23 Burst results for "Judy Woodruff"

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Julie, Deputy for Cake, Sweetie. I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news. Our president Trump and former vice President Biden Square off in their first debate. That's Tuesday on the PBS NewsHour. Stay with us for the news hour coming up after the world this afternoon at three o'clock here on sweetie Public radio. I'm Marco Woman. You're with the world. When it was built. The U. S embassy in Baghdad became the largest in the world, and, if not bulletproof, it was trumpeted as extra secure from possible attacks. Now the U. S. Is threatening to shut it down. U S Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reportedly told the Iraqi government that if it can't rain in attacks on American targets, the American Embassy in Baghdad will close its doors. Joining me is Ambassador Feisal al extra body. He's the former ambassador from Iraq to the United Nations ambassador. A threat to close an embassy seems like a big deal, and it also reportedly caught Iraqi officials by surprise. How surprised are you by this? Well, actually, I am quite surprised that I believe that had caught the Iraqis by surprise, as well because the Iraqi prime minister was just in Washington for a meeting with President Trump on the Iraqi team felt that the meeting Went quite well on. So the sort of came out of the blue. So the center of the U. S complaint our attacks by Shia militias backed by Iran. I know they had been attacking right after He targeted assassination of a solar money. But have these attacks increased recently? And how is the government in Iraq? Responding? These attacks have been going on about you for quite some time, even before the assassination ofthe general Soleimani, But there has sort of been a low level background noise of this going on. Current Iraqi prime minister has taken a number of steps to try to rein in these militias, which is sort of what makes the American threat now so ironic that it comes at a time when the government of Iraq is actually doing what it can, which admittedly is not enough, but it is doing what it can to try to Rain in these militias. The prime minister has made a number of changes in the senior personnel of the security apparatus to get Mohr sort of competent officers loyal to the ST Robin to the militias, hey has removed their offices from what is usually called the Green Zone, sort of the heart of the government of Baghdad. Hey, has removed them from the airport, etcetera. But there's a limit to what the Prime minister Khun Duo and up Until this conversation between the president of Iraq and the U. S Secretary of state I have rather father of the United States had understood that The property in this infamous Green zone in Baghdad. It's nearly as large is Vatican City and for a country like the U. S. That has had a deep in historic relationship with Iraq. A relationship that has led to the loss of many lives can the U. S actually. Just close down the embassy, or do you think these are just threats? Well, it's hard to know with the current administration. We all sort of figure out what policy is based on the last tweet. Eso it could be just a threat. It could also be serious. There's no way of knowing I will say that the true irony here. I know I use that word a moment ago. But the true irony here is that them United States now that third administration since the 2003 war has been attempting to curb Iranian influence with a segment of the Iraqi political class. The United States now has a prime minister in Iraq who was focused on attempting to rebuild the institutions of the state. Which must mean and does mean Gaining control over these militias and limiting their role with an eye towards eliminating them. So you have American administration, which is for almost two decades now trying to limit the influence of Iran. You have a government above that, trying to do effectively. Exactly the same thing by withdrawing by closing the embassy of the United States would actually be handing Tehran a victory a strategic victory in Iraq. It has been Iranian policy for at least a decade to get the United States to leave Iraq and here's the United States expecting to leave Iraq. Do you worry that a U. S embassy pullout would automatically lead to Renewed violence of some sort. The US pull out in 2011 ended in tears in 2014 when Aysel took over occupied a third of the country. So yes, I am concerned about that. There will also be knock on effects. I mean, I know that my former colleagues and the Iraqi Foreign Ministry are very concerned that a withdrawal by the United States with signal toe other Western states that it is not safe to be there, and that a U. S withdrawal would embolden the very groups whose role of the U. S. Is trying to limit and would lead to an increase in violence. Former colleagues of mine and the Iraqi foreign minister specifically concerned about the U. K. French and German embassies as well. It would be a huge signal of a lack of confidence in the government of Iraq and a huge victory for Iran over the U. S policy in Iraq. It's a very odd thing to do at a very odd time. Whether it has something to do with the US election. Maybe, but I don't see how the United States gains by seeking to confront the government of Iraq now when the government of Iraq is doing the things that U..

Iraq United States prime minister Baghdad Iran Iraqi government Iraqi Foreign Ministry President Trump president Judy Woodruff American Embassy United Nations Ambassador Feisal al vice President PBS Marco Woman Julie Biden Square
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ahead on morning edition on Tweedy, who lose comedy Siri's woke follows Keith Night a black cartoonist set to launch a national comic strip until he's profiled by San Francisco police. It's based on real life Cartoonist Keith Night. The story from critic Eric Deggans on NPR coming up. I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news. Our vote 2020. We look at how Americans living in the middle of the country see their choice in November. That's Wednesday on the PBS NewsHour. The story and other news stories of full hour Today. This afternoon at three o'clock for workers will be working from home until well into 2021 trip to the office for furniture and memorabilia is often in order. It's little starting empty. All the office furniture of desks have been pushed. The corners, Rizal, eerie and emotional returns to the ghost office. That's next time on marketplace virus dowith Marketplace at four, and it's 6 30 much of generations. They will vote for the first time in November, and they're not afraid to tell you where they stand when the Democratic Party coalesced around Joe Biden and I remember unregistered from the Democratic Party that day we hear from three Jonesy. Voters in Los Angeles about the issues that matter most to them on the next. All things considered from NPR news for 30 today, Support for NPR comes from Avalere, a managing sales tax compliance with cloud based solutions. Avalere a integrates directly with more than 700, air P and e commerce Solutions. Avalere attacks compliance done right on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards the day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w..

Keith Night Democratic Party NPR Avalere Judy Woodruff Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tweedy ghost office Joe Biden Eric Deggans Siri Rizal San Francisco PBS Los Angeles
"judy woodruff" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"There. And they didn't have a woman. And so they were wondering what they were going to do. But listen to what happens here, Cut five female officer president while you're patting her down that president, you're patting her down. Uh, you know that I don't identify Email. It's throwing it right back in their face, huh? 844 542 42. Nancy Pelosi. She couldn't believe that Judy Woodruff of all people, Mrs Al Hunt. Judy Woodruff, You know a card carrying fellow traveler. She actually Made an argument just in the form of a very polite, some might say, obsequious question. And, uh, But Nancy Pelosi is not used to being questioned. You know, when she doesn't get fact check when she says the president told people swallow Lysol. She doesn't She doesn't have to put up with that nonsense. She doesn't get asked about If it's a bad look for her to be showing off for a run her multi $1000 sub zero freezers full of $15 pints of designer ice cream, she said. She's not used to that. So so Pelosi just flips out here. Cut 15. The other point Republicans are making is there now showing flexibility in money for state and local governments. This is again a difference. Democrats want more money Republicans want A lot less. They're saying they're willing to show flexibility and they're also saying a lot of the money that was passed in the spring. Madam speaker has not even been spent yet. Well, going.

