21 Burst results for "Joyce Npr"

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"For the killing of journalist Lyra Mckee, she was killed while observing Irish nationalist youths clashed with police in Londonderry new research on the massive ice sheet that covers much of Greenland shows it is melting six times faster than it was forty years ago as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that's contributing to rising sea levels, billions of tons of ice covered Greenland up until the nineteen seventies. The amount of ice was relatively stable. What melted and flowed into the ocean was offset by new ice formed on land every year? Now, scientists writing in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences say that balance is off a lot more ice is melting than being newly deposited a study of two hundred and sixty glaciers on Greenland shows that. While the rate of melting varies over short. Periods of time over the long term the rate is speeding up. The researchers point out that Greenland's melted ice as raised global sea levels by half an inch since nineteen seventy two but half of that rise came in just the last eight years, Christopher Joyce NPR news six people were killed yesterday. When a small plane crashed after it left west Houston airport in Texas, a family member of one of the people who died says the group was going to survey some property, it's not clear what caused the accident the National Transportation Safety board will investigate I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include zoom zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio with.

Greenland NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Lyra Mckee Christopher Joyce National Academy of sciences Londonderry National Transportation Safety Houston korva Coleman Texas Washington eight years forty years
Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

Marketplace

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

"Carmel, California. She and her father were diving in the Pacific just offshore from a golf course. She looks down. And saw something weird. You couldn't see the fan. It was completely white golf balls. You looked down. And you're like, what are you doing here? Thousands of golf balls. It felt like a shot to the heart. She was offended. She decided she'd haul them up she put them in her family's garage. I had all these. My garage and they stunk and I had no idea why. Then she heard about a scientist who studied the plastic waste in the ocean. His name was Matt Sevaka from Stanford University. She emailed him. He came to look at her collection fifty thousand golf balls just sitting in the garage. He said, I should write a paper about this. And I was like man, I'm sixteen years old. I don't know how to read a scientific paper he said he'd help that meant diving with her not easy. The oceans off California, actually, quite cold. And so you suit up in a pretty thick wet suit. It's incredibly physically demanding they took kayaks out to ferry the golf balls back. We'll have the kayak so-so prostate that will end up just having the to- the kayak back, and we'll have to swim to shore while we were out there. We would hear plink plink. And then we look up on the hill. And there would be golf balls flying in off the course right into the ocean. Where we were doing some collections actually whenever we have good conditions were able to pull out between like five hundred. Two five thousand off ball over two years. They found more than fifty thousand golf balls. The source five golf courses. Three were up. The Carmel river, the golf balls just rolled underwater down to the ocean in the journal marine pollution bulletin, the team says chemicals from fifty thousand or so cough balls. We'll probably only have a small effect on the ocean. But they do degrade into micro plastic pieces that marine animals could eat Alex Weber says, if those golf balls floated people would be shocked, if a person could see what we see underwater, it would not be acceptable. Christopher Joyce NPR news, the Brazilian composer and pianist Andre math Mari has always played with the concept of theme and variation. He did a whole album of variations on Beatles tunes. She's a very early age. I was drawn to improvisation even sometimes the classical teachers didn't like it when he got off the

Golf Matt Sevaka California Carmel Alex Weber Carmel River Christopher Joyce Npr Andre Math Mari Scientist Stanford University Sixteen Years Two Years
An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

