17 Burst results for "Joyce Sheridan"

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 5 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Large armoire had fallen over and blocked the entrance. They found John Sheridan's body under the armoire. He was stabbed and badly burned. The door blocked by the armoire would become a crucial detail for the detectives because if there was an intruder, how did that person get out? We're gonna need our rehabbing. Then they removed the body of Joyce Sheridan, who was lying on the floor by the bed. The firefighter who carried her out was covered in blood. We still working on the bar. From WNYC in New York, this is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. This week, how the efforts of a gumshoe reporter sometimes can maybe lead to change. Nancy Solomon is a longtime colleague in a reporter for OTM producing station WNYC in her new podcast dead end, a New Jersey political murder mystery. She tells the story of the death of a prominent couple in New Jersey, so it's a true crime cold case investigation. It's also a deep dive into the inner workings of how local politics work and don't. In the garden state. Nancy will take it from here. I live in New Jersey. And cover the state for WNYC. And that's almost a full-time political corruption beat. John Sheridan was connected to some of the most powerful politicians and movers and shakers in the state. And that was enough to make me follow every detail of this story. I was one of the first from the crime scene unit

John Sheridan Joyce Sheridan WNYC Nancy Solomon Brooke gladstone New Jersey New York Nancy
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

05:43 min | 5 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

"They finally got in, they found a large armoire had fallen over and blocked the entrance. They found John Sheridan's body under the armoire. He was stabbed and badly burned. The door blocked by the armoire would become a crucial detail for the detectives because if there was an intruder, how did that person get out? We're gonna need our rehabbing. Then they removed the body of Joyce Sheridan, who was lying on the floor by the bed. The firefighter who carried her out was covered in blood.

John Sheridan Joyce Sheridan
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

08:06 min | 5 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

"Listener supported WNYC studios. Earlier this year, the New Jersey attorney general opened up an investigation into the killings of John and Joyce Sheridan, a well-known couple with personal ties to three governors. In 2014, they were found stabbed to death, and their homes set on fire. This morning, the mystery deepens over the death of John and Joyce Sheridan, a prominent New Jersey couple with powerful connections and close friends of governor Chris Christie. The first responders who came into the door, the Sheridan home early the morning of September 28th, found what could only be described as a house of horror. Local police thought that John Sheridan murdered his wife and then killed himself. That was 8 years ago. So why is the attorney general revisiting the case now? Well, this year, our WNYC colleague Nancy Solomon released an investigation into their brutal deaths and found damning evidence of corruption at the highest levels in the garden state. The series is called dead end, a New Jersey, political murder mystery. I'm a big show out on Friday, you'll hear an hour of that spellbinding coverage. But in this midweek podcast, I wanted to hear why after 20 years of reporting on New Jersey politics, Nancy made the show at all. The idea first occurred to her in 2019. She was working on a project with ProPublica, and she found that a tax break program was being exploited by a powerful family in Camden, New Jersey. During that reporting, she realized there was more to the Sheridan killings than the public had been told. But that thought didn't make it into that story. Instead, she focused on the political corruption. I'd spend a whole year working on that reporting. And it never really broke through. It never had what we call legs. It didn't feel like it went anywhere. And that it got the kind of attention that I had hoped it would get. Those are hard stories to tell because they're very document driven and us radio people we love good tape. And I didn't have a lot of good tape. And so those stories were just a bit dry and long and complicated. And so it just left me kind of a little frustrated by the end of the year. You said it was a yearlong project. And you were looking into many party bosses. But you ended up focusing on the nor cross brothers, right? Yes. George norcross was often described by the press as quote one of the most powerful Democrats in New Jersey. Is that phrase straightforward? Or is that code for something? I don't think it's code necessarily. I think it's true, but it doesn't really tell you anything. And I think for many years, I wondered what exactly that meant. You know, okay, so he's powerful. I get that, but how? What kind of power does he have? What levers of power is he able to pull on? And how did he get to be so powerful? Okay, so that started out as a story of outrageous conflict of interest and corruption and a tax break program in the poorest city in America. Somehow you found yourself staring down an old double murder case. And that is what dead end is about. And in order to tell the old story and the murder story together, you landed on a new format true crime. And that was a conscious decision because you love true crime. That's right. I guess my very first experience with detective stories was Nancy Drew, who I adored when I was a kid, especially since my name is Nancy. That sort of thing matters a lot. I thought those books were written for me. And in more recent years, I'm just a complete Scandinavian noir nerd. And I like in a true crime podcast. So all that was rumbling around in my mind in terms of what I actually consume as a reader and a watcher and a listener. So I realized that if I could hook an audience with a compelling murder mystery, then maybe they would stay along for the ride to understand the political corruption at work behind and connected in some ways to the murder mystery. You know, this spring as we geared up and got ready to launch the podcast. I would lie awake in bed in the middle of the night. Worrying that the audience was going to drop off as soon as we left the murder mystery and tried to explain the political machine and the real estate deal and the tax breaks. I thought, oh, people are not just going to not listen, but they're going to be mad at me. That's what I was afraid of. But you made those inextricably intertwined. To me, they are inextricably intertwined, and that was one of the mind-blowing pieces of new information that no one had ever reported related to the Sheridan case. So, you had all this. You had the somewhat arcane story of taxes intertwined with a, let's face it, addictive mystery about terrible murder. Did this strategy of yours to apply the true crime format to a story you'd visited before? Did it work? Yeah, absolutely. I think we're thrilled with the audience numbers that we're seeing. How many listeners do you know that you've gotten? As far as I know we're up over 3 million in two months, you know, when I do a story that runs on the air, even if it runs on NPR on the national network, I'm excited if I hear from one or two people. Like, oh, I heard your story. It was so good. Blah, blah, blah. This has just been unreal. But here's the big question. This is a somewhat fraught genre. The gory details are what draw people in, but true crime can easily tilt closer to exploitation than justice. Also, the plot twists that keep people tuned in can feel manipulative and confusing, but hey, that's the price of admission, right? As long as it doesn't mislead. Now is really concerned about the Sheridan family and how they would feel about it and what it would be like for them. And so I was really super happy to hear from multiple members of that family about how pleased they were with the podcast after it came out. You know, and one of the other issues is, you know, we thought long and hard about whether we would insert the usual narrative tool that many mysteries engage in, which is the red herring. They present a solution to the crime that starting to look like, oh, that must be it. You get really drawn in like, that's the guy who did it. And it's looking like it's going that way. And, oh, I'm so smart because I'm figuring this out ahead of what they're telling me. And then of course it turns out not to be true. And that person, whatever has an alibi or didn't do it, and you move on to the next red herring. And I really did want it to unfold like a murder mystery, but I just couldn't, as a journalist, I couldn't put information into the podcast that I knew was not true. I just couldn't live with that. So there were, there were limits to how far we were willing to go. When our producer asked you, if there was anything about dead end that you didn't want to give away in this conversation, you mentioned feeling a little conflicted about that.

