25 Burst results for "Juana Summers"

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:04 min | 3 months ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Give by calling 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 My name is juana summers and I'm a co host of NPR's all things considered. I think our audiences crave clarity. I think they're looking for context in an incredibly crowded news ecosystem. What I love about all things considered is the range of different stories, whether it's the news that they need to inform their decisions for their family or the cultural stories that are of things that people are talking about in their group texts, we get to do it all. I am really proud to support several NPR stations and I really value the work that our member stations do to help people understand their own community. And I feel that for myself and my community, I think it's important for our coverage to always be culturally relevant and to reflect the diversity of the communities that we live in and work in. I hope that I can be a part of expanding who sees us as their natural news and culture home. I'm wanna summers, support this NPR station today. And you can support it with a donation right now at WAB dot org slash donate. And yeah, as one of summer says range is really great. That's not just a variety of stories on all things considered every afternoon. It is that, right? But it's every time you listen to 90.1, also, you might not have thought about it this way before, but your gift, it really does matter. It makes everything that we do possible. It pays for that range. The information, the smiles, the civility, your connection. No matter when you listen, so please we're asking you especially right now to take a moment to give as we are close to the end of this drive, but we're still a little distance away from our goal. Make your donation at 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 or WAB E dot org slash donate. And we've heard from Stephen Decatur who writes, I heard you were behind on your fundraising goal, so I decided to give a gift, Steve. Thank you for getting us one step closer. Indeed, thank you, thank you, thank you

NPR juana summers Stephen Decatur Steve
"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are ready to go into battle. However, they don't realize how little they know. And we need to find a balance between their desire and their skills. The biggest challenge in the first couple of months of the war was instilling discipline. For instance, the major sent one team out to provide cover for another. They forgot water. Night vision goggles, backpacks. Due to the fact that the guys had trouble organizing their stuff, they were half an hour late. And because of that, the second unit came under heavy fire. Thank God no one was hurt. Afterward, the team that got shelled punched out the latecomers, the major says his soldiers have come a long way since then. If we compare us from four or 5 months ago to today, we have improved significantly. But the nature also says an improved army can only do so much against a better armed one. I have a clear feeling lately that we are being kept on artificial respiration. We are given just enough so that we do not lose, and don't win. Give us enough weapons, please, and we give you our word, we will knock the enemy out of our land. The major and other commanders here worry, the west doesn't share Ukraine's goal of total victory. I think they don't want Russia to lose. Politics is a complicated thing. It is clear that the world does not only consist of a conflict in Ukraine, there are a lot of conflicts all over the planet and a lot of geopolitical interests. There's China, Taiwan, and a bunch of regions. But major covalent also says he thinks the future world order is being decided here and now in his homeland. Frank langton NPR news in Ukraine's herson region. This afternoon and all things considered parents and students and uvalde Texas are returning to school. For the first time since the shooting that killed 19 students and two teachers in May. Juana summers introduces us to one family. Tell your smart speaker to play in PR or your station by name. This is NPR news. This is doubly NYC coming up on morning edition, the conservative partnership institute is a nonprofit group and a hub for a pro Trump Republicans. But some legal experts say CPI's political activity may push the boundaries of tax law. If I was looking at this as an IRS agent or has an outside lawyer for that matter, I would say that's enough here that I want to do some digging. More on some of the red flags later this hour. Support for WNYC comes from ox spine at New York Presbyterian when it comes to neck and back pain, the experts at ox spine have seen it all, so patients can get back to doing it all. Stay amazing. New York Presbyterian, more info at dot org slash ox spine

Ukraine Frank langton NPR news herson Juana summers conservative partnership insti uvalde Russia Taiwan China NPR Texas CPI New York Presbyterian IRS WNYC New York
"juana summers" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"juana summers" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Things for the better? Up next, how friends can help you work through your big feelings. Stick with us. This message comes from NPR sponsor, better help. Stress shows up in all kinds of ways, in a world that's telling you to do more, sleep less and grind all the time. Here's your reminder to take care of yourself. Do less, and maybe try some therapy. Better help is committed to helping you in times of stress, with customized online therapy. Get 10% off your first month at better help dot com slash minute and see if it helps life feel a little bit easier. Hey people, the wait wait, don't tell me podcasts has a brand new show on Wednesdays with me. I'm a joy. It's called everyone in their mom, whatever everyone is talking about, that's what we'll be talking about with way weight panelists, comedians you love, and people you don't even know you love yet. Just listen to the wait, wait, don't tell me podcast from NPR, wherever you get your podcasts, and I'll be there every Wednesday. To a great shows in one feed. Mollye, you mentioned earlier and you wrote really openly about your own experiences with despair and depression. And I found myself wondering, did writing about it, did you learn anything new about your experiences? Yes, I it was therapeutic to write about it, definitely. It had been a long enough. This is the part of the book that is the scariest for me to put out into the world. When I think about my distant cousins, let alone the public reading about this thing that I experienced, it's quite difficult, but again, my main motivation for writing about it was to try to remove some of the stigma around this. Moving through despair, I mean, when you're in it, it feels endless. You will never get out of it. And I wanted people to know that you can move through it and you can come out the other end of it. And I wish that there were more stories of that because in the middle of feeling that I was grasping for any stories that I could find of people who had been through such a difficult emotion and made their way out the other side and I tried to share it in a way that was narrative enough so that people could follow what was going on, but that also wasn't trying to wrap it up too neatly because, you know, I still deal with, not as intense thoughts, but I still deal with depression and it's okay for not everything to be resolved. I really loved a piece of advice that you wrote about in the book that your friend Julia gave you. And she told you, I'm paraphrasing here, but she doesn't believe in comparing levels of suffering. And if you're in a low place, that's just the place you're in. And I just really loved that. It was such a nice affirming, real thing to say to someone who's going through it. Yes, absolutely. I think about that a lot. If you're suffering your suffering and don't judge yourself for that, we talk about this in the book, but when you're in the middle of such an intense emotion, being really careful about who you speak with in the beginning, because not everyone will understand or say the right thing. And it's not their fault. But trying to find people who you can have conversations with that you know that you will not face any judgment and they will be supportive and then I go back and I really think those people and I tell them how important they were in my life and help them know that they can be that for others too in the future. I think we also do this to ourselves a lot where if you're feeling low, you then beat yourself up because you say, well, relative to others, I have this amazing life. Why should I feel bad? And I was doing that to a friend, and she said, you just need to stop. When you're having a great day and you're really excited about something, I'm not going to come in and say, yeah, but look at Jeff Bezos. He has so much more money than you. And so I think sometimes it can be useful to say, look at all the good things in your life, but you also, it's so important just to acknowledge life as hard and you're going to go through hard moments and you can be in a good situation and still emotionally be feeling devastated or low, it could be the chemicals in your brain. It could be whatever, that's just really meaningful to you. So I think again, just remembering that when someone comes to you and is going through something hard, not immediately being like, oh, you know, it look on the bright side because you wouldn't do that to them if they came to you and said, I just got promoted. I'm so excited. So I just like letting them feel what they need to feel and talk about that with you. You know, that reminds me of something else that really just shone through in this book and it's the importance of having good people in your corner and strong relationships and Friends that you can call and express those feelings that even are really scary to say out loud. And I wonder, did you guys have friends like that that you called while you were writing this book or people who you know you can turn to? I mean, some of them I think you've written about in the book. Yeah, I will speak for myself. I am lucky to have many friends who I could call and the interesting thing is they aren't always the folks who you would sort of expect and the people who once you share with them about big feelings, the people who continue to check in are also so, so valuable and helpful. And again, not always the ones who you would expect. So when I was going through despair and burnout, also, I mean, there are people who I sort of let in a little bit and then they would call me every couple of weeks, how are you doing, or one friend who texted me every single day? And that made such a big difference to not feel alone. And I try to pay that forward now. And there's a story that I share in the book where I had a friend who, many years ago, went through a period of depression and I said to her something like, can't you just look on the bright side, you know, and I felt so bad about that that I had said that to her, but I didn't know. I had not gone through a significant period of depression myself. And I actually reached out to her and apologized like a year ago. So it's like ten years after this event and I said, I'm really sorry that I said that to you. I couldn't relate and I was trying to make you feel better, but that's the last thing that you wanted to hear. And she said, thank you. So I'm glad you brought this up because I think the intersection of being able to talk about big feeling with friends can be difficult. But things can change over the course of a friendship. So what you can talk about with someone now may be different than later on and the people who show up to support you may be those who surprise you. All right, we are going to leave it there. Liz fossil and Molly west Duffy are authors of the new book, big feelings, how to be okay when things are not okay. Thank you both for joining us. Thank you. Thanks. Yeah, thanks for having us. If you or someone you know is in despair and having thoughts of dying, contact the national suicide prevention hotline, at one 802 7 three 8 two 5 5 or the crisis text line by texting home to 7 four one 7 four one. Thanks again to Liz vos and Molly west Duffy. Their new book is called big feelings. How to be okay when things are not okay, and it's out now. You can check out more of Liz and Molly's work on Instagram. They're at Liz and Molly. This episode was produced by Janet Eugene Lee and it was edited by Tamara taney. Listeners will be back in your feeds as usual on Friday until then, thanks for being here. Be good to yourselves. I'm juana summers, and this is it's been a minute from NPR. Support for NPR and the following message come from yogi tea. Take a moment to support your body and mind with yogi honey chai turmeric vitality T, a delicious herbal tea blend made with turmeric and warming chai spices. Support your well-being with yogi tea..