Nancy Pelosi Judy Woodruff president Mrs Al Hunt officer
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"North of Lambert, 11. 30 to 1 30 I'll be there. Come, Let's talk about everything, including this and get educated and get your CBD stuff because they have top of the line products, man and a great staff. That will tell you everything you need to know. Okay? Everything you need to know. Um Now. Nancy Pelosi has kind of lost her mind while she we We know she has listen to this on PBS with Judy Woodruff. Talking about because Judy Wardrobe was pressing it. Actually, you know, pressing her about the unemployment benefits and you know, Democrats, one more. This is this is tremendous stuff here. Listen to this. Has intensified in its spread. The other point Republicans are making is there now showing flexibility in money for state and local governments? This is again a difference. Democrats want more money Republicans want A lot less. They're saying they're willing to show flexibility and they're also saying a lot of the money that was passed in the spring. Madam Speaker has not even been spent yet. Well, going to be a kid for you and very if you want to be an advocate for them. No, I'm that's why what the fact playing Devil's advocate here. No, I ask you for your position. Advocating. She's saying that you guys won more money and you haven't even spent what you've already received. Well, yet, you Abia Because you won't answer the question she attacks. If you want me navigate. I thought he must be an advocate for us. Why are you asking? You're not supposed to say that, Judy, When I come on these shows you're supposed to be on our side. We're leftists. Like Mark, be Evans. We're leftists. Supposed You can't say that. How dare you say that that we haven't spent the money would we have? We've already received that We want more. Trying to be trying to say that there right now. And Judy Doyle, I'm playing Devil's Advocate. Why Shit? No, no, I want to know why do you want more money You haven't even spent with you already received. Good. Advocate has about how's about just you're an American working for Americans. This is about your party and like that's the thing it Nancy. You want American tax dollars that were printing. We're going debt even more right? Whose money is that? It's not your in And and and you know how you are upset. They're being questioned that you want more money without even spending everything you've already received. And you're mad that you know. Judy Woodruff actually asked a good question. She wasn't ready for that. And you know, that's the kind of question that I would ask which I guess is why Mark be. Evans doesn't want the doctors to come up because when I say all these metrics air down, why do you say school should be closed? The American Academy of Pediatrics says. Get kids in school. Even if there's an outbreak of Cove. It They need to be in there. They're not endangered of this. They have no answers. They have no answers. So mark be Evans is running cover for them. And that's why I'm like. Maybe Theresa Cullen should be ousted as the health director in Pima County, Social Francisco Garcia is he's He's like her number two. But his number two was should be ousted. Apparently Chuck Huckleberry So yeah. That's that's what we have. And then and then the latest so again all this information about kids and let me let me get to you the information again from the already exactly verbatim from the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's on my Facebook, Twitter and Paul are the latest Screenshots up there. The We linked to it. It literally came out. Yesterday was August 2020. Pediatrics August 2020. Covert 19 transmission and Children the child is not to blame is the title of this from the American Academy of Pediatrics. And the last paragraph, it says almost six months into the pandemic, accumulating evidence and collective experience argue That Children, particularly school aged Children. Are far less important Drivers. Of the Chinese virus transmission than adults. So the evidence and the experience a kids are far less important drivers of this virus transmission and adults, therefore, serious consideration should be paid towards strategies. That allows schools to remain open. Even during periods of covert 19 spread. In doing so we could minimize the potentially profound adverse social, developmental and health costs that our Children will continue to suffer. Until an effective treatment vaccine could be developed and distributed or failing that until you reach herd immunity base and get the kids back in class. And by the way, the president said that yesterday He said that And and and the Trump War Room. One of his, you know, White House. Twitter's not his. But one of the White House Twitter accounts Retweeted. The president, saying that on video and Twitter suspended in fate actually faced was a Facebook, Facebook said, until you delete this You are violating I know his Twitter Twitter band the Trump campaign from tweeting until they delete that video because, Trump said Children almost immune, and they asked him to play 96 Real quick 96. This is the president yesterday. And this is apparently what part of what got his tweet, The White House's Twitter. Is Trump campaign. Twitter suspended. Listen to this. Here we go about opening the.

Twitter American Academy of Pediatrics Judy Woodruff Evans Mark Nancy Pelosi Facebook Judy Wardrobe Judy Doyle Judy president White House Lambert Madam Speaker Trump Trump War Room Pima County Chuck Huckleberry Francisco Garcia
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Devilish work acuity I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news our outrage how to move forward as a nation confronts a moment of anguish that's Tuesday on the PBS newshour the Tuesday edition of the PBS newshour comes on at three o'clock this afternoon I'm Marco Werman this is the world president Vladimir Putin has announced a date for a national vote on changes to the Russian constitution one of the reforms would allow you to remain in power for an additional twelve years after the end of his term in twenty twenty four by then he'll be eighty three the date for the voting is July first it was originally slated for April but was postponed because of the corona virus but since then the virus has only gotten worse in Russia so I. S. reporter Charles Maynes in Moscow what was the rush yeah you're right the virus in the numbers infections here have gone up you know we've seen Russia just cross the five thousand mark today in fact four deaths from the corona virus but you know there's a sense here that certain being portrayed by the authorities that they've turned a corner that things are improving and this is been the message to get the political calendar back on track not only are we talking about this referendum we're also talking about a a World War two victory day celebration this is to celebrate the seventy fifth anniversary of the victory of the Soviet Union over **** Germany that'll happen on June twenty fourth and the day after will begin voting for a week of voting towards this referendum which finishes on July first yeah and in the background is Russia's very dependent economy on oil and gas the prices were both have crashed because of the virus has that economic fallout hit the Russian people yet it has and I think it also explains some of the push to get this done I mean the this referendum you know Russia's economy of course has been hit hard over the last two months big unemployment numbers big hit about twenty percent of the GDP here of course lower oil prices that you mention and all of this is a drive in the sense that you need to get this vote pushed through a before things get worse I know the constitutional reforms include a wide set of other reforms so what else does put an end to change yeah it's it's really an up down vote on a range of measures and there's something for everyone so you know for example or working families will get extra cash credits for having children there's resetting the pensions every year basically given a pension bonds to the elderly Russians I'm also a law that that proposes to basically make marriage traditional event between a man and a woman mother was outlawing same sex marriage even had a video that went viral here in Russia that was released by pro Kremlin media.

Judy Woodruff
Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

Dan Proft

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

"Well on the occasion last week of the first tranche of the classifications by acting deny Richard Grinnell that provided some detail on all of the unmasking requests that were made by all of the various Obama administration personnel as it pertains to Michael Flynn and perhaps others Ron Johnson and Chuck Grassley the two centers in Wisconsin and Iowa respectively want more details more a documents declassified because they have more concern that perhaps the surveillance that was being conducted by Obama administration officials predates operation crossfire hurricane on that occasion last week John Brennan former CIA director took to his safe space and M. S. N. B. C. and had this reaction this is also going out and saying give me everything about Michael Flynn absolutely not and quite interestingly the number of reports so we're in December sixteen and January seventeen that were declassified by Richard Grinnell I was surprised at how many dates and reports that were there then what was the ground should do is to declassify and release the contents of those reports in terms of what's the individuals were involved with but what he's doing now is just releasing the names of individuals who again were carrying out their authorized responsibilities shin director Brennan he's getting there yesterday to classifying a email from Susan rice that seems to run counter to things Susan rice was saying in public from a national security perspective president Obama said he wants to be sure that as we engage with the incoming team are mindful to ascertain if there is any reason we cannot share information fully as it relates to Russia rice wrote call me said he does have some concerns that incoming NSA Flanaess speaking frequently with Russian ambassador Kislyak Comey said that could be an issue as it relates to sharing sensitive information president Obama asked of Comey was saying the NSC should not pass sensitive information related to Russia to flan Comey replied potentially adding that there's no indication thus far that Flynn has passed classified information to kids they act but he noted the level of communication is unusual potentially we should not pass sense of information to the incoming president incoming national security adviser is that properly or or fairly Radisson body trying to insinuate his way into a counterintelligence operation against general Flynn well that's what Susan rice memorialized in an email here's Susan rice back on March twenty second of twenty seventeen just a couple months into the trump administration in a sit down on PBS with Judy Woodruff what she had to say about what she knew do you know anything about this I know nothing about this I was surprised to see reports from chairman Nunes on that count today fresh off her performance in the Benghazi a misdirection cover up however you want to describe it we get this from Susan rice I really don't know what to what chairman Nunez was referring but he said that whatever he was referring to was a legal lawful surveillance and that it was potentially incidental collection on American citizens and I think it's important for people to understand what incidental means that means that the target was a either a foreign entity D. or somebody under criminal investigation and that the Americans who were talking to those targets may have been picked up well Devin newness has since revised and extended his remarks so perhaps is in rice would like to do the same for more on this we're pleased to be joined by Fred flights he's a former CIA analyst now president CEO at center for security policy former Deputy Assistant to the president into the chief of staff of the National Security Council thanks for joining us again forget it good to be here about what Susan rice said in twenty seventeen verses what Susan rice memorialized about this January fifth twenty seventeen meeting well wishers lined clearly she knew that there was electronic surveillance of general Flynn what this comes down to what is the intention of B. bomber stretching from the top from president Obama not to honor the very important principle of our democracy and that's called the peaceful transfer of power under that principle the outgoing administration cooperates fully with the incumbent won eight daughters the the will of the people turned over the keys to the officers tells all about farm policy mission underway gives them all the intelligence operations and intelligence they collected they don't withhold information from the incoming president and Tucker offices to use this information to investigate the next administration to undermine it it's really very serious violation of our whole system of government if they had concerns about general Flynn they had to tell the next administration about it cook told president trump and vice president pence and call me if needed later said he was held information twelve Attorney General sessions about Russia also this is an effort by an outgoing administration to undermine and destroy any incoming

