18 Burst results for "Jp Sears"

"jp sears" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

04:28 min | 4 d ago

"jp sears" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"Think the same is going to be said for the ASTRO. So what I'm kind of seeing here is a four two mets win where Karev score is able to go those 5 or 6 innings and the bullpen holds on and gives them the victory, but plus two 25 for cookie Carrasco to earn the win is how I'm looking at wagering. What I think you're right, Aaron is a pretty much a toss up game between the mets and the Astros. On Carrasco. Red Sox and Blue Jays and AL east matchup we saw the Blue Jays get the win yesterday behind Kevin gausman who kind of turned things around and looked like the early season galvin that we saw this year. So this one should be a fun matchup between these two AL east teams. Michael waka on the bump for the Red Sox Ross stripling on the bump for the Blue Jays at home. They're a minus one 40 favorite with a total of 9, anything interesting here. Yeah, I'm actually going to go with the pitching match up here because this first game would kind of talked about. I do kind of think it could be a toss up, but I would lean Boston money line. It makes sense to take them, especially at the plus money, but I'm going to go Red Sox, Michael walker, over three and a half strikeouts. He had 7 strikeouts since last outing against Detroit 5 and owners last 5 starts on 5 days rest. And he's been impressive with a 2.34 era this season of 6 two record and 48 strikeouts in the season. I feel like this just seems kind of low for a pitcher like waka, especially since the Blue Jays they came into the series losing 7 of their last ten games despite this obviously game one win in the series, but Toronto, their ERA over the last 15 days has something great 6.15. So I just think they've been struggling plus you have a great bullpen and things like that for the Red Sox. So I just think that Michael waka in general just going to go over three and a half strikeouts. Yeah, I guess I was kind of correlated here because I'll just take Boston on the money line plus one 20. I agree with you again here based on the pitching matchup. It is about as even a 50 50 toss up as we see. Check out these stats I dug up on the two starters over the last two seasons combined. Michael walker and Ross stripling. Walk of the IRA is 4.12 striplings is 4.21. Both of them have a 21% K rate. Both of them have a 6% walk rate. Walk us ground ball rate is 40% striplings is 42. They are essentially the same picture over the last two seasons, waka and stripling. So with Boston being the slight dog here at plus one 20, again in baseball, I'm always trying to find those bets where my return on investment is going to be more than I invest in what is, you know, small sample size theater within any one given night of a 162 game season. The Red Sox, by the way, they've done well this season bouncing back from a loss again. They took the L yesterday. I believe 7 two is the final. They're 20 and 11 this season straight up coming off a loss. So with these pictures being awash with Boston being hot, one of the hottest teams in baseball right now. And before the win yesterday for the Blue Jays, I think they had lost 7 of their last ten. So they're still kind of cold in the month of June, where Boston's red hot. I like Boston on the money line at plus one 20. So if walker goes out there and strikes out 6 or 7 and is able to go deep, that's certainly would help you. And I am correlating that bet. We can't not talk about the New York Yankees because they are the best team in Major League Baseball right now. They're taking on Frankie montas and the Oakland athletics JP Sears a lefty will counter as the starter for the Yankees who had another come from behind win last night against the athletics. Obviously they are a big favorite in this game because of what their lineup has done this season. You've got to lay $2 on the money line with the Yankees. So the run line is just an even money proposition. Total of 7 and a half though, that seems pretty low for a total given a game at Yankee Stadium with this New York offense, how you approaching this one air. I'm just taking the Yankees team total, we're going over four and a half runs. Now with montezuma, of course, he has been relatively good 3.21 ERA and three and 7 record. And yes, maybe he's able to limit the Yankees beginning of the game. But the Yankees bats are just so good and they come alive at the end of games. And it's ridiculous. Last night, they had 6 runs in the 7th inning. And we know for the a's, they're really pitching is just absolutely terrible. So I think if you like the Yankees just in general to win tonight, obviously with their phone offense, they've been great against right handed pictures. Just look at how many total runs are going to have. I know there's usually typically some alternate markets you can play as well, but I think regardless you can't take over on the Yankees runs because they're a bat's literally.

Blue Jays AL east Red Sox Michael waka Ross stripling Boston Karev cookie Carrasco Kevin gausman Michael walker mets Carrasco Yankees galvin Astros Baseball Aaron
"jp sears" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

05:36 min | Last month

"jp sears" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"His worst shooting night of the entire postseason was in game four. 5 of 20 from the field, one of 6 from deep. Now note that because it's the only game he played against Miami all season in which he did not down at least three three pointers. He's played him 7 times three in the regular season for the playoffs. He's made three or more three pointers in 6 of those games. He's averaging just under four made three pointers per game against the heat. I think he gets done tonight with the big minutes. Jalen Brown over two and a half made three pointers. Quickly to the ice before we turn to baseball, game 5 in Colorado, the avalanche with a three one series lead over the blues. I'm gonna keep this one quick. I would play the abs on the puck line. Meaning they need to win by two or more goals, price of minus one, ten. I think St. Louis is absolutely cooked. They stole one in Colorado and gained two to even up the series, sending it back to St. Louis. They lose game three in a matchup where there's a big controversy when his M kadri ran into goalie, Jordan Bennington, everyone in St. Louis thought it was dirty. Some people have broken them down and said it was not. Either way, Bennington was knocked out of the series pretty much, and then kadri comes back in game four when everyone assumes that the blues are going to play this huge effort and he records a hat trick and they smoke the blues. If there was a game the blues were going to play big, that was going to be the game and they got their butts kicked. I think they go to Colorado and they get rolled in this matchup. Billy husso has been a mess in the net the entire postseason. I lean to the over 6 and a half, but I really like the abs minus one and a half on the puck line at a price of minus one ten. What do you like on the diamond tonight? Well, as you know, I'm here in New York and the sky is falling. The sky is falling. When is it not? Oh my gosh, there are complete mess. So where do I begin, right? Like JP Sears getting a spot start tonight for the Yankees okay. Their bullpen, it's a hot mess. No Chad green, Chapman's on the IL. Also, this is their 5th game in four days and they're bullpen is pitched ten innings and 5 of them were last night. So bullpen. Bullpen is toast. On top of that, look at his bench, right? Like gallows out, Donaldson suspended Stanton now is out because of the calf, DJ Lemay who is out, I don't even know. I don't even know who Boone is going to feel tonight. Meanwhile, for the Orioles, they're healthy, they've won four of their last 6. They've got a good bullpen. And this is the 13th time that the Orioles have faced the Yankees. So, you know, they know this ball club well. So give me the Orioles at plus one 40. I know, I know, right? I don't blame you. The Orioles, I have been on the Orioles a bunch of this season, and I've lost a bunch, but they are plus money in so many spots, and they're not as terrible as they were last year. So there's some value in Baltimore here early in the season. Yeah. And the other play I like, I like the Phillies on the money line as well. You get that at plus one 45 Suarez is on the bump for them as we know Harper's back in three games. They've put up 16 runs. They're averaging 4.5 runs per game. Meanwhile, for Atlanta, still not finding that rhythm. They're four and 6 their last ten games. They've scored three or less runs, 16 times this season. They're bull pin is struggling and is pitching tonight. And he's not having a great season. So I think it's more the value here, like my favorite plays the Orioles, but I think the value of getting the Phillies, especially coming back from that West Coast trip that obviously little match under their behinds. I like them at plus one 45. Okay, I'm gonna play into that because I have two place tonight. I'm gonna play over 8 and a half in the Phillies braves game. Let me lean in to what you're saying about Charlie Morton. He looks like he's falling off a cliff. And no disrespect to Charlie Morton. He's put together a fabulous career, late stages of his career, these last few years, he's been rock solid in a lot of these playoff games, but this season it looks like it is gone. Four 9 5 ERA, his K's per 9, his walks per 9. They're awful numbers. He is really struggling this season and Philly can hang some runs with that line of I expect them to score. Now on the other side, it's going to be ranger Suarez for the Phillies who surrendered three or more runs and four of his last 5 starts. So he's not exactly locking it down. He's a lefty. The braves hit left handed fit pitching far better than right handed pitching. I believe their top ten and all the key categories, OPS, weighted runs created, waited on base average. So I'm predicting an over there. I also like over 7 and a half runs between the White Sox and the Red Sox. The White Sox got embarrassed yesterday. Spoiler, my best bet was the White Sox first 5 inning run line. I think I lost that by like 15 runs. It was absolutely one of the worst bets in the history of daily wager. White Sox get smoked, I expect a big effort and a bounce back. They're gonna go against rich hill, who's been average this season, but the White Sox crush left handed pitching. We knew that last year, we're seeing it this year. They struggle against righties, like they did yesterday. Conversely, the Red Sox are just scorching hot right now. They've won 6 straight. They bust up right handed pitching. They are gonna have a tough matchup with Lucas giolito, but I think they'll do enough to get this over a low total of 7 and a half. So it's gonna be both socks White Sox over 7 and a half braves Philly's over 8 and a half. And that ladies and gentlemen is a rap for today. Her name is Anita marks. My name is Joe Ford and ball. You can catch us on daily wager today. 6 p.m. eastern on ESPN2. Best of luck to all of you tonight. We'll see you back here tomorrow morning..

