20 Burst results for "Jules Verne"

"jules verne" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"jules verne" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Not like a yeah, so if it fell off if it was ripped off like you wouldn't be injured. Yeah, there's no wires going into the arm. Okay. The reason why I say that though is because structurally the body and the musculature are not really. These arms couldn't pick up a lot of weight. No, all kidding aside. Yeah, they couldn't, but it would be functional. You could pick up a can of soda. You know, that's use it. You could pick it up enough. And you may have been looking at it. It would have proper strength. And I know that it's there. I know you're not crushing it. That's amazing. So I keep a close eye on this technology and it's again nice incremental improvements. This was worthy of comment. All right, bob, you're going to give us a quickie about quick eaves on Mars. Okay, yes, thank you, Steve. This is your cookie with bob everyone. Recent analysis by scientists have shown what could be more than a thousand caves in the tharsis bulge region of Mars. There's no where that region is. But it sounds kind of cool. Make a left at the close and cut off. Calculations show that these caves could be lifesaving for a human future human colonists, not unlike the lava tubes on the moon. This presupposes though that Mars is far deadlier than a lot of people I think really, really truly understand. They think, oh, it's got an atmosphere. You know, that's not bad. But it barely has an atmosphere. Barely barely. Edited does not have a magnetosphere. Which is also very critical. I mean, regarding the atmosphere, if you're at sea level on Mars, it has .0 .7% the air pressure that we experience at sea level. I mean, you might as well be nothing. It's so small. Let me ask you this. Yes, ask. You may remember this answer that's in our upcoming book. Four. Back to the Future. What pressure would you need to have on Mars or anywhere? What pressure does it really human being need in order to be able to survive without a pressure state? Oh, it was a lot. No, it was actually one of the 6%. Yeah. Oh, really? That's it. Of an atmosphere. The survivability, you can survive. You can't breathe. You need oxygen, but it's not as much as I thought. It's really, but you can't implode. Yeah, you won't go anywhere. But you can't move. You can't move, because if you move, then you would run out. But yeah, but still, even if that is true, but even so we would need 6 7 8 times what's there now just to be able to breathe in the box? So with the volatiles on Mars, we could get to the point where there was enough of an atmosphere where all you would need was supplemental oxygen. You wouldn't need the pressure shit. Yeah. You wouldn't be like, Arnold Schwarzenegger in total. But talking reality tit today, it's a horrible place. But it's not just the atmosphere that the ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. It's so deadly. How much do you think it's on Mars in terms of that radiation than on the earth? Because 900 times. The radiation doses are 900 times. I don't think I've ever been so fast in my life. You were wrong before. That's the question. So calculations show how come this is a quickie. This can't just be under a minute, right for you to finish. Okay. Calculations show that only 2% of the UV would get you through most of those caves. Only 2%. But enough light would get in that photosynthesis wouldn't be completely gone. It would still be able to take advantage of photosynthesis. And they think that for the ionizing ionizing radiation, it would be the same. Very little would get in. So this could be a real haven for future colonists. Also, while you're in a cave, you can also search for life, J because if I'm living on Mars, I'm going in a cave, even if I'm a little microbe so there could be who knows what kind of life could have developed on Mars eons ago in these caves. So in the future, artists who wants to Negro may say, get your ass to a cave on Mars. Yes, this was your cookie with bob. I hope it was good for you too. Okay, thank you, Jake. So Evan worked up a little puzzle for us that we're going to do before we go to science or fiction. And he has given us a bunch of quotes and we have to figure out who it's attributed to, right? So you're going to play at home, you're going to keep your own score. We're going to ask each of the individuals here who they think the correct answer is. The first, quote, science, my lad is made up of mistakes, but there are mistakes which is useful to make because they lead little by little to the truth. Was that written by Jules Verne Ray Bradbury or Edgar Rice Burroughs? Let's go down the list, Steve. George, Bradbury, Kara. Third? Bob? Doesn't sound like Bradbury to me. I'll go where that Edgar Rice Burroughs. Okay, and Jules Verne. If you answer Jules Verne, you are correct. Nicely done. Come to the center of your car, you and me, baby. Oh, nice. Next, I despise the lottery. There's less chance of you becoming a millionaire than there is of getting hit on the head by a passing asteroid. We'll start at the end, J that's Phil plait. Bob. Got.

Bob Steve Arnold Schwarzenegger Edgar Rice Burroughs Jules Verne Ray Bradbury Evan Bradbury Jake Jules Verne Kara George Phil plait
"jules verne" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"jules verne" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Dismissing it. Because you think i'm just a sun big stone. Her and remember machinery at caltech understood. Jeff that we don't know whether you actually graduated with a degree but that's fine. Ms grey any home. You know to me. That's that's very very hurtful and very very insulting to listen to. We need to. We have to turn down or you need to do something to get away from the crowd. Very loud really. Is the crowds drowning. You out get around the corner you guys on radio yes so you gotta be quiet So the screen and so the cigarettes which see screen and as they sailed and they thought this was the crack and it was a monster that they talked about their correct and okay so they say silly. Sorry cracking her. It's an existed or not exist spencer. Entering the crack it is supposed to be gigantic right. Yeah so then we get to the mythic version of this of squid. Which is this crack creature which is gigantic octopus. And if you've seen motion pictures like it came from beneath the sea or if you've seen jules verne's twenty thousand leagues under the sea or you. Saw deauville cupertino. The thing from way down there. I don't i don't know the name of it but it was about a giant squid or or actually applaud screen that attack cleveland and in that particular Worked they're living in lake erie. I don't understand so there is this. Are we still talking about the crack. Let's get back to the.