Joyce Sheridan New Jersey Sheridan WNYC studios Nancy Solomon George norcross John Sheridan Chris Christie WNYC Nancy John ProPublica Camden Nancy Drew America NPR
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Without giving away too much of the podcast is it fair to say that you're reporting has shown the investigation into the deaths of John and Joyce Sheridan At first thought to be murder suicide I should say that it was a sloppy investigation Is that accurate Well yeah I mean I talked to a broad array of people who do believe the investigation was sloppy and that the detectives suffered from coming to too quick of an analysis of the crime scene and that their analysis was wrong We outlined some of the striking details of how many things they got wrong So I'm curious about your motivation going into this One would think that you went in thinking I'm going to solve this murder Did you think you would and did you project the attorney general's response I wanted to solve it but I wasn't sure I would be able to And I think in terms of the AG investigation the fact that we produced the last episode that laid out a case for why the investigation should be reopened and we had to rip that up that kind of tells you where we were headed And we had a lot of people saying that the investigation should be reopened Police detectives journalists John Jay criminal of justice experts lawyers former governor So there was a lot of people that I had talked to who wanted this investigation opened and that happened So you mentioned all of the interviews you've done in this and it must have taken you forever to gather all of that It was a bit I mean it involved a lot of white boards and diagrams and tons of documents I had kind of backed into this whole story because in 2019 I had worked on a yearlong project that was a collaboration with WNYC and ProPublica And I started looking at the power of political machines and that led to what became really a yearlong investigation into what was happening on the Camden water front with land deals and corporate tax breaks My reporting partner Jeff Pilates and I were talking to developers and redevelopment groups and we stumbled into the John Sheridan connection to those deals on the waterfront So Jeff reached out to mark Sheridan's son of John Sheridan the victim in this true crime story And we started talking to him And by the end of 2019 I felt really strongly that this was a story that needed to be retold in the context of what was going on at the waterfront at the time in 2014 So you mentioned Mark Sheridan To the podcast and to your work on the podcast I'm wondering how that relationship with him was developed because I would assume there would have to be a certain level of trust there And it's curious to me now how you did that especially in an age when there's a lot of distrust around the media Mark did do an incredible amount of work trying to figure out who killed his parents He's a well-known attorney in New Jersey and he used to do a lot of legal work for the state Republican Party And he talks about how he would do his very long day job and then he would sit up nights poring over autopsy reports and crime scene photos And to be honest I'm not sure how I managed to convince him to trust me to go down this road But I think some of the reporting that Jeff pellets and I did in 2019 helped that along And I guess there was a little bit of a persistence on my part talking to him for a couple of years about it to the point where he agreed to do and on the record taped interview Thanks so much for your insights to Nancy I really appreciate it Thanks so much.

Joyce Sheridan mark Sheridan John Sheridan Jeff Pilates John Jay AG WNYC ProPublica John Camden Jeff Jeff pellets Republican Party New Jersey Mark Nancy
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Not have an AK-47 in it Exactly Exactly Nadra would atala thanks for joining us Thank you That was writer and producer nadra witta Tala you can find her writing in the LA times and bustle and more Coming up we're moving away from television and games to the film industry to talk about why movies feel so long That's after the break Starting next week in congressional hearings on the January 6th attack on the capitol lawmakers will probe how our system held up against an insurrection I mean we dodged a bullet right No we didn't Dodge a bullet That was a practice run Now we know how to refine the message going forward Insurrections without consequences are just practice runs Don't miss this week's on the media from WNYC Tomorrow morning at ten on 93.9 FM WNYC is supported by foreman school in litchfield Connecticut a coed college preparatory boarding and day school with a July summer program accepting students entering grades 7 through 11 who learn differently more information at form and school dot org slash summer WNYC is a media partner of the public theaters 60th anniversary season of Shakespeare in the park Richard the third begins June 21st followed by as you like it A summer season of Shakespeare in Central Park public theater dot org In 2014 a New Jersey couple with powerful political connections was found dead in their bedroom I'm Nancy Solomon For two years I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan Was there anything on her mind that was bothering her I know where you're going But no I know you have to ask the question but no true crime and political corruption Dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios Listen wherever you get podcasts Support.

