times fellow kentucky republican rand paul won't vote for the current bill he wants repeal by subsidising they're not going to fix the desk borrow bomb again no democrats will vote for the bill organs ron wyden says ir orders sends the premiums skyrocketing and makes care unaffordable for anyone with a preexisting conditions the congressional budget office will analyse the bills affects next week bob costantini capitol hill virginia senator mark warner the top democrat on the senate intelligence committee says the panel wants to know more about interactions between trump campaign officials and the russians have made it on surrey's of document requests and we expect to be receiving those very shortly we also as as recently as this week have put out request to donald trump junior and i'm gonna take him at his word just take mr kushner is word that they want to cooperate with the committee fernanda has strengthened to hurricane force in the pacific the latest from correspondent jan johnson swirling across the ocean hundreds of miles away from the tip of mexico's baja california peninsula fernanda is expected by forecasters to be a major hurricane by friday it's not an immediate threat to land but a lead forecaster at the national weather service in honolulu says they're urging everyone in hawaii to prepare president trump and the first lady enjoyed a private dinner high above paris as they ended their first day in france that trump's along with the french president and his wife dined at the eiffel tower jules verne restaurant i'm barbara kusak a few years ago my wife and i went shopping for amazing quality luxury bedding we could actually afford and what did we find nothing hi i'm scott tannen.

hawaii eiffel tower paris jan johnson donald trump virginia capitol hill bob costantini kentucky president senate scott tannen barbara kusak french president france majority leader honolulu forecaster baja california peninsula fern mexico fernanda mr kushner surrey senate intelligence committee senator mark warner ron wyden rand paul trump obama mitch mcconnell
"jules verne" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Right so i guess he's just got good lawyers me found a little low oh something there well this this premature ruling that apply to the former governor of virginia i think just open the floodgates to a lot of this stuff that's why they didn't get the blasio no well we'll move we'll take a look at the salute or in the program and if you the prosecutors in the justice department that's a big thing you put up on the website we it was responsible for the conviction of a sheldon silver now you go to the website go mira this correct vis uh we'll get the donald trump he's in paris today visiting with the french president he said mccrone mccrone mccrone i keep things meet with connell mcshane from fox the business it looks like him to smith you're just in his thirties the buddhist looks like and but he's a big meeting today i own what cow without lou well obviously you know there's an isis problem there there's a refugee problem mirror the biggest problem is he's going to dinner at the eiffel tower he has the lobster uh hey that's a great restaurant the jules verne from a secondfloor that is one of the greatest restaurants in the world the best thing they have their in what the hell it's called it's you get an egg looks like an egg it's a real leg in you crack the show and the appetizers inside really i don't know how the hell they do with a what it's like a magic trick it's a bike four hundred bucks a person the there oh it's the second floor of the eiffel tower not the second floor of the second uh but this the bridges are there's like a floor like a few hundred up in another one if you watch this james bond movie one of the roger more movies there's a scene were eats there if you want to see what it looks like a figure which movie it is a thorn in paris and then she's climbing up the eiffel tower and he jumps down in parachutes australia nia so he'll be eating their turn he can always find some relects the you go anywhere to the.

donald trump paris french president lou eiffel tower jules verne virginia connell smith james bond