Jeff spencer jules verne cleveland lake erie
"jules verne" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Science Salon

"Twenty thirty. Maybe twenty thirty five now. So by twenty one hundred. You know. that doesn't mean somebody that makes two dollars. A day is is doing fine but maybe say twenty one hundred. Twenty two hundred. Everybody makes the lead today of what would be say one hundred thousand dollars a year. Or whatever could we get to that point you know kind of projecting this out And not even think about one hundred years. I de what happens here is an. It's it's common it's we do. What we we we we project out sort of literally we which training out and it always looks can look disastrous when you do that and we project out what we know if it's always interesting to read all science fiction. Because they are they gonna go to the moon and jules verne days they were gonna shoot a giant cannon at the moon. That's that's ever going to move to shoot it out of a giant cannon. That went up a mile in the air. Because that's what they knew. Then so kit. Can we get to a human humanity. We're going to have to develop our consciousness. The biggest challenge going forward is not start. Technology but collective collective consciousness switches conscious capitalism which capitalism is done in a more conscious way. I think humans are evolving. I think our consciousnesses. I mean you your moral arc. We are evolving moral arc. Is you now we are. It's certain things that we condemned like slavery which the common sense back. Then you know we look back in utter complete horror and same thing with. We're doing it right now and with a lot woke woke ism in the sense that we look back and see any kind of racism are earning account of discrimination is fundamentally evil in rock and i agree. It is by the way. Discriminating against white people is also even wrong. Of course by definition exactly so i think humans are making progress. And i think we're making progress..

jules verne
"jules verne" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"You know and i mean like to to kinda shy away. I just i really mean if you think if you take Imagination of what the future will look like from. You know five hundred years ago right. It's just it is so hard to conceive of the impossible read so it's it's almost like It's almost limiting to try and imagine things that are an order of magnitude You know two orders of magnitude ahead in terms of progress just because you know you mentioned cars before you know if you were to ask people what they wanted in eighteen seventies faster buggies read so So i think the whole like kind of you know alien. Conversation inevitably gets gets limited by by our entire kind of collective Astrophysical lack of imagination. Ice to to push back a little bit. I find that it's really interesting to talk about these wild ideas about the future whether it's aliens whether say i with brilliant people like yourself who are focused on very particular tools of science today to saw very particular like rigorous scientific questions. And it's almost like putting on this wild dreamy hat like some percent of the time and say like what are what would alien civilization is. Look like what would alien trash look like. Well would our own civilization that sends out trillions of ai. Systems out there. Like hal nine thousand but ten thousand out there. What would that look like. And you're right. Anyone prediction is probably going to be horrendously wrong. But there's something about creating these kind of wild prediction that kind of opens up. There's a huge magnetism to it right and some of some of it You know. I some of the jules verne. Novels did a phenomenal job. Predicting the future right That that actually it was a great example of what you're talking about like allowing your imagination to run free. I mean. I just hope. I just hope there there's dragons that's i love draft yet. Dragons are the best but see the cool thing about science fiction and these kinds of compensation doesn't just predict the future. I think some of these things will create the future plate planting the idea the swallowed the humans are amazing. Like fake it till you make it it. Humans really good at taking an idea that seems impossible to time and for what anyone individual human that idea eh. planting a seed yes and eventually ministry allies. It's weird it's weird. Science fiction can create science. Drive some of the drives. The i agree with you. And and i think in this regard. I'm like a sucker for for sci-fi It's it's all. I listen to like now when i run and And some of it is completely implausible. Right in a care it's it's so it's It's both entertaining and You know just like it's imagination. You know about the black clouds book this by fred. Hoyle this is like this has great. Connections with sort of a lot of the advancements that are happening in nlp Right now right with transformer models and so on but Interest black cloud shows up in in the solar system. And then you know people try to send radio and then learns to talk back at you. you know..

jules verne hal Hoyle fred
"jules verne" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"jules verne" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Idea. And so we presented at conference. And we people lined up at the microphones before we even started talking. It was standing room only hundreds of people crammed in the room because for the two hundred people in the world who care about this. It was a really big and controversial idea. And so that's what got us thinking. How do we look inside. A planet asmal. And that's what eventually led us to psyche. So how does one get all this metal together yet. Why is there a big chunk of metal out there. Well i can tell you some confidence. It's not the death star because those who know the death star say the size is not correct. So how do we collect metal will that is a natural process of making rocky planets. It turns out that we know this from meteorites that the most primitive material just like the building blocks of planets has little bits of metal and little bits of rock all mixed together really intimately like centimeters millimeter sized grains. And when you put all that material clump together into a planet asmal to return to that tiny planet idea. The little bodies that formed early. I mean things that are tens or hundreds of kilometers in diameter like the size of a st. Maybe the size of australia. Their heated up by those early short lived radioisotopes turns out. There was enough of one of them. Aluminum twenty six to actually melt. Those planet tunnels. So when you melt the mixed up. Rock and metal in a body the size of australia the medal sinks to the middle. Because it's denser and that's how you get a big clump of metal. We've got a big clump of metal. Our core inside of the earth. There's one inside of the moon amazingly inside of mars and sign of mercury inside a venus. But we never ever get to see them. It's too hot. it's two pressurized. Like no matter what jules verne says. We are never going to go to their score. So psyche gives us. We think away to see the core of a planet decimal maybe the only way humans will ever see a core if our ideas are right but then tells us that the metal must be exposed for us to be able to when we see it on the surface. How did that happen. Oh okay so they're so psyche. Went through something that really went beyond an adventure a bit into a tragedy and we think this is our best idea. We think that that psyche was part of the planet has melon. It had that metal core in that rocky outside and that as it collided with other planets decimals rather than clumping up into bigger and bigger things like the earth instead it got bashed into pieces and so it's rock was bashed off of it and some of its metal was exposed. Maybe it's all mental could be all mantle could be half metal we really are not sure but we think it must be a fragment of a larger body that finally had its metal revealed on the surface through impacts that were destructive to it. We you know this really makes sense to me. Because you know when i was in grade school a long time ago i was told that the asteroid belt was where to planets collided. And here's the debris but isn't it true that the asteroid belt is actually trying to become a planet. jupiter is not letting it. It's pulling those art. That's exactly right and you know that idea that there was a plan if there has been around for centuries it turns out that if you clicked up everything in the asteroid belt it would be just really tiny. Wouldn't even make a planet even if you get it together..