nadra witta foreman school LA times park Richard WNYC Central Park public theater litchfield Dodge Nancy Solomon Connecticut Joyce Sheridan New Jersey John WNYC studios
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:03 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A new development in the unsolved killings of a prominent New Jersey couple found dead at home in 2014 The New Jersey attorney general has opened an investigation into the deaths of John and Joyce Sheridan The case has received renewed attention after the release of a podcast from WNYC studios dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery Reported hosted that podcast Nancy Solomon joins us now Nancy good morning Good morning Michael How are you I'm doing well How about you Is this a new investigation by the attorney general Or the reopening of an old one This is new The four sons of John and Joyce Sheridan asked the state attorney general to get involved several times since their parents deaths first because they agreed with disagreed with the county prosecutors offices initial theory which was that John Sheridan had killed his wife and then himself But also because an independent medical examiner determined that the knife that killed John Sheridan was missing That was the first time they asked the attorney general to intervene They asked a second time when several other mistakes by county detectives were discovered and a third time when the couple's oldest son brought documents to the attorney general that had been left on the dining room table the night the sheridans were killed those documents detail a multi-million dollar real estate deal on the Camden waterfront that involved powerful political interests in New Jersey but 5 successive attorneys general never intervened So Nancy I'm curious what has changed here Well there is a new attorney general Matt platkin He was nominated by governor Phil Murphy in February I don't really know what's behind the decision All I know is that over the last couple of years I've tried to get the current and former attorneys generals to speak with me about the decision About not to intervene in the case And all I got was crickets A couple of weeks ago I started hearing from a few people that they'd been contacted by a state investigator I reached out to the AG and his office actually responded confirming the investigation in a one line email Our office is investigating this matter and we will follow the evidence wherever it leads Now what can you tell us about who their contacting and what the investigation is looking into I know that a state investigator and an FBI agent interviewed a couple who were close friends of John and Joyce Sheridan I had interviewed them for the podcast and then I spoke with them last week after I'd gotten the investigation confirmed Chris Stevens had told the huge crowd that attended the Sheridan's memorial in 2014 that she had had a three hour lunch with Joyce just a day and a half before the sheridans died And then she and her husband bob were really surprised that after saying that to at the memorial that detectives never interviewed Chris about what Joyce had to say at their lunch That was 2014 The interview Chris did recently was pretty much about that lunch how Joyce seemed and whether there had been any trouble in her marriage Chris said absolutely there wasn't She said she's happy that state and federal investigators are finally asking questions We really would risk easier If we knew that everything was resolved on this it would be very comforting knowing that they finally figured out what the story was Nancy has the shared and family said anything about the opening of this investigation Yeah I talked with Mark Sheridan At first he didn't really believe anything would be done But when I told him that Chris and bob Stephens had actually been interviewed that quickly changed his mind Until you just told me that I didn't know for certain that the attorney general's office was actually reopening the investigation was doing anything So I'm happy to hear that they've started to reach out to people I didn't know that But I certainly think it's a good start It's been what more than 7 years now since the sheridans were killed Do you think the case can be solved Michaela I think it's going to be extremely difficult I don't know what's in the original investigative files from Somerset county Did they obtain surveillance video of cars coming and going from the neighborhood Can DNA be extracted from anything that's been kept or stored The problem is that from everything I've been able to find out the Somerset county detectives believed so fervently that it was a murder suicide that they didn't do much investigating And now 7 and a half years later it's certainly a very cold case But some cold cases do get solved So this is a very significant development Nancy Salomon is a senior reported WNYC in the house of the podcast dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery Nancy thank you Thanks Michael It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Ian Martinez And I'm Leila Fulton This is the sound of COVID-19 COVID's DNA code was loaded into a computer and interpreted as music The person behind this is Mark temple a microbiologist in Sydney Australia I'm both a musician and a scientist so I thought I'm well placed here to actually approach this from a different angle No one's really done this He developed a computer algorithm that assigns musical notes to DNA sequences and he says it could help save lives I heard about this thing called sonification It's a way of using audio to analyze or to represent data So I thought well could I get some DNA data and make audio from that Generally computers display DNA as lines and lines of letters Each letter represents a module in the DNA sequence But there are hundreds of thousands of letters in the sequence Slack trying to read a book that has no punctuation so doctor.

Joyce Sheridan New Jersey John Sheridan WNYC studios Nancy Solomon Nancy Camden waterfront Matt platkin governor Phil Murphy Joyce John Chris Sheridan's memorial Mark Sheridan Chris Stevens bob Stephens Michael Somerset county FBI Nancy Salomon
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:08 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Put their lives at risk to save someone else's A friend who survived the massacre said that before she was shot amery tried to call 9-1-1 She'll be buried Tuesday It reinforces NPR news Yuval D Texas After weeks of negotiations European Union leaders have agreed to ban most oil imports from Russia and piers rob Schmidt says its over Russia's invasion of Ukraine The EU agreed to block two thirds of all oil imports from Russia by the end of the year Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban prevented a total ban on Russian oil by only agreeing to ban C shipments of oil to the block Pipeline went from Russia which benefits countries like Hungary Czech Republic and Slovakia will continue to flow NPR's rob schmitz reporting President Biden is set to meet today with Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell as NPR's Tamara Keith reports inflation will be on their agenda Concerns about the economy and rising costs for everyday necessities rank at the top of the list of voter concerns this election year Even democratic voters are dissatisfied with the current conditions That's a political problem for Biden and his party and there are no quick fixes According to The White House Biden and the fed chairman will discuss the state of the American and global economy Inflation is a problem in many countries due to ongoing pandemic supply chain problems and in part because of Russia's war on Ukraine which is affecting fuel and food prices The Federal Reserve is in the process of raising interest rates to try to slow inflation while also trying to avoid too hard a landing for the economy Tamara Keith NPR news President Biden will also welcome the prime minister of New Zealand to The White House today Jacinda Ardern says she'll focus on the continued partnership between her country and the U.S. in the indo Pacific region Later this afternoon Biden will welcome the hit KPop band from South Korea BTS The White House says the president and the BTS singers will discuss diversity and discrimination against Asians they'll also talk about the band's platform as youth ambassadors This is NPR This is WNYC at 7 O four Good morning 76 and Sunday now sunny today in a high of 94 We have delays this morning on the 7 E and F trains in the city and NJ transit's Atlantic City and past cac valley lines New Jersey's attorney general is investigating the unsolved killings of John and Joyce Sheridan a prominent couple who died at home in 2014 WNYC's Nancy Solomon reports John Sheridan had served in two gubernatorial administrations and had a storied career in Trenton The couple was stabbed to death in their house near Princeton set on fire Local detectives believed John killed Joyce and then himself the four Sheridan sons have fought that determination for 7 years and requested an investigation by the state attorney general's office 5 attorneys general later newly nominated mat platkin has opened an inquiry a spokesman wrote our office is investigating this matter and we will follow the evidence wherever it leads We'll hear more about it in a conversation with Nancy Solomon coming up next hour The Sheridan case is the focus of a new podcast from WNYC studios dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery It's been 20 years since the formal end of the 9 11 rescue and recovery efforts at ground zero the 9 11 memorial museum held a ceremony to commemorate the milestone yesterday governor Kathy hochul spoke at the event She said New York will never forget those who worked at the site day after day risking their health to help the state and the country recover There's so many who know the bigger story That for 260 days people showed up here exposed to toxins and contaminants The ceremony was held at the memorial glade at the World Trade Center site which honors thousands of responders and relief workers who went on to develop illnesses New York's redistricting shuffle continues to make ripples this time in Queens now that the new district maps are final a pair of democratic state senators have finalized their election plans Senator John Lew says he'll run in the new 16th district which includes bayside and flushing and longtime state senator Toby and stavisky says she'll run in the 11th district which snakes around from college point to queen's village All 213 state lawmakers are on the ballot this year June 28th for the assembly and August 23rd for the state Senate candidates Sunny and 94 today is ash of showers after midnight and we cool all the way down to 65 tomorrow slight chance of afternoon showers and 73 76 and sunny now at 7 O 7 Support for NPR comes from safa offering 7 different types of handcrafted mattresses including delivery set up an old mattress removal more at SAA TV a dot com.