kadri Orioles St. Louis Jalen Brown Colorado Jordan Bennington Billy husso Phillies Charlie Morton JP Sears Chad green DJ Lemay Yankees Bennington White Sox avalanche Suarez Miami Donaldson baseball
"jp sears" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"jp sears" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And you pretty much watch any show on popular television, and it becomes so obvious when they're going down. Like you said a storyline about BLM or You know, if you watch law and order s v u, or you could see it injected into homeland in recent seasons of the shower to final seasons of the show, everywhere you see it, so apparently and it hits you over the head to such an extent today that I do wonder, and I'm curious about your take. From a critical side of this. Does it have a bit of a There They go again, sort of feel to it where the messaging is so Bladen and over. It's that Not only does it make the art poor But it might actually have the reverse effect of turning people against the world narratives because it's so blatant the way the propaganda is happening. Yeah, you know, I don't I don't know if my crystal ball can tell me that's going to be a A negative effect down the road. It's certainly possible smart that you bring that up. But, you know, from a critical point of view, it stops the story cold. So you're you're watching a TV show and you're invested in it, and you're curious about where the characters are going. What mystery will be solved That kind of thing, and all of a sudden you get a lecture, and it's very obvious it. The story stops. There's a speech and you can tell what's going on, and it just takes you out of the experience. I mean, we've seen that in Star Wars movies. We've seen it and, you know, reboots like Charlie's Angels, so just from a creative point of view. It's unfortunate and even if you are on board with the particular message you support BLM you want this or that? I can't imagine you walk away, please, because it's just a quick example with the last Avengers film had a kind of a you girl you go girl moment where a bunch of the female of injuries just got together and the United and they kind of went to strike that that guy's And even you know, pretty hardcore left of center websites were like, Oh, gosh, they're pandering to us. So no one was pleased by that. So when it becomes that transparent and that obvious I don't think anyone's happy. Does it create a massive opportunity to the extent that great stories that just don't comport with focused agenda aren't being told? Or is it that the controllers Who actually gets to determine what content gets out there and how it's disseminated and distributed are so strong that they would put a chokehold done any sort of alternative content that in another era would have just been considered conventional and normal. It's both. There are opportunities for independent creators. Right now we're seeing it in comedy, You know, YouTube podcast people like Ryan Long and JP Sears and making some pretty funny stuff. It just goes kind of against the group think they are succeeding? But like you said, you're not going to get a big studio took him up with a supremely a nwo comedy that happens to be hilarious. That's not going to happen. So I think on a smaller level, you're seeing some outlets providing content. That kind of goes against the narrative in is successful and funny and clever but larger scale. It's not really happening. It's why they do. The Daily wire is getting into the entertainment business. And in theory, that could be one avenue where, uh, something that would be made in the eighties, but not today. Could have a home there. But again, it's you know, we haven't seen it yet in a large scale, and the the mainstream outlets are not going to go there. You're not going to see a Netflix production. I think that's going to kind of allow these kinds of voices to come out least not yet. We're speaking with Christian Toto. He's a contributor. Real clear investigations and the author. Most recently of the piece left foot in Children's TV is doing the will keep okey I noticed you and you only have a couple minutes left. But I noticed that you recently also wrote a piece a bit about there is fighting against Cancel culture Open way, including Kevin Hart, for example, comedian comic actor Charles Barkley a in his and the only the way that Charles Barkley Can criticize his critics seeking to try and cancel him and him basically saying, You know, I'm not going to be cancelled. I'll wait till I'm 60. And then I'll step down if I have to. Essentially. And of course, there have been notable examples of late of folks like Bill Maher and Jon Stewart fighting against the progressive orthodoxy on issues like Wuhan Lab League or, in the case of Mar, many things relating to the coronavirus and progressivism can't cancel culture woke ism and beyond. Do you think that there is Sort of a backlash, a counter revolution brewing or these just individual instances of people with very big platforms that are much harder to cancel than most speaking out. Well, I think a lot of people are afraid. A lot of people are even if they agree with the Mars and the Barclays are not speaking out. But every time someone of their statute does. Hum it on this issue. It makes it easier for others to do so. So it's it's kind of two steps forward one step back because Rita Moreno recently came to defensive Lin Manuel Miranda, who is accused of not having enough darker skinned, um Latinos in in the heights. And literally. A day later, she backpedaled and apologize. No, this is woman. I believe she's about 89. She's a legend. She's she's done it all you know she could. She's at the point in her career, which you can basically say what you want. You would think, and even she couldn't stand by her own principles. Within a day or two. She had to apologize. So yeah, it's a challenging time. I don't think the groundswell is happening yet, but the more people speak out and do it without fear, the more they embolden others to do the same. Great point, a powerful point. Then it's just worth noting. When Juan Manuel Miranda of all people were talking about Hamilton, trying to cast people only of darker skin color explicitly, we're talking a guy who supports a felon terrorists, but even he is potentially cancel. It's really remarkable where the culture is gone anywhere starts on that. Yeah. You know, I think it may be in the recent past. It would the folks who are right of center who if they said the wrong thing would get in trouble, But really, no one is safe. We've seen Tina Fey get pulled over by the PC police. Amy Schumer as well. Will Ferrell. So it it can strike anyone and we saw what JK rally Maybe the best example of someone. Was very progressive, very emboldened, certainly the most one of most powerful people in literature with Harry Potter books and you know she's almost a nonperson in certain communities now because she dared to speak out for herself in ways that weren't mean or cruel. She just had an opinion about certain issues related to the trans movement and That you know, the left despises her now. So you know, no one is safe. Like all cultural revolutions. They always eat their own and then go even beyond that, In the end, Christian Terra, Thanks So much for coming on the program really appreciate your insights. My pleasure. And this is Ben Weingarten in for Buck Sexton on the Buck Sexton Show more right after this. Hey, guys, I want you to trust me on this one. If you've ever thought about real estate investment the past, but you knew. Oh, gosh. Where am I going to start? How do I do this? Why do I go about this? Well,.

Bill Maher Ryan Long Rita Moreno Jon Stewart Amy Schumer Ben Weingarten Charles Barkley Will Ferrell Kevin Hart JP Sears Lin Manuel Miranda Juan Manuel Miranda Tina Fey Star Wars Charlie's Angels Netflix Christian Toto Barclays 60 eighties
"jp sears" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"jp sears" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And in this hour we're welcoming one of my favorite guests. Christian Toto joining us for the first time in 2021 after the garbage Year. That was 2020 Christian. I think. What was it like in June? Maybe maybe earlier that you and I had a conversation jokingly that sonic the hedgehog was going to be up for an Oscar. Because nothing else came out in 2020. Is that still on track right now? I mean, I'm I I might actually watch the Oscars this year just to see I'm just looking forward to the acceptance speech. You know, I think, actually, that might have been one of the biggest box office winners of the year because nothing else open. It's been such a crazy here and I, you know, back in junior, so I'm thinking Well, you know, movie theaters will come back. It'll be fine. You know, Once people you know people always love to go to the movies. I think we're done. I really do. I mean, I hate to say it. I hate to be cynical about it. But I think that we have spent 9 to 10 11 months getting used to not seeing films in a theater and Netflix just keeps flooding the zone with these big budget, big actor movies. Why leave the house? And of course, one of brothers is gonna gonna put all their new releases on HBO. Max, you know The writing is not on the wall it it's written, and it's like the shining scene where the it wasn't all work and no play. Well, you don't one big indicator of that is when Disney said, Oh, you know what? What did they released the first movie? They released straight, too. Streaming, and after that they came out and said, Oh, we're gonna honor theatrical releases for for seven days. And basically said, You got a week of ethics. We all have great technology. But one of the things that's happened because of that is that you've spent a tremendous amount of time on your excellent website Hollywood and Toto. Talking about kind of industry related stuff that has now moved into big tech because it's all intertwined. I mean, it's all very incestuous. How old this stuff kind of goes together now, and you have a great column didn't come out yesterday. Or was it window your column on Big Tech come out. I've been writing about it so often, So yeah, whatever. Be more specific. Yeah, well, just you know, Big tech. Is making moves right now, and they've made moves in the last week or so to crack down. Obviously, they bounced the president of the United States off their social media platforms, but bigger than that, and I have not talked about this today. I was kind of waiting for you to come on here. I have a lot of conservative friends. They're not wacko birds. They're not militia members. They're not people who are going to take up arms. They were banned from posting in any Facebook group. Until tomorrow. Over the last four days. These air average people who are not inciting violence they just post regularly in conservative Facebook groups. So now we're talking about much more than Donald Trump. We're talking about average Americans, and this is something we have to be extremely concerned about. Absolutely. I think the speed at which this is going forward, really Starling. I confess I've been having trouble sleeping. Partly because of this issue. I just I worry about my livelihood. I worry about the country where that having a voice be heard. And you know one of the little samples and you mentioned how it isn't just the Alex Jones types were right. And I've been covering the subject of comedians who are either right of center or maybe just kind of contrarians. They like to poke the bear. They like to say things that are a little bit atypical, and they've been experiencing big text. Censorship is a fella named Ryan. Long Love him. He's amazing, and he's aggressively a political is really not trying to pick sides. There's no sacred cows on Ryan Long's page. Exactly, And some of the material I'm talking about will be. There will be no nudity. There'll be no cursing. It's not outrageous, but it is problematic to people on the left, and it's been censored. JP Sears is kind of a rising storm of the comedian. I think he's more aggressively right of center. At least now is I mean, maybe he's being read told by the moment of our time, but You know, he's sharing stuff that is not crazy. That is not conspiratorial, but he's suffering consequences as well. And I've been talking to comedians in the right for years. Is that Oh, yeah, I just got out of Facebook jail. Do you think that people on the left hook comically motivated? You think they're getting bad? I don't think so. And you actually talked about this recently, Hollywood has spent the entire Trump administration Joining up Urging and otherwise encouraging political violence. And now they will have the vapors. You know not to not to excuse anything that happened at the Capitol. I think this is key. While I can condemn what happened to the capital. I can also condemn Other things that have gone on the on Lee. The on Lee Celebrity I know of to pay a price is Kathy Griffin. And is it just because she was unlikable and people were willing to hang her out to dry as saying she went too far. Why does she pay a price that nobody else does? Well, I think she went from 0 to 62 early. Yeah, And you think that holding that that Trump had a loft in the isis style right out of the gate was just shocking, But I think if you did it a week ago, I don't think I got and that is really scary. I cover Hollywood. I got into this whole business because I love movies. You know, I do it for Right of center perspective. But I love the product. And it's been nauseated for me to cover Hollywood the last 12 months because of this because of the hatred because of the rage and because of the incitement, it is remarkable how angry people in Hollywood are and how quick they are to push for violence literally pushed for violence cheering on riots, you know, using their their cash to support the bailout funds for the people in Minneapolis, who are committing violence and doing some terrible things in Between the protesting as well. It's just on and on and on it and know the bottom line is that conservatives, we can point out the hypocrisy all day long and it is important. But what is the next step for us? Because it's clear that the media and the powers that be in big tech, they don't care. You know, we could point to us 1000 liberal Twitter accounts promoting violence and nothing will be done. So what happens next? I'm flummoxed. I don't know what to say. I will tell you I am. I'm a libertarian at heart. I want government to be as small as it can possibly be for me to say ever That perhaps it's time to regulate is almost like I can't even believe those words are coming out of my mouth. But if we're going to the thing that frustrates me about Tech right now, there's a lot of conversation about section 2 30 that they enjoy section 2 30 protections. Section 2 30 has a good Samaritan provisions that allow people don't know what section 2 30 is. It says that a Facebook we're gonna use Facebook as an example. But it also applies to Twitter. Anyone who allows anyone to post stuff on their website right? Facebook, Twitter instagram. Whatever its user generated content section 2 30 says that those companies cannot be held responsible or liable for what appears on their website as long as they don't edit it. Now there's a good Samaritan provision that says they can pull down dangerous content content to incite violence, things of that nature as long as they're acting in good faith. What we're seeing is not good faith We're not seeing so I would love to see these companies not do away with section 2 30, but to tell them you're in violation of your responsibilities in section 2 30, you are in violation of ensuring that this is a free and open platform based on politics and political viewpoints. Even when people are not inciting violence. And if you're going to edit, you can be held responsible for everything that appears on your website that would have one of two effects..