NPR's World Story of the Day

06:29 min | 2 years ago

An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

"A tide of plastic waste is contaminating the oceans. And in a congressional hearing Senator Sheldon Whitehouse named major culprits over fifty percent of the plastic waste in the oceans comes from just five countries, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka NPR science. Correspondent Christopher Joyce. Went to one of those countries the Philippines to see how bad it is Manila it sprawls along the coast of Manila Bay. Shantytown sit in the shadow of new high rises and mega shopping malls, people here have more money than they used to. So they're buying more stuff from fancy soaps to important coffee in fast food, all which is wrapped in plastic packaging. A lot of that plastic ends up in the bay. There's an island in the bay that's kind of like a doormat for that floating. Plastic. I went to take a look it's not far from shore. We're on a Bunka, which is a Filipino vote. Wouldn't vote about twenty long creepy by. I could see lots of mangrove trees, the islands could be a place for a resort except that what looks like Spanish moss hanging from the branches. Isn't it's plastic bags. On the way out there. You look along the shore at just one all mine, plastic debris. To get a sure we walk on a little catwalk me, Dan Boone held together with plastic tie underneath it. It's. Classic perplex. Hello. The variety of stuff leading around is amazing shoes bottles, syringes, even motorcycle films. It's impossible to tell exactly where all this stuff comes from. The clearly a lot of it comes from the neighborhood surrounding Manila Bay. Some of those neighborhoods trying to stop the flow of plastic into the bay. Visit who long do hot? Good morning told people the local government is now requiring residents to actually pick through their trash and segregate out the plastic. So the community can deal with it. The woman pushes her trash carts who had paid and series of allies and along with her is a monitor from the neighborhood government. My name isse Danya Daleas, Akita speaking through a translator. So the policies that no segregation election so collection is free. But the household need to segregate their race food waste goes in one bag metals paper glass in another in two bags for plastic recyclable and nonrecyclable if residents don't comply with all this. They pay a fine. I offense by bonded vessels. Second offense one thousand and third going to Jane even jail for nuts. Separating plastic from your trash. There are hundreds of official neighborhoods in this huge city who long do hot is one of just sixteen now require residents to segregate plastic from their garbage. Is it enough? I asked the town secretary need to Yano you think it's going to work. I mean, it's. Like a soon. Nami aplastic. Now do not own. Well, sometimes I get mad as a community. We do our part to clean up the waste and educate people about the environment and in the beginning people call rate, but then they go back to their old ways. And it makes me sad. But even when people do do their best where does that plastic go? That's where it gets complicated. Some plastic bottles gets recycled. But then there are the sachets plastic packets that contain a single portion of soap or coffee your shampoo, that's how corporations like Unilever and Nestle market consumer goods in Asia. And most of these Shays cannot be recycled that rankles froylan. Greta he's with an environmental group mother earth foundation, which has sponsored the neighborhood cleanups. The problem is that for most of these companies, they feel they're responsible to their product ends the moment, they sell it. He says there's a reason us. Sachets end up in the ocean, and the Philippines, independent waste workers collect plastic and sell it to recyclers. But if it can't be recycled like, those Shays, it has no value doctoral waste Mercker, can you actually earned from this big collecting it. So they don't collect it groti has spent seventeen years looking for ways to get rid of plastic waste in our realizes that Filipinos can't dig out of this alone. Most packaging comes from just a few big companies. He says it's time they take more responsibility companies dumping all of this new products and packaging that is beyond their capacity to manage you earned from this in and you expect all of us to then magically just solve it for you. You can't just magically get rid of something that is permanent that doesn't degrade. It just keeps piling up. Remember that visited walking toward the beach plastic underfoot? I stopped to look at a huge pile of burlap bags stuffed with plastic waste a team of workers collected that waste one day's work. And yet they barely make dent. It's relentless and it buries itself in the sand and becomes permanent. Kick the stand aside. And there's a plastic tile. There's four or five straws Sanders, a half of a plastic bag and mixed in with coconuts and mangrove seeds. You know, it's just it gives you the feeling that you can't ever catch up. That's why many people throughout southeast Asia are now saying enough cleaning up isn't going to fix this. They want to take the fight to the corporations that create the plastic in the first place. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Manila Bay Philippines Manila Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Christopher Joyce Shays NPR Christopher Joyce Npr Southeast Asia Danya Daleas Dan Boone Vietnam Asia Indonesia Sanders Unilever China Jane
"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"That already comply with them say it's not worth them back. Christopher Joyce NPR news. At the end of a dramatic week. Wall Street drifted between minor gains and losses today. The Dow closed down seventy six points, the NASDAQ closed up five points. This is NPR news in Washington. And this is KCRW Leary parole infrastructure. Take us on a Friday, December twenty eight the very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening at three. Oh, four another caravan a Central American migrants preparing to travel north and this one could be much larger than the last group as KCRW's, Gerald sats. Been reports. These migrants are not making the US border their destination at least not right away without hundreds of migrants. From the last caravan languishing in Tijuana's, they wait out the length the asylum process. The new group is planning a shorter trip. According to the San Diego union Tribune organizers, say the migrants will initially stay in southern Mexico in Chiapas and Oaxaca. They estimate that fifteen thousand migrants from Honduras, El Salvador in Guatemala will join the new caravan the new Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Oberdorf has pledged visas and work for Central American migrants. He's planning billions of dollars in public works projects in the southern part of the country that will provide some of those. Those jobs factual several thousand bikers arrived at the US border in November President Trump deployed troops to help prevent them from entering the country. A handful of migrants have tried to cross into the US le- illegally. But most are staying in crowded shelters in two one is the way to make asylum claims the state of California will get a big chunk of a new settlement reached with Wells Fargo. It's all connected to revelations that the Bank opened millions of fake Bank and credit card accounts without customer's knowledge well today said it will pay five hundred seventy five million dollars. CEO? Tim Sloan says the deal shows the Bank is making a serious commitment to make things right. More than a quarter of the payout is coming to the bank's home state of California state. Attorney general heavier Sarah called the banks behavior disgraceful support for NPR comes from American universities kogo school of business committed to business being forced for meaningful change through graduate and undergraduate degrees, mission driven curriculum and a hands on approach. More kogo dot American dot EDU right now, Santa Monica..