Russia President Biden Tamara Keith NPR Biden Yuval D Texas rob Schmidt Federal Reserve Viktor Orban rob schmitz Nancy Solomon Jerome Powell European Union Jacinda Ardern WNYC indo Pacific amery White House Joyce Sheridan Slovakia
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"2014 The New Jersey attorney general has opened an investigation into the deaths of John and Joyce Sheridan The case has received renewed attention after release of a podcast from WNYC studios dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery Reporter in host of that podcast Nancy Solomon joins us now Nancy good morning Good morning Michael How are you I'm doing well How about you Is this a new investigation by the attorney general or the reopening of an old one This is new The four sons of John and Joyce Sheridan asked the state attorney general to get involved several times since their parents deaths first because they agreed with disagreed with the county prosecutors offices initial theory which was that John Sheridan had killed his wife and then himself But also because an independent medical examiner determined that the knife that killed John Sheridan was missing That was the first time they asked the attorney general to intervene They asked a second time when several other mistakes by county detectives were discovered And a third time when the couple's oldest son brought documents to the attorney general that had been left on the dining room table the night the sheridans were killed those documents detail a multi-million dollar real estate deal on the Camden waterfront that involved powerful political interests in New Jersey but 5 successive attorneys general never intervened So Nancy I'm curious what has changed here Well there is a new attorney general Matt platkin He was nominated by governor Phil Murphy in February I don't really know what's behind the decision All I know is that over the last couple of years I've tried to get the current and former attorneys generals to speak with me about the decision About not to intervene in the case And all I got was crickets A couple of weeks ago I started hearing from a few people that they'd been contacted by a state investigator I reached out to the AG and his office actually responded confirming the investigation in a one line email Quote our office is investigating this matter and we will follow the evidence wherever it leads Now what can you tell us about who their contacting and what the investigation is looking into I know that a state investigator and an FBI agent interviewed a couple who were close friends of John and Joyce Sheridan I had interviewed them for the podcast and then I spoke with them last week after I'd gotten the investigation confirmed Chris Stevens had told the huge crowd that attended the Sheridan's memorial in 2014 that she had had a three hour lunch with Joyce just a day and a half before the sheridans died And then she and her husband bob were really surprised that after saying that to at the memorial that detectives never interviewed Chris about what Joyce had to say at their lunch That was 2014 The interview Chris did recently was pretty much about that lunch how Joyce seemed and whether there had been any trouble in her marriage Chris said absolutely there wasn't She said she's happy that state and federal investigators are finally asking questions We really would risk easier If we knew that everything was resolved on this it would be very comforting knowing that they finally figured out what the story was Nancy has the shared and families said anything about the opening of this investigation Yeah I talked with Mark Sheridan At first he didn't really believe anything would be done But when I told him that Chris and bob Stephens had actually been interviewed that quickly changed his mind Until you just told me that I didn't know for certain that the attorney general's office was actually reopening the investigation was doing anything So I'm happy to hear that they've started to reach out to people I didn't know that But I certainly think it's a good start It's been what more than 7 years now since the sheridans were killed Do you think the case can be solved Michaela I think it's going to be extremely difficult I don't know what's in the original investigative files from Somerset county Did they obtain surveillance video of cars coming and going from the neighborhood Can DNA be extracted from anything that's been kept or stored The problem is that from everything I've been able to find out the Somerset county detectives believed so fervently that it was a murder suicide that they didn't do much investigating And now 7 and a half years later it's certainly a very cold case But you know some cold cases do get solved So this is a very significant development And Nancy as you're talking about the cold case and what has happened since the night of this what happened to the sheridans I'm just curious what are the reasonable expectations if a knight that was there to see as you say is nowhere to be found Right I mean I'm not sure what you're asking exactly Are they going to find the knife Maybe not likely but let's not forget There's this other case going on in New Jersey Sean cattle a political operative hired two hitmen to murder a fellow political consultant in New Jersey in Jersey City And in that case George Brett is one of the hitmen was arrested Now that murder in Jersey City was four months before the sheridans on the day after the Sheridan's died George Brits and the hitmen was arrested in Connecticut not that far from New York with for a bank robbery and he had a kitchen knife in his car So I don't know anything about that kitchen knife There was a kitchen knife missing from the Sheridan house Has that knife been tested Is there any blood or DNA on it Are they going to be able to make any connections between those two cases which are just eerily similar We don't know But at least for now the family is very happy that actual professional investigators are reopened the case Nancy Salman is a senior reporter WNYC in the.

Joyce Sheridan John Sheridan New Jersey WNYC studios Nancy Solomon Nancy Camden waterfront Matt platkin governor Phil Murphy Joyce John Chris Sheridan's memorial Mark Sheridan bob Stephens Chris Stevens Somerset county Michael FBI bob
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Cul de sac a mess of an investigation I'm Nancy Solomon For two years I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan political insiders connected to several former governors But there is they're putting out there what happened It murders suicide This was just not the John and Joyce any of us knew Dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios Listen wherever you get podcasts It's 5 20 later on morning edition to Michigan elections bureau says 5 Republican candidates for governor of the state actually can not appear on the ballot because fraudulent signatures on their nominating petitions The move is a major shake up for the primary which is less than two months away We'll get the latest on that coming up In just a few minutes 56 partly cloudy out there this morning today's forecast mostly sunny a high near 72 and then tonight cool once again and 54 tomorrow mostly cloudy and a high near 71 and then Friday we have a slight warmup to the upper 70s with showers under mostly cloudy skies and gusty on Friday as well Your weekend there's a warmup as well Not hot but warm 56 and partly cloudy now at 5 21 Support for.

