8 Burst results for "Ju- Brown"

"ju  brown" Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

12:11 min | 4 months ago

"ju brown" Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

"News correspondent Katersky as each state has now taken at least a step toward easing restrictions meant to contain the corona virus. We're getting a clearer. Picture of communities have been most affected. It's lower income communities and communities of color particularly in New York City where twenty seven percent of people in those neighborhoods tested positive for coronavirus. Antibodies compared to nineteen percent of the general citywide population. The spread is continuing in those communities. And that's where the new cases are coming. Andrew Cuomo said today. The gap is even wider in certain parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn where more than forty percent of. The people have the antibodies. That's where the cases coming from. That's where the new hospitalizations coming from. That's going into the hospital system. That's where you're going to see the highest number of deaths. He said the state would begin. A public health education campaign in housing projects and distribute masks and hand sanitizer getting the P. p. e. into the community getting the hand sanitizer into the community explaining social distancing. And why that's so important and explain how this virus spreads its public health education effort to those who live in public housing. This is overdue. The density makes social distancing difficult and leaves tenants vulnerable this week. Abc News is offering special coverage of the disproportionate impact of Corona virus on Black Hispanic and indigenous Americans in a series called a nation divided. Ju- Brown joins US FROM JOURNEY FOR JUSTICE ALLIANCE IN CHICAGO. Why is this virus hitting communities of color so hard you know Cova crisis just unveils? Horrible practice that we've experienced really for decades in this country which has been the sabotage of our basic quality of life institutions food production delivery systems health care education housing economic development So those things that many Americans take for granted. We often have to fight and scratch for so. This crisis really exposes our country's lack of willingness to address these issues. How does that play where you are in Chicago? Going to pandemic really a hit. We started seek death with around the country is Chicago today. Early thirty percent of the population we would seventy percent of the deaths and while this is happening Many of our hospitals were on the brink of closing such as Mercy Hospital. We've already lost. Michael Reese Hospital in virtually every other hospital in the black community has been starved to the point of really minimum capacity but at me when the pandemic hit many of our people who have pre existing conditions. We go to the hospital with sent back home right. I HAVE FAMILY FAMILY MEMBER. Who would sit back home from the Emergency Room? Three times and died. What's causing these gaps and disparities? Will you know This African proverb that says the truth. The simple complicated is a lot and I think at some point. We have to realize that America has never dealt with her ugly which is a baseless hatred for Black Brown indigenous families. It's to tional. Racism is the reason institutional. Racism is at play so people going to say that black people get Kobe because we are not listening right while ignoring a white families that are storming the state capital in Michigan or doing protest all over the country. And they're not social distancing we are getting covert because we don't have health we are getting covert because we're going to the high school in sending us home and so I think at the federal level and at the local level what we must have from people is the first thing humility understanding that you not better than at mother who's a high school graduate who works at Walmart that that mother is working just as hard as you to make the future for her baby. Do you think the clamor for reopening would be different if it weren't communities of color that are now the source of the most new cove infections. I definitely believe that's that's a major part of it at once. People realize that is Black Brown indigenous folks. That are getting sick. They're getting sick. The most sensitive importance has gone down a great deal. We had a very critical moment. Where we see America's response to life or death leads has not changed so institutionalized level loveless nece is alive and well and we but we have a moment an opportunity to change it t- to Brown of journey for Justice Alliance in Chicago here in New York. The Transit Authority is testing ultraviolet. Light to disinfect. Subways buses and commuter trains. It comes after Dr David Brenner. At Columbia University confirmed UV. Light does kill the corona virus so this may have application beyond public transportation. Dr Brenner is with us now. Known for quite a while. Ultraviolet light is a natural disinfectant. How's it applying to this global pandemic? You're absolutely right and it's been known since the eighteen ninety s that. Uv light is good at killing microbes bacteria and viruses both over the years. It's been used quite a lot and it's been used for example in Disinfecting surgical operating theatres overnight. The background to the use of conventional Jim Asylum. Uv light is that it's a potential health hazard so in unoccupied space. You can't directly. Shine it on On people because it has potential issues for the skin potential issues for the I one of the ways round that is is is to do the The decontamination where people around and that for example is what they are doing of the MTA. Another approach is one that we're taking is to look at a different type of ultraviolet light this called