Facebook Hollywood Big Tech Donald Trump Twitter Oscars Ryan Long HBO Netflix Lee United States Disney president JP Sears Kathy Griffin Alex Jones
"jp sears" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"jp sears" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"He was traumatized. And he was converted through trauma. That's exactly what happened to him. So if if we look at this, and we see a scenario of people being traumatized and thin Through that trauma that that amazing transformation takes place. Now you see, and look at all the woke people that have come about Wait a minute. Amazing in a negative way or in a parts. Amazingly horrible, right? I was gonna say amazingly horrible. Well, it is a basis because its moral terror he described it perfectly. Moral terror and We see America under assault. Now, JP Sears is making fun of it, but he's actually he's telling a story that you may not be able to tell without a sense of humor about it, because it is so tonight. Right now it is dark. He nails it, though I mean, other words, think about the hours of thinking about what is going on in our country that many of us have, But so many of us don't want to think about it. We distract ourselves. The sad thing is This may backfire on the left. It may backfire on the Khamis because what we have is time on our hands and if used properly, In prayer and meditation. Maybe you'll get some answers the way that even this comedian, he's absolutely correct in his assessment. It's all engineered to give the elites control over us. Through fear throughout moral terror as that that's right, said that's right and to control not just people but everything. They want us to be their pets. Good. 00, man. That's a heavy statement right there. I want to play a clip now of Chris Hays on MSNBC. Now again and you We've heard all of this degradation of President Trump. We've heard the put downs and the he's out of his mind. He's crazy. They have to dehumanize somebody before they can get you to the point where you accept the idea. This person isn't actually as human as the rest of us. And this is what's continuing Chris Hayes on MSNBC listen to what he says. Delusional, and I love the fact that Speaker Pelosi said OK, let's go with the $2000. Yeah, I agree with that ought to bring in someone else. The conversation also served in the U. S. Senate. Al Franken, former senator from Minnesota and Alan, Come I'm curious your reaction this I mean, part of what has made this entire negotiation, maddening from everyone that I've talked to and reporting on it is here. You've got this president who could basically make Republicans do anything who hasn't lifted a finger on these negotiations hasn't pushed them on anything has totally checked out if you wanted to. From the beginning, right, He's got these people doing like Stalinist self criticisms on camera he could have because I've had them probably delivered $2000 check, but he's been nowhere and now the last minute Was the whole thing up. Immunization, demoralization minimization, minimizing trump making him as if he's a one dimensional person. A two dimensional person on the piece of paper that you could just take that paper, crumple it up and light it on fire. This is what the left is doing The chopping off of arms to see this is the equivalent the verbal death by 1000 cuts. That's what they're doing to Trump. Yeah, well, You know, it's funny. I've done a lot of traveling. I've done millions of miles of traveling and airplanes, Millions and millions. I've done millions in cars but on an airplane The one thing you know is that you know, they say if we have a crash landing, leave your things behind. Just get off the airplane. Because you know, here in a basically an aluminum tube that's gonna burn quickly. So get off the airplane of all I've often thought. Hell, No, I'm not leaving my stuff. I got my backpack up there. I'm gonna grab my backpack. If anything happens Well, I have to tell you I'd come back to my point I made earlier in this hour about you're not really, truly happy into you have nothing because we're so connected to our things. And after a while, you start to realize those things own you. You don't own them. Well, they own you. You're just the caretaker's Yeah, but hold on. Hold on. Let me counter that with a thought. Every day of our life. We exchange our our life force and our energy to acquire those things. That's what our culture is basically built on. That's what we have a capitalist. Culture. We have an economy. We have huge creative work force that produces things and services. Okay? So I want to be careful because these things are the things that we've exchanged our life and our energy. For now, if they can convince you that those things aren't important. Then we're one step closer to communism took to pure outright socialism. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. I mean, this is dangerous territory, So I understand that you're saying don't be too attached to things. But at the same time if they can pry us away from the America that we grew up in which where where it was a meritocracy where you worked hard. You earned your way through life. Now the government is minimizing you by $600 that is just horse. Rap. And then I quit. Let me finish my thought. Because you broke in What I was going to say is Be ready America. You walk away from everything you own. Don't be the person that you know the old joke about, you know. God, what happened? You know, I was waiting for you to send the rescuer for me and God says, I sent two boats and a helicopter to get you. Everybody probably knows that story. The point is that You have to be willing like the Von Trapp family. When the Germans come for you in Nazi Germany, you have to be willing to sneak out in the dark. And get the hell away. But if you're not, if you're not willing to to leave everything you own, you can always come back right? If it's so important, you could say, Well, I wonder if my stuff is still there. But don't Care about it. Be willing to save your family be willing to walk away from all this stuff that owns you. And really the idea is that they want to use everything you own as a pry bar. To control you because you know what? So what? You have to sell a few things. I'm not going to rely on their stupid $600 stimulus. What is $600 do for me. You barely pays my power bill. I don't know what they've done. You know what they've done is they have basically told you how unimportant you are as a human being. By offering that little flimsy bribe to you. Go away. You got you $600 leave us alone. That's what I said. Tables. Perhaps Listen, we've got more better things to do than take care of your pitiful Selves. You gotta be willing and I just saw the reason why I was gone last week. On Thursday and Friday. I sold a couple of vehicles. And to make the deal. I had to drive them all the way to Las Vegas, which I did. And I, and it was like he was kind of actually fun. I got to be by myself for 35, or 40 hours. Whatever was driving the Las Vegas and back with a trailer, the one on the trailer and sold both vehicles rented of Vehicle and told my trailer home But I gotta tell you, I don't care. I liked my vehicles, but I don't care..

America Las Vegas Trump President Trump JP Sears U. S. Senate MSNBC Speaker Pelosi Chris Hayes assault Al Franken Chris Hays Khamis Germany Minnesota president senator Alan
"jp sears" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"jp sears" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"It's intoxicating. Some say it's kind of like playing God but not true. It is playing God. In fact, it's actually more than playing God. Because God doesn't control people he gives them free will We do control people. Oh, my God. David Prove think of the brilliant mind that had to put all this together. JP Sears hats off to you man because he nailed it. He's playing the part of this elite. And this little parody is called the elites who control you. And we're not going to play the whole thing on the show today, but I'm telling you not 10 minutes. Well, that's really good. Well, all right, let me let me insert something. I want to play a clip 25. Now we're talking about the elites that control you. And here's the thing. What he's saying is that they don't care about the money. They care about the power. Yesterday, Pet. Kelly said that Obama power is like heroin cursing through his veins. Listen to this if I could make an arrangement where I had stand in a front man Front woman and they had an ear piece in and I was just in my basement and my sweats looking through the stuff, and then I could sort of deliver the lines. But somebody else was doing all the talking and ceremony. I'd be fine with that. Barack Obama has virtually confirmed with his own words, all that I had suspected all this time. These most newsworthy remarks should have sparked controversy and debate. But there was nothing I mentioned that the interview it aired at the end of November, but I saw nothing about it until this past Monday, when Joe hopped at the Gateway pundit reported on it and put up the video you just saw Well, that's the question I've been asking for months is Barack Obama running this show? Is he calling the shots is this his third term as president of the United States? Mm hmm. Yeah, I think oh, by the way, the most interesting thing that was said by JP Sears was this whole thing with these masks is engineered to give us control the elites. And boy, doesn't it feel that way? Let me play one more clip of this before we go to break. Yeah, so I.

Barack Obama JP Sears David heroin United States Joe Kelly president
"jp sears" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"jp sears" Discussed on WDRC

"In trouble with some big tech corporation. There's a very funny fellow you certainly not safe for work is Ryan long, and he puts out some really hard hitting stuff against broke culture and its most recent one was attacked by both TIC Tac and Instagram. And when you watch the video, I think there's a wanted to swear words. And it's not that bad. And certainly that kind of stuff you can see anywhere. On those two platforms, but they were they were both taken down multiple times. Another comedian JP Sears has been doing something similar kind of poking fun at some of the code of it. Hypocrisy is far the government regulation. He's getting in trouble. I think it's a Facebook and then I've talked to comedians like Steve McGrew, actually, either in Facebook jail, getting booted from Twitter. It's happening. It's happening more often and again. It's not just the conservative thought that's being censored or stifled. It's jokes, funny stuff, and it's very clear that some people don't want those jokes getting out. What's the excuse that the tech giants are doing because, for instance, I tell my audience that I love the Babylon be, and there's satire is hilarious. I think the left the onion in the rear view mirror a long, long time ago. And often times you're able to say something with satire or parody that you really can't get across any other way than to sort of make fun of the idea. I'm glad you brought that up. I forgot to mention them. They were. They were kind of the one of the first ones facing fire. Facebook will fact check That tire stories from the Babylon be again is a satire website. If you can't figure that out, and of course, it's on the side as well. And there's a problem and of course, they don't do that with the onion, the other side, which I agree used to be the gold standard, not name or but what these big platforms do, and it's insidious. They're often say that this goes against our community standards or the community standards are often vague, but more importantly, they will not come out and say, Okay, it was this joke in this line. This moment, this visual that caused the problem. They won't do that. They keep it nice and vague, And that way you don't know what's going on. And you know what? He also it helps you self censor. Because if you're not sure what was the reason behind the centering you think, OK, I've got to avoid anything That may be even close to that. It is really, really nasty. And it happens quite a bit Twitter. Facebook, You name it, They do it. You know what I think you just described to Christian. Have you ever heard of the idea of a chilling effect? Of courts and cops and the rest of them. Vaguely familiar with the term, But I think I know where you're going with here would be a good example of it. If if every once in a while, they're used to occasionally be raids on newsrooms, you know, newspaper newsrooms, TV and radio newsrooms. And the idea was, the court said. You can't do that. Because when you do that, when you raid a newsroom and say we're looking, they would come in saying we're looking. We think you you know who the bad guy is, in some horrible crime Well, in most cases, journalists that know the who the bad guy is in can actually show it will write stories about it, and they tell everybody in the world What they found. But when? When the police or local district attorney says I'm going to serve a subpoena on your newsroom, and you don't know why, but or even if you do know why you say all of a sudden there's a chilling effect on journalism because it means that reporters have to say, Boy, you know, the boss doesn't like it when that stuff happens. My sources don't like it when they hear that our newsrooms been raided, so I'd better temper what I'm reporting and it causes self. Censorship if if I was in a newsroom, and I used to be a managing editor in a TV newsroom. If I simply threw a story back at a reporter that I was supposed to read and decide you know what? What needed to be changed about it. If I just said, take this story back and rewrite it, and the reporter said, Well, what's wrong with it? I would say this is wrong with it, and I would point to exactly the thing that was wrong. If I didn't tell them just say, you figure out what's wrong with it. All of a sudden I'd have reporters would be afraid to write anything, especially anything. That's a little on the edge because it's I don't know why large through the story out, but I didn't get my story on tonight because he found something wrong with all of it. That's that same kind of effect. Where you you tell the comedian your band. Why? Because things you've said violate our community standards or whatever language they want to use, and the comedian says I don't know what it was that I said so Then he or she may go back and start to say, Well, I'm gonna pull in my pulling my reins a little bit on all of my jokes. I'm gonna temper all of my jokes to make sure that I don't run up against that standard. Yeah, Just another quick example. Interviewed a filmmaker did a story about a documentary about China and their censorship and he say something very similar. And they did the same thing. The state government of China. The state system basically said, you know, blocked this or block that but again never gave the reason never gave the specifics. So you're left thinking? Oh, my gosh, I won't go anywhere near this behavior just to say free and clear again. The vagueness of it is a weapon and it's weaponized. We're seeing right now. Big check. Well, I'm glad to see the story, Christian. Thanks so very much, and I will talk to you next week. Don't get that's Christian total with us. You can find him at Hollywood in total dot com..

Facebook reporter Twitter Ryan long government JP Sears China Hollywood Steve McGrew managing editor
Stop Stepping To Your Vision