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"World it's the world at two this afternoon and then the PBS news hour begins at three I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news hour on the front lines the view from an intensive care nurse in Florida that's Wednesday on the PBS newshour Zionism it has been debated for decades the elimination of Israel would be as destructive to our rights as Jews as repealing the nineteenth amendment would be destructive to women's rights I'm John donvan and on the next episode of intelligence squared U. S. we ask has anti Zionism become the new antisemitism morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep why has Sweden chosen such a different way to fight the pandemic unlike much of the world Sweden has avoided a mandatory locked down it's sticking with that approach even though Sweden now as a higher number of covert nineteen cases and deaths that its immediate neighbors Stacey Vanek Smith in Cardiff Garcia from NPR's daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money look into why Sweden is chosen to keep businesses and schools open crowded sweaty night club with people bunched together might seem like the first kind of business that would have to be shut down in the middle of a pandemic but so far has actually stayed open up open night club we played everything from you know hip hop to Swedish goalies to technology house Oscar now is the manager of soap bar in Stockholm Sweden Oscar says they are living in way fewer people and they're asking people to stay at least three feet apart and those people are actually pretty good about this in general except of course when it gets late and everybody's had a few drinks then Oscar has to step in and do what he can to get people to observe social distancing itself struggle it's a pretty funny struggle in in this may have the world right now well most of the world is locking down rolling up the sidewalks and sheltering in Sweden has made the controversial decision not to shut down its economy basically because the tradition was not to do that to work on a voluntary basis that understood now is the head epidemiologist at the public health agency of Sweden he says Sweden is not mandating people stay home or the businesses close and they're not requiring people to quarantine or stay inside under says Sweden has asked people to stay home if they're feeling ill to work from home if possible and to maintain at least three feet of social distance when there are just out and about in public and more recently gatherings of more than fifty people have been banned under says the decision not to lock Sweden down was a public health decision honors points to a study from the imperial college in London in that study found that a long term lockdown was not necessarily the best decision for public health another recent study from Harvard school of public health found a long lockdown was less effective at dealing with pandemics than shorter more targeted social distancing measures even help some evidence is servicing right now in Sweden that would seem to indicate that it's more relaxed approach actually is costing lives the death rate in Sweden has soared past those of its neighboring countries Denmark and Norway both of which have imposed economic lockdowns course we're wondering if this is correct I think we're doing the best things we can figure out given the circumstances and the tools we have a base in Republican discusses for decades to come if this was the proper thing to do and I'll understand so far the Swedish public has been very supportive of their approach he gets a lot of emails from people encouraging him to keep going and he points out there is one huge advantage to their approach that it is sustainable the summer should keep wondering for months maybe even years surfer up whereas under says things like keeping kids out of school forcing businesses to close that's not really sustainable for all that long Sweden's approach on the other hand he says is far less disruptive to people's lives and to businesses Stacey Vanek Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news support for planet money comes from Charles Schwab well believes a modern approach to wealth management starts with asking questions Charles Schwab own your.

Judy Woodruff
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Check them out right now you can keep it as a big tech is looking for governments looking for hackers are looking for it it's your data protect it expressly PM dot com slash bent it best answer on taxes control is deformed speaking of of platitude institutional nonsense so you have people to judge them probably the economy is that you're not getting paid enough wow thanks Pete thanks and now you have a live report explaining that the laws they can I'm Mrs she's too to apply because ever since she held that ever is the because it there's there's enough wampum to go around says chief warrant here's Judy Woodruff asking her a very simple question on taxes and was with warm getting a simple but also idiotic answer how do you answer top economists who say taxes of this magnitude would stifle growth and investment they're just wrong they're just wrong I will know that she says until you put it like that I thought maybe that the theory the marginal tax rate increases causes people to generate less wealth until that you know which is pretty solid economic theory until she said that they were wrong I was like aw man she's probably going to crush the economy would be burdensome taxes but now that you said the wrong I guess we're done here I guess around here here's our people judge stepped in and really snacks rentals with one bad night for war judge being reasonable person yes we must deliver big ideas and yes taxes on wealthy individuals and on corporations are going to have to go up we can also be smart about the promises were make make sure their promises that we can keep without the kind of taxation that economists tell us could hurt the economy on issue after issue we got a break out of the Washington mindset that measures the bigness of an idea by how many trillions of dollars it adds to the budget or the boldness of an idea by how many fellow Americans it can antagonize that line that he says right there is actually from Republican debate on a hunt sneaked in there like a it just kind of was in your warm and wanted to be judges breaking race is gonna break out of the Washington mine said the measures the bigness of an idea about how many trillions of dollars it adds to the budget main yeah and then the judge immediately propose adding trillions of dollars to the budget so there is that okay in just a second let me get you more from the democratic base Joe Biden gave himself a problem last night in the general election so you're pretty good today but there is one moment that will seriously come back to haunt him in campaign ads plus we have not even gotten to the rock.

Judy Woodruff Joe Biden Pete Washington
"judy woodruff" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I said Judy Woodruff is the only one who takes her job seriously it least it in the debates of I've heard her as a mother moderator so let's see they're doing about as well as they were in the Obama Biden here the market's wages world doing much better but okay with the vice president what is your argument to the voter watching this debate who won those unemployment among African Americans is down the markets are booming the unemployment rate is at historic lows they don't like the economy so why is it wise consumer spending up wife consumer confidence up if if if there was anything to approaching normalcy in American political life this would be considered somewhat of a golden age in America due to the interior over what the left always does is they find a way to paint the president as awful so but you you look to them for messianic solution to the problem leftism is a secular self deification it's just it's a religion they what is it I remember when I studied marks at in graduate school what was it the proletariat with the chosen people there was always a there was a substitute for a biblical idea in everything caught his man that that mark said that god has made a man is caught angels in March one said mark once said god as man once said man is caught that's exactly what that is believed on the left number eight please the idea that we're growing we're not growing the wealthy very wealthy you're going ordinary people are not going only very well fear growing if you've gone from unemployment to employment you're not growing I think they say the trump lice there is no there's no comparison about the left lying more than than Donald Trump one of the reasons that you always feel about is lying it's a through left uses smoke screens to the friend it's inequities say the same thing here number nine please call me is not working for most of us from the middle class yeah it's not working the economy is not working you realize how foolish people or to come to the United States what it wanted to go to a place that isn't working for for only it's only working for the wealthy I I would love to ask every illegal immigrant and every legal immigrant why did you come to a place with the economy is not working to which still say what do you what are your mind it's working better in America than anywhere else on earth that's why I came here legally or illegally so then you say alright especially to those who came illegally so then we you vote for the party that has made the economy works so well or the party that says the economy isn't working all I'm going to vote for the one that says the economy isn't working but you just said that you came to America because the economy is working so what the group that says the economy is not working is going to give me more then it'll really work number ten please the biggest problem in our economy is simple people are not getting paid enough that is not the result of some mysterious cosmic force it's the result of bad policy and we got a change it by raising wages and empowering works socialist eleven booted judges is put up as a moderate I do understand that what is the what is the bad policy people are not getting paid enough how do you wear wait it's the result of bad policy what is the best policy in other words do you understand the implication my dear listener that means that government policy should determine wages there is no other possible explanation for what the judge said was it a referred to it as the democratic Socialist Party this is exactly how it should be call them if it's no longer argue that that is a that is a leap of description the visit it's it's exactly what it is.