australia jules verne
"jules verne" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"She was original Gourmet. Oh God she kind of is. She's got the black hair and he's got the white hair and a right and and. him being from the future and her being passed Wow. You're totally right. I'm. Over here. Anyway That like the I didn't I didn't really think about her backstory very much until I watched it this last time but she was like sick and it makes sense that she cared more about like thinking beyond just her immediate space of like wanting to look at the stars and Reading Jules Verne and you know expanding her mind more because she was sick as a kid. So she was like very confined like. Yeah Yeah, it was supposed to die off a cliff. WAS A for Clint. She she lost control over jury. Yes. Yes. But yeah, things to do with her and how doc was being like kind of a kid about our bald of Rocco Fall of love his book and then he meets clear and he's like, oh Hi Mike was that all of that was cute. I love. Has. WHITEWALL tires. And.

Rocco Fall Jules Verne Clint Mike
"jules verne" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Times of crisis. But back in the 18 seventies. So Jules Verne tells us at the fantastic notion that a man traveling from West to East could get around the world in 80 days. There's magic in traveling somewhere even to a place we've been. We're bringing with us a new US Maybe moving so much while growing up colors that, but I love the idea of making a soundtrack for a place. It's an audio postcard anchored somewhere in a specific way. Travel outside. We travel within two Strangely, the inward travel is the more real part. And for me, it gets even crazier and realizing that music is a deep inward journey approaching a piano is going to a new place. I'm a new me in front. Of an infinite space for me in the path of least friction and composing is arriving at the piano and improvising immediately. From Lucky. Cool ideas appear and I can shape them over time, adding new bits of clay or paint or the devil's whiskey when needed, and eventually it forms a world with its own textures and emotional consistency. So I think.

US Jules Verne
"jules verne" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KGO 810

"Gain perspective. I'm pulling myself outside a lot more away from the news in the social media. And I have two new favorite things. The first is watching the clouds float by that is the most relaxing, so relaxing and moon gazing. When I'm doing these two things, I find my breath a little bit deeper. I find Com and I want to know if you think we could live in a hot air balloon. Could you do that? That would make Jules Verne I think I don't know. It's sounding very appealing these days. But the clouds are wonderful. They're like their fluffy and they kind of take us off wherever we are right at the moment. And did you know that there are 10 different types of clouds? I I do know that as you know, I'm a big fan of astronomy. So absolutely, and the big, fluffy ones that we all love to see. Are the cumulus clouds. And actually, all the clouds are numbered. And the cumulus cloud is cloud number nine because that's why we say happy people are on Cloud nine, so I was kind of fun. But also the moon gazing. I just wanted to share the year 2020. We have a lot of great moon stuff going on. We're going to have three super moons. We're going to have four lunar eclipses. A supermoon is when the moon is closer to the Earth, so it looks bigger. And then the lunar eclipse is when the moon gets dark because it gets caught behind our shadow. The lunar eclipse is safe to look at.

Jules Verne
"jules verne" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Those same for Paul if those same percentages are correct about describing the future as the twenty fifty data suggests is the case then we'll be able to we will be able to know that you get through that twenty sixty data and yes my hope is and the reason I undertook this experiment other than you know just scientific knowledge was I can see with the climate change that's coming all up with things like code red velvet is you know just the first they're going to be a lot of these I mean climate change is going to cause viruses and bacteria to mutate things are common date of their new circumstances and Shelby that's basically what they call the nineteen is it some kind of mutations and mutation and it's still reported four yeah exactly so if I could tell you George if you want to invest in something or you are are an inventor or you're an engineer and if you will do the best you will save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people that absolutely if I could that's the point so I'm going to see out of the twenty six the data and comparing it with the twenty fifty data I'm going to be able to put forward a series of predictions based on which I believe about the somewhere between seventy five ninety two percent of the material will be correct well now let me ask you Stephen because these these dates twenty fifty twenty sixty or thirty to forty years out yet it seems like you're getting data from these and you're garnering that much earlier so why do you why why do you put it out to twenty fifty or twenty sixty when you're getting stuff right now when they do that when you do the studies because I want to get out yup it's it's it's very important I want to get out further and Josh great intellectual projection can give you the answer but I don't want to get too far out twenty sixty forty years in the future I don't want to get too far out because you don't understand what they're talking about I mean yeah in eighteen sixty five you and I have been having this conversation as I told you that everybody was describing for me that was a kind of picture that you hung on your wall and you could watch people dancing saying all over the world I mean what the hell would you make of that right I wouldn't your what if I could give you a specific example Jules Verne rug twenty thousand leagues under the sea which was hugely successful at the time and he did this in Paris and the nineteenth century he then wrote.