fire. Uv light and fire VC. Light is just as effective kidding. bacteria and viruses but doesn't share the health hazards says with Conventional Jeremy Seidel Unite. So that could then apply to a movie theater. A Broadway theatre peed it on and suddenly the room is virus free. Well yes the idea is. You would apply to situations Web PEOPLE ARE OCCUPYING SPACES. And of course an infinite number of those restaurants offices subways. It's not quite the way you described. It's not gonNA turn it on and immediately all the viruses disappeared. The picture we have at least is that In in an occupied room with a group of People. Shall we say that we start with no virus in that room? The people in that room and people stop coughing and sneezing and and and even talking the amount of virus potentially in that room is steadily. Go into Increase and so there's going to be an ambient level of virus in that room That's really what we want to To to to do battle with the ambient level of Virus in an unoccupied space bitter restaurant or an office that were trying to lower as much as we possibly can. How IS THE TECHNOLOGY? Harnessed the lamps. The fire you'd see lamps January going to on continuously at at a at a low level the whole time and essentially what it's doing is preventing that virus from from dividing and multiplying and which is of course the big issue. It feels like a game changer. Well we hope it is. I mean there. There are not many technologies or techniques out there for preventing the transmission of virus on one person to another in in a in a public setting most of most of the research that I know that's going on and for example is is in vaccination which is of course Trying to prevent the body from responding to the virus once once. It's inside them. What we're trying to do is to kill the virus before it gets inside them. David Brenner at Columbia University. Irving Medical Center FEMA said social distancing measures established during the coronavirus pandemic have driven down childhood vaccination rates in Connecticut the CDC noted a similar trend in Michigan where coverage with all recommended vaccines declined. Pediatric vaccination rates have fallen to New York City. Where there was a forty two percent drop children two years or younger and a ninety one percent drop in children to immunizations require in person visits to a doctor so the belief is this is not a trend toward anti vaccination but rather parents skipping routine appointments out of fear they or their kids will contract covid nineteen office the CDC said there will have to be some accommodation so kids. Don't get sick from other diseases in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. We also heard today about the effectiveness of wearing masks. Governor Cuomo noted frontline workers nurses doctors transit workers. Police officers all wear masks and all have a lower infection rate than the general public. Cuomo said those surgical masks work. I'm Aaron Katersky. Now over to amy robot. Thanks Erin with me. Now is Dr Jen. We're now hearing about these sailors right. Who are testing positive for covid nineteen after reportedly recovering from covid nineteen. So what do we know about recovery and then potentially reinfection and it's not just the sailors. Amy There's new data just out of the Korean. Cdc On the same topic so let's take a look at what we know right now. First of all remember when you talk about the testing there is no such thing as any diagnostic test. That is one hundred percent perfect all the time. The nasal swab which is that that we use to diagnose active infection can have both false positives and false negatives and these results can be affected by a number of factors first of all the method of how the test is actually done when it's done in the course of illness whether it's done too soon or too late it can be contaminated which can lead to a false positive and then the storage time. The time that elapsed from when the culture is done to win. It's actually process all of that can affect the results all right so when someone test positive and then they recover and then test positive again. What could cause that swell so there are a couple of leading theories right now number one if you if you really consider this course when they are tested the middle time and they get a negative here the theories first of all. Is there such a thing as a false negative which of course and we've said can be the case because they're shedding virus and the test positive again down? The road doesn't necessarily mean that they're contagious or infectious. That's just out of the the Korean. Cdc Data and it's really unlikely that someone can be reinfected with the same strain. We think that's just a basic premise of medicine. All right what are the unknowns? At this point we'll right now. We don't know how long someone who has been infected and positive. Can shed the virus this Korean. Cdc data suggests anywhere from eight to eighty two days. Amy after the initially have symptoms. We don't think that someone who sheds virus any longer is infectious but still we need a lot more study on that and we also don't know if someone who's completely recovered can then be reinfected with another strain again. We think this is unlikely but right now there are multiple strains exactly right now. We still need to know for sure. Okay Dr. Jen will be back later in. The show will now with all fifty states partially open. It is up to those governors to determine the best path forward in the wake of Covid nineteen and here to discuss his strategy to get the state of Mississippi out of this health and economic crisis is governor Tate Reeves Governor Reeves. Thanks for being with us and I know in the past few weeks. You have allowed some businesses to reopen with certain restrictions restaurants gyms barbershops.