Nancy Solomon Joyce Sheridan WNYC studios John Joyce New Jersey Michigan
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's why she's here Thank you very much for the opportunity to take care of you Thank you Thank you for everything again for me Thank you You are very welcome This week she returned for her surgery and left with a doctor's note to give to her job But if the Supreme Court overturns roe V wade doctor Taylor will have to stop this part of her practice And people like Martha will have to go somewhere else This is NPR news This is listener supported WNYC coming up on morning edition Today's Republican primary for a U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania is a three way race despite the efforts of two well financed candidates David McCormick and mehmet Oz People spent $30 million telling pennsylvanians why the other person was terrible not realizing there could be somebody making a move in their wake and that seems to be Cassie Barnett More on that story later this hour WNYC is supported by optimum business little by little bringing changes to its services to reconnect with clients like working to secure Internet speeds of up to one gig with built in cybersecurity more at 888-493-8460 The Met now on view in America and anthology of fashion traces the evolution of American style through immersive installations in the museum's historical period rooms tickets at met museum dot org An unsolved murder a suburban cul de sac a mess of an investigation I'm Nancy Solomon For two years I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan political insiders connected to several former governors A series they're putting out there what happened It murders suicide This was just not the John and Joyce any of us knew Dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios Listen wherever you get podcasts 59 with sunshine out there this morning increasing clouds at a high of 77 on the gusty side as well Mostly clear tonight in low run 53 so we do cool off and then still gusty tonight tomorrow increasing clouds in a high in the earth 72 Shower chances come back into the picture on Wednesday night and Thursday morning and then on Thursday mostly sunny and 73 and your weekend it's going to be a HOT one Temperatures in the 90s Support for NPR.

wade doctor Taylor WNYC NPR news David McCormick mehmet Oz Cassie Barnett U.S. Senate Nancy Solomon Martha Joyce Sheridan Supreme Court Pennsylvania WNYC studios John America Joyce New Jersey NPR
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:04 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"An unsolved murder a suburban cul de sac a mess of an investigation I'm Nancy Solomon for two years I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan political insiders connected to several former governors But there is they're putting out there what happened It murders suicide This was just not the John and Joyce any of us knew Dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios Listen wherever you get podcasts It's morning edition from NPR news I'm a Martinez in Los Angeles California And I'm Stevens keep in Washington D.C. We're almost three months into the war in Ukraine and Russia's giant air force has done no better than its giant army In fact the failure in the skies is added to Russian failure on the ground Russia does not control the skies which is one reason it's still possible for Ukrainian forces to keep fighting And piers Brian Mann has been hearing from some of those Ukrainian fighter pilots near defense crews I've been talking to Ukrainian fighter pilots including a guy who goes by the call sign juice for security reasons We can't use his real name And he told me they expected Russia's bombers and jets to hit really hard and fast We've already for much more effective threat from the Russian air force side and it's easy to see why an industry trade journal called flight global estimates the Russian air force has roughly 1500 military aircraft the Ukrainians by contrast have around a hundred Russian planes are also far more modern and lethal than the antique MiG 29 jets that juice flies It's great problem to fight fighters for us because they have a advantage in this technology Unfortunately our jets are not capable to be effective against them I also spoke with Mark kantian with the center for strategic and international studies And he says most military experts expected the start of this war to look something like the opening of the U.S. war in Iraq in 2003 Hammer them for 48 hours until there are defenses and there air forces were defeated And then get a priority if not actually in monopoly But Steve Russia didn't do that It's air campaign is essentially been a bust Well you've just listed the reasons they should have done that or so it seemed why did it go wrong for Russia Some experts think Russia's big fleet of aircraft just hasn't been well maintained and they also don't appear to have the logistical support the fuel and the spare parts to keep their jets flying But another factor is the Ukrainians in the years after Russia first annexed Crimea and invaded Donbass in 2014 Ukraine developed a pretty sophisticated air defense system using that fleet of fighter planes working in tandem with surface to air missile systems The Ukrainians I spoke to believe Russian pilots just don't have the training and experience to deal with that kind of threat Here's a Ukrainian MiG pilot who goes by the call sign moon fish Sometimes we are able to hear their communications When you hear those they actually really scared And if anything goes wrong they just turn away A senior U.S. defense official also told NPR the Ukrainian air force is being helped by real-time intelligence from the U.S. and experts think the Ukrainians are going to get better and better at defending their airspace in part because of better weapons that are coming in from the U.S. and Germany Okay but with all that said the Russians still have this enormous weight of numbers Are they enjoying any success They are Russian long-range bombers or launching cruise missiles hitting civilian and military targets is not a game changer experts say but that is a factor Ukrainian officials also acknowledge the Russians have established air dominance over parts of the Donbass region in the east where some of the heaviest fighting is underway But again Steve that's a tiny fraction of the country much of Ukraine remains effectively a no fly zone for Russian planes and pilots Can you just describe why that matters so much to the war on the ground Yeah everyone I talked to says this is huge You know Ukraine is a vast country and because the danger of Russian air attack is so limited Ukrainians can operate their trains Their roads are busy with supply trucks That means the military can bring supplies ammunition and weapons all the way to the front lines Supplies are also flowing to critical cities like Kyiv and Odessa experts say if Russian aircraft were patrolling overhead able to drop bombs at will the way they were able to do over Syria this war would look entirely different And pierce Brian Mann is just out of Ukraine east today in Zürich Switzerland Brian safe travels Thank you Steve Consumer prices are still climbing much too fast That's likely to be the headline when a new inflation report comes out this morning Although the report is expected to show annual inflation in April was a little lower than the month before that's really cold comfort to people whose paychecks just don't go as far as they used to At The White House yesterday President Biden said fighting inflation is now his top domestic priority I know the families all across America are hurting because of inflation I understand what it feels like I come from a family where when the price of gas for food went up we felt it It was a discussion at the kitchen table rising prices are at the top really around a lot of kitchen tables these days NPR Scott horsley joins us now Scott to annual inflation in March highest since 1981 what do forecasts think happen in April Last month's rate was probably a little bit lower than the 8.5% we saw in March That's partly because gasoline prices which soared in March after Russia invaded Ukraine came down a bit in April Unfortunately that relief didn't last Gas prices are now back up at record highs used car prices may have also fallen a bit last month But we're still talking about an annual inflation rate that's north of 8% So that's four times the Federal Reserve's long-range target All right so what's the outlook for the months to come Simple math should offer some relief We are coming up on the anniversary of the time when prices took off last year So even if those prices didn't come down very much the annual increase should look smaller But there are other factors that are keeping inflation up Air fares for example are likely to climb as people are traveling more this summer rent increases of only started to show up in the inflation data It may turn out that march was the peak month for annual inflation but the slide down from that peak could be pretty slow and pretty bumpy You know inflation has really deflated President Biden's approval rating So what if anything can he do about inflation Not a whole lot Biden has ordered the big oil releases from the strategic petroleum reserve but you can see how much good that's done He has tried to address some of the transportation snarls in this country The president was asked yesterday about lifting some Trump era tariffs which might lower the price of imports from China Biden said the administration is talking about that but hasn't made any decision Ultimately inflation is not something that president has a whole lot of power over Biden acknowledged the Federal Reserve has the key role to play here All right so what's the fed's key role Well it can use its sledgehammer It can raise interest rates to cool off demand The fed is now making it more expensive to borrow money in hopes that consumers will buy less and turn this boiling economy down to a simmer The Central Bank started raising interest rates in March and then they added another half point increase last week The fed has also signaled two more jumbo rate hikes are likely in June and July Now there's of course a lot of uncertainty about the fallout from this And that's caused some wild swings in the stock market Chris Waller who sits on the fed's board of governors says he and his colleagues are ready now to dish out some strong monetary medicine At this point I don't care what the reasons are Inflation is too high and my job is to get it down That means we have to raise rates We have to cool off demand and try to get inflation pressures down If we get some help from supply chain resolution that's fantastic But I'm not counting on it By the way Waller is soon going to have a new colleague on the Federal Reserve board Last night a closely divided Senate confirmed Lisa cook on a 51 vote with vice president Harris casting the tie breaking vote Cook will be the first African American woman to serve on the fed's House and a Senate.