Judy Woodruff
Yang tells fellow 2020 Dems to 'stop being obsessed over impeachment'

Chuck and Kelly

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Yang tells fellow 2020 Dems to 'stop being obsessed over impeachment'

"Question if you did not have this job would you have watched last night's democratic debate either I gotta be honest but I did we did watch it because we have to or we say well watch it so you don't have to but right did you think there was a clear winner last night you know I think what it does it okay I mean I think I wouldn't say there is one person who set themselves out from the pack yeah I thought it was much easier to watch with seven candidates rather than ten fifteen or twenty I feel like they were given a little bit more time to really express their views and follow up questions and things like that but you know it is what it is it doesn't make it any more interesting or palatable but I think Judy Woodruff is one of the moderators has some very tough questions are like that and also you know Andrew Yang I don't but certainly don't believe a lot of the stuff you talk about but this guy does say a lot of very smart things and one thing he did say that struck me early on is perspective he's saying look at him speaking with fellow Democrats if you guys want to win you better focus on stuff people care about and not just you hate trump and this is what he said last night the more we act like Donald Trump is the cause of all of our problems the more Americans lose trust that we can actually see what's going on in our communities and solve those problems they say like people care like the loss of manufacturing jobs you know you can't just run on

Judy Woodruff Andrew Yang Donald Trump
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KTOK

"Awkward moments at the debate moderator Judy Woodruff asking Andrew Yang a question yet looking directly at Tom's tire that prompted Mr young to say I'm over here while clapping to get her attention Mr yeah what more Judy I'm sorry Mr Steiner meanwhile Mister young was on track to be an also ran when he launched his campaign in the spring of twenty eighteen but he's outlasted governors and members of Congress who had access to high dollar donors in campaign consultants James Pendle politics reporter at The Boston Globe says Donald Trump told us about the state of American politics in twenty sixteen the fact that Mr Yang is in the game at all tells us something about twenty twenty James how so I think every election cycle there's that one candidate that teaches us a lot about that particular moment clearly Donald Trump was that person in the last presidential campaign most people would dismiss him think is not real there's not there's no lasting power to Donald Trump bill click of the go down he becomes the nominee he's clearly gonna lose he doesn't and then it makes everyone look back and go I'm sorry what just happened there I had to work I think right now that candidates in the twenty twenty campaign might be injured game waiting is not particularly which he's never held elected office he's never served in the military it kind of just some random dude from New York who had an idea that's not exactly original play him out universal basic income in when he first started running for president he you know he had three staffers he kind of bodies he hired never been in politics drove to New Hampshire they had their first and then in one person showed up flash forward to last summer and he's on the debate stage she qualifies for it and people are like him in Merion Williamson these what you know who these people are from the outside and why the on the stage and suddenly you don't even know what a man Williams is not qualifying for these debates but interviewing is in sixth place nationwide he's in a very strong position he outlasted governors he's not listed senators including com layers of course and he's not going anywhere you drinking a ton of money he's building a movement and you know I just find him to be endlessly fascinating in fact in these debates he gets the least amount of speaking time every single time but is probably no candid for which these debates matter less he still gonna raise the amount of money is going to happen he still surviving regardless of me not being how must shut up sometimes in these debates to city put out an email just asking for money and not tying it to any particular issue or causing me pulled in like three quarters of a million Bucks on Saturday to sell you know I guess is the end of the month I mean maybe you can give me some money in the three supporters are very rapid for him you know in context seven fifty thousand dollars remember Cory Booker was like I'm gonna go out of I'm not to quit if I can't raise another one point seven million any I really did it and he had two weeks to do it in a game just like you here is there something going on with intriguing in terms of campaign for sure but in terms of the general you nature of American politics right now the use of technology clearly being one of the see the idea of an outsider being another idea of having a big idea being part of this going on here that I think a lot of folks have been quite understood yet in terms of what he no one's role will be in American politics speak with James Pendle politics reporter at the Boston globe's pieces called what does the lasting power of Andrew Yang tell us about politics today universal basic income as he has proposed a thousand Bucks a month for every family what do you mean this is something that is carrying him right now or not necessarily that issue yeah I mean to be clear it's a thousand dollars for every in about eighteen so you may have more more than one member in your house but but yeah it was what made him interesting in me will be people open the door to consider well why would he do that and look he he's got a big theory about what's going on the economy because of the four major industrial revolution in that politicians aren't talking about enough you look automation letting everyone sees when they try to walk to the Walmart home depot or anywhere else in the two self checkout line in there talking about you know factories in the manufacturing losses he says that he is actually proposing solutions to the problems the guy Donald Trump elected and others are not argh sorted northeast things but universal basic income as a concept is pretty old injury to a concept Thomas Paine advocated for it and not a advocated for that the Congress actually took it up during the next few minutes looking restoration Alaska of course has one that funded by oil Indian issue unites bowed libertarians who feel like a correction American he's a more efficient way of doing this and then hitting up government brought Chrissy's as well as with liberals and labor leaders who are are worried about the future work thanks James James spindle politics reporter at The Boston Globe fifteen minutes now after the hour on this morning America's first news coming up next the new trade agreements that's.

Judy Woodruff Andrew Yang Tom Mr young
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Judy Woodruff have a great weekend thank you major funding for the PBS newshour has provided by B. N. S. F. railway consumer cellular supporting social their solutions to the world's most pressing school foundation dot org the William and flora Hewlett foundation for more than fifty years advancing ideas and supporting institutions to promote a better world and with the ongoing support of these institutions and friends of the news hour this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you thank you the leading.