CHICAGO Governor Cuomo Dr David Brenner CDC New York City Amy There Ju- Brown America Dr. Jen Columbia University Justice Alliance Michigan Brooklyn Michael Reese Hospital Abc News Mercy Hospital
Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

04:42 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

"As each state has now taken at least a step toward easing restrictions meant to contain the corona virus. We're getting a clearer. Picture of communities have been most affected. It's lower income communities and communities of color particularly in New York City where twenty seven percent of people in those neighborhoods tested positive for coronavirus. Antibodies compared to nineteen percent of the general citywide population. The spread is continuing in those communities. And that's where the new cases are coming. Andrew Cuomo said today. The gap is even wider in certain parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn where more than forty percent of. The people have the antibodies. That's where the cases coming from. That's where the new hospitalizations coming from. That's going into the hospital system. That's where you're going to see the highest number of deaths. He said the state would begin. A public health education campaign in housing projects and distribute masks and hand sanitizer getting the P. p. e. into the community getting the hand sanitizer into the community explaining social distancing. And why that's so important and explain how this virus spreads its public health education effort to those who live in public housing. This is overdue. The density makes social distancing difficult and leaves tenants vulnerable this week. Abc News is offering special coverage of the disproportionate impact of Corona virus on Black Hispanic and indigenous Americans in a series called a nation divided. Ju- Brown joins US FROM JOURNEY FOR JUSTICE ALLIANCE IN CHICAGO. Why is this virus hitting communities of color so hard you know Cova crisis just unveils? Horrible practice that we've experienced really for decades in this country which has been the sabotage of our basic quality of life institutions food production delivery systems health care education housing economic development So those things that many Americans take for granted. We often have to fight and scratch for so. This crisis really exposes our country's lack of willingness to address these issues. How does that play where you are in Chicago? Going to pandemic really a hit. We started seek death with around the country is Chicago today. Early thirty percent of the population we would seventy percent of the deaths and while this is happening Many of our hospitals were on the brink of closing such as Mercy Hospital. We've already lost. Michael Reese Hospital in virtually every other hospital in the black community has been starved to the point of really minimum capacity but at me when the pandemic hit many of our people who have pre existing conditions. We go to the hospital with sent back home right. I HAVE FAMILY FAMILY MEMBER. Who would sit back home from the Emergency Room? Three times and died. What's causing these gaps and disparities? Will you know This African proverb that says the truth. The simple complicated is a lot and I think at some point. We have to realize that America has never dealt with her ugly which is a baseless hatred for Black Brown indigenous families. It's to tional. Racism is the reason institutional. Racism is at play so people going to say that black people get Kobe because we are not listening right while ignoring a white families that are storming the state capital in Michigan or doing protest all over the country. And they're not social distancing we are getting covert because we don't have health we are getting covert because we're going to the high school in sending us home and so I think at the federal level and at the local level what we must have from people is the first thing humility understanding that you not better than at mother who's a high school graduate who works at Walmart that that mother is working just as hard as you to make the future for her baby. Do you think the clamor for reopening would be different if it weren't communities of color that are now the source of the most new cove infections. I definitely believe that's that's a major part of it at once. People realize that is Black Brown indigenous folks. That are getting sick. They're getting sick. The most sensitive importance has gone down a great deal. We had a very critical moment. Where we see America's response to life or death leads has not changed so institutionalized level loveless nece is alive and well and we but we have a moment an opportunity to change it t- to Brown of journey for Justice Alliance in

Michael Reese Hospital Chicago Ju- Brown Justice Alliance America New York City Andrew Cuomo Mercy Hospital Abc News Brooklyn Cova Walmart Kobe P. P. Michigan
"ju  brown" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