Russia Ukraine Brian Mann Donbass Russian air force Nancy Solomon Joyce Sheridan WNYC studios NPR news Washington D.C. U.S. Mark kantian center for strategic and inter President Biden Ukrainian air force John Zürich Steve Consumer Martinez Joyce
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is NPR news WNYC is supported by city national bank whose new Manhattan west branch is now open in the Hudson yards city nationals relationship managers are still committed to getting to know each individual client personally to understand their goals More at CNB dot com An unsolved murder a suburban cul de sac a mess of an investigation I'm Nancy Solomon For two years I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan political insiders connected to several former governors A series they're putting out there what happened It murders suicide This was just not the John and Joyce any of us knew Dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios Listen wherever you get podcasts It's morning edition on WNYC film prize junior is the name of the south's largest student film festival open to contestants 11 to 18 years old this year it's awarding two grand prize honors to two middle and high school students in New Mexico We'll get the latest coming up at about 15 minutes It's chilly this morning 47 out there with some clouds as well We're going up to the mid 60s almost near 70 today sunny and breezy with the high of 67 and then tonight.

new Manhattan Nancy Solomon Joyce Sheridan WNYC NPR WNYC studios Hudson John Joyce New Jersey New Mexico
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

"This week on The New Yorker radio hour, staff writer gia tolentino talks with the actor Stephanie Shu. Hugh plays a young woman who has a complicated relationship with her immigrant mother, and in the same film, she plays an all powerful interdimensional supervillain. Stephanie Shu from the hit film everything everywhere all at once. That's next time on The New Yorker radio hour from WNYC studios. Listen, wherever you get your podcasts. A New Jersey couple is found dead in their home, and the investigation raises more questions than it answers. There's no fingerprint dust in the house. The rug that they were killed on is still rolled up upstairs, like how could you have done anything DNA testing you didn't do? Shit. I'm Nancy Solomon, and I've been trying to figure out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan. Listen to dead end, a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios, available on Apple podcasts. This is on the media. Matt Katz, sitting in for Brooke gladstone. A half century ago, a black judge in New York City tested the constitutional premise of bell. That it should only be used to make sure defendant shows up to court. He offered Lowe or Nobel for black defendants who couldn't afford it. And in 1972, he set $500 bail on a man accused and ultimately acquitted of attempted murder in the shooting of a police officer during a stick up at a steakhouse. The judge's name was Bruce Wright and in post civil rights Harlem and the heels of Jim Crow laws that criminalized black people's existence, he was a hero. I believe, with almost religious zeal, that I must honor the admonition of the last will and testament of Frederick Douglass. Which was to all black people in this country. Agitate agitate agitate, and I don't think that my right to agitate stops at the courthouse door. For agitating the police unions who are allied with the dominant New York City tabloids of the era, Bruce Wright was dubbed first by the daily news and later the New York Post, turn him loose Bruce. That reputation was the reason he said he was banished from criminal court to civil court for four years. Here he is in 1987. Hardly anybody understood or was willing to honor the United States Constitution, especially the Eighth Amendment that says very plainly that bales shall not be excessive. The public, because of the tabloid press, I suppose, had general hysteria about crime assumed that people who were charged were automatically guilty. Bruce died in 2005, but his son is now the chairman of the New York county Democrats, basically the Manhattan democratic political boss. This is headquarters, baby. Keith writes political clubhouses on a 135th street in Harlem. It's tiny, lived in with the morning papers on the table. There are folding chairs out front and right is finishing a cigarette when I walk up. We're here to talk about his father's fights with the newspapers, but right as a schmoozer with other stuff he wants to chat about first. Like his ambivalence about his upcoming law school reunion. I just don't like people Tapping me on my belly and shit. Oh, you gain a little weight, haven't you? And about how he grew up with Jewish kids and even went to Hebrew school for a bit. My Friends were going to hang out with them. For like a week, two weeks. You remember any prayers? Whatever, how would you? And his work at a lobbying firm in midtown, which he says is similar to his former job as a New York State assemblyman. I call it constituent services for white folks. All the I used to do for free, you know, white folks who pay for it. So. Wright's political Clubhouse is down the block from the apartment. He grew up in and still lives in. Three blocks up is a street named for his father. When the papers first called his dad turned him loose Bruce, Wright was in high school. I remember all the white kids coming in and he was coming up to me. What's wrong with your father? What's wrong with your father? Talk to my father about it, and he said, listen, Eighth Amendment of the constitution. Provide that no unreasonable bail should be said. Nobody's been tried. Nobody's been convicted in bail is just to ensure that a person returns to court. And so then I started espousing my knowledge of the constitution when I was 17 years old and all the smart white kids. Oh, damn, this black guy was new something. But there were threats. I'll never forget when I got an envelope in the mail. I got it full of excrement with a note saying if your father didn't stop doing what he's doing, this is what you and your whole family are going to look like. And that was because it was bail policies. Absolutely. Which people would have known about because of the papers. Exactly. Nobody would have known but for the New York Post publicizing it. In Harlem in the 1970s, the community had judge rights back, holding rallies to express their support. Instead of being honored for his courage, compassion, integrity, and ability, he is vilified and subjective to investigations. So he was really questioning the bedrock in the foundation of the American criminal justice system because it really does come down to if you have money. If you have money, you're good, but if you don't, you're going to languish in prison. In 2019, New York State passed a bowel reform law, which eliminated cash bail for most of those charged with misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies. The law would keep thousands of people waiting for trial out of the