US Andres Manuel Lopez Oberdorf Bank Christopher Joyce NPR president NPR California Gerald sats Leary Tim Sloan KCRW Santa Monica Washington San Diego Tijuana Oaxaca kogo school of business Chiapas
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The climate is changing. And it has people worried that they may be held liable. If they don't plan for that attorney dean patents clients, for example, people who build things you need to go in as a practicing architect or engineer and plan for a different environment. Especially for long lived assets things like roads buildings homes. That's where this type of information that attribution science is generating is informing decision taking. So you will get sued for failing to build for a warmer world patent. Who's with the firm earth and water law group is also getting calls about climate liability from another group of people politicians? Christopher Joyce NPR news. This is NPR news up perspective is up next. I though traffic with Jeff Knox that's slowing in Oakland at north eight eighty from sixty sixth avenue to right before embarking arrow due to a stalled vehicle in the left lane. Tow truck is on scene though. San Bruno car with a blown out tire in the center divide south one zero one right near the SFO exit bay bridge. Metering lights are off no delays at the tolls. Little slow in Vallejo on west thirty seven from mare island way to the lane merge. I'm Jeff Knox for all. Right. Thanks, jeff. That report brought to you by unbound dot org. When he was down and out of friend helped him feed his kids, even though she didn't have to. It was kindness. Lloyd Jones has never stopped repaying perspective and nineteen eighty nine. I unexpectedly lost my job at the wonder bread factory. I had two young sons seven and eight ROY boys, always hungry. Title Kana tough. I didn't know how we're going to have enough food for them. Sometime, I will go down to the local Chinese restaurant where I knew the head waitress. Her name was lily, learning new. I wasn't doing so. Well, so when she see me and my son's come in. She would go back in the back and come out with all kinds of Chinese food. She never once asked me to pay. I've eaten at the restaurant hundreds of times as a paying customer and lily, and I became good friends two summers ago. I was at the restaurant and lily certainly collapsed. Paramedics tried to revive her. Then Russia away I learned in this day that Lilley had died. She wasn't even sixty years old at the funeral. I told everyone how lily at help my family and made me feel like I had dignity respect in front of my kids. I told lily kids how proud she was of them how she talked about them. All the time. I told them that their mother was love as she touched people's lives in wave. They may never have known. It was hard for me to stand up. Darren top. Nobody knew my story. Stuck out as the only black man in Chinese service? But I did it because I wanted the people of lily to know the difference. She made in the lives of people around.

Jeff Knox Lilley Lloyd Jones NPR Christopher Joyce NPR SFO exit bay bridge mare island San Bruno attorney engineer Oakland Vallejo Darren ROY Russia sixty years
"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"From South Georgia to see if they could survive on Signi, they didn't but the bugs on the plants managed to hang in there. Really extreme environment. Joking not much and forget there and not much ten fish survive there in this thing is done both in ninety striving. The midge doesn't even need mates. It reproduces solo. A sexually doesn't have any predators. It doesn't have any competitive. So it's been able to just set up camp there then spread around the midges like moss, which is good for them. Because it's mostly what grows on the island Bartlett at the university of Birmingham in Great Britain says the midges decompose organic material in the soil doing the job of an SM in an ecosystem that never seen anything like it. So what's the harm here? Well, their appetite is altering the island. They create huge amounts of nitrogen compounds. It's like dumping fertilizer in the soil, and it could change the mix of plants and other insects there. Peter convy from the British Antarctic survey says that the midges might reach the Arctic mainland and play havoc with the ecosystem of one of the world's last pristine places. Is basically the cat's out the bag invading species are affecting everywhere and moral less and until the last continental scale policy will where Mkhize convy says scientists are doing their best to keep the midges from my grading off the island. Christopher Joyce NPR news. This is NPR news. And you are listening to KCRW. Good.