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:51 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Judy Woodruff on the next news hour from a tiny desk concert win two international virtuoso the journey of violinist Galen only that's Friday on the PBS newshour three o'clock this afternoon well mount Diablo will live up to its reputation this weekend excessive he watch begins in the mount Diablo range starting tomorrow morning going to Sunday night triple digits expected there the East Bay hills and valley will be very brutally hot heat advisory in effect in the Sacramento Valley in delta tomorrow as well this is science Friday and I Molly Webster is sitting in for IRA Flavio I'm talking with internet linguists Gretchen McCullough she's the author of the new book because internet understanding the new rules of language so Gretchen when we were left we're talking about punctuation identifying tone and I want to go to one of our callers he has a very interesting question about ellipsis Nate from Dayton Ohio hi Malik hi I was wondering if you could explain the use of it sees on the internet it seems to vary from generation to generation Gretchen yes there is absolutely a generational different a live sees and it's one of my favorite things that I figured out when I was writing because the internet so the the brief not shell version of what's going on and we'll get into why in a sack of the reed mental version of what's going on is you have predominately older people who use a Lexus as a generic separation character so between any sort of utterance or phrase you might say Hey you dot dot dot how's it going dot dot dot do you have time to chat soon dot dot dot and this is used as a way of separating remarks that might be full seconds of the maybe phrases the younger generation also separates their sentences and phrases with a generic mark and this is generally for them the line break or the message right so you send them each as a as a new line Hey new line what how's it going new line just wanna know if you have sometime to that is what my text messages look like I just want to say what I got was from your when I did I got this from your phone I do not own the and do you have some other people who also use the the hyphen or dash as the dinner coverage after as well on the Lexus is common sometimes you see like a string of comments as well which is a kind of an even older thing to do but you have a couple different types of generic separation characters and for you so everybody has their generic separation character just depends which when you use the different generations the thing is is that because the younger generations don't use the ellipsis as a generic separation character because they're using line breaks they instead have a different meaning for the ellipsis and now he is indicating something left unsaid so kind of mailing on meaning fully and nothing can be a lot of different things sometimes it's actually a little bit annoyed or I have some reservations here like okay a dot dot dot like I I guess I can come pick you up doctor I got uncomfortable while you sometimes you know we could be flirtatious it could be like oh well you know it could be kind of insincere it could be passive aggressive there's a bunch of different things but what it does is it hints at something left unsaid deliberately hints at that kind of thing the problem comes when these two sets of norms clashing to each other because if you're using ellipses guitar exaggeration character as long as you're communicating with someone else who also does that you're doing totally fine but if you're using a lips is as your something left unsaid character and you're talking with someone who uses it as a generic separation character you think they're being incredibly passive aggressive just think they're being normal that will this is funny because one of the things people talk about is that tone is so hard to express three tax is that something you would agree with or D. or do you just think that's just because of clashing we all have tones it's just when they clash that's the problem I think we're developing ways of expressing tone through text and it really depends on kind of what internet generation you belong to and where are you we are thinking of as your imaginary authority when you're composing a text message so I see the biggest divide here between people who are thinking what is the other person going to sing about my tone which tend to be younger what isn't exclusively and people who are thinking what is the correct thing that I could be doing what is the imaginary standard you know the imaginary English teacher with imaginary copy editor in your head so if you're writing to an imaginary English teacher if you're writing to imaginary copy editor you're not thinking about how your tone is interpreted you're thinking about an external list of standards and the big clash comes from people who have one system communicating people have a different system because the the kind of magic audience that you have is different and your writing differently because of and do those systems those different systems come just because of age are they there because of geography our other is somehow something else is causing different systems to come into play this is where I like talking about what your formative internet social experience was like so you know you could have somebody right now who say you know forty or fifty who joined the internet before there was even technically at the World Wide Web like joined back in like the the BBS bulletin board system dial up you know pre dialup days or was on use net or was on chat rooms of these kinds of old systems and they've been using internet media tone of voice for thirty years and dot forty or fifty something is gonna be very different from a forty fifty something who joined say around the new year two thousand or who just was dragged kicking and screaming on the internet two years ago you know especially in that older group it's really hard to tell from someone's age what their internet social experience was because there's a big divide between early adopters and made a doctors and leader doctors in those older demographics within the younger group I think it's a lot more homogeneous but in the older groups there are huge differences and you can't always assume that just because someone's on the older side means they don't have the facility with intermediate on a voice so you're aligning more with experience on the internet than with H. and especially not just experience on the internet in general because if if all you use the internet for is like you know booking flights and looking up the weather that's not a social internet you know where it's only reasonable to look at the weather I look at the weather every day but that doesn't make the internet social for you so if you make friends of the of the internet if you have relationships in your life that you keep out via the internet via the text based medium of the internet and you then you think of the internet as a possible way to like be a full person and have communicate tone of voice to communicate important ideas for you then your on an internet that you you figured out a way to communicate is and the tone of voice even not exactly the same as everyone else so the question is the social potential of the internet for yeah yeah so like so we talked about a little bit about tone and how things can vary in different pockets of the world and if I think about speech I think about the fact that you know people have accents while they talk it is that show up in you know informal internet communication at this point there are some really interesting studies using geo tagged tweets to look at how people tweet differently in particular areas so you can and you can find some things that knock off with the sort of traditional sort of dialect maps that were made by doing you know telephone surveys or by sending people around in a quote on quote word wagons to do these surveys and you can so for example you can find on Twitter that like people in the American south are more likely to use you all people in the north American to say you guys like Pittsburgh has he ends its own little pocket and you can you can map on some of these things we found a traditional dialect back not findings on to what people are saying on social media as well I want to bring in a caller we have Tom from Ames Iowa Tom what's your question Thomas left us let's try where I like this one let's try Jordan from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania since we're talking about unions price anything wrong with the ins and I'll I'll find out Jordan what's your question hi I love the fact that you use the ends by the way had a question about the use of images in text messages so I know the infographics a really great way to express information really quickly and since we're more of a pictographic culture these days what is the way that pictures play into text messages like means are also on yes absolutely I I love the analogy that I really like using for images whether that's gifs or memes or emoji even emoticons kind of making pictures of of punctuation characters is there a lot like a digital version of gesture so you can send someone like good job with the thumbs up you could put a physical thumbs up for you could plans and a thumbs up emoji or get for something and that reinforces your message is pretty positive but if you say to someone good job with the middle finger really changing the interpretation of the exact same words yeah that you're saying that you're being like really friendly really friendly made me really ironic so you're you're doing this sort of additional layer of interpretation on top of what's being said and you can do that with with physical gestures and the most popular remote you are the hand and face and heart emoji which are also very gestural the most popular gifts have people or like humanoid animals in them like you can't do a gift that's just a tumbleweed rolling by it but it's not as popular something with a face yeah well so in your book you talk about memes and I quite memes as a very you know two thousand teens kind of like the ends of the and ends of the office but if you say means of actually been around for a while just like in different ways yeah it's really interesting the continued evolution of the medium like which which which one do people think of as prototypical memes says a lot about where you were on the internet at various times and more but like where you are with respect to the culture so the earliest example that we have you know the the current term was coined by Richard Dawkins but it was like a social science term at the time the example that we have it from in the internet sense from the first time comes from Michael dard when who is better known as the guy they came up with Godwins law this one I have one of these laws kind of like rule thirty four something that was on one of the early internet things was on in the nineties and Godwins law says the longer a discussion thread continues the improbability of a gratuitous Hitler or Holocaust or **** interpretation converges to one in other words like everything becomes a a Hillary analogy the longer the conversation your eventually get to him even to get to her and go home and came up with this as an ex experiment in social engineering because he was annoyed at this tendency he felt that it trivializes the actual horrors of the Holocaust and he wanted to get people to stop and so he decided to make it a medium so that people could call each other out on doing if you like here's Godwins law again you know to be like this is a bad argument we should be taking very seriously when we do and do not make this comparison nothing you can never make this comparison but we shouldn't be doing it about like how bad the pizza was right right right right that's that seems fair yeah and so he sees this on a bunch of use that forms back in the day and then a few years later he wrote an article for about what in wired I'm talking about this experiment that he had and the fact that this name was not replicating on its own other people were siding god until it wasn't just him that's so interesting that's so interesting and the matter article kind of introduced the term need him to an internet audience only okay this was I mean I came up with we need to be careful kind of what we're propagating with me it's really interesting because like Michael Irvin still around this wasn't that long ago she has a Twitter account and a couple years ago he tweeted that you know just to be clear my this law that I came up with only applies to gratuitous comparisons and you know by all means if someone is actually doing that you know is actually being a not so you can definitely call them that so yeah it's really interesting so Great Britain so I Molly Webster and this is science Friday from W. NYC studios I'm here in studio with Gretchen mycologist telling us about the internet and linguistics Gretchen one of the things that came up in your book is that has the role that tools like spell check and auto correct have in helping us of all the language because I find at this point personally the very end I have to find a very annoying classic trying to turn them off absolutely it's fascinating because on the one hand you have the internet but actually changing language faster because you can be exposed to more new words you can learn the for people on the other hand you have.

Judy Woodruff Galen East Bay hills mount Diablo thirty years two years one hand
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fish house. I'm Judy Woodruff. On the next news hour, we sit down with the secretary of housing and urban development. Ben Carson that's Tuesday on the PBS NewsHour. Stay with us for the news hour from PVS. It comes on after the world this afternoon at three o'clock. The time now is to twenty one. I'm Marco werman. You're with the world at this point. It's going to be weird not to talk to the world's Caroline Baylor in Antarctica. She's been there for almost two months. Reporting back to us from on board a research full of scientists studying the effects of climate change on glaciers and now they're headed back to port in Chile. So Caroline, this is gonna be our last chat while you're on board. And then you'll be Palmer. I gotta say I'm gonna miss checking in with you down in Antarctica. How you feeling I'm feeling good? I am excited to get home. Eat a giant salad and go for a run. It also feels a little surreal to be heading back to Boston and the office and seeing everyone again, it it kind of feels like this is just my life now. So it's kind of strange that it's going to be ending and a handful of days. Well, you'll be happy to see that. None of us have changed. I hope everything's the same. When I get back. What is the mood on board? As is. Void wraps up. People are definitely excited to be heading home. I some of the scientists down here what they are most looking forward to you about getting home and university of Alabama PHD student, Victoria, FitzGerald was excited to see her ten month old daughter, I left and she was barely crawling. And now she's like standing up by yourself and stuff university of Gothenburg researcher. Alexandra Mazar is looking forward to some uninterrupted sleep at home in complete silence. No snow is heating. That is can be pretty noisy hitting the ship and Peter she hand from the university of East Anglia is looking forward to a couple of the little things that I'm looking for glass of wine. I'm looking forward to my bet. Again, I am looking forward to just those little things like like cycling to work can little routines of daily life that you don't really realize that you'd miss perhaps until you don't have them anymore. So when we spoke just before you left. Caroline, one of the things you were worried about was going stir crazy or fuelling board on the ship. Did that ever happen? Oh my gosh. That was not a problem at all. There was so much going on on the ship. Twenty four seven literally that I wanted to cover that I needed to learn about I've watched half a movie while I've been down here. I've read a couple of books, but really there's been almost no downtime. Did you develop any new daily routines that you think might be hard to kick when you're back in Boston? Oh, that's a good question. I will miss going up to the bridge in the evening and just looking out at the natural, beauty, and whatever were passing. So it wasn't like the astounding beauty of these glaciers ever got ho- home for you. It wasn't like, oh, there's another mammoth. Glacier, whatever. No. It wasn't. And everything looks different. I mean every iceberg is is unique. Like every snowflake is unique. And I've seen humpback whales breaching and the other day we saw a giant group that feels swimming which was something I hadn't seen yet in such large numbers. There were hundreds of them. So looking out the window never got boring or blase? So caroline. I'm always kicking myself when I get somewhere new, and I've neglected to bring that one key piece of gears or something you really wished you'd brought with you. But didn't I would have brought my big puffy code from Boston because parkas are part of the standard issue that you pick up at the warehouse when you're getting ready to deploy. And the folks at the warehouse were telling us, no, you're okay. Their coats on the ship. But what's on the ship? Are these float coats so their coats and flotation devices in one so they're very hard to like move in a very, bulky? So I wish I would have had a regular coat that I could throw on whatever I wanted. So one more listener question for you Carolyn that I understand you've been working on answering. This question comes from. Jan Kramer, who listens to the world on K UT in Austin, Texas, and Jen asked how the scientists on the ship deal with the emotional impact of their work on climate change. Yeah. That's something. I've been asking people for the past several weeks, and I put together a little report on it. And I was actually surprised by the range of reactions. I got some people said they weren't panicked by climate change. They were more professionally curious other people did give answers I was expecting a bit more like they found it daunting or depressing. That was the word that keyboard to loto used when I think about everything not only climate change. So when I think about all the issues that we have I get to be the press, really. He's a marine ecologist at the university of Saint Andrews in Scotland, and he is particularly worried when he thinks about his two year old son. We still have the feeling that he just arrived in this world. And when my wife, and I we talk about this wondering if he's going to be happy with the issues that they were has also worries about the fate of his hometown. He's from a low lying coastal city in Brazil. But he says he's really careful not to let these feelings interfere with his work. What I'm doing my job? I'm not thinking that my hometown will be underwater. I'm thinking that this is a global issue that I need to help to understand. That's the kind of thing I heard from nearly everyone down here for activists and policymakers emotion can be a really important way to spur people to take action on climate change. But these scientists are trained put their emotions aside. They don't cloud the analytical thinking that's central to their work. Here's how Alexandra Mazar who researches sea ice. That's weans university of Goth. Sandberg put it when we were sitting on the floor for cabin. I'm just trying to be very new child to analyze the results property because if you include emotional center that biased back at home, some people say they feel helpless when they think about climate change. But that's not something I heard down here. And I think that's at least partly because the scientists here feel like they can actually do something about climate change by studying it and helping figure out what lies ahead that's part of what motivated Rachel Clark to start a PHD at the university of Houston. If there's an issue. I don't like belabouring how difficult it is. I just want to find a solution. So maybe I just sort of transfer my emotions into action when it comes to climate change getting PHD in geology and shipping out to Antarctica is clearly not how everyone's going to cope with their feelings about climate change. But LARs, Bouma strategy that might be a little more doable going outside appreciating every day. And. He says that helps sometimes and then you have moments where you listen to news, and you hear a change in policies. And you think like why are they doing that? We know better, and that's very depressing. I think as a scientist, then you go outside and have another walk, and then you worry about your children, and what you leave them. And it's up and down all the time. Scientists LARs Bouma they're talking about the emotional ups and downs of climate change research. So Caroline dealers. I said you're coming back to Boston from Antarctica. How is this trip impacted you and how you think about climate change and thinking about two main things right now Marco the first is how difficult it is to know and gathered data about climate change in places like Antarctica took seven years for the scientists and a Volen to get the robotic submarine that she just resembled to fend down under the floating shelf of tweets. It takes a full day sometimes to find a seal to put a tag on that will track ocean temperature going forward. So. It takes a lot of work to get this. Really good data that will help us figure out. What's coming in the future? And the other thing that I've been thinking about is once the scientists on this ship right up the findings right up the data that they've gathered and publish it. What happens next and how we use? That information is not up to these scientists it's up to policymakers and the public. So I've been thinking a lot about what needs to happen next. If this information is actually going to have a real world impact and help people better prepare for future. The world's Caroline Baylor from the Southern Ocean. Now heading to port Carolyn. Can I just say it has been great living vicariously through you for these past couple of months and enjoy your for salad back. If thank you Marco Caroline's been sending us behind the scenes pictures from the ship like the time, she wrapped her microphone in plastic and lowered it overboard by rope to get.