Mollye depression NPR Jeff Bezos Julia Molly west Duffy Liz fossil national suicide prevention ho Liz vos Janet Eugene Lee Molly Liz Tamara taney juana summers
"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Three AI is enterprise AI This is all things considered from NPR news I'm juana summers And I will Russian president Vladimir Putin is distorting history when he says he's sending his military to quote de notify Ukraine Ukraine's president after all is Jewish So why would Putin tell this story And who would it resonate with Julia Longoria host of the podcast the experiment talked with one man about his family's complicated history with Ukraine and how he came to view things differently My grandmother viewed the Ukrainians that she knew as Nazi collaborators And so that was the story that I grew up with When I first met Franklin Thor he told me his grandmother's pain had once led him to believe the narrative that Putin is spreading right now Until eventually that changed I came to view my own myth the story that I grew up with as just simply wrong And the Putin version of events simply to be grotesque The purpose of this interview is to add to the oral history of the Nazi Holocaust So that future generations will know what happened Could you please tell me your name It'll come on I was born in 1920 June 15 I had two sisters Thank grandmother's existence before.

NPR news Ukraine juana summers Julia Longoria Putin Vladimir Putin Franklin Thor
"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Left Congress to join The White House as Trump's fourth chief of staff overseeing the west wing starting in the spring of 2020 as the pandemic took hold All of you know the president and the First Lady tested positive for COVID-19 Meadows released a new book this month revealing new details about when the former president tested positive for coronavirus and Trump's medical condition then Trump called Meadows account fake news The book came out within days of Meadows initially agreeing to cooperate with the house January 6th committee Soon after Meadows stopped cooperating The House voted to refer him for criminal contempt of Congress charges Meadows did not respond to a request for comment Brendan Bach worked for both former speakers Boehner and Ryan He says Meadows botched his book rollout You guys turned on and Trump starts coming after him He needs to get back in his good graces So he stops participating But Meadows had already turned over thousands of pages of emails and text messages They revealed the panic consuming some members of Trump's inner circle on January 6th Alissa fara Griffin was White House communications director She left before January 6th The fat day she texted Meadows that if someone didn't say something people would die She now works at CNN I will never stop believing that anyone who had a platform that day had an obligation to use it So even if Meadows had hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers his voice would have rang very important to people on Capitol Hill Meadows former Republican House colleagues condemned the committee Congressman Jim Jordan of Ohio called it a political charade Make no mistake When Democrats vote in favor of this resolution it is a vote to put a good man in prison The Justice Department will now decide whether to move forward with this case Leaving a man who was at the center of power in Washington for years Now potentially facing prison Juana summers NPR news Storms left scenes of devastation across the U.S. this past week and on the other side of the world another massive weather system tore across the Philippines It killed at least 12 people and cut a broad path of destruction and Pierre's Julie McCarthy has that story The Philippines disaster management agency reports that super typhoon rye has forced some 300,000 people to evacuate ahead of the storm that first made landfall on the island of shergarh A surfer's Paradise typhoon rise smashed after chagall shores sustaining 120 mile.

Meadows Trump Brendan Bach Congress Alissa fara Griffin Capitol Hill Meadows Republican House White House Boehner Congressman Jim Jordan center of power Ryan Juana summers CNN House Justice Department Twitter Ohio
"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Got to kind of split screen in my head. I'm thinking as President Biden was speaking in Pennsylvania today. Here in Washington. A lot of Democratic lawmakers from the state of Texas have showed up. We talked to one of them elsewhere on the show today. They're here, in part to call on Congress to pass new federal voting laws. What is Biden saying about that? Yeah. So Biden described the for the People Act, which is that sweeping voting in elections bill that Democrats are pushing as a national imperative, and he also called for the passage of a bill named for the late Congressman John Lewis. I want you to restore some parts of the voting Rights Act that were struck down by the Supreme Court in 2013. Challenge with both of those bills, though, is that neither bill has a path to passage in Congress right now, given that there is unified Republican opposition that has led for a number of calls for Biden to come out and support Of either eliminating or modifying the legislative filibuster, and that would allow these bills to pass the Senate with only Democratic votes. This is a topic that has come up frequently, including in a meeting that the president had Civil rights leaders at the White House last week Now in the speech today, the president did not mention the filibuster. But our colleague Asma Khalid, who covers the White House, spoke with Vice President Harris earlier in the day. And in that interview, the vice president suggested that she has talked about the future of the filibuster with senators and in terms of how invested this White House is some critics of President Biden. Some of his allies have said they want him to do more on voting rights. They argued. Look, you promised you were going to make this the central theme of your presidency. How Is today's speech being received. I talked with Vicki Miller of indivisible Philadelphia, which is one of the groups that held a rally as the president was set to speak. She told me that she did not believe the issue of voting rights had been made enough of a priority compared with other legislative issues like the American Rescue plan, for example. We're so happy that he put his muscle if you will is presidential muscle behind that bill, and also for the infrastructure bills. We want him to do the same thing for the for the People Act because we believe that without it Democracy will be tremendously weakened. There's also frustration, of course, that the president did not mention the filibuster despite the fact that this is an issue he speaks about with such urgency. NPR's Juana Summers thanks Thank you. The water levels behind the Colorado rivers. Biggest dams are at record lows, and that means the historic drought in Western states will probably start showing up in people's energy bills because those dams can't produce as much electricity. Luke Runyon from member station Kunc has more.