Marketing Secrets

06:40 min | 2 years ago

Stop Stepping To Your Vision

"Right but so. Most you know Rachel Pearson spoke at the last two hacking lives and she's made. She's also the Queen of Tiktok, and my daughter is her biggest fan, and anyway she's actually going to boise and my daughter so excited to talk with her, which is going to be so fun anyway, she. She, she walks me over a really cool question about you know taking things once airtime, and how you create your vision, and how you bypass things in all kind of stuff so I'm GonNa play her her part of Oxford right here, senior the question and then I'm GonNa. Come back, answer if someone called me out today, and and they were very spot on. They said I feel like you are taking the stairs. One step at a time when you are destined for greatness, so my question to you is. How did you create a vision? Did it fall into your lap? Did you read a book how you create a vision for your life in Your Business that? Keeps everything going. You know like the infinite game from Simon Sinek. Thank you so so so much. Okay, so I think it's a really good question, and it's interesting because. I think a lot of us. We get into this game and we don't really know what's possible where we're going or any of those things you know like. I didn't I didn't know what was happening. Today was possible by any stretch of the machinations. So I think sometimes you bypass your vision. In fact, it was kind of a really cool. What a really cool experience I was Remember we did. The final startup story was with mixer at this. In Utah called the drive, our comedy club and had JP sears. Come into roast me for an hour before we. We did the interview and it was so funny, but anyway at dinner I asked JP makes what's next few. What's what's the next plan? And he has smiled at me. He looks so content something that I've never been my wife and he was like It's like you know what he's like so far. Everything that's happened me surpassed wherever possible select some China just enjoy, and just like enjoy things as they. They. Come and be grateful for them. And I was like Oh my gosh. That is amazing like I need to learn that, so there's that piece of it right and he gets entrepreneur struggle with us, because because We're always looking, you know come back to my my last podcast, so talking about We're so tied into achievement achievement. She moved. Forget about the fulfillment side, so there's an apartment, the other side which I understand Moore's this goal of achieving and trying to take over the world and stuff like that and You Know I. Remember A- At the very I live in ever went to I remember I one thousand dollars to go to which is like the first step for me, my call so much money like stressed out and the speakers talking up people selling different things and and I remember. I can never Ford this thing for two grander, five, ten, grand, or all these different things kind of being like bummed out about it right and I. Remember Admits Kid and the kid was. Maybe a year, older Mir, maybe same age. I was like I was twenty two at the time he been twenty three or something but we are about the same age and and I saw the the presenters Solas Mash grouping route three signed up for it and I was like how did you? How are you for that like I can I can figure it out for that and he's like. Oh, he's like well. There's two ways to get. Get the top you can work your way, and you can buy your insights by my way I'm like well for sounds like this leap in thought I'd never have crossed my mind before my okay, it's pretty cool and then then it's more questions like well. How'd you four for this and he's like I'm actually in twelve masterminds. This time I was like what how did you do that? And he came back and said well what I did is that. What and He's like I. wanted to go these things, but I couldn't afford us as they found. People who kind of trained toss of to so I wanna go is mastermind. Groups obviously can be expensive for everyone to pay. For you for you know if you guys want to go, all this is going to be really expensive so if you're interested. I think if you pay me ten grand and I get. I don't know twenty people. Two hundred thousand dollars Algo. Join all of them and I'll come back until you cool stuff I learned and he got all these people are paying twenty grand. And he took the money, or whatever it was I don't know. And he joined all these mastermind groups, and he bought his way in, and he got up, and he built his company very very very very quickly and I thought that was just a strategic thing. You know I remember celebrity apprentice. Few Watch delivery apprentice in the past I three or four episodes, people do things that was like fundraisers. It was like Corey's money sleep while on the street and they're try. Lemonade always seems raise. Money wasn't tough. I don't know two or three seasons in when the dude from kiss. that. Yeah. Kiss Gene Simmons. GM's was on it and They do fundraising things out there trying to raise money that hustling and he just sat, there picked up his phone made a phone call and got a check from his buddies for half million dollars, and you destroyed everybody else out of the Moore. Looking at thinking, he's thinking in a different level and everybody else says the thought difference, right? Everyone's like like here's the task must do the thing. And they jumped up him. Trump except step-by-step. Whereas Gene Simmons came back and said Look I can do that or I. Can just do this and we'll jump you know a thousand steps past everyone else. And I think I remember watching have now and just like okay. I got started thinking more strategically. US think tactically which tactics are so important is how we get the thing done, but it takes stopping stepping back and looking at things more strategically of okay. Here's next step next up. You want to jump five or ten or twenty tears is not going to happen by you. Doing the next step is to stepping back and saying what's the next thing like what's the? What's the big the big domino? The next I don't know there's ways to phrase. It I'm not sure the best way but conceptually it's it stopping the tactics instead back strategically and thinking different right. Click funnels I'd so many amazing strategic conversations with friends and people The worldwide software company right, if you, if you at the expert, secrets book like we talked about movement and finding a future base 'cause and like all these things that weren't. They weren't tactically like. Here's the next step it. It's like how do we? How do we? We've these things into our culture right? How do we? H-. How do you do these things? They caused these incremental big shifts as opposed to just increasing your your your ads by ten, or you're just created another friend and offer it's like. Have you create things that have mass shifts? Mass changes things like that. I think it really comes back stepping back away from the tactical, which means getting out of the day today, which means taking a vacation, which is hard for us right or or doing strategy your team, and just they look for three days, and we're GONNA work. We're talking about like what's possible. It's a future. Where could we go you know not not with Nextstep, but like if what if we just destroyed these steps and had a whole new thing like what would that look like? And how do we get there and you pull it? Poor Gene Simmons instead of fundraising. You just pull out A. Just, you know, put your phone and call buddy in and get five hundred thousand dollars in five seconds. That's that's the power of it so I. Hope it helps the no, it's not a full answer. Hopefully gets the Wilson head-spinning. Everyone else's listening help that helps as well

Gene Simmons Moore Jp Sears Rachel Pearson Simon Sinek Oxford Tiktok Boise China Utah Ford GM Corey Donald Trump
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"It will bring that <hes> that that magical side that <hes> that gives that do you have that you can give us like he does beautiful words brother. Thank you for s- pressing <unk> site. Yes i feel a lot of benefit in here knows my other people do too bad. Thank you for saying that's yeah my pleasure. It's it really comes from the hardest. Not just something that the to say into words but also so as a closing thought could you you share with us. What and cool you are grateful for in your life right now. In the first i who that comes to my mind i mean there's many of them but the first one is slave beautiful fiancee amber i mean just beyond in gratitude for her being lay life and is specifically it right now. We're were apart. She's running a retreat costa three kosovo specifically last night the time we took the talk. Via skype was just beautiful. She smiles how she she shares her challenges. She gets playful with me. I am very in how she cheers in supports me. She believes leaves them very very grateful for her and then you know the the what ungrateful for you right now. I'm very very grateful. I'm in a a nice home and swarm. It's comfortable what you now nate wonderful trees so <music>. I'm definitely experiencing a what that i'm grateful for and i think <hes> roy moore combination of who in what i'm very grateful unfold for you in this conversation. This is feels good to me this connection. I communicating with you so i feel very great for in fact they feel the gratitude is sorta like tingling by chest about our conversation. I love it. I love it and i hope that our listeners i have gotten some of your feeling some of your graduated and also mine of course and <hes> thank you so much which for being here and for being so present and for having such a great conversation thinking. You're very welcome georgie and thank you for having me on brother. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you've enjoyed this interview as much as we've enjoyed doing it. I think honestly honestly is one of the best interviews that i've ever did and <hes> g._p. Was certainly one of the best guests that i ever had and if you enjoyed this interview please share it with your friends with your family. I think g._p. Release share some amazing tips for for all of us. I certainly got some great tips from him and some really good inspiration and also if you're <hes> on brand new listener to gratitude podcast i invite you to subscribe because there are many many other very interesting interviews on gratitude on life stories in general that you can learn from quite a lot and that can inspire you to live of more grateful and the more happy life. My vision with the podcast is to inspire one hundred thousand people to discover gratitude dude how they can do it each and every day how to create the habit and how to leave a happier life and they would really appreciate your support in helping me do this and making this vision a reality. Thank you so much for listening for sharing and for for taking the time to be with us and to connect. Thank you so much gratitude seeker. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen. Listen to this interview. I really appreciate it and if you could think of one person that would also benefit from it. Share it with them. It might actually be the the inspiration that they need to make their day or maybe even their life much better. Thank you so much once again. This has been georgia banta though forget had to keep seeking and spreading gratitude.

georgie skype kosovo roy moore georgia
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

13:14 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"It's it's it's beautiful. I love it eleven hundred percent. I think it was something i've learned about. People who who live what i would call inspirational lives allowed at times. The mindset isn't what will it cost me. What kind of time will that cost me but more. What will that be worth to me. It's like taking five minutes to gratitude journaling the the while that's going to cost me. Five minutes. I think is a very poverty consciousness mindset but asking what will that be worth to me gene. Will i find personally immersing myself in the the feeling in the biochemicals of gratitude early in the morning one that makes me way more productive throughout the day so investing five minutes i would dare say gets me at least forty five minutes. It's worth of more productivity no more time throughout the day but just forty five minutes more worth of productivity because i'm in a happier state by mind is working cleaner and more connected to my intuition more connected to my heart in my perception changes throughout the day you know i meant. I was really in a great frame of complained of gratitude last week. I mentioned the whole airport experience. I'd been consistent with my gratitude journaling which really helped train me for. Here's a tough day so was it worth me taking five minutes in the morning to have a day where i was actually feeling cullman peaceful foale versus a day where i just feel like i'm in broken glass inside. I'm angry absolute. That five minutes had a it was well worth yeah. It was worth way more than i could put words to so yeah. What what will this gratitude journaling be worth to me rather than thinking how many minutes this is gonna cost me. I think it's important mindset that inspirational people tend to have whether they know it or not in then angry people tend to have has the mindset that says it'll cost me time. I don't have time for that l. Take away from me watching the tv and i gotta watch the news on t._v. So that i can know what to be angry about out of it. I think you you put some really good questions. I hope that our listeners there's war <hes> aware of the subtlety of our of your question so something that you as listeners can ask yourselves who when you're listening what is this bringing into my life and not what it costs. I think this is very very powerful and like you said with the productivity and everything it's an amazing perspective. Thank you really. I didn't think i could learn so much <hes> <hes> so many new things about gratitude but i am still learning and even though i've been exploring it for quite a while and i'm sure that our listeners have been doing this as aw but i i want to talk a little bit about something that <hes> you promote and that i think it's very important for all of us. It's about appreciating ourselves and <hes> being grateful for ourselves one way or another and i'm talking about being weird absolutely yeah. I think it sometimes it's easier. Take appreciate and be grateful for other people. It's like cool but let's treat ourselves the way we treat other people i think some people it's like the real challenge is being appreciative of our selves so i think the real beauty to be grateful for about ourselves is our uniqueness our weirdness. I think weirdness is a gluten free bread crumb trail that leads us to our authenticity titi in and you know how i look at myself now. What i appreciate the least about myself is when i act it's normal. I think acting normal is another way of saying not being yourself but you act normal in a way of like we'll. We'll let me act the way everybody else acts. Let me can form and you know. Sometimes you do that. If you drive in a car it's great tact normal normal <unk>. Let me do self-expression here color outside the lines like no it'd be normal but i think the time in place for deem normal will isn't all the time everywhere i think we we have the ratio backwards where most of the time most of us act normal. Maybe lending diener beautiful weird authenticity out a little bit of the time. I think we should foot that. I think muslim we should be meaner weird authentic selves in then in. We do a little bit of normal when it will serve us. Well like driving our car so my experience with weirdness was was when i was a child the weirdness uniqueness authenticity about me. That's what i had the most shame about like i'd be made fun of it. Sometimes i only the ever red hair you see things differently. Excuse me so. I think a lot of times as children we learn to be ashamed of what makes us ourselves because it makes different but then we can flip the script on that one. We're adults it when we start to wake yup. We realized like oh is weirdness. It deserves to be celebrated because it's what makes me different. 'cause i gave when we're a kid like the last lastingly one is to be different but when we're an adult the the less different we are the more differentiated we are which means we're able to find ourselves more. It was able to celebrate ourselves more. I think when we do that we inspire other people to do do it for themselves. I don't know what the purpose of life is but i would dare say that have something to do with the purpose of your life is for you to live your life in. I don't think we are living. Our lives lives when we're acting like other people were acting normal. I think we are much more at living our lives when we're being unapologetically weird when we're being authentic authentic. I love it. I love it and one more thing that i think this helps us with is the fact that we can find <music>. Our place in the world when we're trying to much to conform is it's really hard for us to where we're going to do the things that everybody does and sometimes this just doesn't work for us and we feel that we know that this is not supposed to do and you know i know where you just know and many people have been through this but i think that this is exactly what they also appreciate about. You is that you're a living example of that like all of your your weirdness. Your <hes> the things that you might have been ashamed over something like this. In in in the past you are bringing them to the surface and your gifting us with them and with who you are car and this this actually helps us also to be to be more okay with our weirdness and i think this is this is also for ask because <hes> actually one of the ways that we are learning is <hes> through seeing what other people are doing and and the fact that you are authentic helps us be more authentic as well yeah i just i think i just wanted to say thank you for what you're welcome. Look i appreciate your seeing that way. Georgian and it's nice to hide my dirt. In heavy hitters recognize recognize the the beauty of may does mean a lot to me <hes> but yeah yeah i've got plenty of skeletons in the closet of instant worked in unto definitely i'm. I'm sure that your human i mean i hope you're human. Not i'm actually mostly turtle okay significant human yeah and this own for instance this is this is what i love and the fact that we for instance our listeners right now <hes> so or when they will be listening. We're talking on and on it's normal. It's something that okay they might. I pay attention attention or not but when you have a moment like this being so fantastic surreal it just freezes the brain is like what what did he just say and you become more aware of this and i think it's <hes> it's something that we can all bring to the surface and bring to the world and and <hes> it's something that once we learned to appreciate and to see and helps us quite a lot and for your living an example of that that we can <hes> do great work and help many people by being ourselves and i think this is this is very important for i ah i live by thinking that examples are the most powerful we can talk for hours but if we see someone actually do that that that speaks like much more than we can speak here than ours of podcasting so man. I i agree with you. Under the percent i think talk that leads to action leads to examples and there's the real impact. It's just like when when parents have rules rules. They tell the kids don't do this. Don't do that but then the parents go and do that thing. We realize kids learn by example the it's like the the words are maybe one percent of the learning. The example is ninety nine percents before her name and i think when we realize that as you clearly clearly heaven i love how you pointed out. We can use that to our benefit. I love to see the examples of other people. I think we can learn from anybody. Nobody <unk> especially the people that we consider inspiring. They inspire not us to act like them but they inspire are true sells to come out to a greater degree that i love seeing people invariably essentially example expressions you know i love listening listening to them but it's like then. I think that's why there's magic hanging around someone unit has got to dinner and they might not be lecturing view but it's like i learned more during that dinner and i think that's you know i've been really into podcast for the past few years the i i very rarely listen to books on tape but i because i feel like i don't learn too much but i feel like i learned a hell of a lot or or from podcast because i think it's more example oriented because especially with a podcast like you're facilitating here where people are having coversation. You get more three dimensional examples rather than the one dimensional. Just talk talk at you. Here's the lesson so it's like parents having a real life conversation with their kids rather than one dimensional. I'm gonna talk at yet. Here's the rules. We paying attention. Yeah exactly exactly i love. I love the perspective and i think it's <hes> yeah we see. Examples of people actually talking about it then we what i think it's also important that we we have an opinion from another person of something and that helps us choose is easy more easily <hes> one way or another. If we agree over we we we don't agree or <hes> if that actually works and one thing <hes> that really works for us is and one thing that i would love to who and this interview with is go to <hes> g._p. Sears youtube channel facebook if you like and follow follow him and other than the entertaining that you entertain that you will get from that <hes> my advice is to also look at him mm-hmm as <hes> someone living his passion and living. He's authentic self and try to lie like g._p. Said to get inspired expired by that then. I'm sure that that will bring from yourself as well..