14:36 min | 5 months ago

"ju brown" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Facilities reducing class sizes and protecting the arts and all kinds of good things that schools should be doing. And I've been forced to force not to do for instance one out of every four schools in the country doesn't have a full time school nurse. We're in the midst of a massive national crisis and there should be a school nurse and every school every day not once a week or never so. We've we've gotten rid of a lot of good things like the arts and even just play Because because you have to be tested all the time and the test always showed the same result. Rich kids get high scores. Poor kids get low scores. And so how does like the value added measure of a of the quality of teacher? How does that work? And why is that Also essentially a minutes. It's sort of Voodoo in a way. But wh why why explain this for that I showed in. The book is that During the Obama Administration Under the program call race to the The administration tangled five billion dollars in economic recovery. Money and school states were told if you WANNA be able to compete. You have to change your laws and one of the things you have to agree to do is to evaluate your teachers based on whether their students get higher test scores every year and so forty. Five states changed their laws to evaluate teachers by test scores. And they're still doing it although it has been tried now for Since twenty eleven and some since twenty twelve we've had at least eight years of experience and we have seen absolutely no positive effect although we have created an artificial are genuine teacher shortage By firing people who should not have been fired and by using a measure that is inherently flawed because the most important determinant of Student Test. Scores are out of school factors. Not Teachers Teachers very important but they are not the primary determinant teachers affect anywhere from ten to fourteen percent. Ten to fifteen percent of whether it's scores go up or down but the other eighty five percent is determined by mostly by out of school factors meaning whether they live in home the richest their education and whether they have access to nutrition and health care and so forth those things matter more than the teacher and and and I would assume that that to the extent that there is a. We've seen any type of bump or difference between teachers in terms of the the the grades that ends up being a function of teachers on day. One say you know? Let's set aside the curriculum itself secondary or I should say that the curriculum is. We're going to do well on the test. And and and losing sight of the any other value in what. They're teaching kids. Well the first thing to know. Is it the test are useless for the purpose of there being used? They're being used a whole students and teachers accountable. And so the kids take the test in the spring and then frankly I think under the current corona virus circumstances Osprey all of this spring testing should be cancelled. Because the kids aren't even going to be in school and in many places But the kids take the test in the spring. Typically the results come in in August or September when the kids have a different teacher and then the new teacher can look at the score and see whether the child is ranked higher ranked low but they get no diagnostic information. This is like going to a doctor and saying doctor. I'm having a problem. And he's he says I'll get back to you in six months. And then he returns six months later to tell you that you rank higher or lower than people with the same symptoms but has treatment because he doesn't know what the actual issues are. That's the nature of standardized testing. Today is utterly completely meaningless useless and is being used to stigmatize children to tell them that they fail and also to evaluate teachers and determine whether they get a bonus or whether they get fired So let's talk about what when did when did a significant movement in response to like as we see You know a no child left behind and then race to the top. We're seeing sort of like the The ascendance of this so-called reform. When did we start to see like organize? Pushback talk to us a little bit about the. I guess the David's here. Well I give many examples and my book of people and organizations that have fought back Take Bill Gates. Bill Gates is common core for instance and I quote. Bill Gates is common core because he paid for every part of it he paid for his Writing Development. Its evaluation its dissemination. It was made part of the requirement and the Obama Administration's race to the top. The states had to adopt the common core or they call them college and career ready standards. And that's been a total failure. They've been rejected by many states after having used them But most states are still using something like the common core and so this has been going on now. Gosh since passage of no child left behind and there have been teachers who've objected But you know in many cases The opposition was bought off by the Gates Foundation. If you wanted to get a grant from him you had to be on board But I get a lot of stories of students like this. Providence Student Union which fought having a graduation requirement based on standardized testing of the teachers at Garfield High School in Seattle who boycotted a standardized test. Because they knew that it was useless of civil rights organizer in Chicago Ju- Brown who prevented rahm Emanuel from closing the last open enrollment high school and the heart of the black community in Chicago And he did this not because he had any money but because he and eleven other people. His Allies Satin Lawn chairs on the at the school. It was going to be closed and said we're on hunger strike and on the thirty four. Th Day of the Hunger Strike Mayor Rahm Emanuel gave in and instead of closing the school he invested fifteen million dollars and renovated it. And it's open now But there have been stories like this all over the country of parents of educators of teachers students of citizens who said we will not do this In Massachusetts in twenty sixteen there was a huge usually important referendum on the ballot about whether to lift the charter school cap and have more charter schools across the state and when the waltons started pouring millions in In saying this is for black and Brown children which is what they always claim This is. We'll help to save them. The early polling showed that it would pass overwhelmingly But by the time the election came around every local school committee in the State