Vicki Miller Asma Khalid Luke Runyon Biden Washington Congress Pennsylvania Juana Summers John Lewis Colorado 2013 Democrats last week Texas Senate today Democratic NPR Republican Supreme Court
"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Split screen in my head. I'm thinking as President Biden was speaking in Pennsylvania today. Here in Washington. A lot of Democratic lawmakers from the state of Texas have showed up. We talked to one of them elsewhere on the show today. They're here, in part to call on Congress to pass new federal voting laws. What is Biden saying about that? Yeah. So Biden described the for the People Act, which is that sweeping voting in elections bill that Democrats are pushing as a national imperative, and he also called for the passage of a bill named for the late Congressman John Lewis. I want you to restore some parts of the voting Rights Act that were struck down by the Supreme Court in 2013. Challenge with both of those bills, though, is that neither bill has a path to passage in Congress right now, given that there is unified Republican opposition that has led for a number of calls for Biden to come out and support Of either eliminating or modifying the legislative filibuster, and that would allow these bills to pass the Senate with only Democratic votes. This was a topic that has come up frequently, including in a meeting that the president had Civil rights leaders at the White House last week. Now in this speech today, the president did not mention the filibuster. But our colleague Asma Khalid, who covers the White House, spoke with Vice President Harris earlier in the day. And in that interview, the vice president suggested that she has talked about the future of the filibuster with senators and in terms of how invested this White House is some critics of President Biden. Some of his allies have said they want him to do more on voting rights. They argued. Look, you promised you were going to make this a central theme of your presidency. How Is today's speech being received. I talked with Vicki Miller of indivisible Philadelphia, which is one of the groups that held a rally as the president was set to speak. She told me that she did not believe the issue of voting rights had been made enough of a priority compared with other legislative issues like the American Rescue plan, for example. We're so happy that he put his muscle if you will is presidential muscle behind that bill and and also for the infrastructure bills. We want him to do the same thing for the for the People Act because we believe that without it Democracy will be tremendously weakened. And there's also frustration, of course, that the president did not mention the filibuster despite the fact that this is an issue he speaks about with such urgency. NPR's Juana Summers thanks Thank you. The water levels behind the Colorado rivers. Biggest dams are at record lows, and that means the historic drought in Western states will probably start showing up in people's energy bills because those dams can't produce as much electricity. Luke Runyon from member station Kunc has more Standing.

Vicki Miller Asma Khalid Luke Runyon Congress Washington Biden Pennsylvania Juana Summers 2013 John Lewis last week Colorado Democrats today Senate Texas NPR Democratic White House Republican
"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"D let us know that he supports passing the bill, but he wants to make sure that it's the right building, not averse view. Hey also said that He said that they live. He's not happy about it not being made. But all in all, he just wants to be able to be right and meaningful and that it holds George's legacy intact. Family attorney Benjamin Crump made the point today that this should not be about pitting policing against civil rights. He said that everyone should want just policing you describe. That is the kind of policing were Floyd would have been able to breathe without having any place on his neck, right? Well Can you just update us on where things stand right now, With these negotiations among lawmakers, like is there a sense were even close to a deal at this point. So key lawmakers who are involved in these negotiations have said that the talks are continuing really productively. One of them who Congresswoman Karen Bass of California, said today that she believes that everyone involved understands the urgency of moving quickly. She said she believes lawmakers will be able to get a deal across the finish finish line. Across the capital. South Carolina Senator Tim Scott, the lead negotiator for Republicans, said yesterday that he could see the end of the tunnel. Okay, so what's been the hold up? The biggest sticking point remains this debate over accountability for individual police officers, including the doctrine of qualified immunity. That shield for individual officers to avoid lawsuits is something Democrats broadly are opposed to, and most Republicans just really don't want to touch. Senator Scott has been working on a possible compromise that would shift the legal burden from individual officers, two departments instead. But that could cause some Democrats to not support this bill it all earlier today I talked with Missouri Congresswoman Cori Bush believe that eliminating qualified immunity for law enforcement officers must be included. In any deal that gets passed in the Senate, just like what we did on our side in the house, and it ultimately needs to be signed into law by President I have made that a red line that there has to be a clear red line with that. Now. Bush's House colleague, Karen Bass, speaking today seemed to indicate that any compromise that she would support has to take some sort of action on qualified immunity. But she was not specific on what that could potentially look like. Mm. That is NPR's Juana Summers. Thank you wanted You're welcome. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has his work cut out for him in the Middle East. He is trying to make sure a ceasefire holds between Israel and Hamas. And he says he wants to help restore in his words, hope, respect and trust between Israelis and Palestinians. NPR's Michele Kelemen, reports secretary. Blinken says he had a busy and productive day in Jerusalem, where he met Israeli officials and in Ramallah, where he sought to revive relations with the Palestinians. He said the U. S is on track to provide $360 million in aid to the Palestinians and to reopen the U. S consulate in Jerusalem. That's important way for our country to engage with And provide support to the Palestinian people. The Trump Administration had closed the consulate and cut off aid to pressure the Palestinians to accept its ideas on how to resolve the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said he's glad to see the quote actions of a hurtful few come to an end. That's good that America had. We thank the U. S administrations, commitment to a two state solution and the maintenance of the status quo in Jerusalem of us said, calling for an end to planned evictions of Palestinians from their homes. Their Palestinians want East Jerusalem as the capital of a future state. But talks on that seem a long way off. Blinken is focused on the immediate humanitarian crisis. And then Looking to see actions on the part of both. Israelis and Palestinians that will Takedown attention. And try to remove or minimize Some of the potential catalyst for Renewed cycle of violence. There have been repeated military clashes between Israel and Hamas since Hamas took control of Gaza 15 years ago. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu remembers that during the 2014 conflict, Blinken, then an Obama administration official, helped to rush us military aid to Israel. And you're giving meaning to this now again. With replenishment Savarin Dome interceptors that save civilian lives on both sides, Netanyahu says. If Hamas fires more rockets, Israel's response will be in his words very powerful, and we have discussed ways of how to work together to prevent Hamas food rearmament. The U. S. Doesn't talk to Hamas, a U. S designated terrorist organization, but Egypt does and played a key role in negotiating the cease fire. Blinken travels to Cairo tomorrow. Then on to Jordan. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS, the state Department in parts of the Eastern U. S. The everyday sounds of birds and cars and barking dogs have been joined by something else. A buzzing that means brood. 10 is back after 17 years underground, millions and millions of cicadas are emerging and as they fly clumsily around going about their business. Scientists are busy, too. As NPR's Nell Greenfield boys reports for people who study insects. This is a major event brood. 10 isn't the only group of cicadas that spends nearly two decades underground. But it is the biggest and most famous. That's why entomologist Mariana Helene drove east. She normally works at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. I didn't see it 17 years ago. On. I wanted to experience it and my brother in law actually said it perfectly. This is your Entomology Woodstock, isn't it? She studies tiny structures in sick adle wings that make water droplets just roll off their surface..

Michele Kelemen Cairo Ramallah Nell Greenfield Netanyahu Benjamin Crump Mariana Helene Juana Summers Blinken Jerusalem Hamas George $360 million Karen Bass Jordan East Jerusalem Floyd Republicans Democrats millions
"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Our news in Washington on Corvin Coleman. Secretary of state, Antony Blinken is in Israel today, where he's met Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Blinken is working to strengthen the cease fire between Israel and Palestinian Hamas fighters in Gaza. He says the U. S. Will now work to rally international support around rebuilding efforts for Palestinians in Gaza and the Biden administration will contribute to this. We know that to prevent return to violence, we have to use the space created to address a larger set of underlying issues and challenges. On that begins with tackling the great humanitarian situation in Gaza and starting to rebuild. Blinken again reaffirmed the Biden administration support for Israel to defend itself against Hamas rockets. Rather blinking won't meet with Hamas officials on his trip as the U. S considers the group a terrorist one. Instead, Blinken is going to meet with the leader of Hamas, his rival, the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank. NATO ambassadors are talking about the brazen actions of the Belarus government. It forced a passenger plane to land and its capital on Sunday and then arrested in opposition journalist aboard NATO chief calls the move dangerous and unacceptable. European Union leaders have already moved to impose fresh sanctions on Belarus. President Biden will meet members of George Floyd's family at the White House today as NPR's Juana Summers reports the meeting comes his talks focused on the policing reform bill, named for Floyd have stalled on Capitol Hill. 46. Year old George Floyd, who was black, was killed one year ago today by a white Minneapolis police officer. And the whole world saw it. The viral video of his death sparked months of protests across the country. Last month, President Biden called on lawmakers to pass the George Floyd Justice and Policing Act by the anniversary of Floyd's killing. While negotiations continue. Lawmakers have yet to come to an agreement over key provisions of the bill, including the issue of qualified immunity for police officers. Juana Summers. NPR News A second covert 19 vaccine for teens should be available this summer. NPR's Joe Palka reports, Moderna is reporting a positive outcome from a study. The study involves some 3700 Children. Two thirds got two shots of the Madonna vaccine. The remaining third got two shots of a placebo. There were no cases of covert 19 illness in the group that got the vaccine, compared to four in the placebo group. Equally important, the vaccinated Children had an antibody response comparable to that in adults. Some Children experienced the same adverse side effects in adults, headache, fatigue, muscle aches and chills. Madonna says it plans to seek regulatory authorization in June so it's vaccine can be used in 12 to 17.