youtube cullman facebook foale five minutes forty five minutes eleven hundred percent Five minutes one percent
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

16:26 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"The next day when he was talking to my fiancee on the phone she's like how was that and i'm like i was so surprised that i it was like pretty pleasant the whole time because normally like i get caught up dammit life. Why're you doing alertness in the same long story short as i digress. I think a great opportunity for all of us when we're on the path of gratitude is is make sure we have a gratitude in strength attitude of gratitude and strengthening situations challenging times. It's harder but it's way more beneficial show than if we only have gratitude when it's convenient definitely i love this story and i think it teaches us something really important and from my discussions and from my experiences well. It's it's like a muscle. I like you said the fact that you have a stronger muscle. In those kinds of situations situations you were able to <hes> to to put up with that not to put up but actually <hes> find things that are that are good tara k and that changes your experience because you and also all of those people have had the same experience basically and <hes> the the beautiful part about cultivating this as a habit is the fact that when those kinds of experiences arise you're table to deal with them differently and and this is actually and i think this is an important thing to <hes> to point out for instance when people see you they see you in your in your <hes> videos. They might see onstage or <hes> in different kinds of situations. When you're <unk> estar. Let's say and <hes> they they don't see the the fact that you still have to go through these kinds of situations as well because you're human also and it's important to see that when we when we see people people that are successful and they seem to have a perfect life they still go through this kinds of things but the fact that you have this <hes> this habit has helped you go through them in a different way more pleasant way and i think this is very important because usually when we we as is a society as humans we tend to follow people <hes> and that seemed to have the perfect life because we think if we're going to be identified successful one way we are not that we will every all of our plant problems will go away and everything will be perfect. And how boring would that be in house. Everything's perfect which means we don't have any stimulus to make us grow. We don't have any challenges to make us grow exactly yeah. I think there's some times when we i think we can all fall into that trap. You point now where we look on social media in see people like wow who really living a perfect life like that's us playing a trick honor cells. We're looking social media. It's not meant to be like a journal where we see people's <music> <unk> challenges like social media. It's not meant to be a whole life broadcasting system. It's like here's a frigging picture of me and i <hes> i can take a picture of me like having diarrhea on the toilet <hes> so i i think we can play that trick on ourselves as a way of deflecting leading her celts and sometimes we really get our emotional needs met by deflecting ourselves. It's just self bullying. It's not a constructive way of getting our emotional needs met but it's it's a way of stimulating ourselves. Emotionally that will be getting their needs met in a crappy way just like eating junk food is a way we're trying to meet our emotional or are nutritional needs. It's a very ideal way. It's not effective but it's a way that people feed themselves nutritionally so yeah i do my best to remind myself self and others often that everybody shits out of their asshole like no matter how glorious they look you. We know <unk> on social media. We all over bus hints okay. We all have our crap. Were working on. We all have the things that we think our flaws. We all have shortcomings. We all have our bad days. We all have bad moves in. I think in a good scenario we just minimize how long were in the bed mood. How long were depressed a maybe we we get depressed less frequently but we're always there and i by no means what i want to trick anybody into thinking that i'm any less human than anybody else and i would also. I'm encouraged everybody to know that every other human as as human as you that's lovely that's lovely and it's a really great reminder because even though we we might think we know this and the fact that you told us this is very important and very comforting somehow how because we sometimes like you said and i love your episodes on social media as well like you said we see the highlights of other people's lives we compared them and we we get to feel bad and it's not doing anyone any good and not the tar selves or they're the ones around us and yeah it's. It's a really great reminder absolutely infecting the in terms of the the shine the glory would be the challenge the tough times in man those tough times. That's that is the stimulus for our growth. That is the stimulus for our fulfillment in our personal. Oh expansion so the tough times be it a bad mood a break up a challenging time financially at anger the those tough times are not only okay. They are freaking important. They they are absolutely <hes> <hes> seeds seeds of growth seeds of change seeds of healing so men. If we didn't have those we would be pretty handicapped apt. I don't think we can grow in less for challenge and a lotta times <unk> challenges if we think they're bad because other people on on social media period adam so i think we should actually celebrate them. Instead of having shame about them well this. This is amazing. So how can we do do that. Actually because i love the idea of so like you said unlike curb we all do i have changes myself and <hes> seeing them as has growing opportunities and seeing seeing this whole process as growth is is really interesting and i think it can be really helpful for for our listeners yeah so you know the first step of how to see a challenge is a growth experience and accepted as a growth experience for me starts with realizing just because something feels bad doesn't mean it's bad for us. I think the number the number one factor in helping people become successful in fulfil is their willingness to get uncomfortable period. I don't think uncomfortable feelings have ever hurt anybody. I think trying to avoid are uncomfortable. Feelings hurts us so when when we have this attitude like <hes> feeling depressed feeling challenged feeling defeated feeling scared when we have the attitude that those are bad things that they're not really okay then. We're going to be an avoidance posture. The the challenge might be right in front of us us instead of going towards it into it can posture so selene away from it so we're avoiding getting uncomfortable and in that keeps us from going into the challenge in there for that keeps us from growing so i think once we realized like not only is it okay to be uncomfortable. Being uncomfortable is the number one factor in growing getting more successful getting more fulfilled old inside getting more genuine happiness then we can realize okay. It's actually okay for me to go into the discomfort in do whatever whatever it is. Whatever the doing is that might be who here's this new adventure it might be. I'm gonna be in this depression so i feel these feelings so i can digest them rather than in having the feelings but being perpetually trained to avoid them so i did a little bit a a journaling last week in you know here we are january. Two thousand eighteen is talking so i just woke up. I wanna reflect on two thousand seventeen in and i wrote down all the experiences that i could think of that. Were worthy of celebration. I'm capable at celebrating so it's like wow what a great pattern interim. Let me look at the things that are important celebrate so i listed them all out a midnight. Who's now fiance. Got engage those other great ones transients thank you i launched my book. I did a lot of performances at book events. I i co hosted a a big cool thing called genius network. I went on a comedy tour as signed on to do a documentary. I've stopped wearing my head been when i'm on stage won't go into that but it was really important to me so i just taking those it. I looked at every freezing on one of these experiences that were worthy of celebration and they were all riddled with discomfort. None of them were comfortable comfortable. They they all had joy. They all had great benefit in growth but they all scared the hell out of me. They were all in comfortable so i was very grateful. In going towards discomfort is absolutely one of my core values but it is interesting to see like like every single one of these experiences worthy of celebration. That really helped me expand. They all had immense discomfort not a little bit. Eh intimidation a little bit of like oh. That's kind of scary but like i am really scared doing this. I am really scared. Saint yesterday in comedy shows in theaters. I'm really scared getting engage. My heart says yes scares the hell out of my mind but i did it anyway so being willing to be uncomfortable in doing the thing anyway be afraid and take action anyway. I think is one of the best mantras we can have so that we can grow from a challenge. I love it. I love it and georgia and yes. I think it's it's it's just amazing using to do that. Then <hes> doing like you said that journaling is also great a actually the a series as of episodes with each and every month of the year two thousand seventeen and <hes>. I shared my my own three things that the were great about out <hes> that particular months like january of decision in in total and <hes> i encouraged the gratitude seekers also to do the same and i think it's really powerful because it creates a great and they're g for two thousand eighteen and four setting the goals for for the the next year when you when you feel fulfilled in you understand how many amazing things have happened in the past months you you get there really the different kinds of vibe to to go forward and they and they love that you you've been doing that as well and it's awesome so <hes> what they also i wanted to ask you is <hes>. When did you start writing in the gratitude journal like how did that happen because there there might be listeners of ours that the want to start this <hes> gratitude journaling and they might need some inspiration of how to get started or listen to your stories and take some things interesting yeah you know at a let's see at like i've always known that gratitude awesome yeah okay but actually doing it his much different so it. It took me a while of just hearing people talk about it. <hes> you know the hearing a lot of wonderful happy. Fulfil people doing really exciting things in life hearing so many of them talk about out a simple gratitude journaling practice in the morning to finally i think the tipping point for me i was at tony robbins event unleash the power within which is just a beautiful amazing experience so grateful to have had the chance attend enduring the event. Tony talked about his like quick morning routine gratitude journaling as part of it feeling the feelings of gratitude. I think that was a tipping point. When i heard tony talk about his nudges write it down but then feel the feelings of gratitude it clicked because i think there was a part of me that just thought like like talking about gratitude raining down like that doesn't deal beneficial and i don't think it is beneficial by really grounding into the feelings of gratitude not that makes it immensely beneficial so after after that event. I thought we'll tony's morning routine. I'm gonna give it a shot for a week after week. I'll if i don't like it off. Throw it away. I'll take parts of it if i like it so men that the gratitude journaling was just something that stuck in on the screen here araf y'all can see it just varies cool shore three simple things i write down that takes maybe twenty seconds and then another minute or or two or three to feel it so you know one of the things that doesn't work for me as a bigger elaborate process that takes a long time in the morning 'cause then and i feel like it's like it's taking away from day rather than adding to it and i. I think there's probably a lot of different ways to do gratitude journaling but for me it's the writing is the shortest part feeling that that's the most meaningful cart i love it. I love it and i loved the idea so there is his research on this and what's important is not so much to have a huge lists like one hundred reasons why you're grateful each and every day but uh-huh actually go deep and i think that you're doing this in a very intelligent way like i love the fact thank you right like one row and afterwards you go deep on the feeling and for me for instance this this is a great right idea and i hope that <hes> me pointing. This out is helpful for our listeners as well so <hes> you you don't need to write this march which but what is important to go deep on the feeling and i love i love the idea and it it might <hes> make for having more time and adding to your your time. I love this idea as well like when you think of doing this practice like adding your the day you just it's. It's something very important in your brain you think oh so. This is adding his not taking time away but it's actually something that yeah..