Paul Shelby George engineer Stephen Paris Josh Jules Verne
Difference Between a Maker and an Engineer in the Maker Movement

3D Printing Today

07:24 min | 2 years ago

Difference Between a Maker and an Engineer in the Maker Movement

"Been this series of articles by a fellow who we've talked about on the show before Michael Mola's Hugh who's thankfully been around for quite a while and has not walked away like so many others have because they didn't get rich quick or something But he he's sticking to it and he's been writing a series of articles about the maker movement since make media went kind of bankrupt. They've re the make media folks have reinvented themselves into nonprofit and from what we hear Dale dougherty the guy who He didn't actually started. He started with The fellows O'Reilly Timaru Riley and Tim O'Reilly said ticket. And he got up and left and made his own little thing and and he and from what we hear. He has taken his own money and purchased from the holders. The people that owned the the properties to everything To get at the content and the titles and the names and things so supposedly Dale dougherty. Now Kinda owns it and what we hear. He's looking at making it into a nonprofit which sounds good. I think that might be the better way to go. And we'll talk about why in a second but mister you has kind of featured What's been happening to this? I'm using my finger. Air Quotes Maker Movement One thing about Mr use articles that he's never really stated explicitly and we would like to is the distinct and explicit difference between a maker and an engineer. So let's make something clear. People have been making things for quite a while. We've had the wheel for a while. Now it's just a few years. I didn't get invented when make make magazine came out. You know the fact. We've had these people. These strange beings go by the handle engineer for quite a while. Now but what's the difference between an engineer and a maker and there is a difference. I mean you can be an engineer and a maker of course sure but we believe that. There is an explicit distinction. That makes a person a maker versus engineer. And that's a person who's making something just for the sake of making it. They're not making it to meet a specific objective for some external pressure. Thing like you got to make this. They're not they're not. There's no gold. There's no necessarily a contract or a thing that has to be fixed because nobody really needs a life-size animated giraffe that they can drive around make refer cool and nobody really needs a giant statue with flames coming out of who knows what orphans. You really don't have. Don't give them any ideas. And if we look at the roots of the even the maker Faire and make media they themselves went to the artists from the burning men community and brought them in along with the folks who were the. What do you call them again? The the Jules Verne fanatics that water steam pulse team. And they do things just for the sake doing for the fun of it for the art of it for their motion of it and and we believe that defines a maker. That's what makes them maker and there's some differences in that in that light because now a maker does not necessarily mean they're an engineer. They could be an artist. Could be musician. They could just be a ten year old kid. Who's not sure what? What are your she wants to be or do that. But it sounds like fun to make this thing. That could be fun. It would be cool water. Some of the more impressive things you see more. Technically complex things you see are being made by people who are in their day jobs engineers and some of the ten year old kids grow up to become engineers because they were inspired by it in their in their youth. But but yeah. I think you're right in the. The central motivation is different now. Going to a university and interviewing some engineering. Phd's about the maker Movement. Is that kind of problematic? Because are they makers well? Yeah they're makers doing things for the fun of it. Some of them are the market. They've they've got their their budgets. They have to meet. They've got their students that got to teach the their goal directed there. I mean they could be makers they monto sit back and develop something fun. That's well within the realm of reality for them but that's not that's not their career. They're not making a career as a quote maker. Very few people do right. And as such what has to question if the whole idea of a maker movement makes sense for a financial endeavor probably not Does the maker Movement make sense as the basis for stem Maybe to get the initial interest. Yeah it's motivating that would be great but as the foundation for Stem I. I don't I don't think so. I think traditional education environments are essential for stem. You still have to learn the basics you still have to have the foundations all right and to be an engineer. You still have to know details that most makers just don't want to sweat sure but you can you can when you're trying to get kids motivated to learn stuff showing them you know some application of it that that interests them. Yes is much much more important. Oh Yeah Oh sure I mean I. It's it's in my opinion. It's a lot more fun than shooting at Aliens on screen sure area. But but I mean I I I show my kids. You know something that they're interested in. They're interested in building. Somebody I say okay well. Here's here's you know how you start but then you need your math. You Gotta learn this math in order to do this process. You know all right. So there's some motivation to learn some math skills that ordinarily most young folks say. Why do I need this? Yeah well you need it. In order to make the bullet go further right exactly. The Little Arrow go further at that. Get that piece to fit better. Whatever and this was never made clear by Mr you in any of his articles each simply kind of like most of the make media related kind of stuff just kind of glossed over the fact that there is a big difference between Disciplined Foundation Engineering and shoot from the hip having fun maker. Let solder it together and see if it works. It doesn't make is not synonymous with open source. No I don't agree with that Open source has a strong engineering foundation. All Open source came came from the software world. I mean I remember the early. Pdp Lebanon's they. The deck people sat here. It's open source that you could play with it and do whatever you want with it. But in the end we want in right and a lot of that is happening in this commune. This word. Yeah we do see that So it's not automatically you know. Open source equals maker. No I don't agree with that But there is overlap. Yeah definite overlap But that doesn't equate open source does not equate to the maker.

Engineer Maker Faire Dale Dougherty Tim O'reilly Timaru Riley Jules Verne Michael Mola Disciplined Foundation Enginee Lebanon Hugh PHD
"jules verne" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KCRW

"We run into the the we run into and red rose the so in then then No Way the commission we catch the baby right away the the the catch catch in the day no way the No Way kitchen the day I spent all day Jules Verne Kelana mom was still busy trying maybe I should wake up in the and just say yeah yeah.

No Way Jules Verne Kelana
"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On Jules Verne WBZ bosses whose radio it's twelve thirteen time for the Super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the three is rob a lot of folks around the shopping malls this afternoon yeah there certainly are dug we're seeing a lot of volume down near the south shore plaza for example that's one of the tough spots here that's causing delays on route three north bound in Braintree also bid on ninety three on the northbound side approaching route thirty seven now the bottom into the expressway that be busy as well the reason it is in his ears are crash show up on an expressway back near Squantum street in that is traffic backed up almost to the o'neill tunnel it is to forty two minute drive time from Boston down to Braintree getting down to their crash near Squantum street northbound is slow from furnace broke up towards east Milton then again for massive up into the deal tunnel there was a crash earlier in the tunnel it's gone now straw drive east is lowered leverage circle north of town we one busy near route sixty in Linn street again up by the Saugus area near Lin fails and walnut street one twenty eight south bound is slow from one twenty nine in Wakefield down to the cloverleaf again some pockets through wall Sam the pike west is slow from one forty six to two ninety and both sides everyone getting jammed down in Foxborough near the stadium this report sponsored by staples staples printed marketing services makes connecting with clients and loved ones easy with hundreds of holiday template you can customize and right now get twenty percent off select custom cards and invitations ends December twenty eight twenty nineteen limit one visit staples dot com slash holiday cards or store for details staples rob Pacolli WBZ's traffic on the three.