Joe Palka Juana Summers George Floyd Antony Blinken Corvin Coleman June Blinken Gaza Sunday Palestinian Authority Israel Capitol Hill NATO Floyd Last month West Bank European Union George Floyd Justice and Polic two shots Washington
"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

"Let's make a plan DONNA work It's 5 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep. When last year's election results showed Georgia to be a Purple State, a state that voted for Joe Biden, a state that elected two Democratic senators, Asian American voters were part of that picture there a growing part Vital states electorate, and that is one sign of the rising political influence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, which NPR political reporter Juana Summers has been following. Good morning. Morning. How is this part of the electorate changing Well. Asian Americans are the fastest growing segment of the U. S electorate. And right now we're seeing something of a political awakening. This community has experienced a dramatic spike in the number of racially motivated attacks in the past year during this pandemic, which is how to galvanizing effect. That is something that vice President Kamila Harris touched on when she spoke at a virtual event for the A P I Victory Alliance last night. As a member of this community I share in that outrage and grief. And I believe we have an opportunity now to turn that pain into action. Harris also talked about a bill that President Biden will sign today intended to address that increase in hate crimes and violence against Asian Americans. Well, what can you tell us about the political power of Asian Americans right now? So I spoke with Karthik Rama Krishnan, who is the director of a P I data and his analysis of Census Bureau data shows that turnout among Asian Americans shot up from 49% in 2016 to 60% in 2020, and among Pacific Islanders, There was a jump from 41% in 2016 to 55% in 2020. Now Those numbers are lower. Overall, the national turn out in the last election, but they were the biggest increases among any racial or ethnic group and then 2020 as you point out that was to the benefit of then candidate Joe Biden and Democrats. Now I asked Rama Krishnan to explain to me why this turnout Serge may have happened, he said. There are a slew of reasons. But one important thing that he did. 10.2 is a sharp increase in voting among the second generation who are born in the United States to immigrant parents. This second generation is coming of political age. And especially during this moment of covert and the increase in anti Asian Racism and hate incidents. You are seeing a kind of political consciousness that's forming that will likely last a generation. And that, he told me can tell you a lot about what this participation might look like in the future. Although I'm remembering a couple of years ago, we did a profile of a Chinese American state legislator and part of the notable factor that it's just that she was rare. They're not that many Asian American elected officials And see if that is still true. The reflective democracy campaign did a report recently It found that Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders make up less than 1% of elected leaders. When you look at all levels of government, Asians Now make up about 7% of the nation's overall population. Now that being said, we do know that more Asian Americans are running for office now than ever before, including folks like Andrew Yang, who ran for president in 2020, now running to be the mayor of New York. Michelle Wu is running to be the mayor of Boston, and they have been all these groups that have sprung up that are working to recruit potential candidates. And breaks down some of these barriers they face when considering whether or not to seek office as NPR's Juana Summers. Thanks as always, for your reporting, you're welcome. Mature now to Brazil, where the pandemic is far from over covert cases. They're dipped recently but are edging up again. Many people blame President gyre Belson Aro for ignoring science than giving the wrong people the wrong jobs. NPR's Philip Reeves reports that Brazilians are now taking a closer look at what has gone wrong. You've also hippity appeared Want to your sequence? An Army general is being interrogated Life on TV tratamiento that coffee. It is a naughty conformity is facing a group of Brazilian senators. Brazil is the world's second highest number of covert deaths after the U. S. These senators want to know to what extent this catastrophe is the government's fault. The chloral cleaning capacity. It's concho vid trees. The General Eduardo Pezuela spent nearly a year is President Chae Oppose Narrows Health minister before being replaced two months ago..

Rachel Martin Michelle Wu Juana Summers Steve Inskeep Andrew Yang Joe Biden Karthik Rama Krishnan Philip Reeves United States 2016 2020 Rama Krishnan Census Bureau two Democrats 49% 41% Harris NPR Brazil
Where Does Biden Stand on Policing in Communities of Color?

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Where Does Biden Stand on Policing in Communities of Color?

"The epidemic of black men being killed by police. But he's also presented himself as an ally of the law enforcement community. NPR's Juana Summers takes a look at the line. The president is walking when Joe Biden offered his condolences to George Boyd's loved ones in a video played at Floyd's funeral last year. Supposed to question Why do so many black people in America wake up knowing they could lose their lives? Now is the time for racial justice. That's the answer. We must give to our Children when they ask why. Because when there is justice for George Floy, we will truly be on our way to racial justice in America. Aside from the policing overhaul bill that carries George Floyd's name that is stalled in Congress. Biden does not have a clear agenda to deliver on his promise of making real change and policing and communities of color. Congresswoman Brenda

Juana Summers George Boyd Joe Biden NPR George Floy Floyd America George Floyd Biden Congress Congresswoman Brenda
"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"A Classic story of Many people get addicted to opioids. Both Suffers from chronic pain. The court's decision to allow testimony from those close to Floyd is controversial. Minnesota is the rare state to allow prosecutors to present sympathetic depictions of a victim's life while a homicide defendant is on trial. At the same time, the jury will not hear about Floyd's criminal convictions, including a felony that led to his imprisonment for five years for NPR News. I'm re ham Fish year drug company Fizer says It's vaccine continues to be effective against covert 19 6 months after it's been administered Pharmaceutical company and its German partner by on tech, announcing updated results of a late stage study involving more than 44,000 volunteers. Companies say the study showed the vaccine to be 91%, effective against symptomatic disease was even more protective against preventing severe covert 19 cases. Actually also appear to work well against the burying of the virus that was first detected in South Africa. Much of the focus on president binds infrastructure plan has been on physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. But as NPR's Juana Summers reports, the plan also includes new funding that could reduce gun deaths. The infrastructure plan includes $5 Billion for programs focused on community violence prevention. Susan Rice, the head of the Domestic Policy council, told NPR. These funds were included in the infrastructure bill because gun violence is not only deadly, but it is also a barrier to economic activity and growth is one element of our society is is Not part of the equation. If they're left behind, whether it's you know, and Appalachia or on the south side of Chicago. We all suffer and we have to care for all of our communities, and that's what this American jobs plan does. It's not yet fully clear how the money would be allocated and the package still must make its way through Congress. Juana Summers, NPR news spending a new construction projects from in February, with bad weather hitting many parts of the country. Commerce Department reporting today, spending on new projects was down 8/10 of a percent falling a 1.2% gain the previous month. Stocks moved higher on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 171 points. The NASDAQ gained 233 points today. You're listening to NPR. Ticket sales were performing art groups in the U. S and the UK fell nearly 90% over the past year. That's according to a leading arts agency, or from NPR's medal will be the fallout has been catastrophic, says Trg Arts. The industry consulting group says ticket sales were down 86% in the U. S for March 2022 last month compared to the year before. In the UK the drop was 89% jazz.