tony robbins depression georgia twenty seconds
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

13:01 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"Host of our podcast georgian bente high gratitude seeker welcome to this really special episode wrote with an amazing person. I've had a really beautiful <hes> peach at twitter with him his humorous really authentic and he is really authentic and he just changed my state as we were speaking and it was just amazing i think so <hes> his name is j. P. sears most. Probably you know about him or if you don't you should because what what he's done and what i really admire about him is that he brought up some things that were not easy to speak about ten some things that were really serious regarding spirituality in general and the the the lies that we actually tell ourselves sometimes and for me it was really deliberating and to see how how he managed to put the a really entertaining way and to to bring people do pay attention to this is really amazing and <hes> really inspirational for me. He has been on youtube and the for quite a while alan. He's had like millions of fuse with his <hes> really smart and really humorous videos and i'm jackie is here with us right now and we will get to spend some time with him so i'm very grateful for that j._p. Thank you so much for being here with as yea. You're walking georgia appreciate you having me on brother neff initially my pleasure my pleasure so firstly. I'm so what they say in the beginning is that <hes> beyond the the humorous side. You are a really deep person and i really feel that you have not just the knowledge but you're actually leaving somehow and you're helping people as as a life coach right. I hope that time i'm saying that <hes> right and maybe we're both wrong so yet so there's more to you than just the humorous bartender i think that's important for our listeners to know and they will definitely find out in now. What was to come in in the in the next twenty thirty minutes so <hes> thank you so much again for being here and my first question for view is what does gratitude mean for your personality and it timmy gratitude means being deeply connected to do what we have in the present moment period so deep connection. If i were really summarizing eh deep connection wonderful. Why can i ask what does it mean to you. Well my definition of whoa or the the feeling that i get is <hes> very much related to <hes> brother david <hes> steinem rust. Something like this is is his name. He says that the gratitude is the great fullness or gratefulness is the great fullness of life and i think this this just encapsulates this perfectly like the great fullness of life of course in the present moment because you can only experience experience the fullness of life when you're very present and <hes> yeah that that's for me the definition in hawaii. I best relate to gratitude attitude man. I think i like your definition better than mine. So now i feel inferior about talking to you george in and i'm not grateful talking with you now. I i love the though in timmy there's there's a lot of parallels in the definition but that's a beautiful mutiple. Look at it. The great solis rife yeah. Yeah i love it and i've researched gratitude quite latin. I've spoken in too many people on this and i really feel that this resonates best with me and it is the the best way to to feel it actually and to to understand it from from the heart somehow <hes> but there are all kinds of things like <hes> people are saying that they are grateful very lightly many times and <hes> there are all kinds of things of this nature that we sometimes do or that people sometimes do and <hes> i was wondering if you would like <hes> do share with us a few things that you've been seeing seeing people do that are not actually the way we should approach gratitude in 'harmonious way yeah you know and i'm gonna fall into the category of people who sometimes gratitude in a way that's maybe not as <hes> potentially it it is we can you know i don't know about you but i remember needing a kid. Whenever someone gave me something my parents would say well now. Say thank you. I'd say thank you but i wouldn't mean it. I i mean that's probably a great practice to have with kids. It instills like i think that's a positive thing but that doesn't necessarily surly teach <unk> centered gratitude is more like my mind is remembering is say. This is a little more approval. Life is good and i think a a lot of us myself included a lotta times will approach gratitude like a mental concept will be theoretical like like yeah. I am grateful for that but but it doesn't mean we're feeling grateful it means i think i'm grateful and that's like that's a cool step in the right direction but i think we can really really get to the heart of the matter which is our own hearts when we look at gratitude not as a mental concept but feeling so i've actually got my gratitude journal here that i'm writing every morning and it'd be funny if it's not it's just like it's a black gut but i wanted to impress you. It has my gratitude journal title informing. What's most important. I write down three things that each morning but that's not the most important part of the <unk> more important part is after right right down each one. I closed my eyes and i sit and i feel the feelings of gratitude associated with each item and i think that stealing the feeling of gratitude that's where our life becomes very positively impacted by gratitude and and i think another important thing with gratitude that can be <unk> fall. Is we need to be grateful for what we have. I think sometimes when we drank a a little bit of positive thinking coup ladle too much we get into this mindset where we're trying to trick life into giving us what we want by the way i don't necessarily i think that what we want is what we need. Sometimes i think a lotta times are once just comes from our ego. That says enough is never enough so in so we can become like well. I'm grateful for the money. That's coming towards me. I'm grateful for the ferrari. That'll be in my driveway next year because i've got my vision board but i think real gratitude has do with what do i have now in. How can i feel the feelings in the body's sensations about what what i have now because i think we're either grateful for what we have or were resentful for what we don't have in. You mentioned that earlier. We're about gratitude being a way to get really present in the moment so i think it's a great reminder to be cognizant of the idea like let's be grateful for what i have and then lastly stop stop <unk> rambling here. I think there's easy gratitude attitude in then. There's what i would call strengthening gratitude which of course would be. It's challenging like right now. It's easy for me to be grateful like i'm in line of sunshine coming in my window talking to you and your awesome. You feel peaceful like there's no there really challenging me right now. Got a plastic turtle on my desk so i got life by the balls right now so this is easy gratitude and and i think it's great for us to remind ourselves like yeah. Let's even feel grateful when it's easy but i don't think that helps us grow much. I don't think it really takes us deeper into your heart's dislike. You know if you if you can bench press a hundred pounds but you only put ten pounds on the bar. You're not gonna be getting that much stronger from it. It's easy weightlifting but it's like okay. You can only bench press one hundred pounds and you put ninety nine on the bar or hundred one now now. It's like okay when i'm challenged in life when i'm stressed out when i'm scared now is the time where if i can have an attitude of gratitude the tude in the even field grateful in those challenging circumstances that is helping me grow. I think it's helping me grow stronger. I'd only might resolve of growing more gratitude in my life. I think it's helping me as a person expand beyond my limits so <hes> and i'll tell you <hes> last week at so quick. Close story was hard for me to be grateful for. In the moment i i was is flying from costa rica whereas with fiancee to new york where it's going to be helping a wonderful company mm-hmm sponsored by called on human optimization company doing a nationwide launch across all the whole foods in the u._s. cool so i was in a going to new york to help that lunch and a big winter storm hit so from costa rican flying north got to florida. My connecting flight to new york was cancelled campfire theory tonight. The rescheduled me for the next morning at six a._m. Cool so get to their report and were we're about to land in new york. We're in new york and huge snowstorm in they divert us at the last minute can't land snow is falling so hard the pilots highlights don't have enough visibility so they divert the <hes> the flight a few hundred miles over to pittsburgh cool. I i am grateful i. I'm i'm i'm very safe so we're in pittsburgh for seven hours after seven hours of waiting and you know the next days of product launch. Can i really want to be there to support the company that they say okay. We're gonna put everybody on buses and bus you over to new york. The nine hour bus ride in granted only a plane full of people now. Do you think it's a plane full of happy people at this point not even close so i'm seeing the worst commodity people and i i was so grateful that i actually maintain a grateful attitude most of the day which is weird like. I'm grateful that i'm grateful right now. So then there. I am you know after a long day of being in the airport and at just like i'm physically uncomfortable now. I'm on a bus for nine hours and i'm on a bus for nine hours with people well who are pretty darn angry so led a stress lot of chaos in. I won't pretend that i loved it but i will say hey i was i was very blessed to maintain my attitude of gratitude in that moment where grunted like wow. I'm i'm warm orm. I'm safe in like i'm being taken to new york like i could have easily missed this event. I could easily be somewhere where i'm not cold. I'm not sure where i'm cold. I'm not safe. I don't have food t. so it was nice to be grateful for what i had god in that moment on the crowded bus rather than just being resentful of what i don't have and i won't pretend like i'm the dalai lila. I'm always attitude feeling of gratitude tough circumstances the next day when he was talking to my fiancee on the phone she's like how was that and i'm like i was so surprised that i it was like pretty.

new york twitter youtube jackie georgia neff pittsburgh alan j. P. dalai lila david hawaii george ferrari costa rica florida seven hours nine hours twenty thirty minutes one hundred pounds
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