notorious Rikers Island. New York's deadly jail complex known for suicides, brutal assaults, and lack of medical care. But the New York Post founded by Alexander Hamilton and owned by Rupert Murdoch saw calamity. The headline the day bell reform went into effect. Welcome to New York. The state where criminals go free. The sub head get out of jail law starts today. Another story same day, it's the year of the perp. From the day the law went into effect until this past April, the New York Post has mentioned bell reform more than 400 times. Yes, we counted and read. Almost all of the stories framed bell reform in a mostly negative light, a constant drum beat of editorials, columns, letters to the editor and news stories that made it seem as though bell reform was going to turn to New York into something out of the horror movie the purge. We're all crime is legal for 12 hours. At the siren, all emergency services will be suspended. Your government thanks you for your participation. The post literally ran an article with the police union boss saying New York was now on the verge of the purge. This is the American work. The post amplified the views of the NYPD and its police unions. Bell is good because keeping bad people locked up keeps everyone safe. Of course, studies show that committing a serious offense while out waiting for a court date is rare and that sending people to dangerous gels often does more harm than good, but that context is relegated to the bottom of the stories or nowhere at all. In other words, the same as it ever was. You got to look at history. The fight hasn't changed. And all along the way in New York Post has always been there. Fighting us tooth and nail. Ten days after bell reform went into effect and alleged unarmed serial bank robber was let out. Supposedly due to bell reform. An unnamed police source told the post that the suspect set upon his release, I can't believe they let me out. What were they thinking? The police union tweeted the article. A week later, The New York Times printed a follow-up. Turns out that since he didn't have a weapon, he might have been released even without the new law. 17 days into bell reform, the post ran a story about a New Yorker released on bail that they nicknamed brickman,.

Stephanie Shu WNYC studios Bruce Wright gia tolentino The New Yorker Nancy Solomon New York Post Joyce Sheridan Matt Katz Bruce New Jersey Brooke gladstone New York City bell New York Harlem Frederick Douglass Jim Crow Hugh
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

"This week on The New Yorker radio hour, I'll talk with the Ukraine's ambassador to the United Nations. The United Nations is not an ideal institution by design. And why should it be ideal? I mean, the United Nations was conceived by three fathers, Roosevelt, Churchill, and the pure evil Stalin. It's all next time on The New Yorker radio hour from WNYC studios. Listen, wherever you get your podcasts. A New Jersey couple is found dead in their home, and the investigation raises more questions than it answers. There's no fingerprint dust in the house. The rug that they were killed on is still rolled up upstairs, like how could you have done anything DNA testing you didn't do shit? I'm Nancy Solomon, and I've been trying to figure out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan. Listen to dead end, a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios, available wherever you get podcasts. So it sounds like Maggie mayhem sent you down a bit of a rabbit hole. What did you learn about the history of abortion in our country? So to start, I hadn't even heard about the quickening. Have you heard of the quickening? No. It sounds like a film title, doesn't it? Yes. But, you know, in the early days of America, when they were still following what had been British common law, when there weren't disposable pregnancy tests around the idea was that there wasn't anything that would be legally recognized or treated as a fetus until the woman felt the first fetal movement, which would be about four to 5 months into pregnancy. So the time that first kick comes, then there's something going on. And until the quickening, it was perfectly legal for women to go out and pursue treatments to bring down the menses. As they called it. So early in the 19th century, you could go to a midwife, you could go to other traditional healers, and that was pretty uncontroversial. By mid century, you've got newspapers with all these advertisements for things like madam drones lunar pills and some of those commercial preparations could kill you. So some of the first laws set up to regulate abortion were really poison control measures aimed at those concoctions. They weren't there to make some sort of moral point. They were there to keep people from drinking stuff that might kill them. So when did social attitudes toward abortions start to change? Yeah, so it was around the 1860s that there was this shift in how abortion patients were perceived. There was a lot of racism and nativism going on at the time stoking fears about white women having fewer children than immigrants and people of color. The anti abortion leader, horatio Starr, who was running the anti abortion campaign, I mean, he literally asked whether the west would be, quote, filled by our own children or by those of aliens. And said, this is a question our women must answer upon their loins depends the future destiny of the nation. Wow. And horatio's store led the campaign against abortion for the newly organized American medical association. Wow, so the American medical association was organizing against abortion in this way. Yeah, at the time, doctors, who were just about all male, weren't the ones who were delivering babies or performing abortions. Midwives were. So the American medical association was trying to drive out competition, and they decided to campaign against abortion, and it worked. With a new generation every single state had laws that criminalized or restricted abortion. Good evening. Tonight, the subject of abortion. The illegal termination of pregnancy has reached epidemic proportions in this country. Abortion will continue to be a critical problem. And for those involved, may call for desperate decisions that result in dangerous medical complications. So basically, when you have abortion becoming totally criminalized, it goes underground, which means some people are going to resort to really dangerous methods. The facts are astonishing. Hundreds of thousands of pregnant women, unmindful of what may happen to them, secretly seek abortions. Common causes of abortion deaths were poisoning. And there were also complications from people introducing a foreign instrument into the uterus, something like the proverbial coat hanger. For them, there is a wide goth between what the law commands and what they feel they must do. By 1965, botched abortions accounted for one in 5 maternal deaths. So around that time, activists started organizing to make abortions safer. They knew how horrific they could be if they were done in the absence of good.