Susan Rice Juana Summers 233 points South Africa 91% March 2022 Trg Arts $5 Billion 89% Congress February 1.2% five years 86% 171 points Appalachia U. S NASDAQ NPR NPR News
"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

"Were Community Service of Santa Monica College News, music, culture and NPR for Southern California And as you might expect, Coming up news headlines from NPR will check in with Madeleine brand on the other side of news. Get another hour of morning becomes eclectic, so much music to get to. So stay with me. Hey, there, do me a favor. Go check your fridge. Pantry. I'll bet you you have more food than you probably need in the U. S. And in North America, more food is wasted at the household level than it then the other part of the supply chain wasted as in. Oh, yeah. Maybe I should have eaten all those strawberries. Now I have to throw them out. I'm Steve to take us are Syria's on waste. Continues on the next greater L A Today at one and 6 30 on KCRW. Lie from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying the battle against climate change is back at the top of the U. S agenda evident in the latest series of executive actions, reversing Trump era policies that Sought to expand oil, gas and coal output. Despite the environmental risks involved today, President Biden halted new oil and gas leasing on federal lands and offshore waters. He's also cutting fossil fuel subsidies. My view. We've already waited too long to do with this climate crisis. We can't wait any longer. We see it with our own eyes. We feel it. We know it in our bones. Biden says he believes his climate agenda will create jobs as about actions on Cole. National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy said Cole quote will be in the mix. During his campaign by and said he planned to support the economies of coal producing communities. As quote marketplace. Competition continues to shift the country away from coal fired electricity. On his first day on the job. Secretary of State Tony Blinken says he hopes to build morale and trust at the State Department. Here's NPR's Michele Kelemen. It was an unusual welcome ceremony. Only a few employees were allowed into here is remarks in person and all were wearing masks. Secretary Blinken says. We've never been in a moment quite like this. The world is watching us intently right now. They want to know if we can heal our nation. They want to see whether we will lead with the power of our example. It will put a premium on diplomacy with our allies and partners to meet the great challenges of our time like the pandemic, Blinken says. The Corona virus pandemic has claimed the lives of five State Department, American employees and 42 locally employed staff around the world. Michele Kelemen NPR NEWS the State Department, a new survey of the nation's mayors finds that the vast majority do not support sweeping changes to the funding of their police departments. NPR's Juana Summers reports on reactions to changes stemming from the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, which sparked nationwide protests against police brutality. More than 100. Mayors who lied cities with more than 75,000. Residents responded to the annual mini No survey of mayors. Ah large bipartisan majority of those mayors say they believe their police budgets last year were about right. Just 12% said that the budgets for their departments were too large. This comes amid calls in some cities to defund the police, redirecting money to social services or other programs or to do away with the department's altogether. Survey also found that most mayor saw last year's racial justice protests has having Dunmore good than harm in their communities. But there were divisions along party lines. Republican mayors were more likely to view protests as negative than their Democratic counterparts. Juana Summers. NPR news The Dow is down. 391. This is NPR..

NPR State Department Secretary Blinken Biden Juana Summers Michele Kelemen Santa Monica College News Cole North America Southern California Madeleine KCRW Laxmi Dunmore Syria Steve President
"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Robin Young and I'm Tanya mostly, And on this inauguration day, it's here now. Joseph Robinette Biden Junior do solemnly swear that I will faithfully exit President Biden was sworn in today as the 46, president of the United States with a call for unity, and he addressed those who did not support him. While those who did not support us let me say this. Here me out as we move forward. Take your measure Me and my heart. If you still disagree, so being that's democracy. That's America. The right to dissent peaceably when the guard rails of our republic is perhaps this nation's greatest strength. You hear me? Clearly? This agreement must not lead to this union. I pledge this to you. I will be a president for all Americans. Oh, American Vice President elect Kamila Harris was sworn in as the first woman and first Black and South Asian American vice president. This is two weeks to the day after an insurrection by mostly white pro trump extremists. And just a day after the country marked 400,000 deaths from the coronavirus, Let's bring in NPR political reporter Juana Summers, who joins us now from Washington Welcome Leather. Wanna? The president called for the ending of the uncivil war. That's in his words that pits red against blue and rule versus urban what stuck up to you most about his speech. Yes. So as a politician, President Biden is someone who has made the challenge of unity of bringing people together. Ah, hallmark of his campaigns, and that was certainly on display here. It was very evident and the words that he very deliberately chose. He saw it in the speech to begin the process of bringing healing and unity to an incredibly fractured nation. I believe he described this as a historic moment of crisis and challenge. He made clear that Americans are united in the same fight against these swirling crises that the country faces in terms of the corona virus pandemic that has killed so many Americans. The economic challenges that have so acutely felt by so many of us As well as the ills of racism and racial unrest that we have seen play out that this country has been reckoning with for some time but very powerful Lee this year. He clearly wants to be someone who is a president, he said. For all Americans And you mentioned the economy. He started with the economic fall out from the pandemic. Let's listen. Millions of jobs have been lost. Hundreds of thousands of businesses closed. Cry for racial justice. Some 400 years in the making moves us..

President Biden Vice President Joseph Robinette Biden President Robin Young United States Lee NPR Kamila Harris America Tanya Juana Summers Washington reporter
"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

"It's 7 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King. And I'm Steve Inskeep. One reason today is historic is the inauguration of Kamila Harris. No woman has ever served as vice president. Nor has any person of color Day. Those statements ceased to be true and will never be true again. People who want to mark this moment cannot do so by attending an inauguration that is limited by the pandemic so summer, finding other ways to note the occasion. NPR's Juana Summers reports. For meeting with her students on Wednesday. Cherie Burrell has some special deliveries to make, so we are going to be delivering them their inauguration package, and it's gonna include on American flag is going to include actually a set of pearls in honor of Kamila Harris. Pearls, of course, are an accessory that Harris is rarely seen without. These packages were going to students in a program called Yells, a nonprofit youth empowerment program and Marietta, Georgia. Morale is a program coordinator for the group. Her students. All virtual will read the oath of office and after they watched the inauguration, they'll write letters to the country's new leaders. The staff wall came together We really made sure to let them know that we are going to celebrate this inauguration. It's very, very important. Tow us that they are witnessing. As one of one of us. One of the students did say she's like, you know, we are witnessing history and we're also witnessing my future. Harris, who was the daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, will become the first female vice president. As well as the first person of black or Indian descent to assume the vice presidency. It is a moment that carries so much meaning for so many But one that has also been stripped of some of the traditional pomp and circumstance. There's so many cultural reaches of her being in that office that we can't even celebrate. I think we were robbed of that celebration, but, you know From the resumes on the virtual spaces will do our best to celebrate so much of the last year has required people to adjust their expectations and carve out new traditions. And the inauguration is no exception. Over the weekend, Harris is Caribbean routes took center stage at a virtual celebration.