had rejected it And the teachers unions were very active against it and the parents were and you just go on with major politicians. Speaking and people got together and organized and they had a theme. The theme was every dollar. That goes to a charter. School will be taken away from your local public school which is true and people said but we like our public schools. We're not gonNA vote to defend them and so when the voucher Vote came around not Thatcher about the charter vote. Came came around and November Twenty Sixteen The effort to lift the cap on charters and Massachusetts was decisively defeated and I have to say the same thing about vouchers. Whenever vouchers have been put on the ballot there overwhelmingly defeated and yet we have half the states in this country having enacted that's your legislation despite popular opposition. Look let's talk about that. I interviewed a he was his name. Escapes me now But he had a book yet embedded himself Success Academy for a year. And yes. Roy Robert Can't think of his last name. But yes no you mean and you know we. It was a perfectly civil conversation and and you know a he. At least Was willing to concede that the way that Success Academy finds its success is that they basically cherry-picked parents right. I mean they create proper time disco kid and and that the what they do is they find parents who are able to either have like. I don't know you have a relative or they have the the money or the resources the social capital whatever. It is to be able to meet the standards. And they're necessarily you know being able to provide for their kids and so the kids do Better in in these specific schools and and you know we talked about. This is draining resources from the public sector schools and it's a limited number of kids. It's not necessarily scalable. And his argument was look. We allow rich people to opt out by paying for you know going into a private school. This is like a version of that for low income people and I mean what is your response to that that that that argument well my response to that is that when you have a school system. That's enrolling eighty five or ninety percent of the kids and you take resources away Too so that a few a handful of children can go shorter like even my school. It doesn't make sense because the regular public schools as I've discovered in my book and the research for our overwhelmingly underfunded and we're expanding we can't afford to have two separate school systems. One was cherry picks the parents the problem with Success Academy and Is that it presents itself as a model for the public schools if all the public schools did what they did They they would be successful. Success Academy gets very high test scores but success academy is not for all kids the kids who get kicked out of Success Academy. You have to have someplace to go. Guess where they go. They go to the public schools and so Robert is willing to Sacrifice the majority because there'll be a few kids who will get this benefit The First Class in Success Academy has seventy eight children. Twelve years later there were sixteen of them left to graduate so even those who are admitted Most of them didn't survive. And I would say that. That's not a place to invest if we want to have a decent society if you WANNA have one school like that and and it should be all these billionaires who should support it. Why don't they just support private school and say we're going to open a private school? It's going to very high standards and most of the kids won't survive But we won't hold it up as a model for the public schools. Because it's not a model and I've talked to Success Academy contributors who give big money and they say they don't care how many kids drop out they only they only care that those few survive so this is not a model and it's unfortunate that so many politicians think that charter schools are a panacea win. In fact They closed with great regularity A report that my organization than it worked for public education did a show that about forty percent of the federal most charter schools. Get some federal money about forty percent of the ones that were launched with federal funding. I have closed Are Either never opened. The planners took took the federal money and never opened. The school are without a year or two. They were closed so they have a very very high failure rate and in some states. They're more charter. Schools closing than there are charter schools opening. So it's it's like any kind of free market thing if you open a restaurant and say this is what all restaurants should be like. That's okay it's a private thing. If you've got a business nobody cares but a public school should be a permanent part of every community. Every community should have good public schools and by taking resources away from public schools. To open up some boutique charters. You're undermining the education. The institution that educates all children and it's open to everybody. Why why am I? I know that there are some decent charters around the country. I think that I mean my personal feeling is that there's some merit that perhaps you could use them as laboratory schools. But you don't need these many and you gotta make that. The the experiments are scalable and as far as I can tell him. Success Academy is simply not scalable and But why are hedge funders? So a NAM it's maybe I maybe it's just my perception but it feels like hedge. Funders in particular are really enamored with charter scanning fully. And what you're absolutely right and I think it was not this one of my other books. I mentioned the story that Andrew Cuomo. I ran for governor He was trying to raise money on Wall Street and he was told. You cannot raise any money from Wall Street unless you support charter schools. And He. He was told to go to group called Democrats for education reform which is mad about charter. Schools and every member of their board is a hedge fund manager and they have deployed their their Money into political campaigns like like a lot of billionaires Michael Bloomberg's major supporter of Charters As is Bill Gates and Betsy Devos family. The Walton family has takes credit for opening one out of every four charter schools in the country. Why do all these people have charter schools? Well some of them love it because they love the free market and they don't believe the government can do anything right And so they they. The market will solve all the problems. And the reality is and I think we're experiencing it right now. The market goes up in the market goes down. The market has winters. The market has losers..