Christopher Joyce NPR NPR British Antarctic survey South Georgia Mkhize convy Peter convy university of Birmingham Signi Bartlett Great Britain Arctic
"joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Climate experts say global warming is responsible for intensifying some of last year's weather extremes around the world, including drought in the US NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports. Scientists meeting in Washington DC say they've connected. Several extreme weather events to the effects of global warming in two thousand seventeen and drought in the northern plains of the US was made more likely because average temperatures are higher now flooding in China a heat wave in Europe heavy rainfall in Peru, and several other examples of severe weather made the list last year was also one of the worst ever for Atlantic hurricanes. But the analysis of those events wasn't complete in. Time for the report from the American meteorological society, scientists have already linked the severity of hurricane Harvey in Texas to global warming. Christopher Joyce NPR news, snow ice and below freezing temperatures are causing problems again today in North Carolina and Virginia and parts of Georgia. Some school systems are closed for a second consecutive day due to icy roads and sidewalks North Carolina's governor ROY Cooper says the state's highway patrol responded to hundreds of accidents yesterday because of the winter like weather more than twenty inches of snow fell in western North Carolina. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle, more at Sierra, Nevada dot com. This is WNYC. Good morning. I'm Sean Carlson with a look at our weather forecast. Sunny today, the high only reaching about forty today with the win though that will feel anywhere between twenty five and thirty five for tonight, partly cloudy, low thirty the wind making it feel between twenty and twenty five degrees. Tomorrow Wednesday sunny today, high near thirty nine wind chills between twenty five and thirty five once again looking at it Thursday, we could see some flurries just a chance of flurries on Thursday. Otherwise, partly sunny with a high near forty..

NPR North Carolina Christopher Joyce NPR US Washington Christopher Joyce Sierra Nevada brewing company Sean Carlson Dave Mattingly American meteorological societ ROY Cooper hurricane Harvey Nevada WNYC Texas Europe Peru
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything in Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in twenty seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year were up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of. What's been happening in China? Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled. But now the government is trying to boost growth than are green lighting, some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution. Ironically, could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a Lou. Coming carbon apocalypse like Corine mccarey from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth. Ninety owner and wind power. Yeah. Hasn't been investment by government, and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down to cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the gauche eaters in Poland. Just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Christopher Joyce Npr Poland Rob Jackson China Comcast University Of East Anglia NPR French Government Stanford University France Environmental Research Researcher
"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month. Inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording of Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to kashogi? Right. You know, this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled and dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia. So is probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed as listen to the audio tapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to put more pressure on the Trump administration act to take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. There was a few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate, Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, and reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in the killing and President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But, you know, also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are a growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom plan or cutback US involvement in the Saudi led war. You know, Yemen. Yeah. And on that the US has decided to stop refueling Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket? Oh, jeez. Staff possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the warning has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking a key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of famine. So there's growing.

Saudi Arabia Kashoggi Saudi consulate Yemen US Turkey Trump president Canada Saudi Crown Istanbul Christopher Joyce NPR NPR Jackie Northam Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Irwin
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month inside the Saudi consulate in eastern bowl. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled. And then dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia's who's probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed its listen to the audiotapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence that Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to or put more pressure on the Trump administration actor take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. A few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in killing President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But you don't also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom way or cutback US involvement and in the Saudi led war in Yemen. Yeah. On that the US has decided to stop refusing Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket show? Jeez. Death possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the war in Yemen has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of a famine. So there's growing urgency to stop the war. That's NPR's. Jackie northbound. Thanks very much. Jackie. Thank you..