WNYC studios United Nations The New Yorker Nancy Solomon Joyce Sheridan New Jersey American medical association Stalin horatio Starr Churchill Roosevelt Ukraine horatio's store Maggie John America
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Time to work out the details Greg Allen and PR news Miami It's morning edition from NPR news WNYC supporters include the John S and James L knight foundation helping public radio advanced journalistic excellence in the digital age The night foundation believes that informed and engaged communities are essential for a healthy democracy knight foundation dot org The chamber music society of Lincoln Center presenting the innovators debussy to crumb a program that includes stravinsky's the Rite of spring tickets are available now at chamber music society dot ORG It's morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill A prominent New Jersey couple with powerful political connections were killed in their bedroom in 2014 The case has never been solved now a new podcast tells the story of John and Joyce Sheridan the failure to solve the case and incompetence and corruption that might have led to that failure The podcast is called dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery and it's reported and hosted by WNYC's Nancy Solomon who joins us now Nancy good morning Good morning Michael I remember when the news first broke about the Sheridan deaths it was such a strange story and as details began to come out in only got stranger remind all of us who John Sheridan was please Right John Sheridan wasn't a household name But he had been the transportation commissioner under governor Tom Cain and continued to work as an adviser to governors and a lobbyist for much of his career He was so well known in New Jersey's political and legal world that when he died the current governor Chris Christie and three former governors and almost the entire state legislature attended the couple's memorial I remember that The county prosecutor investigating their deaths eventually ruled it a murder suicide that John Sheridan killed his wife and then himself but your reporting has uncovered questions about that determination What did you find There were serious flaws in the investigation into their deaths From the fact that the wounds that John suffered in the incident weren't consistent with suicide to the fact that at the time of his death there was a significant there was significant evidence that was ignored And there's a paper trail that offers some tantalizing clues about what John Sheridan was worried about at the time of his death All of which point to the possibility that both John enjoys were murdered and that political corruption could have had something to do with it Nancy you brought us a sample of the podcast which really starts to lay out the mystery here This is a few minutes from dead end on New Jersey political murder mystery Let's listen 9-1-1 where is your emergency Yes meadow.

John Sheridan NPR news James L knight chamber music society of Linco WNYC Joyce Sheridan New Jersey Greg Allen Nancy Solomon John S Michael hill chamber music society Tom Cain stravinsky Miami John Sheridan Nancy Chris Christie Michael
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill a prominent New Jersey couple with powerful political connections were killed in their bedroom in 2014 The case has never been solved now a new podcast tells the story of John and Joyce Sheridan the failure to solve the case and incompetence and corruption that might have led to that failure The podcast is called dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery and it's reported and hosted by WNYC's Nancy Solomon who joins us now Nancy good morning Good morning Michael I remember when the news first broke about the Sheraton deaths it was such a strange story and as details began to come out in only got stranger remind all of us who John Sheridan was please Right John Sheridan wasn't a household name But he had been the transportation commissioner under governor Tom Cain and continued to work as an adviser to governors and a lobbyist for much of his career He was so well known in New Jersey's political and legal world that when he died the current governor Chris Christie and three former governors and almost the entire state legislature attended the couple's memorial I remember that The county prosecutor investigating their deaths eventually ruled it a murder suicide that John Sheridan killed his wife and then himself but your reporting has uncovered questions about that determination What did you find There were serious flaws in the investigation into their deaths From the fact that the wounds that John suffered in the incident weren't consistent with suicide to the fact that at the time of his death there was a significant there was significant evidence that was ignored And there's a paper trail that offers some tantalizing clues about what John Sheridan was worried about at the time of his death All of which point to the possibility that both John enjoys were murdered and that political corruption could have had something to do with it Nancy you brought us a sample of the podcast which really starts to lay out the mystery here This is a few minutes from dead end on New Jersey political murder mystery Let's listen 9-1-1 where is your emergency Yes.

John Sheridan WNYC Joyce Sheridan New Jersey Nancy Solomon Michael hill Tom Cain John Nancy Chris Christie Michael legislature
"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

03:58 min | 7 months ago

"joyce sheridan" Discussed on On The Media

"George norcross spoke at the sheridans memorial. Bob Stephens, the husband of Joyce's close friend Chris, was taken aback. That was the first time I saw nor cross, and that was the first time I said, jeez, John was dealing with norcross there. I didn't know that. And I knew nor across his name and probably not in a good sense. Bob watched as his wife offered a eulogy for Joyce Sheridan. He had been an assistant attorney general. So he knew what to expect when his wife told everyone at the memorial that she had had a three hour lunch at the Tiger's tale with Joyce just a day and a half before her death. And I thought I'm sitting there right behind her because she needed my support. Especially when she saw a cane Christie, you know, and everybody there and Christy Whitman. Two former governors and the current one. She was sitting next to Christy Whitman. They got all great. But as soon as she said, when I had lunch with Joyce, two days before she was killed, and I don't know if I even remembered what she said after that. I said, well, she just sealed your fate. You're going to be brought down and questions. Not for the suspect, but for information. So after the memorial, bob canceled the rest of his work day and drove his wife home. He was certain that detectives would be waiting for them on their doorstep. And nobody was there, and I would think that they'd want to see what Joyce said. And she's complain about John's that weren't getting along or the three hour lunch. Joyce probably wouldn't have said much, but she might have said something. But they didn't know Joyce could have said, John, John's been crazy. He's on medication. He's nuts, you know? That maybe he's not feeling well and he's hallucinating. But you don't know what. So you follow the leads. Never did it. And right away from the lack of contact by the prosecutor's office, I knew right away that they didn't do a good investigation..

Joyce Christy Whitman George norcross sheridans memorial Bob Stephens Joyce Sheridan norcross John Chris Christie Bob bob