Kamila Harris vice president NPR News Noel King Steve Inskeep NPR Cherie Burrell Juana Summers Marietta coordinator Georgia
"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Acting the Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf is resigning effective tonight. NPR's Brian Naylor reports, Wolf will be replaced by the current head of FEMA. Senior DHS official tells NPR that Wolfe's resignation is effective at 11 P.m. Eastern, and that he'll be replaced by Pete Gainer of the current head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Wolf has served as acting DHS secretary for some 14 months and had said recently that he would stay on for the remainder of President Trump's term in office, even though Trump had pulled his nomination to become permanent secretary. His resignation comes is Washington is ramping up security in advance of President elect Biden's inauguration next week, he becomes the third Cabinet secretary to resign his post following last week's storming of the U. S Capitol by a mob of pro Trump supporters. Brian Naylor. NPR news after introducing an article of impeachment against President Trump on the House floor today, lawmakers will return tomorrow to vote on the measure calling for Vice President Mike Pence to remove Trump from office within 24 hours. If that doesn't occur, Democrats say impeachment proceedings against Trump for his role in last week's violent insurrection at the Capitol will begin mid week. One time impeachment manager in California Congressman Adam Schiff, telling NPR getting Trump out is imperative he presents a real and present danger. As we saw on Wednesday. We don't want another violent attack on the capital. We don't want other Uh, decisions by this president that threatened the peaceful transition of power and so within our power, we can impeach the president, and I believe we should Democrats in the house say, Well, it's far from clear where the Senate will go along. It's important to send a message by voting to impeach the president. Democratic lawmakers are making a new push to end the federal capital punishment as NPR's Juana Summers reports the party's putting focus on the issue is Democrats were here to take unified control of Congress as well as the White House. Proposal from Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, the incoming chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Massachusetts representative Iona Presley would end capital punishment at the federal level. It also would require the re sentencing of all federal inmates currently on death row. In an exclusive joint interview with NPR, Durban, noted one of the long standing criticism of capital punishment and the United States the history of racial disparities. If we truly believe that all large mentor and black lives matter, and brown lives matter, and the lives of poor people matter It is time for us to make sure that our system of justice reflects that. President elect Joe Biden has said that he wants to work with Congress to abolish the federal death penalty and would incentivize states to follow That example. Juana Summers. NPR news After last week's gains, stocks took head to start the new trading week The Dow was down 89 points. The NASDAQ fell 165 points today. This is NPR. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Julian will be the newly expanded list of groups eligible to receive the covert vaccine includes transit workers w. N. Y C. Stephen Nessen reports. They're essential workers. 127 transit workers died from Cove in 19 and thousands caught the virus. Now that they're eligible for the vaccine, the state will reserve a number of shots at the Javits Center just for Mt. Workers. It's expected open Wednesday and stay open 24 hours seven days a week. The M to also plans to offer bonus pay for hourly workers who get the two shot vaccination. And soon the agency plans to open its own vaccine locations. In a memo to transit workers, the chief safety officer warned demand is outstripping supply, and it may be several weeks before workers can receive their first shot. Legalized marijuana and sports, betting our governor Cuomo's priorities for the new year or among them in his annual state of the state address today, he also announced proposals to boost production of medical supplies. And for 1000 workers to help coordinate and expand Cove in 19 vaccinations, But Cuomo says more federal help is needed to help the state recover from the pandemic. New Yorkers were called on to flatten the curve created by federal failure. New Yorkers cannot now be asked to pay the financial bill for federal incompetence. New Yorkers already paid too high a cost. State faces of $15 billion deficit, The state's odds for a bailout are looking brighter. With Democrats taking control of both houses of Congress. The New York State Board of Regents has elected its first black chancellor, Lester Young Junior, was a teacher, principal and superintendent for New York City public schools before joining the Regents. He says his 10 year old focus on addressing race and economic disparities, disparities that have deepened because of the Corona virus. We must go beyond the rhetoric of our commitment to education. And used the crisis caused by this pandemic to rethink our systems of education. Board of Regions overseas Education policy. Currently 33 degrees in New York City, going down low of 27 overnight. Support for NPR comes from Cyber reason. A cyber security company dedicated to helping companies and cyber attacks on computers, mobile devices, servers and the cloud. Details at cyber reason dot com. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Democratic lawmakers are making one thing crystal clear after last week's insurrection at the U. S. Capitol. They want President Trump gone from office as quickly as possible, and they're moving rapidly to try to accomplish that The House is being called back to Washington and could vote on an article of impeachment this week. Some lawmakers, including Democratic Congressman David Sis, a lenient say the Senate should prepare to do the same. The Senate should come back immediately. Once we pass it, they should take it up immediately. This is urgent. This president represents a real danger to our democracy. But Joe Biden will be inaugurated in just nine days. And it's not clear whether lawmakers will have the support or the time they need to oust Trump. You talk about all of this. We're joined now by NPR's Claudia Gonzalez, who covers Congress and MPR's Aisha Roscoe, who covers the White House. Hated both of you. Hi there. Hello. All right, Claudia. In addition to an article of impeachment, congressional Democrats have also been calling on vice president Pence to lead the charge on removing the president through the 25th amendment. Where does that effort stand now? Congress said they would give tense 24 hours to respond to their calls, and we should note that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she and incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer Literally called him. They were on hold for about 20 minutes last week trying to get a response. Upset without any response from Pence at this point, House Democrats are moving forward with their plans to pass their own legislation. This is led by Maryland Democratic representative Jamie Raskin to create a commission that determines fitness off the president to hold office, so it establishes a panel that will be tied to the 25th amendment..

NPR President President Trump Senate Congress Joe Biden Vice President Trump New York City Mike Pence Brian Naylor Federal Emergency Management A Homeland Security Juana Summers Washington secretary
"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Racial justice activists watched an outrageous pro trump extremist stormed the capital. They're angry that the response stood in contrast and stark contrast to the aggressive tactics. They have endured MPR's Juana Summers reports after the death of a young black man in Washington last year. McKee a Green said that police fired tear gas it protesters as they demonstrated peacefully outside of a police station. Green said they were shot with rubber bullets and that protesters, adults and Children alike were tear gassed and pepper sprayed. Seems like that one have played out across the country. Law enforcement faced off with activists protest in police brutality and racial inequality. And so what many of those activists witnessed on Wednesday was enraging. Ah, largely white Group of pro Trump extremists stormed the capital in an unprecedented violent insurrection. Some war red trump hats. Others carried Confederate flags. It was really shocking to see the difference in how the white supremacist extremists were treated by MPD by Capitol police. And so I think we're seeing the most overt signs of white supremacy that has been existing in this country since its creation. Green is a core organizer for Black Lives matter, D C. It's really hard to be constantly told that black lives matter is some sort of super radical, violent extremist organization by the Republicans when you know that what we're fighting for his freedom and peace, and we want an end to violence and we get treated with nothing but violence. Bethlehem. Yoga is another local activist, a co founder of the Palm Collective We have been protesting all summer, We stepped off the sidewalk for one second on Capitol Hill, and we've been arrested. Some activists said that in some ways, what happened at the Capitol was a validation of their suspicions that white violent actors would not be met with any of the tactics that protesters Against police brutality have faced a phrase that kept coming up to describe the treatment of the pro trump mob was kid Gloves. President elect Joe Biden acknowledged the contrast in treatment on Thursday. No one can tell me. That it had been a group of black lives matter Protests in yesterday. Wouldn't have been, they would have been treated very, very differently. The mob of thugs that stormed the capital. You know, we all know that's true. And it is unacceptable. Totally unacceptable. The Capitol police chief resigned after pressure from congressional leaders but had defended the response, saying that the officers were overwhelmed by the thousands of people who descended on the Capitol. One officer died from injuries sustained Democratic Congressman Jamal Bowman of New York, said that when lawmakers talk about law and order it too often only applies to people of color. We don't mean it, you know for Why domestic terrorists committing treason in sedition and storming the Capitol. I mean yesterday was an act of war and we were not prepared. Bowman is calling for a commission to investigate the attack. Where law enforcement failed as well as any relationship between law enforcement and white extremists. Juana Summers, NPR news 7 49 is the time on KQED. We're going to go back to Joe McConnell for rundown of the freeways, the highways and transit show. It's been heavier this morning that it was any day last week or the week before that, especially but we will be. We have some crashes.