Saudi Arabia Yemen Trump Turkey Jackie Northam Saudi consulate US president Canada NPR Kashoggi Christopher Joyce NPR Irwin Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Gina hospital State Department
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour as wildfires. Burn in California. We'll hear from a business owner in evacuation zone by lookout mountain. I mean, it's completely three hundred sixty degrees charge nothing. Also, former first lady Michelle Obama reflects on her life in place in American history. I am making my Mark in hopes that my grandchildren will experience something better than I did a documentary about the thousands of people helping companies like Google and Facebook, remove toxic content from their sites so stories after these news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. A new report from a Washington think tank says North Korea continues to operate more than a dozen missile basis, even as President Trump of ending pain Yong's nuclear threat, NPR's Scott Horsely reports the basis are widely scattered throughout North Korea and effort to avoid easy destruction. Researchers identified the missile basis for a combination of satellite, imagery, and interviews with intelligence experts in North Korean defectors North Korea has not publicly acknowledged any of the basis. Lisa collins. So the center for strategic and international. Studies says that would be a first step towards actually dismantling the regime's nuclear and ballistic weapons program way, just putting a spotlight on those different bases and showing the world that there's more to the North Korean missile program. Then maybe publicly known President Trump has promised to hold a second meeting soon with North Korean leader Kim Jong own the last week the north. Koreans cancelled a preparatory meeting with the secretary of state, Scott Horsely NPR news Washington after a vote count that dragged on for nearly a week. The democrat is the projected winner in the Senate race to fill the seat vacated by Jeff flake, forty two year old cinema beating out fifty two year old Republican Martha mcsally cinema. A three term congresswoman faced a stiff challenge from accelerator. Former air force pilot embraced President Trump after opposing him during the two thousand sixteen election mic Sally, had labelled anywhere protests by cinema fifteen years ago, treason contest, drew more than ninety million in spending much with by outside groups as California's suffers through a catastrophic series of wildfire. Scientists say both climate change and force management are partly to blame. Here's NPR's. Christopher Joyce climate change has driven up temperatures around the planet in California that's contributed to record droughts. Hot dry air sucks moisture out of vegetation and leads to more fire fire. Scientists Jennifer ball. At the university of Colorado says it's getting worse in the American west. But the trend has been is that we've seen the number of large fires increased fivefold since the nineteen seventies forest managers have made matters worse by suppressing even small fires over the past century. That's led to overgrown forests that are full of ready to burn trees experts say thinning out those fire prone. Forests by cutting or burning some trees is difficult and expensive Christopher Joyce NPR. News highlights with discount carrier frontier. Could be close to reaching a new contract. After two years of discussions union, representing pilots for the Denver based airline announcing today, the two sides of reaching agreement in principle on a deal that would include improvements to pay work roles and benefits the airline Pilots Association says terms to must be reviewed by frontiers. Union executive council abroad selloff in the tech sector sent large swaths of the financial markets lower than that affected. Stocks broadly. The Dow was down six hundred and two points today. You're listening to. NPR from news. I'm Tiffany Cam. High the Republican member of congress who represents the area burned by the campfire does not think President Trump's comments blaming California for its large wildfires will mean he withholds funding for the disaster cake lily Demolli reports from Chico President Trump tweeted incorrectly that the wildfires in California were caused by what he calls the gross mismanagement of the forest and he threatened to withhold federal funding. The president has also lashed out against California's democratic leaders GOP. Congressman Douglas alpha says despite the rocky relationship he has no doubt the region will get the federal funding it needs to rebuild for this disaster. He's actually reproved every order every request that California's made for disaster relief at each stage. The federal government owns and manages close to sixty percent of California's forests the state owns three percent. I'm lily dramatic, KiKi weedy news more than. Seventy eight hundred firefighters are deployed at three major wildfires in California state fire and rescue chief with the governor's office of emergency services. Kim Zegarra says resources are stretched thin that's in part because some federal agencies that you seasonal firefighters have laid them off already since the normal fire season would be over by now. So why we do have federal assets were very gracious reform. We have a lot more. A state and local resources that are currently on the line..

President Trump California NPR Washington North Korea Christopher Joyce NPR Ari Shapiro Scott Horsely Michelle Obama Jack Speer lookout mountain business owner president federal government Kim Jong
"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Bigger sharks. And ultimately giant reptiles geology controls destiny in the sense that biology has to adapt to the stage that it's put on it was a drama that might have continued if an asteroid hadn't hit the earth in wiped out the giant reptiles and their dinosaur. Cousins opening a door to us the furry little mammals, Christopher Joyce NPR news scores of children who were kidnapped from a boarding school in Cameroon earlier this week have been reunited with their families. The authorities say the kids were released by an unidentified gunmen. This is all happening amid mounting tension between Cameroon's minority English-speaking regions and the. Majority. French-speaking government NPR's ofeibea Quist arcton says two staff members from the school are reportedly still being held. Initial cries of anguish gave way to relief after two days of heartache when some of the nearly eighty missing school children met up with their parents in Bamenda Cameroon's northwest commercial hub, this fifteen year old girl whose family preferred anonymity says the worst part of their captivity was walking barefoot in the Bush. The Dow was it striking very very long distances. Well, we started a journey at night under let us read with Aaron judge the students were kidnapped before dawn on Monday in Cameroon's, restive English speaking region, which has been plagued for the past two years, by instability and increasing violence between the security forces and armed separatists, the rebels accused Maroons dominant French-Speaking government of discrimination against their to anglophone regions and they're vowing to establish a breakaway Republic both sides blame each other. For the mass kidnapping Cameroon's eighty-five year old president Paul Biya made no concessions to the secretaries telling them to lay down their arms..