New England Braintree Boston Lin Wakefield Sam Foxborough Jules Verne WBZ Saugus rob Pacolli WBZ
"jules verne" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Mother with a give away some. yes yeah what that guy said what that guy said is true go stick around ten o'clock it's just a few minutes from now I will call the next name if that's your name because back nine minutes fifty five seconds to win five hundred dollars I believe in free gas and we got to have your name though WSB radio dot com WSB radio app sign up all right Gregory much time you have another stacked Tuesday I know it's weird on Wednesday but just one more special edition tech Tuesday on Wednesday story you on musk has revealed his new spaceship cleverly called starship yes and supposedly it's going to it's he wants to be in space in six months or something and then he's going to Mars and can I ask you a question Greg yes the picture that I see of this star ship it looks like it's at a Jules Verne not yet is that is that an artist rendition or is that the ship is that a picture of the ship that's the real thing all you can watch it live on you too they have a a live cam so this thing is a real for built thing and it's out there it's not going to fly you that that's the prototype but that's what they wanted to look like with that she was cool I guess you know in line for men musk the lan Fiske email email yes as you call an email he realizes that you got to have that you know that apple slash with the design you know you wanted something was cool and different and not knock on my mac now if I was if I was even eat one must if I was actually in the spaceship yes I wouldn't care what it looks like I'll be more worried about whether or not I could actually fly me to the moon and more comfortable to ride it looks awesome but if it blows up and kills the spaces the astronauts then is known to be much good well we'll just build a new one I don't know the seal on must got he's got too much on his plate Greg what do you say..

Greg Jules Verne WSB Gregory Fiske apple five hundred dollars fifty five seconds nine minutes six months
An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

Hijacking History

05:18 min | 3 years ago

An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

"We're going to look at the consequences of this revolution first and then you'll see how important it is to understand first of all. Here's a definition of the industrial revolution. It's the use of steam engines to produce power instead of the ways going back thousands of years wind water and muscle and the second definition of the industrial revolution is it's the rapid social change that flows from that introductory machine in other words. The steam engine is quite literal definition of the industrial revolution but what were the consequences consequences of using the steam engine instead of wind water and muscle rapid social change was the answer the industrial revolution's chief product product was a world in constant change mainly in the areas of transportation and communications think about it this way at the beginning of the nineteenth century that is the eighteen hundreds the army of Napoleon did not move faster really then the armies of Julius Caesar Two thousand years earlier so in terms of transportation you couldn't get from Point A. Point B. Any faster Mr in one thousand nine hundred then you could in say five hundred. BC however by the end of the eighteen hundreds it was possible to go around the world in eighty days which was of course the title of Jules Verne's famous novel and you could send Semaphore. I four messages in a flash from one continent to another so that gives you a sense of the rapid changes in technology to just use one example news in eighteen hundred was very slow and very selective. It was only available to the rich in order to buy a newspaper. You had to have enough money to buy a newspaper which was certainly not cheap and news production production was quite slow and in fact the the whole concept of news did not exist until the industrial revolution brought it into existence in order to have news. You have to have change in society but if people were living in eighteen hundred you're pretty much the way they lived in say five hundred they would not be expecting to read much in a newspaper. Even if they could afford one they couldn't afford one but they didn't even have the concept of news. News requires a society that changes and the society never really changed changed not for the common people that's why when we study history we tend to study kings and generals and statesmen and what they do because at the level of the common people there's not much historical change to talk about so there was no concept of news news but by the eighteen thirty s and eighteen forties thanks to the industrial revolution which started in England news production began to increase and also thanks to the Industrial Revolution Printing presses were produced which were so advanced that they could produce a newspaper for only a penny and for example in eighteen thirty two. You have the first Penny newspaper The New York Sun in the United States of America now that was going to revolutionize politics because for the first time relatively poor people could afford to buy a newspaper for only a penny and once they could read the news once they purchase it. They could read it and once they could read it. They knew what was going on and then it became a factor in politics. newspaper editors would have to pay attention to the opinions of the poor whereas before the poor never had an opinion because they could not know what was going on and in the nineteenth century in Europe and America newspaper Editors Editors Editors were the political kingmakers who could select candidates and mobilize people to support them so the industrial revolution created the technology that gave people a reason to look for news and the means to look for the news because of the relatively cheap cost of the printing press and the ability to turn out a newspaper for just a penny any so this is one way in which the industrial revolution was going to revolutionize society in the next podcast. We're going to be looking at the first country to experience an industrial revolution.