scientist Marco Caroline Boston Antarctica Caroline Baylor Alexandra Mazar Marco werman Judy Woodruff Ben Carson secretary university of Gothenburg PBS university of East Anglia Chile Palmer LARs Bouma port Carolyn Alabama Southern Ocean
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good evening. I'm Judy Woodruff. On the news hour tonight. Brexit in the balance the UK parliament rejects prime minister maze. Latest plan to leave the European Union at the end of the month. Then grounding, the fleet the US continues to permit the Boeing seven thirty seven max jets to fly as Europe and other countries van them from the skies and varsity blues, dozens of parents, and coaches are indicted after a federal investigation into widespread college admissions at elite universities, plus we return to the southern border this time in Mexico to examine the harsh conditions and uncertainty faced by migrant families waiting to enter the US legally us. Until a few months ago. The majority of the population that came shelters were men mainly men started to change drastically when violence unemployment started doing crease, then entire family started crossing all that and more on tonight's PBS news hour. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. On an American cruise lines journey along the Columbia and snake rivers, travelers retraced the route forged by Lewis and Clark more than.

US Judy Woodruff PBS prime minister European Union Boeing UK Europe Lewis Mexico Clark
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:53 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Alarm. I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news hour leaving never land a new documentary reveals allegations of sexual abuse by Michael Jackson at Friday on the PBS NewsHour. Stay with us for the PBS NewsHour comes on after the world this afternoon at three o'clock here on K Q E D. I'm Carol hills. This is the world thirty years ago. A novel was published that stoke protests across Great Britain. Versus by someone rush, the sponsor cultural. The conflict itself chain reaction that we're still dealing with today. That's the voice of BBC journalist Mabini czar from his new documentary and podcast, The Satanic Verses thirty years on he looks at the long term impact of the novel and the controversy that followed including the Faatoia from Iran's Ayatollah calling for Rushdie's death the fatwa came about on Valentine's Day of all days. So February fourteenth nine thousand nine hundred nine it was just about four months after The Satanic Verses was published. Now, The Satanic Verses was a novel Salman Rushdie is you could call him a surrealist novelist, and he'd written controversial books before he himself was British Indian from a Muslim background, and he hadn't shied away from controversy. Now this time around and in the novel, The Satanic Verses he wrote a book about a central character called mound. Now. Hounds life in the book resembles the life of the prophet Mohammed is very similar, but the concept of the book suggests that this this character is corrupt and he's trying to pull the wool over the eyes of the people in Saudi Arabia at the time by starting this new religion, it's satirical, but I think many Muslims perceived it to be too close to the bone. So The Satanic Verses was published in nineteen eighty eight. What was the reaction to it among British Muslims at that time tepid response. So there was a fence. But the response was really about letter writing. There was a real shift. I'd say a few months after that in January nineteen Eighty-nine where the demonstrations thought Ed becoming physical and this stage. I think things got really out of hand. So why did the tenor of these demonstrations change when I speak to them about what shifted they say? They felt ignored the affair became kind of symbolic and it became a rallying call for lots of other grievances. And so it was about blasphemy. Sure it was but it was also about things like racism in Britain at the time, you understand Britain was hosting an influx of immigrant communities. Many of these people that come from places like India and Pakistan and historically for decades they had been and they had felt like second-class citizens. So they were activists in the community, you I think stoked that sentiment and said, look this is actually about our community being respected. And so because they felt ignored. I think many of those activists decided they needed to do something. More radical had many British Muslims actually, read The Satanic Verses. Absolutely not so to make this really clear, and this was fascinating to me when I was making the documentary is a part of that community. You know, I'm second generation British Pakistani. I'm a Muslim. I'd never read the book. So I read the book whilst I was making the documentary, and the vast majority of people that I met said, they'd never read it, and they felt they didn't need to read it, and the reason being one of the organizations that I met it's called the Bradford council of mosques, they delegated responsibility for reading the book. So they said it would be dangerous, and I'm quoting directly for the general public to read it. So they actually got one member of the committee and said is your job to read this book and decide what the appropriate reaction should be so much of what you covering your documentary in the podcast is is how it was the younger generation. They were the ones who. Responded to the politicization of Islam think. That's very true. You know, I met a man now in his early fifties. And he told me that he wasn't ever a very practicing Muslim. He was second generation, and he explained to me how he felt that society treated him like a second class citizen. And so he didn't see himself as particularly religious and says that he went to a demonstration in London as a bit of a jolly that's how he described it. He said it was a day out and the demonstration he ended up being very rowdy causing some trouble. And he got arrested now when he got arrested he said one of the police officers referred to him as a part time Muslim guppies going in my head. What does it mean by part time Muslim from that moment? Onwards start to become more practicing. I thought to learn more by slum. There was a period in my life. When I start to take on some of these kind of more, extreme ideas. I joined the Bosnian army division became a foreign fighter. And then around the front line against the Serbs. So now, you're talking about jihad. Yeah. And what's he doing today? So today, he has done a one eight t and he has turned his back on political and radical Islamism and today he actually worked for the UK government. Indeed radicalization. Do you see a through line between this event and Islam extremism that some Muslim communities in the west dealing with? Now, I think there is absolutely a line between what happened in the response to The Satanic Verses, and what we have seen in more recent years. What did is it politicized an entire generation? It's so important to say this so many of the people that I met who were activists at the time were first time activists, and they explained to me that the time religion was seen an Islam. Specifically was seen as one aspect of an identity. There were also Pakistanis. There were also Asians. There were also British what happened thirty years ago. Really put the focus on religion as the primary totem that people would gather around. So, of course of these men just became more practicing. But some of these men not only became practicing the become politicized the became radical the began to think of themselves as being at war with the community around them. Well, Mabini I know you went to Bradford in northern England during research, and you brought with you a copy of The Satanic Verses famously a copy of The Satanic Verses was burned in Bradford thirty years ago. What was the reaction among the Muslims? You talk to their today. I took the book back to the it's a public square to the exact same place, but the book was bent that two years ago, and I have to say the majority of people would engage with some of the texts, and if they didn't want to engage there were quite polite, and they just said, I don't want to look at that some. Some people have you know, kind of suggests that I shouldn't be holding a copy one individually, and you see this in the film went much further. He actually told me I needed educating. And then maybe ten minutes later was I was speaking someone else he approached me, he grabbed the book out of my hands. Logo. My book. He ripped up. And then he sets it on fire. Two years later. There was a repeat of historical events. And I for one found that really shocking. And I think it really tells us is that thirty years on there is still such a visceral response to what the book represented. Journalists moving as are produced a documentary called The Satanic Verses thirty years. I'm he's also produced a ten part podcast. Thanks so much. But we thank you. News headlines coming right up. You're listening to the world. Support for kqed.