Cameroon Bamenda Cameroon Christopher Joyce NPR ofeibea Quist arcton Maroons kidnapping Paul Biya Aaron president eighty-five year fifteen year two years two days
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. After a bitter bipartisan fight over now supreme court Justice Brett Cavanaugh key member of the Senate Judiciary committee democrat, Chris coons says it's time for the country to move forward a senates role in our in our politics is not to just reflect the country, but to help heal and leave the country. And that's the course, we should be on speaking there on NBC's, meet the press. Meanwhile, Republican Senator Lindsey Graham says he's happy about Cavanaugh. But he says he has a warning for Democrats this midterm election season. This is going to the streets at the ballot box. I'm going to I've never campaigned against a colleague in my life. That's about to change Graham. Speaking there on Fox News, Sunday, National Transportation Safety board. Investigators are looking into what caused a limousine crash in upstate New York. The kill twenty people today as NPR's Bobby Allen reports officials say it's the deadliest transportation accident. Nearly a decade police say a limousine was carrying eighteen people and barreling down a steep state road and scary when it killed two pedestrians. Amy Dunlop Johnson says she lost three family members in the crash, including a couple who got married this past summer, devastating. We actually have a large family and those two cousins I liked that my brother, and I really liked close with such a shock that this happened. Investigators win say how fast the limo was traveling. They are examining why the vehicle did not stop at an intersection. Bobby Allen, NPR news. In Brazil presidential election today, far right ex army, captain Jerry bell scenario ran up a commanding lead in the first round of voting, but he didn't get the outright majority. He needed to avoid an October twenty eighth runoff against leftist rival Fernando Haddad this after an election that deeply divided Latin America's biggest nation along gender and racial lines. Also narrow often compared with President Trump has been accused of denigrating women and minorities in Brazil. Leading climate scientists conclude that new technology and other untested methods are needed to take greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and Christopher Joyce has details on the new report. The scientists were asked if it's possible to keep the planet from warming more than about two and a half to grease Fahrenheit above pre industrial temperatures. That's a red line for a dangerous effects on the climate. They conclude that current pledges by governments to simply limit emissions of greenhouse gases are not enough to stay below that line. What's needed are new and potentially expensive technologies to extract those gases from the atmosphere as well. As vast new forests to soak up carbon dioxide from the air. The report is from the intergovernmental panel on climate change a scientific group that advises the United Nations. Christopher Joyce NPR news. Asia markets are trading lower at this hour. The Dow is down about a third of a percent. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. Interpol says a Chinese official who was reported missing has resigned as head of the international police agency, the announcement came after Beijing said Mung-hung way was under investigation in China on suspicion of unspecified legal violations. Interpol says mum was had resigned as president of the agencies executive committee at -ffective immediately. But didn't say why Turkey's president says he is closely following the investigation into Saudi journalist who disappeared after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul NPR's. Peter Kenyon reports another Turkish official says investigators believe Jamal Shoghi was killed president. Register barrier says Turkish investigators you're going through camera footage and other evidence and he'll await the results of that investigation. One of his advisors tells a Turkish broadcaster that investigators believe kashogi was killed in the consulate in his body moved elsewhere. He said he's skeptical about Saudi claims that there's no camera footage of kashogi inside the consulate and says. There's no evidence that he left is the Saudis claim he Shoghi has been a prominent critic of Saudi Crown prince, Mohammad bin Salman and fled the kingdom last year. He went to the consulate for papers you needed to marry his Turkish fiance. Peter Kenyon, NPR news Istanbul. The price of a gallon of gas is rising gaining seven cents a gallon over the past two weeks. The Lundberg survey says the average price for a gallon of regular now stands at two dollars ninety seven cents, and that's forty one cents a gallon higher than this time.

NPR Saudi consulate Bobby Allen Senator Lindsey Graham Jamal Shoghi Peter Kenyon Interpol Christopher Joyce NPR Washington Istanbul president Brett Cavanaugh Brazil Chris coons Senate Judiciary committee NBC Saudi Crown Amy Dunlop Johnson
"joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Weapons? Kiva gave up. What does that mean? Giving up already all the nuclear weapons already made individual okay now impossible. That was part of the statement. They signed him Singapore, though. Oh, yeah. Via are not reproducing nuclear warfare and nuclear weapons anymore. Vessel for mate. This is our you think the ones you has is our strength because DPRK already developed into nuclear power. This is what they will knows already made all the way it will not give up impulsively. Jay, our guide on a tour of juche tower this month, she is one North Korean one voice and not an official one, but a window into how one North Korean sees her country's nuclear weapons status, and it's changing relations with the US and the world more stories from my reporting trip to Pyongyang in the days ahead. Smugglers are selling tens of thousands of tons of ivory every year that illegal trade threatens the existence of elephants conservationists have developed high-tech strategies to track the source of the ivory NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports on a new effort to trace the smugglers as well. Biologists. Samuel Wasser follows the ivory trade closely. He says too many elephants are dying right now. We're after meeting that they're about forty thousand elephants being killed a year, and there's only four hundred thousand left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population. A year the cartels that run the ivory trade try to cover their tracks. They falsify shipping documents. For example. They hide ivory in shipping. Containers, they send the average multiple ports before its final destination at the university of Washington. Wasser developed a way to use DNA in tusks to tell what part of Africa the elephants lived in. Now, he's using the technique to home in on the cartels Wasser, analyzed d. Anna from tusks that were seized by customs officials. He noticed that smugglers often separate the two tusks that come from a single elephant and ship them. Separately, presumably to make it harder to track with a came from. But Wasser found a pattern with matching tusks through common port. They were shipped close together in time, and they showed high overlap and the genetically determined origins of the topics. So these three characteristics suggest that the same major trafficking cartel was actually responsible for shipping. Both of the shootings worser says wildlife authorities rarely get enough evidence to identify the big players often. It's they're smaller suppliers who get caught with only as much as they can carry those convictions are well down the smuggling pyramid and don't do much to stem the trade his technique aims higher. When you get a strong connection in the DNA, all of a sudden weak evidence becomes much more confirming Wasser says linking different shipments to a small number of. Sports made about the same time with ivory from elephants in just a few locations in Africa reveals which are the likely cartels doing the smuggling writing in the journal science advances washers team identifies three cartels associated with much the trade. They operate out of Mombasa in Kenya. Entebbe in Uganda and low may in Togo, Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're.