America Jules Verne Julius Caesar Napoleon Europe BC England United States The New York Two Thousand Years Eighty Days
"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Source with Intel's on Jules Verne WBZ also uses radio we all got only WBZ Taylor's traffic reports for Boston commuters WBZ traffic on the three only WBZ Boston's news radio one forty three on WBZ traffic and weather together it is a server retailers and England all wheel drive traffic on the breeze David has a role in seems a bronze to make yourself a town my god this time we are sponsored by LifeLock with Norton so it's still a bit heavy on the expressway north bound appointed right up through the o'neill yet but a twenty minute ride time Braintree through the nailed to persuade southbound sluggish seven hello Morrissey and again through the and get get through the split with three south is heavy eighteen to derby that clears from their right to the to the Sagamore bridge twenty five east bound it's like you should the born sixties is in good shape between the sag more in Orleans ninety five north gets heavy at the top connecting to one twenty eight no issues on the lower end of one twenty eight and ninety three downtown district brown pride parade still under way March is heading around the city hall area watch for restrictions along that route downtown low decker ninety three back to Solomon square liver downright the still full top top to bottom star westbound doubts that pass them long fellow inbound on star gets busy mass average to leverage circle took out the Tobin northbound busy through that works on heading down into Chelsea in the Ted Williams is slow inbound heading in to login the drive time the drive time can be home how you could be home relaxing if you're not worrying about malware compromising your devices or your identity getting stolen introducing LifeLock with Norton outstanding protection for your identity and devices join at LifeLock dot com use promo code risk to get ten percent off your first year to draw any WBZ's traffic on the freeze and now we check the four day WBZ accu weather forecast well several of the sunny to partly cloudy skies could be really nice.

Intel Jules Verne WBZ WBZ Taylor Boston David LifeLock Norton o'neill Braintree Morrissey Chelsea Ted Williams WBZ Sagamore bridge twenty minute ten percent four day
"jules verne" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to the world shapers conversations with science fiction fantasy authors about the committee made a process. I'm your host every and this episode's guest cameron hurling relief <music> welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I am as i just said a minute ago over the music. I'm your host edward bullet and i write science fiction and fantasy and i've always enjoyed talking to other authors of science fiction fantasy about their creative process. That's what this podcast is all about it. It takes its name from the world shapers series which is my latest series of models from books book. One world shaker just came out on august the the sixth in mass market paperback already out in trade paperback audiobook and a yearbook and the second book master of the world will be out on september timber tenth which is a couple of weeks away as this episode goes live and it will come out to simultaneously and e book and audiobook and trade paperback with the mass market computer back to <hes> follow later. <hes> one reason that this podcast takes its name from the world shapers is that the whole premise of the world shapers is that there are a potentially the infinite number of shaped worlds which are worlds that <hes> have been shaped by individuals who now live within them so it's a bit like authors <hes> giving inside the books that they've created the main character's name is shana keys. She's in a world that she thinks is the only world she thinks it's <hes> our world basically although there are are some differences that readers from our world will pick up on <hes> but then suddenly something happens that <hes> shosha that something weird going on. There's an attack in her. Best friend is killed and she. She can't believe any of this is happening and just like that. It isn't happening because she actually has the power to shape this world mysterious stranger named carl yasser shows up and explains to her that she is the shape paper this world and that is just one of many many shaped worlds and elaborate shaped worlds. He also tells her that <hes> the adversary who is the one who attacked her is trying takeover her world and already has the knowledge how to do that. She can't stop it. All she can do is try to escape her own world and he says if she can travel from world adds to rolled through the labyrinth and retrieve the knowledge of the shaping of each of those worlds she can take that knowledge to agree or the mysterious woman at the center of the labyrinth and onc- ziegler has that knowledge she can protect labyrinth from the adversary who's trying to take over and eventually destroy all of these shaped worlds so the the first book takes place in the world is very much like ours book to master the world which comes out september tenth from books takes place in a world inspired by jules verne so i had a lot of fun doing the steam punk thing in that book it has you know submarines and flying machines and mysterious islands and all that great stuff you'd expect from a jules verne inspired world book three which doesn't have an actual title yet but my working title is where wolves vampires peasants so my. I don't think they're gonna let me keep that one. I'm working on that now and as you can probably tell from that it will indeed have werewolves and vampires and presents so that's going to be a lot of fun and it will be out about about this time next year. I would imagine the other thing. I wanted to mention before we get into the episode. Proper is that <hes> this podcast is up for an aurora era award this year. The aurora awards are the fan voted awards for best canadian science fiction and fantasy and if you sort of like the hugo's only limited to canada. If you are a canadian resident or citizen you are eligible to vote for the aurora awards. All you have to do is buy a membership in the canadian science fiction and fattest association for a whopping ten dollars. Most of us can afford that and you can do that by going to the website pri aurora awards dot c._a..

jules verne carl yasser canadian science ziegler cameron edward bullet canada ten dollars
"jules verne" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on KTOK

"Force it means steam literally it's a living vapor it's humid this watery and the moon and the sun and actually the the plan is the larger plants themselves have an effect on all of us I do believe to some extent in astrology and enough said you know if we human beings would never have involved as we have if the moon had had not been there to guide our way through the night keep things anyone I guess again flash Gordon's where do Flash Gordon go in in the first cereals he went to the moon and you know let me just say something Jules Verne's a in in the L. yes from nearest to the moon yeah interesting Jules Verne predicted that the launch point to would be Florida because he was he was right about that too yeah you figured out that it would be easier to get into orbit closer the closer you are to the equator could you get a thousand mile boost I don't know how he knew that you know in the in the eighteen eighties Leonardo da Vinci in the things that he knew about the hearing he invented the submarines basically any right and tanks yeah and helicopter based on on a spiral airfoil but when you get back to the United Nations is and finish that up something happened there because I don't remember anything major coming from them wells of the presidio what you what we were able to do is generate enough attention interest.

Gordon Jules Verne Florida United Nations
"jules verne" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on WTVN

"Literally it's a living vapor it's humid this watery and the moon and the sun and actually the the plan is the larger plans themselves have an effect on all of us I do believe to some extent in astrology and enough said you know if we human beings would never have involved as we have if the moon had had not been there to guide our way through the night keep things anyone I guess again flash Gordon's where do Flash Gordon go in in the first cereals he went to the moon and you know let me just say something Jules runs a in in the L. yes from nearest to the moon yeah interesting Jules Verne predicted that the launch point to would be Florida because he was he was right about that too yeah you figured out that it would be easier to get into orbit closer the closer you are to the equator could you get a thousand mile boost I don't know how he knew that you know in the in the eighteen eighties looking to Leonardo da Vinci in the things that he knew about the hearing he invented the submarines basically any right and tanks yeah and helicopter based on on a spiral airfoil but when you get back to the United Nations is finish that up something happened there because I don't remember anything major coming from them wells of the presidio what you what we were able to do is generate enough attention interests.