Capitol police Juana Summers Green Congressman Jamal Bowman MPR Joe McConnell Joe Biden Washington McKee Others Bethlehem KQED MPD NPR news President co founder New York
"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"juana summers" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Elsa Chang. This our adversaries of the USC Yesterday's events as I told you, so they think that this is really revealing the United States for what they have always claimed that we are, which is just as bad as they are and looking at the police response to insurrection on Capitol Hill through the lens of race, plus making sense of the struggles to vaccinate everyone in the country has staff are better trained and more people. Are educated about the vaccine. We fully expect that our vaccination efforts will be ramped up over the next few weeks, we'll have more after these news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President elect Joe Biden says the blame for the violence that engulfed the U. S Capitol yesterday belongs with President Trump Is NPR's Juana Summers. Reports Bind says the people involved are domestic terrorists. President elect Biden says that the people involved with the violent breach of the U. S Capital on Wednesday are a riotous mob and insurrectionists, he says. President Trump tried to use that mob to silence the voices of millions of people who voted in November. The past four years. We've had a president He's made his contempt for our democracy. Constitution. Rule of law Clear And everything he has done by also says he believes that if the extremists responsible for Wednesday's actions had been a group of black people, they would have been treated very differently, A reality that Biden says is unacceptable. Juana Summers. NPR news within 24 hours after thousands of supporters stormed the capital, President Trump is condemning the violence in a video he posted on social media, calling it a heinous attack. Over the president did not mention is called a supporters to march on the Capitol. Trump said he believes election laws need reforms to verify voter idea ineligibility. Trump did not repeat his baseless claims the election been stolen from him committed to a smooth transition of power. Meanwhile, the announcement comes sources now tell NPR police officer injured in yesterday's right has died. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao is now she's quitting NPR's Tamara Keith reports. It's the first Cabinet level departure from the Trump administration, the wake of yesterday's insurrection. Chow, who has been with the Trump administration since the beginning, announced her departure in a letter to staff that was also tweeted from her account. She wrote that yesterday's violent invasion of the capital by Trump supporters was entirely avoidable. And that quote it has deeply troubled me in a way that I simply cannot set aside. Chow, who was married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell added that she and the department will help her announce successor Pete Buddha judge with taking on the responsibility of running the department. Several White House aides have resigned since yesterday's outbreak of violence that followed a speech where Trump encourage supporters to go to the capital. Tambor, Keith NPR news pushing into Record territory today, here's NPR's Scott Horsley. All of the major stock indexes closed at record highs as investors looked past Wednesday's deadly rampage inside the U. S. Capitol. And a head to a new Biden administration. The president elect will have a razor thin majority in the Senate after Democrats clinch both run off elections in Georgia this week. That will give Biden a bit more maneuvering room. Expectations of more federal spending on pandemic relief also push stocks higher. The Dow rose two thirds of a percent. The S and P 500 index jumped 1.5%. This is NPR and from the David Bohnett Foundation newsroom a KCRW This is Larry. This is KCRW on Larry Parole. Here's what's happening at 504 wide swath of California Democrats are among those in Congress calling for President Trump's removal from office today. Most say that the insurrection of the capital By a mob of pro trump extremist was directly incited by the President. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is one of them. She says that if the Cabinet and Vice President Mike Pence don't move forward to exercise the 25th amendment, the Congress may be prepared to move forward with impeachment. Several members of the House Judiciary Committee wrote to the VP to invoke that law that includes local representatives like Ted Lieu of West L. A. He joined several lawmakers like Katie Porter of Irvine to sponsor articles of impeachment. Other real lawmakers calling for Trump's removal include representatives Judy Chu of Monterey Park, Tony Cartoonists of Pacoima, Santa Anna's Lou Correa and Mark to Kano of Riverside, among other Democrats. Was covered 19 continues to Rock, California The state has issued new recommendations today to accelerate vaccinations and is acting state health officer Dr Eric Upon, says the Golden State has a lofty goal to achieve we are working apart is to reach one million vaccinations in 10 days that requires the process to keep moving forward. Under the new recommendations, local health departments and providers should try to move on to the next distribution phase. Once efforts to reach the highest priority groups have been exhausted. And if any demand subsides, and if your doses they're gonna expire too again, The priority is to get vaccine into people and not waste vaccine. So those providers should immediately administer vaccines to everyone and all tiers of phase one A and then move on to tear one phase one B. That's while continuing to offer doses to those in higher priority groups. The new recommendations may be welcome news to help stop the spread of the virus. Today, the state announcing another nearly 600 new code 19 related deaths. That's one of the highest fatality counts fatality counts so far. Elon Musk, the outspoken tech entrepreneur behind Tesla and Hawthorne based Space X has now become the richest man in the world He's estimated to be worth now. $185 billion. Musk knocked Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of the top spot after Tesla's share price increased more than 5%. Today, it hit nearly $800 in mid day trading..

President Trump President Joe Biden NPR Trump Juana Summers Audie Cornish Chow Senate United States Cabinet Congress Elsa Chang California Elon Musk U. S. Capitol Vice President officer
Biden Says Rioters Who Stormed Capitol Were Domestic Terrorists

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Biden Says Rioters Who Stormed Capitol Were Domestic Terrorists

"From NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President elect Joe Biden says the blame for the violence that engulfed the U. S Capitol yesterday belongs with President Trump. NPR's Juana Summers. Reports, Biden says the people involved are domestic terrorists. President elect Biden says that the people involved with the violent breach of the U. S Capital on Wednesday are a riotous mob and insurrectionists, he says. President Trump tried to use that mob to silence the voices of millions of people who voted in November. The past four years. We've had a president He's made his contempt for our democracy. Constitution. The rule of law Clear Everything he has done. Biden also says he believes that if the extremists responsible for Wednesday's actions had been a group of black people, they would have been treated very differently. A reality that Biden says is unacceptable. Juana Summers NPR news

President Trump Npr News Jack Spear President Elect Joe Biden Juana Summers President Elect Biden U. Biden NPR
Bloomberg Campaign Staffers Speak Out, Alleging Broken Promises

Morning Edition

05:12 min | 3 years ago

Bloomberg Campaign Staffers Speak Out, Alleging Broken Promises

"Mike Bloomberg's presidential campaign was one of the most expensive in history he ended it after a dismal performance on super Tuesday one month ago today the former New York mayor still promised to keep his operation running through the general election and to invest more than a billion dollars to defeat president trump but then hundreds of Bloomberg field organizers were abruptly fired last month three of them are now sharing their stories they talked with NPR's Juana summers when Mike Bloomberg launched his presidential campaign he hired an enormous network of staff across the country showering them with salaries that far exceeded what other candidates for pain he also offered them something else a job through the general election no matter what they offered an incredible benefit package which is unheard of for a field staff offering eight thousand dollars a month for a regional wall dedication to kill our healthcare technology a laptop cell phone that's all just money he joined Bloomberg's campaign in Miami Dade County as a regional organizing director in December he said those guarantees unheard of on campaigns made a job with Bloomberg incredibly attractive part of his job was to interview potential staff and it's part of our hiring guidelines wise to utilize the line back employment it guaranteed greener member location it's not that promise was part of what convinced Matthew jeweler in Denver to quit the I. T. job he'd worked at for ten years I honestly don't know if I would have taken the job if it weren't for that specific guarantee because I knew I wanted to work in the general election Bloomberg dropped out of the way shortly after super Tuesday then there were two rounds of layoffs in the first round hundreds of staffers across the country were let go told that they behave through March thirty first they were encouraged to apply to work for Bloomberg's organization in battleground states then Bloomberg abandoned his plans to form a new independent entity and announced that he but instead give eighteen million dollars to the Democratic National Committee for the party's battleground states program Donna wood in Miami lost her job on March twentieth conference call and it was all right options script from HR and then the call just ended it was selected by you can hang up now in a statement Bloomberg's campaign manager Kevin cheeky told NPR the campaign reached out to every organizing staffer in six battleground states as well as others and ask them to consider working with the GMC she he said hundreds of former Bloomberg campaign staff have been contacted interim hiring pipeline to join the DNC's organizing efforts something he insists would not have happened without the campaign's massive donations to the party but staffers were let go without guarantees I asked him all Jeff wani about conversations he had with potential campaign staff where he promised continuous employment three November Mike borrowed my credibility and abused in that moment we want people like Mike to now and the people in the party who benefit from like philanthropy chin now that it is not OK to just get harder as though you know where mere tool Summerfield organizers for Bloomberg's campaign have filed potential class action lawsuits were these complaints have been detailed in court documents Donna would file the first breach of contract suit it's now grown from one plaintiff to roughly eighty I just know what I was promised and I'm a woman of my word and I would just think that other people would be the same if you repeatedly tell someone something and it sure than that they still have their jobs and ensure them that you'll be transitioning to an end of independent expenditure that that would happen another potential class action lawsuit was filed by former campaign workers in Georgia Utah and Washington while the former workers say Bloomberg's campaign promise them continued employment they acknowledge that they signed at will contracts meaning they could be let go at any time Matthew jeweler and Denver the point isn't the contract that we signed it says out well it could come from the station two thousand former staffers had with hiring people all then you have a guaranteed job November fifteenth on official interview documents that they use internal many staffers including jeweler expressed frustration that Bloomberg funded the most expensive primary campaign in history five hundred million dollars on our on loan in a four month period he keeps falling one percent of that and every single one of his fields far higher salary for the remainder of the year the campaign manager Kevin G. Keyes said that staff worked thirty nine days on average and were given several weeks of severance and health care through March the campaign has also established a fund to cover health care costs through the month of April something chic he says no other campaign has done Bloomberg's campaign hopes that in time many staffers will be hired by the

Mike Bloomberg
Elizabeth Warren announces she is ending her presidential campaign