Samuel Wasser Africa Kiva Christopher Joyce DPRK NPR Christopher Joyce NPR juche tower Mombasa university of Washington Entebbe Pyongyang Singapore Kenya Togo Uganda
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jason debris in Chapel Hill. North carolina. Authorities in Bakersfield California are investigating why a gunman killed five people before taking his own life. The sheriff of Kern county says the gunman's wife was among three people shot to death at a trucking company later to others were shot at a home in Bakersfield. This is NPR news from Washington. Authorities in China's say the death toll has risen to eleven after they say a man drove an SUV into a crowd in the central part of the country before jumping out and attacking them with a shovel and a dagger had happened Tuesday night in a public square and hang young city. The suspect is said to have a criminal record scientists digging in a cave in South Africa, say they found the oldest known drawing. NPR's Christopher Joyce says it looks a bit like a hashtag ancient humans apparently lived in. What is now called the Blombos cave for thousands of years the NF behind numerous artifacts, including a sort of toolkit of shells and stones for making a pigment called red ochre? Now, researchers report in the journal nature that they found the stone withdrawn lines on it the dates back seventy three thousand years the lines were drawn with red ochre and former rough cross hatched pattern several years ago. The same team found a piece of ochre with cross hatched. Gradings that had been scratched into it. The scientists say these artifacts are evidence of early symbolic thinking by our ancestors. Christopher Joyce NPR news. The Russian military is carrying out what Moscow was calling the country's largest military exercise on record. It's taking place this week in eastern Siberia and involves about three hundred thousand troops Russian President Vladimir Putin praised the war games today. During a visit to a firing range. I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington. Television was banned in Afghanistan until the US drove the Taliban out of power now Afghans has satellite TV foreign movies and a Bollywood standard of beauty next time on the world, a plastic surgeon helps women of one ethnic group to alter the shape of their eyes and noses to change their faces why cosmetic surgeries catching on in Afghanistan. That's on the world. Catch the world with Marco werman this afternoon at two followed by the PBS news hour at three I'm economics correspondent pulse on Wall Street with the starring Adam twos, author of Kranj decade of financial crises changed the world on the next PBS NewsHour. If you need to track someone down in Melbourne you need to call Jack Irish, the former criminal.