Gordon Jules Verne Florida Leonardo da Vinci United Nations
An Interview with Space Historian, Rod Pyle

Jay Talking

10:29 min | 3 years ago

An Interview with Space Historian, Rod Pyle

"Here with our next guest rod pile space historian he's worked with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Johnson Space Center and as written a lot as well he was written for PBS and well you also can involve with Deep Space Nine and Battlestar Galactica say if engine interesting stuff thanks for being with us thanks for having me and it's you know some people would call me a diverse career background person other people would call me a dilettante but yeah I'll check whatever well you can choose how you decide so let's start with what you did and have done for NASA so I had it kind of worked around the edges of that off and on back in that the ninety is mostly doing television production so occasionally we'd cross over into what NASA was doing but I was the car the employee of theirs but then about two thousand nine I got hired to write this really interesting program they wanted an executive training program the partnership between NASA and this group called the copper toward other York so I got together with the guy from IBM and we wrote up this training program and did that for a couple years I was great fun because if you're gonna talk you gonna give people lectures about how great space age was having a standard five behind with the profits but it's cool the gastric salute that was really fun and then finally the on time about two thousand twelve I guess two thousand thirteen I started working for Jeff horse migratory Pasadena on as needed basis writing books and articles for them and that that was really cool because now you're sitting there talking with the guys they call this stuff happens so this guy worked on many relator arm the rover and this guy over here worked on some kind of inflatable antenna system for CubeSats they're just brilliant really dedicated people that are so passionate excited about what they do and of course that that translates into you if you're listening to open hopefully the writing he's on a little bit about Mars making contact and also the blueprint for a battle star Margaret your contact was a cooperative they're both coffee table books in the sense Mars make contact was I'd written two books before the kind of looked over the Mars missions from mostly the American perspective somewhat from the Russian perspectives albeit perspective but they didn't have the kind of like we did so there's much more of an American story there and then as we got about twenty fifteen twenty sixteen won the publishers I work with said you know we really like to look at everybody's projects so that means the United States and Europe and Japan's made the Tampa and and India actually succeeded with their very first try a couple years ago and they want to do a picture book of it so I thought well this is great and actually got paid to do so I got to go hang out the archive your post laboratory and a few other places in big draw the old photos and interview the folks that worked on so forth so it's just really fun kind of a broad look at that basically everything that's happened since about nineteen sixty four four I think all the NSS what's that actual spaces ID at the group the oldest prose base human spaceflight group out there it was actually founded as a wage to organizations that merge one of them was founded by Werner von Braun the father the Saturn five back in nineteen seventy is and then the other group sub group was formed by a guy got to the office of the guiding Jerry o'neill was big the space colonies use a visionary at Princeton so those two groups merged a few years later and form the society so it's just a huge pros based advocacy group they have some political action they do I edit a magazine called ad astra which is a nice splashy quarterly periodical and then we got your the conventions and education programs in stem programs and so forth that you just really good good group of people I listened to I don't know who's a podcast of some broadcast of some kind that you were involved in and it was I learned a lot from it and you talked about whether it would make more sense next to go to the moon again or to try to go to Mars can you talk about the the risk reward present kinds of each of those so this is the longest you want to start a food fight one of the space advocacy groups just an argument going up moreover Mars or vice versa and it's been going on for a long time we've been talking about going to the moon sense Jules Verne wrote about it the eighteen hundreds with talk about going to Mars at least since the nineteen forties one or one about brown started writing seriously about it really before that with the various other visionaries and the question always been you know which ones cheaper wall so we did the moon in the nineteen sixties with their power projects so we know that that's doable and I would say it's behind us but we kind of picked the low hanging fruit there so the question now is what limited budgets and limited frankly attention span with both the public and Congress which one do you pick well Mars program is a very ambitious goal would be very inspiring for people but it could be anywhere from hundreds of billions to by some estimates as much as a trillion dollars and it's a long trip you know by the time you go out do you think there and come back it could be a year and a half two years and we just don't yet quite know enough about the effects of extended space flight on people both in terms of no gravity and also the radiation out there I'm kind of understand it but we need to know more about how to mediate it now to keep her from damaging people so the moon just makes an awful lot of sense in terms of something that's cheaper ball there's a lot of science rewards there there's a lot of training and work we could do towards getting to Mars and probably most importantly as it turns out recently discovered that in the last decade there's a lot of frozen water water on the south for the modem the ice and where you got water you can melt that make rockets you'll need make readable aired you can make drinking water you can go all kinds of stuff there's also metal and glass and some other elements on the moon that are very useful so for every bit of that you find there and can use their or used to go beyond to Mars let's say that's a whole bunch of stuff you don't have to watch in the space so you can use smaller rockets you save money at all just gets much much much easier so for my money the moon the next logical step and plus the the reward of going to Mars is more strictly scientific not so much commercial writing like did there's a possibility at least in a distant fantasy to manufacture on the moon maybe it will be cheaper somehow and you just kick the stuff back to earth and you can have a an earth the type of crowded and dying because of so much industry on a you can have all the industry up there I mean is that a crazy crazy I'm think of a thing or is that at least something you could end that might be a reason to go to the moon well I think that's what the settlement discussion comes and that's one of the things the national space society is very focused on so that you know it's not a fantasy it's doable it's workable we know that we've got everything in place with today's technology if we just get off our behind the bill what separates those founder of Amazon is so keen about he formed a rocket company actually before you on must did the SpaceX based Basil's former tropical blue origin back in two thousand and gives express purpose was to move heavy manufacturing off over do it in space or is not going to hurt anybody allow the plant to heal you go back to it you know like state if you well and give people options to live and work awesome first because there's a lot more resources even the local solar system then there is honor if you just have to go out and get up so this pretty compelling financial argument here and as you know as well as I do when there's a profit to be made suddenly things start moving a lot faster so I think that or on the cusp of right now so wouldn't it be my got would say be prohibitively expensive to manufacture stuff on the moon but that's not the case it doesn't have to be the case the thing is is to make getting there for the first few dozen times less expensive than what we're doing it with the Saturn five back in the nineteen sixties it cost a bundle you know in today's dollars the proper Graham would have been about a hundred and fifty billion under sixty billion she so that was expensive for six landings but nowadays when you have you on must flying as rockets for in some cases virtually a bird or or less than the other commercial providers are in there already cheaper than it was the nineteen sixties and their reusable they fly back to home base robotic we all by themselves and landed the refuelling be used again and Bayless is doing something very similar and other companies trying to get in on the act now you're reducing costs down by be be a factor of ten or alternately a hundred when you start reaching those numbers suddenly going out and doing stuff on the moon it's very affordable makes a lot of sense on the other side of that is once you're there you got these manufactories going your commoditized the stuff they put a price on it so whether it's U. S. government or private industry restore be international sector that matter saying al all by that gallon of liquid oxygen for this many dollars space credit or whatever we call them at that point now you've got a really calm me out there it becomes very much like how the free market works on earth and again but there's money to be made people will go so you in fact have kind of a gold rush out there so it's really not as far fetched as one might think this other minerals out there that it would make it worth any chances oil on the moon the if you gotta have you gonna have I you have animals sorry all rights are you got of the dinosaurs you got to have plant matter all right right sorry sorry to be down there what no but there is there is healing and three which is a form helium that can be very useful for fusion we're still struggling to get to work but if you can get yours no work at what times work a lot of money only now going up there get that stuff you're gonna make a bundle so yeah very

Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Johnson Space Center Battlestar Trillion Dollars Two Years
"jules verne" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"jules verne" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"I don't live in Gotham city thinking about I mean, there are so many situations in a day starting from the first choice you make where you avoid all kinds of scenarios because of a fear of getting hurt. You're not even conscious of all the things you avoid every day because you're afraid of getting hurt. I mean, I guess I could I could step out of a moving car. If I saw somebody yelling at his girlfriend in front of a club. Right. That kind of thing. Well, yeah. But also like you don't in the fight right there. If you see some guy fall out of a car and roll over and hit a brick wall. And then he gets up and he's like, hey bothering you. Hey, why don't you be nicer to your girlfriend? Hey, hey, buddy. I think you're using while you're swears while you're the yourself. But buddies wealth is not one that anyone would choose. I I don't think I wanted and that's why it's a fictional trope. Because you see these people who were like they've apparently never seen anybody comedies, right? Because none of them are like, oh, this is like a freaky Friday thing. Well, what kid would ever say? I wish my mom could just be inside my body for a day. She that show her. The funny thing is a completely arbitrary device that we know will never happen. No scientific basis for it. I mean, the bodies while comedy the soul transference presume, some kind of cartesian dualist, right? Where your mind your consciousness exists out with your body, and it can just get mapped onto any other body with no difficulties, and that's that was very appealing in the seventeenth century. But I think today we know that your consciousness intrinsically in the nerves of your head, and you couldn't just drop your conscious into someone else's brain. And they would. Be you'd have to physically transplant the brain which never happens in these movies. Nobody ever gets their heads sawed off, but it fit. Well. No, that's true. But unless I'm missing some part of I never saw the Disney channel Shelley long Gaby Hoffmann head transplant transplant off at some. They're both. Weirdly stitched on sewing thread. No. But is that? I mean, it seems like it is kind of written into reincarnation that your soul would insult form. Cleansed of memory, but the same soul, the memory, but son, how you're you. Yeah. You're you, and you would transfer from body to body, but in other in other religious traditions is there any instance, where the I mean, even if you don't believe in if you just believe that your spirit is going to survive your body. Right. I mean that does somehow imply that, but it never is lead. It's not transferrable to. I mean, got it. No point puts you in someone else. It's book of job like scenario got on the devil, or like, you know, what would be funny Shelley long as very up tight executive, and she does not get along with her daughter. Yeah. It's the soul survives the body. But they're only a few places. It can go. It can go to heaven or you can go to hell. Yes. It can't just like. I wonder the earth. The clearly it's not just an effect of how it feels to have a bunch of neurons firing because it can survive the neurons stopping right? Even in most western religious traditions in my tradition. Mormonism the sole actually predates the body. We all lived before we came here as well. So clearly that's something that can come get imposed on a head somehow, and then leave again when also you can in the after world, you are affected by things that are happening on earth. Still right. I mean, you can be baptized retroactively. I see what you're saying. So there's or if you're Patrick swayze's goes you can move penny. Right. Or if you're well, no, I guess, that's inter- dimensional. I was going to talk about the one where he moves a book on a bookshelf to communicate with his daughter tesseract. You love the ending of interstellar. So mad still. Every episode. We talk about the ending stellar. Liens live behind the bookshelf in your house. But it's weird because it goes up and down inside decide all the houses that could be we happen to be his so luckily. I guess what? I was saying is that none of these things. There's no reason to think that there's some scientific basis for a lot of these fantastic premises. They're driven by a desire that this could happen someday. Jules Verne is life..

Shelley Patrick swayze Gotham Jules Verne Disney Gaby Hoffmann executive