Success Academy Bill Gates Obama Administration Garfield High School Roy Robert Massachusetts Gates Foundation Rahm Emanuel Andrew Cuomo Chicago David Seattle Michael Bloomberg Thatcher fund manager Providence Student Union
"ju  brown" Discussed on Mother of All Shows

Mother of All Shows

05:32 min | 10 months ago

"ju brown" Discussed on Mother of All Shows

"Don't have this to have your child play with biodynamic. Plato what have you just want to go public. What is the a parrot? Well you're in luck because I speak to an expert in the field of Education Dr Dietrich Jones. She has worked for fifteen years in the early childhood field he manages manages and advocates for high quality cultural diverse an equitable private state and federal programs. She knows her stuff. But I I jump into the topic with Rebecca Johnson and Amanda Diaper. They bribe me with wine to get to the top of the panel waiting lists and they each paid two years wages to get in. Do you remember what you learned at all in pre school like finger painting drawing chickens anything like performance the true memories memories I have are the the twins. The actual twins these Ju- Brown haired girls that had the most beautiful long curly pigtails. Oh my God and then one time I'm performing but that's it. It's so crazy because we put so much into where we're going to send her child for. Preschool appear advance. When I I miss my mom you remember the twins we put in Los Angeles people put their children on weightless when they're still in Utero? Did you guys do that. No okay okay. That's what we were friends no-no because the schools aren't the same as like small town in terms of of you can't you can't be like can I go to school next week Most schools are booked in advanced. So I did a very fancy restaurant you know. What in March for September he so? He started preschool when he was three. And I went in March and the reason I did. The Bat is 'cause preschool was way cheaper than a nanny and did you. Send Your Vivian to preschool. Yes she started at two and a half almost almost three. I guess it was probably a months before she went that eye toward a bunch of preschools just to get an idea and Because everyone was so stressed about it I was like okay. I'm going to tour a bunch and just see what the hype is so. I went to one of those. The Hope School wins one of those like thirty thousand dollars a year pre owned. Yeah guess what is it like. Tell me because I was like no anything about this. We'll see that was easy. Land The guy that I was like. Oh my God I was like. We're obviously never going to do that. but I was just like I want to know what I missing out. I'm like what L. Like Harvard. Bound thing they're gonNa have her doing that. We're not going to be able to afford to do an Alpine away over right and so went and beautiful place You know all natural wood campus. Well no it was. It was like a like a nice house a nice yard but everything was like everything was like fancy and lovely fancy fancy fancy. No Harry Potter was writing room. You don't have Fritz crackles. The thing was then they were like all we have for the children to play with. Are these gray blocks. Because I'm I'm got joking. Not because it's a real thing thirty thousand dollars a year and they were like we have gray blocks because we went to we don't want to inhibit the children's imagination nations so it's and it's all child lead play lead. which does the school that she's at? Now I'm very fond of this idea of all blocks of Pale. Oh Pink it was just like nothing I was just like really play with gray blocks and sticks and they run around and do whatever they want and you want to charge me Eh. Thirty thousand dollars. It's not like she's GonNa come out. Doing advanced. Chemistry were even some weird dystopia future with institutionalized realized play. They're ready for the future. When we have nothing toward a co op on the other side? That had like chicken which meal inside a co-op for those who don't know is like you share the responsibility of taking care of the preschool. You but there's a teacher and then it's often much much it's cheaper yet right so you can go for like three hundred a month. which here would be a quarter of the price of a reasonable three school instead of thirty thousand dollars? which is I think how much my college tuition call time right and then I realize I realize the cop was going to be like a part time job and I was like I can't can't do when our working parents right? It's like you're either going to you either. Have to pay with your time or pay with your dollars. We'll in preschool is also like there's a difference between preschool which is just like fun for the kid education or for me. It was dake. I needed a place that had daycare hours. So it's like replacing daycare replacing a nanny that also also is not a bad environment for the kids to be in nine hours a day right because really when we're talking about preschool. I think for a lot of parents. It's not like I'm GONNA get. My kids started with education. It's not that it's you need affordable childcare and education at the more strict educational curriculum. They have is actually good for kids that age so like a lot of what is now public preschools. A lot of them are more like sit down. Start with your homework. Start with your letters is not not actually as helpful for kids at this age like they need to play and then unfortunately you have to.

Hope School Vivian Dr Dietrich Jones Amanda Diaper Plato Rebecca Johnson Los Angeles Ju- Brown Utero Alpine Harry Potter Harvard Fritz Pale
"ju  brown" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"ju brown" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