Salman Rushdie Britain NewsHour Bradford Judy Woodruff Michael Jackson Bosnian army Mohammed Saudi Arabia PBS BBC Carol hills Iran London India Ed UK kqed Pakistan England
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Judy Woodruff. Thank you. And we'll see you soon. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by ordering take out west route talking. You can do the things you like to do with a wireless plan designed for you talk, text and data consumer sailor. Learn more at consumer sailor dot TV language program that teaches Spanish French Italian German and more. An S F railway. American cruise line. And with the ongoing support of these individuals and institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers. Mike. Meena kim. We'll be here with weedy news after we get some good news for San Mateo bridge.

west san mateo pbs french
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:41 min | 3 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Judy Woodruff on the next NewsHour hour pile of playwright, Terrell mccranie, and his Broadway hit choirboy that's Friday on the PBS NewsHour. The interview on all the news this afternoon on the PBS NewsHour at three o'clock today on Kikuchi, we public radio. It's science Friday until one o'clock and then fresh air. This is science Friday. I am I replied oh. The headline. In a recent LA times was worrying at best. Rare. LA mega storm could overwhelm dam and flood dozens of cities the article warned that damn is the Whittier narrows dam, which overlooks the town of PICO Rivera, east of Los Angeles. And that mega storm is a hypothetical one thousand year flood like the forty five day deluge that drowned the state in eighteen sixty one the worst disaster that many people have never heard of a new analysis from the US army corps of engineers found. The Whittier narrows dam would be unable to handle the thirty six inches of rain at fell in eighteen sixty one and it's upgrade has been made the highest priority of any project in this country. A failure of the dam could affect up to one million people in the region here to explain more about explain. That is Louis a Hagen a staff writer for the LA times. He reported on the story. Welcome lewis. Thank you for having me. Your welcome. Now. Your story starts with this new analysis from the army corps. What exactly are they concerned about in Los Angeles? The situation at Whittier narrows dam. I actually underlines how climate change has suddenly become an urgent local safety issue in southern California. The spillway and the earth and dam were built in nineteen fifty seven by the army corps of engineers to control flooding and store water along the San Gabriel real Honda rivers, by the way, there about thirteen miles south of downtown, Los Angeles. It's construction. Was was an urgent need at the time, and it displaced hundreds of people, including those in a farm worker's camp where my family lived at the time, and I'm actually old enough to remember the commotion caused by the federal government's order for the Mexican American families there to to leave the area today that damn poses a serious risk to more than a million people who live downstream and twenty-five mostly working class cities. Most of the year that fifty six foot tall three mile on damn contains little water, but the core recently classified it as the top safety issue in it system seven hundred dams nationwide. So they're saying the damn needs to be upgraded ASAP, but they, but they need money from congress right is is the core assured of getting funding from congress fitness project at my understanding is that it is. And it needs roughly up to six hundred million dollars to make the needed repairs. That's because it's engineers recently found that the dam would fail if Waterworld afloat over its crest or seepage eroded, the sandy soil underneath. Also, unusually heavy rains could trigger a premature opening the spillway releasing more than twenty times what the downstream channel could safely contain now into army chorus worst-case scenarios, which are derived from computer modeling, estimating the the. The risk during a nine hundred year storm event downstream cities such as PICO Rivera, which has a population of sixty three thousand people would be hit with water twenty feet deep and their current evacuation. Route to be turned into rivers. So where where's this? Go ahead. No, I'm I'm saying, you have outlined the credible risks. What how soon could they renovation be made? What are we talking about here? Yes. The the on Wednesday Representative grace Napolitano whose district includes many of the downstream cities in question here urged the army corps to make safety repairs put ear narrows its highest budgetary priority. The core is expected to get the money. It's asking for the six hundred million dollars from congress and complete the job by twenty twenty six. In the meantime, downstream communities are only just beginning to revise their evacuation plan revised evacuation plans, and researchers are suggesting time is running out. I want to thank you very much taking time to explain it to us lowest. Thank you. Lou Hagen is a staff writer for the LA times in Los Angeles. I want to continue onto the bigger picture. These major flooding events are more likely to happen as the climate warms. But according to research from my next guess, they were also already more likely than we thought and the problem isn't in just one for Los Angeles. But the entire state of California. Dr Daniel Swain is a climate scientist with joint appointments at UCLA the National Center for atmospheric research and the nature conservancy and he joins us from Boulder, Colorado. Welcome science Friday. Thanks so much for having me we've been referring to this is the big flood of eighteen sixty one and sixty two how bad was it though. Well, it was a big one. And as I think you alluded to in the introduction. It's one of the greatest California disasters that that most Californians have never heard of. And that's partly because it happened. When California was a relatively new state the population of the region at the time this occurred last occurred in eighteen sixty two is about four hundred thousand compare that to forty million today. So the state was a very different place and get even then this was a massively destructive event, and it wasn't a single storm. It was actually sequence of what are known as atmospheric river storms that lasted more than a month and brought wave after wave after wave of rain pretty much to the whole west coast of North America, but focused on California, and what ended up doing was resulting in catastrophic inundation of almost all of what are now. California's most densely. Populated areas. Los Angeles basin Orange County, the San Francisco Bay area and the central valley and the central valley in particular was was very hard hit and essentially turned into an inland. Sea two hundred miles long, thirty miles wind and in some cases, twenty feet deep. So this really was a fairly monumental event in California history, and it's been called a thousand year flood, but new research says it could happen more often than every thousand years. Yeah. This was actually some of the motivation for the study we did last year where there had previously been this expectation than what happened in eighteen sixty two was essentially a vanishingly rare unlikely sort of freak event. But it turns out that work conducted in in the two thousands by especially by UC, Berkeley, researchers suggested that the flood deposits and some of California's coastal river systems suggested that floods equal to or even greater than what happened in eighteen sixty two occurred multiple times. Perma Liam so really every hundred fifty to two hundred years rather than being thousand year flood it was really somewhere more like a one hundred and fifty or two hundred year flood meaning that it happens five times more frequently than we used to think. And so even if we don't address the climate change question quite yet. These kinds of events are probably more common than we used to think they were. And let's talk about the the causes of all this rain. You you mentioned something called an atmospheric river. Tell us what that means. And how it forms where it comes from where it goes. So an atmospheric river, it's a very evocative term that it actually evokes essentially, the the correct sense of what it is. It really is a river in the sky in a sense of it's a river of concentrated atmospheric water, vapor that looks if you look down on it from space kind of looks like a sinuous meandering stream like much like you'd have with a stream on land and this.