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 3 years ago

Elizabeth Warren announces she is ending her presidential campaign

"Elizabeth Warren is ending her presidential campaign the Massachusetts senator was defined by a flurry of policy plans and to focus on the corrosive power of big money as NPR's Juana summers tells us warns exit makes this a two person race Warren's decision to drop out of the presidential race comes after a dismal showing in the fourteen states that voted on super Tuesday including a third place finish in our home state of Massachusetts with worn out the democratic field which began with a record number of female candidates has now become essentially a contest between two men in their seventies former vice president Joe Biden and Vermont senator Bernie Sanders her departure from the race clears the left lane of the Democratic Party for Sanders Warren has not said whether she will endorse a

Elizabeth Warren Senator NPR Juana Summers Massachusetts Joe Biden Vermont Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Sanders Warren Vice President
Charleston: Democrats seek to slow Sanders’s momentum in South Carolina debate

Forum

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Charleston: Democrats seek to slow Sanders’s momentum in South Carolina debate

"Another democratic presidential debate is just hours away in Charleston South Carolina where the next nominating contest takes place in just four days NPR's Juana summers reports the rivals are competing for the hearts and minds of a more diverse electorate black voters make up roughly two thirds of the democratic primary electorate in South Carolina recent polls show former vice president Joe Biden is the favorite to win the state but after Vermont senator Bernie Sanders won the popular vote in Iowa plus contests in New Hampshire in Nevada he is on the rise Biden is hoping that a win in South Carolina we'll give him momentum in the southern states with large black populations the vote on super Tuesday Sanderson Porter say that if the Vermont senator wins the primary here that his path to the nomination would be essentially

NPR Juana Summers Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Iowa New Hampshire Nevada South Carolina Sanderson Porter Senator Charleston South Carolina Vice President Vermont
Tech Support Needed In Iowa

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Tech Support Needed In Iowa

"There are still no official results from the Iowa caucuses is NPR's Juana summers reports state democratic officials say technical problems and reporting inconsistencies have slowed the count there has not yet been a winner named in the Iowa caucuses the results have been delayed which has created widespread confusion among the presidential campaigns little information has come out so far Iowa Democratic Party officials hold a call with campaigns as concerns were growing over the delays and several candidates took the stage at caucus night events across the state nine able to claim victory but many projecting strength the Iowa Democratic Party has released a statement saying that the problem was not the result of a hack or other intrusion in that the integrity of the results is paramount statement describes this as nothing more than a reporting issue and that it will take more time than planned to report the results

Iowa NPR Iowa Democratic Party Official Juana Summers
Democrats say they won't cross picket line over union conflict at debate host site

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Democrats say they won't cross picket line over union conflict at debate host site

"And more Democratic candidates or saying they will not cross the picket. They could line to participate in next week's presidential debate. The event is scheduled to take place at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. NPR's Juana Summers the report. Campus workers. There are locked in a labor dispute. Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders Joe Biden and Andrew. Yang are among the candidates who say they won't Cross a picket line in order to take the debate. Stage the leaders of unite here local eleven which represents more than one hundred fifty food service workers say. They've been picketing since November November unable to reach a resolution in negotiations for a collective bargaining agreement with the subcontractor. That employs them. They say they're planning to pick it on campus the day of the Democratic Debate Elizabeth. Warren was the first handed it to signal that she wouldn't cross the picket line saying on twitter about the Democratic National Committee should find a solution in that lives up to Democrats commitment to fight for working.

Biden defends health care stance

KQED Newsroom

06:10 min | 3 years ago

Biden defends health care stance

"Thursday's democratic debate kicked off the post summer political season with former vice president Joe Biden staking out centrist ground with his plan to add a public option to current health care law but many of his challengers made a forceful case for an overhaul of the nation's healthcare system. my plan for health care costs a lot of money it cost seven hundred twelve forty billion dollars it doesn't cost thirty trillion dollars three point four trillion a year how we gonna pay for how do we pay for it we pay for those at the very top the richest individuals of the biggest corporations are going to pay more and middle class families are going to pay less every study done shows with Medicare for all is the most cost effective approach to providing healthcare to every man woman and child in this country. joining me tonight Jake Sherman senior writer for politico and co author of playbook Enguerrand White House in foreign affairs reporter for The Washington Post Juana summers national political reporter for the Associated Press and coral holes chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times wanna you've been on the campaign trail covering the twenty twenty race you think about that debate on Thursday you have Medicare for all proponents versus those who want to tweak obamacare what is that tell us about the Democratic Party I think it tells us quite a lot one of the things I've noticed I've been out on the campaign trail with these democratic candidates and particularly talking democratic voters is when you ask about this issue of health care first of all it's the first thing that often comes up on people's minds but when you're asking about the details Medicare for all they say sure they support Medicare for all and I start asking about the details and it's they might not necessarily be full bore where senator is Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren are they might support an incremental measures yes I think this is really going to be the defining issue the Democratic Party for the next some odd months until we have the general and how we get through the general election but it's clear that voters are not necessarily fleeing to either extreme I think most people seem to be but from pulling an anecdotally there somewhere in the middle we saw vice president Biden really embrace the Obama legacy of obamacare of that health care program is that enough is that his position well I think you might be on that he went directly out the big question which is how in the world are is this thing going to be funded I and any went directly to Bernie Sanders on that and and I he made I I think of you know that was one one of the stronger points are stronger moments last night was in making that point he did it simply and and he asked the question that that immediately springs to mind once you get past you that sounds nice you know what having the government pay for it does not that sounds lovely what does that mean what what how much money are we actually talking about. and no I mean that combined with this is the thing that the signature of thing that that we did together it in the White House helps remind Democrats of who we is and and why he's up there again so I thought that was effective call your room in the Senate hallways day in day out with your notebook in hand you know senator Warren despite all the details and the and the different arguments that and just laid out she sees energy on the left she sees a spot no I think that is true that's who they're appealing to right now of course it's creates the great problem what do you do when you have to go back to the middle in the general election if she becomes the nominee every top democratic strategist that I talked to says the polling shows his Medicare for all plan is really bad for them in certain places and it's certainly certain places where they want to win Senate seats like Colorado Arizona Iowa they just don't see this working let's remember how hard obamacare what. they could not get a public option through Congress when they were in full control do you think some democratic Senate candidates next year senator warrants the nominee would break from gas our nominee I think they've already broken you hear them they're not going for Medicare for all I think this issue they just see it as a real detriment it's in the places that they have to win I didn't think her explanation of how this was going to be paid for was very good it's really hard to see of the elites gonna pay for but the people in the middle are gonna play last that's just not how it works and also you just the idea to a lot of Democrats and I talked to absorb so disrupting the private health insurance industry they just think it's bad they just want a mid term election basically running on let's fix obamacare let's take her with this and now we're gonna throw that out the window and run on this big new program and when you're talking to house Democrats Jake they're focused on prescription drug reform they're not talking about Medicare for a why is there a disconnect between the democratic presidential candidates and house Democrats because house Democrats as Carl just said one in districts in suburban districts across the country I just came back from North Carolina this week where a Democrat lost but in this in the suburbs of Charlotte a district that was drawn for for middle of the road Republicans the Democrat got thirteen percent more of thirty percentage points higher than the Republicans in the suburbs of Charlotte talking about fixing obamacare talking about the things in the middle of the party not these pie in the sky ideas that will never get past with eighty votes in the Senate I mean I think what's missing from these debates is someone saying okay thank you I know you want to confiscate guns I know you want to re write the health care law's. how are you going to do that what configuration of Washington do you see do you envision to re write the health care law's in such a drastic and meaningful way that's part of the argument vice president Biden has been making in the tensions of the ABC news debate however were personal as well as political former Obama housing secretary holy in Castro wondered if the seventy six year old former VP was forgetting his own remarks. would you support vice president Biden is it you require them to opt in and I would not require them to opt in they would automatically be enrolled they

Joe Biden Vice President Seven Hundred Twelve Forty Bil Thirty Trillion Dollars Seventy Six Year Thirteen Percent