"I mean, he is the workhorse is a workhorse. He was dominant. Yeah. Not not only is he dominant and a workhorse. But finally, we've talked about this through the year got involved in the passing game. And that's the thing where if we've always said if he were to be used in the past game, he should be pretty much the number one running back run football because he has the ability. He's got the chops for he had it coming out of college. And he showed that this year. But strangely this season despite him leading the league in rushing yardage his rushing touchdowns which of always been there. We're down this year. And I don't expect them to stay down. Now with his talent his right style of running. You didn't bring up the stat line Jay, but it's seventy seven receptions for five hundred sixty seven yards and three touchdowns us targets, and he made really need that because his league-leading total. Kyle looked back all the way to two thousand three hundred and four rushing attempts by the league leader, that's the lowest total since that date. So you're seeing a decline of you know, the the three fifty runner for three right? Running a huge of tick in the passing game for running backs. But Zeke Elliott since being in the league has averaged the most yards per game at the position. So he didn't play a full season rookie or sophomore year. But in those games, he averaged the most rushing yards. Like we said he led the league in in overall rushing this past year. But those rushing touchdowns Jason was talking about his rookie year. Fifteen touchdowns sophomore year. Seven touchdown seven rushing touchdowns in ten games in this season in fifteen games. Six rushing touchdowns. He just he got hit with the touchdown variance. I expect that to bounce back. The biggest the big questions just is he gonna hit at least sixty receptions next year. Oh certain. And I think that he will. He he hangs of. Good of a chance to be number one, which makes him elite with with the possibility of being a number one running back when we talk about the truth of how did the season play out awesome. He had seventy seven receptions ninety five targets. Those are great numbers. But look at what happened when the bye week came in week eight and how they used him after that versus before him. The we saw the Dallas offense chain. They get Cooper that. Right. Then those weeknight. Yeah. So when they got Cooper and the offense change a little bit that pays from. And that's that's the whole second half of the season. He was on pace for a hundred and four receptions, not just targets, but actually eleven fewer touchdowns on the ground. Then Todd Gurley did. Yeah, that's a variance that should change. He has as good a chance of being number one. Like if you have to handicap like if Vegas was handicapping number one fantasy Russia next year outside of girly. I'd put them at Zeke. I would put Zeke too. Yeah. Let's talk about a more interesting debate. Here we all know, zeke's great. You should draft him. Yeah. James Connor and number six consistency rank of eight the reason I I'm so excited to talk about. So scared to talk about James Connor who by the way, zero bus games when he was starting seventy seven percent good thirty eight percent, great. You can't argue with that. He was a great surprise for fantasy teams on more fantasy rosters than just about. Anybody? My my concern with James Connor is the hypothetical question of this. If you put James Connor on the Tennessee titans K put them on there a different roster. I dunno. Let's say one without Antonio Brown. What is he is? He a top six top seven top eight runner on that roster and on Dallas without Zeke. And that's my point is is like I don't want to discount what he did in this situation ju ju Brown big been that line that team that defense, but I don't want to over emphasize this year and overdraft him. I don't he's not in my top ten which I know is for both of you guys..

Zeke Elliott James Connor Jason Cooper Dallas Antonio Brown football Todd Gurley Jay Tennessee Kyle Russia Vegas five hundred sixty seven yards seventy seven percent thirty eight percent zero bus
"ju  brown" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

GSMC Football Podcast

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"ju brown" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

"Get one year of him and then we'll see i guess hopefully i mean whether i've talked about it a lot with lincoln riley is going to have to take that into account maybe calling whether they're going to have less touches when he's going to have less keepers and tell them to throw the ball more and get rid of the ball out of your hands tackles much i don't know how they're going to i don't know how they're going to do that but i mean this is the guy who's probably wanted to play quarterback for go home for a long time he's been transferred there from saying them and he made a promise and he wants to keep his promise to the two coaches into the school so i mean it's pretty honorable and he's got a good little running back behind him and rodney anderson so why wouldn't you stay healthy buddy and get to the as and play some baseball because he'll make some money there so number one number two west virginia love what virginia i'm excited to watch them honestly dinner hogan's going to be a guy who's going to create choices for world grier to air the all out get some points record the points on the board obviously got play defense too but this is a team that is going to be fun to watch they're gonna be high flying high octane with a good quarterback will greer look out number three tcu as they get they have their defense is actually going to be the most i think the most interesting dynamic of this big twelve that's kinda how you win in the big twelve is new can actually be the team that plays defense oklahoma this last year they actually played defense there's not many teams in this conference the play defense and tcu can be a team plays the best defense they could burn off some wins really easily because they can source points this is team has been in some serious shoot outs and there relate lately especially so look out for defensive ed's then bag bengo sorry it's actually ben benigo bene goo and then defensive tackle rosa blacklock so two guys who are going to be interesting obviously they're going to have to completely overhaul that offense i mean hill's gone the figure out with sean robinson the attested sophomore quarterback there tcu four is texas actually texas gonna interesting they got a good one is in the outside so having to figure out their quarterback etlinger are semi longer and chaim she'll those are going to be two guys as they going to be we don't know who's gonna stand out under center who's going to be the guy yet we'll leave it up to tom herman but i mean this is year two for him it's kind of almost been kind of revolving door down there in texas where it's like okay one year two years charlie strong there yet okay we'll get new guy in there so we'll figure that out as it goes for four coach herman i mean i think is a better thing when texas when texas is good that red river rivalry fast is texas oklahoma we want something competitive i mean it hasn't really been that competitive oklahoma's been really good and texas hasn't been as high so hopefully we can get another installment of good battle number five oklahoma state have to obviously get replace mason rudolph but they have some very very talented very talented players to test for that so there the figure that out the first quarterback force quarterback derby competition they're calling it there and oklahoma state but they got a walk on guy as he has teller corneas has been very good in spring football take first team reps also have to hold off the credit transfer ju brown from hawaii all freshman spencer standard sanders who top out of texas high school out of the school system so three guys there and mike une hill have to make a decision about a month to do it i'm always proponent of getting the word out earlier lisa trying to tell somebody that they are going to be like you do this and you're going to get the job instill confidence early into your young player so oklahoma state number number five sixes kansas state bill schneider still still not as hardy on who's going to start for him scour thompson in alex dalton there at kansas state so again same kind of thing that situation where i like tell them early or at least give some somebody somewhere inkling where they you have their confident you have confidence in them.