Los Angeles California Whittier narrows dam LA times army corps US army corps of engineers PICO Rivera Louis a Hagen Judy Woodruff PBS staff writer NewsHour Kikuchi Terrell mccranie congress army atmospheric research San Gabriel North America
"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"judy woodruff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Judy Woodruff on the next news hour. Oscar nominations are coming which beloved films of two thousand eighteen we'll get the big non that's Tuesday on the PBS NewsHour. This afternoon at three o'clock. I'm Marco werman. And this is the world we've got plenty of government dysfunction here in the US, but Venezuela's level of dysfunction is something else entirely. The country's economy has pretty much collapsed. President Nicolas Maduro is at the start of his second term in office. But the head of Venezuela's opposition has made clear he's prepared to take over instead and tomorrow, there's a nationwide protest planned against Modesto. There are reports that yesterday a group of Venice Waylon national guard troops tried to stage a revolt we asked reporter Marianas Zuniga in Caracas to give us the latest a group of twenty seven national guards. They were arrested by the government because they try to turn against the government tried to initiate some some kind of coup. And now they would put in the order of the military Justice. It suck many people. But it's actually not the first time. This has happened in Venezuela. In in twenty seventeen we saw maybe two or three. Now, the leader of the opposition party. One Guido has been unusually bold and calling out Madurai, but until a week ago a lot of people outside of Venezuela had not heard of him. What should we know about one guy do until we can ago even inside Venezuela? Not many people have heard about him right now. He's thirty five year old jeeze if I'm wrong. He's the youngest president that the parliament of Minnesota have had he's kind of the new phase of the opposition. And he kind of brought live one that seem kind of dead. Many people haven't heard from the opposition since last year on the political spectrum the ball was in the court of the government, actually. And now these seem kind of re birding from the ashes with this nationwide brothers that he's expected tomorrow. One Guido is young is he kind of being seen as the energy needed for change. I don't know if many people believing him for being here. Or just because they needed someone to have hope that the situation could have an end that the government of Madrid or could have an end. Also at particular thing that these young men is having is report of international community, many head of states around in America, also in the European Union and in the United States. They don't recognize my government. They don't recognize these new term. So that has given power to these new wave of protests. So with all those domestic and international pressure on Madeira, what's keeping his regime in place. What's keeping his regime in place is what always kept him in plays the military. They've always counted the military as the major fours inside their government. And that's something that has given them power. But now something is changing even the military. There are suffering discretionary of food discussion of medicines. The crippling hyper inflation the cost of living. That's why this guy. He's also calling to the military to join them in the fight. I mean, the military is not really in a position to change the economic crisis. It seems so is Madeira getting help from outside powers like Russia or China. Some years ago says economic crisis started they've been having some help from Russia from China in economic terms, but the government of Venezuela is really in that with this country's and this by the fact that they are paying this debt..

Venezuela president Guido Judy Woodruff Madeira Marco werman United States Nicolas Maduro Oscar Venice Waylon national PBS Marianas Zuniga Caracas Russia Madurai European Union Minnesota China Modesto
Charles Krauthammer, legendary conservative intellectual, dies at 68

PBS NewsHour

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Charles Krauthammer, legendary conservative intellectual, dies at 68

"And before we go we are sorry to share this passing charles krauthammer the syndicated conservative columnist and fox news contributor has died after battling cancer he had not been on television for nearly a year and wrote a public letter earlier this month announcing that he only had a short time to live krauthammer a former psychiatrist and paraplegic since a teenage diving accident won the pulitzer prize for his commentary and was a bestselling author charles krauthammer was sixty eight years old and that is the news hour for tonight i'm judy woodruff for all of us the.

Pulitzer Prize Charles Krauthammer Judy Woodruff Sixty Eight Years
Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

Morning Edition

02:27 min | 3 years ago

Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

"In washington i'm dave mattingly the world health organization says there's now a high risk of bola spreading regionally from the democratic republic of congo npr's ava peralta says there are fourteen confirmed cases of the virus in the country including one case in a major city outbreaks of ebola in drc are usually easily contained because they happen in rural areas the chief of the world health organization says a confirmed case in the city of more than one million is concerning but he says the global community now has more tools to deal with any poll outb break a vaccine for example is already being deployed in congo more than four thousand doses of the new experimental ebola vaccine arrived in the country this week a house committee will be questioning the justice department's point person on civil rights this morning he is expected to be pressed about a citizenship question added to the twenty two thousand census npr's hansie lo wong reports the government says the question will help enforce the voting rights act many democratic lawmakers are skeptical of that reasoning and they're worried that this question will discourage non citizens from participating in the upcoming national headcount that's why they went to question the acting director of the justice department civil rights division john gore he was invited to testify last week at a hearing but he didn't show up and now he has agreed to attend a foul appearing with the house oversight committee i'm dave mattingly in washington and i'm dave freeman in san francisco on kiki we at five forty three coming up on morning edition in a few moments us wine exports to greater china which includes taiwan were two hundred ten million dollars up ten percent last year and four hundred fifty percent in the past decade but chinese tariffs have fifteen percent put into place after trump put tariffs on steel imports are threatening the export market the export market growth the story on american wine and much more ahead you run an american company you use imported steel and aluminum yellen we had ships on the water with material so we are paying the tariffs but as far as going forward we're kind of in a pause i'm kai ryssdal yes please we would like an exemption trade of a global nature next time on marketplace the financial story of the day in the week on marketplace today at four pm on k q public radio i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour ahead.

Dave Freeman John Gore Justice Department Dave Mattingly Judy Woodruff Taiwan China San Francisco Washington Acting Director Congo Ebola Ava Peralta Two Hundred Ten Million Dollar Four Hundred Fifty Percent Fifteen Percent
Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

02:34 min | 3 years ago

Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

"From npr news in washington i'm nora romm negotiators from the us canada and mexico have yet to reach an agreement on arena goshi ation of nafta despite reaching today's deadline set by congress but as james frederick reports from mexico city some negotiators are still hopeful mexican economy minister ildefonso guajardo says although there are still major issues to work out he thinks it would be possible to reach a new nafta deal by the end of the month mexican officials are eager to finish the deal as soon as possible since elections for a new president as well as hundreds of legislators happened on july first it's a big day in the central african country of burundi npr's eyder peralta says amid tension and fears of violence burundians are voting on a controversial referendum so far there have been no reports of violence but the runup has been marked by intimidation beating and even the murder of opponents of the referendum the proposed change the constitution would give more power to president pierre including see some and it would also extend his rule until twenty thirty four a spokesman for the chinese commerce ministry says china does not want increase trade tensions with the united states but it will defend its interests the comment came as the us and china resumed talks aimed at heading off a trade war the trump administration is threatening to impose tariffs on as much as one hundred fifty billion dollars of chinese imports china's threatening to retaliate i'm nora raum npr news on the next fresh air trump versus the deep state we talk with evan osnos of the new yorker about how hundreds of nonpartisan civil servants considered not loyal enough to the administration have been sidelined or pushed out of government key positions have been left open to an unprecedented degree leaving the president with few restraints on him join us here fresh air this afternoon beginning at one followed a two by the world here's a preview next time on the world south koreans flocked to a movie set outside seoul it's a full size replica the place where kim jong hoon shook hands last month with south korea's president visitors can now do their own handshakes for the cameras why some people in south korea say they like kim jong un it's the world i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour we continue our series inside yemen with a.

Seoul Ildefonso Guajardo Mexico James Frederick Canada Nora Romm NPR Yemen Judy Woodruff Kim Jong South Korea Kim Jong Hoon Washington Evan Osnos United States China Chinese Commerce Ministry Pierre
Alex Jones is a menace to society. I'm suing him.

01:15 min | 3 years ago

Alex Jones is a menace to society. I'm suing him.

"I'm jack lepe ours the supreme court is striking down part of a law that makes it easier to deport immigrants convicted of crimes the five four decision says legal definition around a crime of violence is too vague to be enforced new justice neal gorsuch joined the four liberal justices to form the majority the families of two children killed in the sandy hook school shooting or suing conspiracy theorist alex jones who claims the shooting was a hoax twenty six people including twenty first graders were killed in the two thousand twelve attack the defamation lawsuit says the families have received death threats because of jones actions starbucks says it plans to close more than eight thousand u s locations for several hours late next month to provide racial bias training at move comes after two black men were arrested out of philadelphia starbucks while waiting for a friend you're listening to here now i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour are making the grade team at the recent successes and ongoing challenges of chicago's public school system that's tuesday on the pbs newshour we'll bring you the pbs newshour this afternoon beginning at.

Neal Gorsuch Alex Jones Starbucks Judy Woodruff Chicago Sandy Hook School Philadelphia