10:13 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"Are car and this this actually helps us also to be to be more okay with our weirdness and i think this is this is also for ask because <hes> actually one of the ways that we are learning is <hes> through seeing what other people are doing and and the fact that you are authentic helps us be more authentic as well and yeah i just i think i just wanted to say thank you for what you're welcome. Look i appreciate your seeing that way. Georgian and it's nice to hide my dirt in. Have you just recognize the the beauty of may does mean a lot to me <hes> but yeah yeah i've got plenty of skeletons in the closet of instant worked in unto definitely i'm. I'm sure that your human i mean i hope you're human. Not i'm actually mostly turtle okay significant human yeah and this own for instance this is this is what i love and the fact that we for instance our listeners right now <hes> so or when they will be listening. We're talking on and on it's normal. It's something that okay they might. I pay attention attention or not but when you have a moment like this being so fantastic surreal it just freezes the brain is like what what did he just say and you become more aware of this and i think it's <hes> it's something that we can all bring to the surface and bring to the world and and <hes> it's something that once we learned to appreciate and to see and helps us quite a lot and for your living an example of that that we can <hes> do great work and help many people by being ourselves and i think this is this is very important for i ah i live by thinking that examples are the most powerful we can talk for hours but if we see someone actually do that that that speaks like much more than we can speak here than ours of podcasting so man. I i agree with you. Under the percent i think talk that leads to action leads to examples. There's the real impact. It's just like when when parents have rules rules. They tell the kids don't do this. Don't do that but then the parents go and do that thing. We realize kids learn by example the it's like the the words are maybe one percent of the learning. The example is ninety nine percents before her name and i think when we realize that as you clearly clearly heaven i love how you pointed out. We can use that to our benefit. I love to see the examples of other people. I think we can learn from anybody. Nobody <unk> especially the people that we consider inspiring a inspire not us to act like them but they inspire are true sells to come out to a greater degree that i love seeing people in their essentially example expressions you know i love listening listening to them but it's like then. I think that's why there's magic hanging around someone unit has got dinner and they might not be lecturing view but it's like i learned more during that dinner and i think that's you know i've been really into podcast for the past few years the i i very rarely listen to books on tape but i because i feel like i don't learn too much but i feel like i learned a hell of a lot or or from podcast because i think it's more example oriented because especially with a podcast like you're facilitating here where people are having coversation. You get more three dimensional examples rather than the one dimensional. Just talk talk at you. Here's the lesson so it's like parents having a real life conversation with their kids rather than one dimensional. I'm gonna talk at yet. Here's the rules. We kids like paying attention. Yeah exactly exactly i love. I love the perspective and i think it's <hes> yeah we see. Examples of people actually talking about it then we what i think it's also important that we we have an opinion from another person of something and that helps us choose is easy more easily <hes> one way or another. If we agree over we we we don't agree or <hes> if that actually works and one thing <hes> that really works for us is and one thing that i would love to who and this interview with is go to <hes> g._p. Sears youtube channel facebook if you like and follow follow him and other than the entertaining that you entertain that you will get from that <hes> my advice is to also look at him mm-hmm as <hes> someone living his passion and living. He's authentic self and try to lie like g._p. Said to get inspired expired by that then. I'm sure that that will bring from yourself as well. It will bring that <hes> that that magical side that <hes> that gives that do you have that you can give us like he does beautiful words brother. Thank you for s- pressing <unk> site. Yes i feel a lot of benefit in here knows my other people do too bad. Thank you for saying that's yeah my pleasure. It's it really comes from the hardest. Not just something that the to say into words but also so as a closing thought could you you share with us. What and cool you are grateful for in your life right now. In the first i who that comes to my mind i mean there's many of them but the first one is slave beautiful fiancee amber i mean just beyond in gratitude for her being lay life and is specifically it right now. We're were apart. She's running a retreat costa three kosovo specifically out last night that the time we took the talk via skype was just beautiful hoshi smiles how she she shares her challenges. She gets playful with me. I am very in how she cheers in supports me. She believes leaves them very very grateful for her and then you know the the what ungrateful for you right now. I'm very very grateful. I'm in a a nice home and swarm. It's comfortable what you now nate wonderful trees so <music>. I'm definitely experiencing a what that i'm grateful for and i think <hes> roy moore combination of who in what i'm very grateful unfold for you in this conversation. This is feels good to me this connection. I communicating with you so i feel very great for in fact they feel the gratitude is sorta like tingling by chest about our conversation. I love it. I love it and i hope that our listeners i have gotten some of your feeling some of your graduated and also mine of course and <hes> thank you so much which for being here and for being so present and for having such a great conversation thinking. You're very welcome georgie and thank you for having me on brother. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you've enjoyed this interview as much as we've enjoyed doing it. I think honestly honestly is one of the best interviews that i've ever did and <hes> g._p. Was certainly one of the best guests that i ever had and if you enjoyed this interview please share it with your friends with your family. I think g._p. Release share some amazing tips for for all of us. I certainly got some great tips from him and some really good inspiration and also if you're <hes> on brand new listener to gratitude podcast i invite you to subscribe because there are many many other very interesting interviews on gratitude on life stories in general that you can learn from quite a lot and that can inspire you to live of more grateful and the more happy life. My vision with the podcast is to inspire one hundred thousand people to discover gratitude dude how they can do it each and every day how to create the habit and how to leave a happier life and they would really appreciate your support in helping me do this and making this vision a reality. Thank you so much for listening for sharing and for for taking the time to be with us and to connect thank you so much. Hey gratitude seeker. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen. Listen to this interview. I really appreciate it and if you could think of one person that would also benefit from it. Share it with them. It might actually be the the inspiration that they need to make their day or maybe even their life much better. Thank you so much once again. This has been georgia banta though forget had to keep seeking and spreading gratitude.

youtube kosovo georgia roy moore georgie facebook skype one percent
"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

13:29 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"Uncomfortable so i was very grateful in going towards discomfort is absolutely one of my core values but it is interesting to see like like every single one of these experiences worthy of celebration. That really helped me expand. They all had immense discomfort not a little bit. Eh intimidation a little bit of like oh. That's kind of scary but like i am really scared doing this. I am really scared. Saint yesterday in comedy shows in theaters. I'm really scared getting engage. My heart says yes scares the hell out of my mind but i did it anyway so being willing to be uncomfortable in doing the thing anyway be afraid and take action anyway. I think is one of the best mantras we can have so that we can grow from a challenge. I love it. I love it and georgia and yes. I think it's it's it's just amazing using to do that than doing like you said that journaling is also great a actually the a series as of episodes with each and every month of the year two thousand seventeen and <hes> i shared my my own three things that the were great about out <hes> that particular months like january thirty six in in total and <hes> i encouraged the gratitude seekers also due to do the same and i think it's really powerful because it creates a great and they're g for two thousand eighteen and four setting the goals for for the the next year when you when you feel fulfilled in you understand how many amazing things have happened in the past months you you get there really the different kinds of vibe to to go forward and they and they love that you you've been doing that as well and it's awesome so <hes> what they also i wanted to ask you is <hes>. When did you start writing in the gratitude journal like how did that happen because there there might be listeners of ours that the want to start this <hes> gratitude journaling and they might need some inspiration of how to get started or listen to your stories and take some things interesting yeah you know at a let's see at like i've always known that gratitude awesome yeah okay but actually doing it is much different so it. It took me a while of just hearing people talk about it. <hes> <hes> you know the hearing a lot of wonderful happy fulfil people doing really exciting things in life hearing so many of them talk about how a simple gratitude journaling practice in the morning to finally i think the tipping point for me i was at tony robbins event unleash the power within which is just a beautiful amazing experience so grateful to have had the chance attend enduring the event. Tony talked about his like quick morning routine gratitude journaling as part of it feeling the feelings of gratitude. I think that was a tipping point. When i heard tony talk about his nudges write down but then feel the feelings of gratitude it clicked because i think there was a part of me that just thought like like talking about gratitude raining down like that doesn't deal beneficial and i don't think it is beneficial but really grounding into the feelings of gratitude not that makes it immensely beneficial so after after that event. I thought we'll tony's morning routine. I'm gonna give it a shot for a week after a week if i don't like it. I'll throw it away. I'll take parts of it if i like it so men that the gratitude journaling was just something that stuck in just showing on the screen here araf y'all can see it just varies cool shore three simple things i write down that takes maybe twenty seconds and then another minute or or two or three to feel it so you know one of the things that doesn't work for me as a bigger elaborate process that takes a long time in the morning 'cause then and i feel like it's like it's taking away from day rather than adding to <unk>. I think there's probably a lot of different ways to do gratitude journaling but for me it's the writing is shortest part feeling that that's the most meaningful cart i love it. I love it and i loved the idea so there is his research on this and what's important is not so much to have a huge lists like one hundred reasons why you're grateful each and every day but uh-huh actually go deep and i think that you're doing this in a very intelligent way like i love the fact thank you right like one row and afterwards you go deep on the feeling and for me for instance this this is a great right idea and i hope that <hes> me pointing. This out is helpful for our listeners as well so <hes> you you don't need to write this march which but what is important to go deep on the feeling and i love i love the idea and it it might make for having more time and adding to your your time. I love this idea as well like when you think of doing this practice like adding your the day you just it's. It's something very important in in your brain you think oh so. This is adding his not taking time away but it's actually something that yeah. It's it's it's beautiful. I love it eleven hundred percent. I think it was something i've learned about. People who who live what i would call inspirational lives allowed at times. The mindset isn't what will it cost me. What kind of time will that cost me but more. What will that be worth to me. It's like taking five minutes to do gratitude journaling the the while that's going to cost me five minutes. I think is a very poverty consciousness mindset but asking what will that be worth to me gene. Will i find personally immersing myself in the the feeling in the biochemicals of gratitude early in the morning one that makes me way more productive throughout the day so investing five minutes i would dare say gets me at least forty five minutes. It's worth of more productivity no more time throughout the day but just forty five minutes more worth of productivity because i'm in a happier state by mind is working cleaner and more connected to my intuition more connected to my heart in my perception changes throughout the day. You know i meant. I was really in a great frame of you've mentioned of gratitude last week. I mentioned the whole airport experience. I'd been consistent with my gratitude journaling which really helped train me for. Here's a tough day so was it worth me taking five minutes in the morning to have a day where i was actually feeling cullman peaceful fall versus a day where i just feel like i'm in broken glass inside. I'm angry absolute. That five minutes had a it was well worth yeah. It was worth way more than i could put words to so yeah. What what will this gratitude journaling be worth to me rather than thinking how many minutes this is gonna cost me. I think it's important mindset that inspirational people tend to have whether they know it or not in then angry people tend to have has the mindset that says it'll cost me time. I don't have time for that l. Take away from me watching the tv and i gotta watch the news on t._v. So that i can know what to be angry about out of it. I think you you put some really good questions. I hope that our listeners there's war <hes> aware of the subtlety of our of your question so something that you as listeners can ask yourselves who when you're listening what is this bringing into my life and not what it costs. I think this is very very powerful and like you said with the productivity and everything it's an amazing perspective. Thank you really. I didn't think i could learn so much <hes> <hes> so many new things about gratitude but i am still learning and even though i've been exploring it for quite a while and i'm sure that our listeners have been doing this as aw but i i want to talk a little bit about something that <hes> you promote and that i think it's very important for all of us. It's about appreciating ourselves and <hes> being grateful for ourselves one way or another and i'm talking about being weird absolutely yeah. I think it sometimes it's easier. Take appreciate and be grateful for other people. It's like cool but let's treat ourselves the way we treat other people i think some people it's like the real challenge is being appreciative of our selves so i think the the real beauty to be grateful for about ourselves is our uniqueness our weirdness. I think weirdness is a gluten free bread crumb trail that leads us to our authenticity titi and and you know how i look at myself now what i appreciate the least about myself is when i act it's normal. I think acting normal is another way of saying not being yourself but yet act normal in a way of like we'll. We'll let me act the way everybody else acts. Let me can form and you know. Sometimes you do that. If you drive in a car it's great tact normal normal <unk>. Let me do self-expression here color outside the lines like no. Let's be normal but i think the time in place for deem normal will isn't all the time everywhere i think we we have the ratio backwards where most of the time most of us act normal maybe lending diener beautiful weird authenticity out a little bit of the time i think we should foot that i think most of the time we should be meaner weird authentic selves in then in. We do a little bit of normal when it will serve us. Well like driving our car so my experience with weirdness was was when i was a child the weirdness uniqueness authenticity about me. That's what i had the most shame about like i'd be made fun of it. Sometimes i only the ever read hair. You see things differently. Excuse me so. I think a lot of times as children we learn to be ashamed of what makes us ourselves because it makes different but then we can flip the script on that one. We're adults it when we start to wake yup. We realized like oh weirdness. It deserves to be celebrated because it's what makes me different. 'cause i gave when we're a kid like the last lastingly one is to be different but when we're an adult the the less different we are the more differentiated we are which means we're able to find ourselves. More doc was able to celebrate ourselves more. I think when we do that we inspire other people to do do it for themselves. I don't know what the purpose of life is but i would dare say that have something to do with the purpose of your life is for you to live your life and i don't think we are living. Our lives lives when we're acting like other people were acting normal. I think we are much more at living our lives when we're being unapologetically weird when we're being authentic authentic. I love it. I love it and one more thing that i think this helps us with is the fact that we can find <music>. Our place in the world when we're trying to much to conform is it's really hard for us to where we're going to do the things that everybody does and sometimes this just doesn't work for us and we feel that we know that this is not supposed to do and you know i know where you just know and many people have been through this but i think that this is exactly what they also appreciate about. You is that you're you're a living example of that like all of your your weirdness. Your <hes> the things that you might have been ashamed over something like this. In in in the past you are bringing them to the surface and your gifting us with them and with.

tony robbins georgia cullman five minutes forty five minutes eleven hundred percent twenty seconds
"jp sears" Discussed on The Captain's Log with Host Brien Spina Podcast

The Captain's Log with Host Brien Spina Podcast

10:09 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on The Captain's Log with Host Brien Spina Podcast

"We are going to be outra spiritual. Today. My guess JP Sears live on the counters log. Thanks, buddy. Thanks for joining me. Yeah, you're welcome, brother. I, I have no choice because in the car in the doors locked, I like to tell the viewers, I like to take it just to be nice. But clearly wasn't like you were going to get a ride or walk every other way, except to be with me. And I'm super happy to be Here here with with you, you. my friend. Well. Hey, we're Abel's Florida actually Fort Myers heading to Naples. But I'm honored to have you. You are blowing up everywhere. You're on this tour now what's is their actual name for the tour. No, though, if I were to name, it would be the never ending tour, because it's just sort of, like, you know, when okay here's the last state on the schedule. Then more days, just keep getting, which is a joy. I love it. I source. Yeah. The never ending tour, the tour that never stop. Right. Well, we are we're excited. I mean it's, it's amazing. What you've done. Tell me how,.