lincoln riley one year two years
"ju  brown" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"ju brown" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"He just brush it off or do you think okay i'm gonna make an adjustment from this point you know the first thing and that's of the corners for to the father immediately not not jay said that you got caught why did you get and he became is you got time you made a mistake and that's part of being a champion vincent part there's the technical we saw that on display you chuckle but this is the part that you don't give up on yourself when the moment comes difficult incomes you find a way look fighting in webster's dictionary you know what it is over common so it becomes time to be a fighter so there's a time to fight leg of fighter there's a time to behave like a fighter during that time is when you've been robbed the old mike tyson thing everybody has a plan for your punched in the face yeah but the good ones they overcome the good ones they find the way they get up they know how to behave like a fighter behave like a champion back to the nba cleveland's george hill excuse from practice saturday and for good reason he received his decree from up you i as the cavaliers teammates got him one last workout prior to today's game one against the seas hill took part and graduation ceremonies at the school in indianapolis he was one of two students speakers to address the new graduates the celtics hoping they can graduate from lebron ag's since game six of the east finals in two thousand twelve when lbj scored forty five teams have won the last six playoff games in boston brad stevens on getting his players ready for the moment against lbj you guys understand young healthy the preaching that's not i mean i think that that's just matter of who danny has prioritize drafting signing and created trading four guys thirteen guys that are tough that'll that'll work committed to get better every day you know and i think that that helps when obviously that helps any team but it helps when you lose guys because it's you know they really do have a great and talented long in annexed guy and the expectation is that personal play well for i ju browns going up against the and joel had it for care the celtics team with growing anytime you play in the playoffs against great players but everybody's a.

webster indianapolis celtics lebron ag lbj jay mike tyson nba george hill cavaliers boston brad stevens danny joel
"ju  brown" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"ju brown" Discussed on WJR 760

"Plane when it happened yet grudge guy i said i didn't believe them who's at six a santa claus yes sir you'll think i'm too old to change my mind you're never too old mr grudge will then i but i believe in santa claus and columbus about cleveland cincinnati and easter bunny here them too and toledo i i still i made up my mind yet about though look grudge up on this guy he's coming back for the second load that is the only guy no can make everybody happy in one night he must have the biggest heart in the world is about the size of a well now a special education to servicemen and women all over the world a safe and that you will stay that way until we get you home were you belong another christmas day will come and go away mom got so far to go when alone do muoi the on the two goal haul maybe surrounded by strangers and christmas lives shooting feels so long along with gore god amish no sza the blanca snow us going all my friends and family no no bloodbath then com am too soon kohl gordon them to say the another christmas day he will come and go away and i will leave you know more go home god to go let me go uh oh jeff ju brown where you go now so far away more than me in me on though that on me gene ann dowd navient back to you on needs huge come big bag buying craves soon hoon added chris drum ball away i won't leave you alone go i'm vassell added by vis cold is sadly i'm gonna go van on this n no emme oh man mound man down komen back maigov oh it will all be all right and the holding yet because this is most there were many artist during wartime conflicts overseas did would perform for servicemen and women it was the one thing that kept our soldiers connected to home entertainers like bob hope than being cosby mickey rooney him more recently billy joel them robin williams and katy perry and one of the most famous singing groups.

santa claus cleveland cincinnati christmas jeff ju brown ann dowd hoon bob hope mickey rooney katy perry easter toledo cosby billy joel robin williams