Florida JP Sears Fort Myers Naples Abel
"jp sears" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:58 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Boy be well had a boy to your wife lasted five years. It's all over is now for five years and change. And hopefully, I can keep fooling for another couple of decades. What what are you doing? What are you going? We're we're going to go down to comedy works downtown and see lower L on the show today. You guys had yesterday. We had him on yesterday. I think I inadvertantly hosed you on a question because I had heard him on a podcast talk about where he got his name. So I should ask him about his name because names, Milton? But it's you you, you know, they're kind of started the whole interview often the bad foot. So we have little role in studio on the FOX yesterday morning b k texts me he goes to make sure you ask him about his name. So that's like the first, you know, we kinda hey, how you doing? Hey, how'd you get the name little row any kind of? Why why people ask me that all the time because that's such a white person question. Let let let me let me just can. I ask Rick and ask you a question. Did you not know that text was from vk, I knew it was from be your fault. But I thought maybe you saw him interviewed somewhere, and he gave you a really good answer. I heard him and I had to backpedal onto that he was on Mark man's podcast. But that's an hour and a half kind of format and he's ready to tell stories marks a fellow comedian. He gave this great story about how it's not even his name. It's his cousin. And so he lay Rick out there. I really comes the typical white dude. But it seems like another white person screwed you even more some other white person screwed up his name. And it seemed like you you've just in a bad another white person this lady during some award show called him little Ray. So that he got mad about that up twice while he was venting. He brings up that story. Just like, you know, that's the little. You know, that's a very common name little. And then I'm unlike. Yeah. I said my daughter whose name is Jordan, I called her little Jay. Little Miller little and he's like, oh, okay. That's cool. So I took us like maybe seventy got a little bit of your white dude card back finally. And then we had a good interview with them. But you you torpedo that whole not if you're not on purpose. But then I apologized on your behalf. I go. Hey that was kind of my fault. I had heard John Mary. And so he was coming into ours. He goes, well, it's a really good sports story because it happened to basketball practice, and then we never even asked him about his name was Durell. So that's where he got the little Durell. It's a little rally, but he's not now. Cousin played on the same basketball team. And the guy goes oh your little drill. Anyway. Yeah. Thanks for that breath. I think. Is funny. I'll let you know how it goes. I guess he was tired yesterday. And he came right in first thing, he said, I'm really tired. You better think he's funny you're taking your wife to see him on your university anniversary. She loves going to see any comedian. I have a pretty high standard like. They need to make everybody laugh. I need to know that they're one of the they do great job with these guys in the morning, but she's like Agassi anybody like we saw that DJ. Go with you. Right. Yeah. She knows. Okay. ABC's funnier on his videos any a stand up. Just a fact I could tell he wasn't a stand up. We had him on the morning show. Cool guy very Zanu JP Sears. He's not. He's not a stand up comic now. So I I bet a lot of people went in. What what is this? I just think of the motivate you like it because of the YouTube stuff she likes she watches, everyone who's video. I'll watch a couple of this is funny. I don't I'm not subscribed to the channel. But that's why we went and then he wasn't as funny as those videos because the videos are really funny. But I just think it's a tough deal for comedians who are kind of nocturnal by nature they perform at night and then like, hey, get to town. And we're gonna take you to twelve media interviews already. It's a lose lose our buddy Brian Callans coming in April. I'm gonna go see him. Yeah. He is one funny comedy show. Good fifth anniversary. I mean, I don't know. I bought the traditional gift which would about her a nice. What the traditional fifth anniversary gift is. Would you? Conditional? I don't know because because there's this table she really wanted from furniture store. Really nice. You bought her a table? Like an end table. It's like intricate trees painted silver would table, really. Where's the dinner going to be? Let's let's say this thing with meant so much on the table. I think I'm going to go to Wendy's. I told her not to buy anything because I'm like, I spent both of our budgets on would. Yeah. A beer tap handle. For the greater. Nice nice. They keep to yourself. I'm going to say what would like you follow the traditional glass would. I'm just trying to picture her like opening saying, oh, it's a table. She didn't open it. It was waiting for downstairs. I snuck it in from the car after she fell asleep, while she's way too classy to tell you what she thought. So I mean, I'm sure I'm sure it was a good. I this is the table. She's wanted for a couple of years, and in fact, eight and suggested she by for me as a gift, so she can have it. Yeah. So she kind of had the idea that. Okay. Good then. So she was excited or legitimately acted extended. What is the table? She is quote dated for a couple of take her to Louisville. We don't ask them about his name. He starts doing crowd work. I hope he's funny. I bet you he movies. Remember when Dave Chapelle came in. He wasn't funny. But every one of his shows, he's the best. But he had a great bit. You know, he didn't play in the rock and or the celebrity basketball game. And he's in that movie uncle, drew. He's like the biggest star. That's not a basketball player, Reggie Miller, and Chris Webber and shack and Lisa, Leslie, and Gary and then him and he's like, and they don't even invite me they got other comedians. So he feels like he's slide and he's gonna do a whole docu series. He told us documentary leading up to like training for next year's celebrity game in his hometown of Chicago. Yeah. And they had Adam Ray. Probably like who's why do I do? I just smile and chuckle everytime. I see Brad Williams dribble. The ball. Twenty two and he said he played sports his whole life. The basketball before though was played sports. Listen. It's a different judging mechanism to say somebody has truly great handle in there. How tall is Izzy four four to the ball. I mean, honestly, but yeah, I mean, he he did he did dribble. It all way down the correct? It was like a mascot for the team know, Rick that's in your dreams. Joke. Played sports. Yeah. Don't remember that. Thanks bite. Soccer something you're saying. He he told us that he played high school sports. I. I'm texting him and asking him. Guys now on Monday. He jokes around about the he was the mascot the guy, you know, in the mascot. I'm telling you guys, go big for anniversaries at this point. After this many years. Not really, yeah. No. I don't it's supposed to taper off five just seemed like a big number maybe six dollars five. Would you even know what sixes rubber rubber latex late? Leather leather leather was three and I got her nice wallet. Nice. We're on a damn good night tonight. Thank you. On university. Said Hello to everybody had to have a good weekend. Michael Brandman for six I can do that. Our patch? Kids for everybody. KOA NewsRadio understanding.

basketball Rick Little Miller Adam Ray FOX Milton YouTube ABC Zanu JP Sears Dave Chapelle Mark man Louisville Durell Brian Callans Michael Brandman Agassi John Mary Jordan Chicago
"jp sears" Discussed on Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

"So I went from the super Christian private expensive school to being in public school. Where? Kids are having sex kids are talking about sex. There's kids smoking kids. Dress a certain way, they talk about things. I've never heard of before I'm thrown into it. And I am mmediately feel like I don't belong and at the same time. I'm going home alone to an empty house. Something's different. Something's weird. Something's wrong with me. And that was what? Opened up the door for the next belief of not being enough. I've spent a lot of time with my good, buddy. JP Sears and j p co host to the capitalism conference with me, he's become one of my best friends here in here in Austin, Texas, and JP talks a lot about embracing ones weirdness. And it's the idea of what makes you unique. What makes you you? And what I realized now is those were the the same things that are weird about me. Make me who I am that make me unique the same things that were that way when I was young when I was a kid when I was a child. And those are the things I love most about myself. I love the fact that I ask hard questions about business life money relationships religion that I bucked the trend that I'm constantly pursuing truth. Which is why I love getting haters on social media who tell me I'm going to hell or I'm a scam artist or whatever it is. I love getting that. Because I have to know exactly who I am and be committed to the pursuit of truth in order to deal with something like that. So I love that game. I also love my weird sense in music my sense in. I love David Archie leda, and like weird Carly Rae jepsen like pop EDM, and which is. Doesn't match a lot of the rest of my life. And I love that about it to like these weird weird things about me that make me who I am. For the same. When I was a kid. I'm still love baseball. The same way I loved baseball. When I was a kid..

baseball JP Sears David Archie leda Carly Rae Austin Texas
"jp sears" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"jp sears" Discussed on 1A

"And that thing is is that there is a western view of veganism, which makes sense because of how western the western world raises food, and and it's ideology, but this is not new you know, what I'm saying there's cultures that are thousands of years old that have vegan food in his part of the culture whether it's Indian or eat THEO paean or eating even the Rastafarian tradition. They all have vegan options because that's part of their life. So it's not a new thing at all. With regards to the idea of vegans being a little bit pushy. We wanted to play a quick clip from a comedy video that went viral back in twenty sixteen. Maybe you've seen it in your. Facebook feed at some point. This is J P Sears in video that's called. If meat eaters. Acted like vegans, listen, it's not the vegetable eaters are bad people just that they're terrible people this sausages a meat based vegetables substitute for cucumber. It's got the taste and the texture of an actual cucumber with none of the cucumber eating plants makes your body weight to alkaline, which will definitely kill you. You really want that? All you need is some meat to be healthy and thrive. You get everything you need for me. Beef is loaded with carbs JP. Sears in the video of meters. Acted like vegans, by the way, beef is not loaded with carbs. So please, let's just cross that off right there. But Stephanie I get the perception. I mean, he's he's obviously being a little hyperbolic, but there is a little a little, but, you know, I know lots of people I haven't counted it myself, very, well, meaning people who are vegan vegetarian, and when they find out that, you know, I love a good rebuy. And I'm not really willing to part with it. It manned is that spark an argument. It's happened to me more than once what's up with that. You know, I can identify because I think I one hundred percent used to be that way, especially when I was younger and a little bit newer to this diet. And you know, eighteen in thought I knew everything about everything as well. Eighteen year olds we sure do it. You know, I currently I have so many friends of varying diets I work in a vegan restaurant, and that's great. But not even you know, our staff isn't even all vegan by any means. It's not a requirement to work there. And you know. Like this like the pushy vegan is is frustrating. And it's like it is frustrating for me. Because I I think it's like more important to just get people interested in something, and you do that positively and by, you know, attacking somebody's views is probably not going to be the way to do it. And you know, I I certainly, you know, I know that there's times when all still like have a conversation with somebody. And we'll be talking about phobe talking about food because inevitably comes up and shore. Sometimes I catch myself being a little like, but you know, if you try and cut myself off because I know that that's just not going to be the way to make it work. We'll doctor we'll it looks to the flip side of this. What if those pushy vegans are, right? What if they are correct? That in a nation where a third of us are overweight or obese that we do need to back off from eating meat, beef, cheese, processed meats, processed foods. Refined sugars, the maybe we do need more plants in our diet that we are on a planet where carbon levels are rising because of human actions climate change is real what if the vegans a right pushier, not what does the evidence say in terms of who should win that argument. Yes. The evidence is absolutely clear that begins. I write that we need to be moving strongly in that direction. We have followed in our own research several hundred thousand people for now almost up to forty years and track them carefully overtime monitoring their diets monitoring who gets cancer who Kentucky's who dies, and it's very clear that people with a more plant based diet survived at our healthier in every way that we look at them including a better cognitive function. So, and it's very clear that from an environmental standpoint, this is going to be critical for again, the future of our future generations and part of it is that cattle are just..

J P Sears phobe Stephanie THEO Facebook Kentucky one hundred percent Eighteen year forty years