NPR Afghanistan Christopher Joyce NPR Bakersfield Blombos cave Chapel Hill North carolina Christopher Joyce Kern county Marco werman Vladimir Putin California Taliban China Washington Adam twos Dave Mattingly Melbourne PBS South Africa
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. Forecasters are stressing how dangerous hurricane Florence will be once it makes landfall in the Carolinas late Thursday the category. Four storm is expected to bring heavy surf and high water levels along the southeastern coastline by Wednesday NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports on the storm's progress meteorologists say Florence continues to strengthen as it moves toward North Carolina and Virginia. Well, it may moderate once it hits the coast, high winds pose a serious threat to life and property. In addition, the National Hurricane Center warns of storm surge that could be several feet high even more worrisome experts say is the potential for the storm to stall once it works its way over land that could drop more than two feet of rain in some places and caused flash flooding hurricane this strong. So far north is rare climate scientists say Florence has potential to cost flooding is due in part to a warmer Atlantic Ocean. And atmosphere caused by global warming. Christopher Joyce NPR news in Hawaii Maui county is bracing for the arrival of tropical storm Olivia on Wednesday. Now, the snow weather service's Olivia could dump five to ten inches of rain in some areas of the island chain, Pittsburgh Bissett. David zubec- is asking clergy to fast and pray. For the purification of the Catholic church. Repressed comes in the wake of Pennsylvania. Grand jury report alleging widespread child-sex-abuse Lucy Perkins of W E ASA in Pittsburgh reports that it also comes days ahead of a meeting between high level US bishops and pope Francis. Bishop Subic is inviting all Catholics to join members of the Pittsburgh diocese during ember days twelve days a year at the church, that's aside for special fasting and prayer father. Tom a spokesperson for the Pittsburgh diocese and says the idea came from both the Bishop and priests and deacons who felt they needed to directly address the report, obviously, there's more to be done. But. This is kinda spiritually the first step earlier. This week cardinal Donald world announced a season of healing for parishes in the Washington DC area, but zubec- and whirl have faced calls for resignation for their handling of sexual abuse. Within the church for NPR news. I'm Lucy Perkins in Pittsburgh UN secretary General Antonio, Gutierrez is urging all parties involved in the Syrian conflict to protect civilians in the last rebel stronghold of it live. Gutierrez says the battle for control of the city could lead to a bloodbath. It is absolutely essential to avoid a full-scale battle in Italy. These would unleash a humanitarian nightmare. Unlike any seen in the blood soaked, CDN conflict US ambassador, Nikki Haley is warning serious president and his allies again, then any assault on eight live, but lead to dire consequences, and she says Russia has the power to prevent that from happening. This is NPR news from news. I'm Jeremy Siegel to new San Francisco police commissioners were named today giving the oversight body. It's full seven members for the first time since April Kate you read Alexander reports commissioners have been scraping by sometimes unable to meet waiting for these new appointees. Tamale Taylor is a former state and federal prosecutor. And now a defense attorney. She says learning about systemic problems in the SF PD which culminated in a review by the US department of Justice was heartbreaking because I do hold law enforcement to a very high standard. And know how important it is for. Our officers to be guardians to be protectors. Our communities that to me is the role city supervisors also approved the appointment of Dion Jay Brooker, whose experience includes working with a nonprofit providing job training to kids in the Bayview hunters point neighborhoods. Bruckner and Taylor were appointed to four year terms. I'm Alex Emslie weedy news. The Oakland fire department is investigating the cause of an early morning. Blaze at one of the city's largest homeless encampments today at least thirty seven people were displaced from their tents under the twenty third avenue bridge at east twelfth street. Melinda means says she was awakened by the blaze in escape barefoot as it spread to her tent. I saw big orange light. And then I felt the heat. And I'm like, this is serious got up got my phone. I just ran out any got nothing. There were no fatalities from the fire. But a man was found dead and another area of the encampment. The coroner's office is looking into the cause of that death, which authorities say was unrelated to the fire in may have happened earlier. I'm Jeremy.

Pittsburgh NPR Tamale Taylor Lucy Perkins Catholic church US Christopher Joyce NPR hurricane Florence Florence National Hurricane Center Christopher Joyce hurricane Shay Stevens Pittsburgh Bissett Nikki Haley Washington Gutierrez Jeremy Siegel
US, NPR and China discussed on Q

Q

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

US, NPR and China discussed on Q

"Hurricane Florence is. Now a category. Four storm and is expected to bring heavy surf and high water levels by Wednesday along the southeast coast, embarrass Christopher Joyce reports on the storm's progress meteorologists say Florence continues to strengthen as it moves toward North Carolina and Virginia while it may moderate once it hits the coast, high winds pose a serious threat to life and property. In addition, the National Hurricane Center warns of storm surge that could be several feet high even more worrisome experts say is the potential for the storm to stall once it works its way over land that could drop more than two feet of rain in some places and caused flash flooding hurricane this strong. So far north is rare climate scientists say Florence potential to cause flooding is due in part to a warmer Atlantic Ocean and atmosphere caused by global

United States NPR China Hurricane Florence Christopher Joyce Npr National Hurricane Center Hurricane Gotham Senator Jeanne Shaheen Christopher Joyce Cuba Exxon Mobil Senator Jeff Klein Russia Florence Chris Christie NBC North Carolina State Department
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hurricane Florence is. Now a category. Four storm and is expected to bring heavy surf and high water levels by Wednesday along the south east. Coast ambulance. Christopher Joyce reports on the storm's progress meteorologists say Florence continues to strengthen as it moves toward North Carolina and Virginia. Well, it may moderate once it hits the coast, high winds pose a serious threat to life and property. In addition, the National Hurricane Center warns of storm surge that could be several feet high even more worrisome experts say is the potential for the storm to stall once it works its way over land that could drop more than two feet of rain in some places cause flash flooding hurricane this strong. So far north is rare climate scientists say Florence has potential to cause flooding is due in part to a warmer Atlantic Ocean and atmosphere caused by global warming. Christopher Joyce NPR news and official with the US business group says. Chinese regulators are putting off accepting license application from some American financial service companies and other firms as of two countries try to resolve a worsening trade battle, the disclosure, one of the first confirmations of fears. The trade dispute could disrupt US access to Chinese markets and vice versa. Still. Some Chinese leaders have been trying to smooth over some of the worst aspects of the trade fight kind. Exxon Mobil still has plans for a ten billion dollar project in southern China. US intelligence considers Russia to be the main suspect in a series of mysterious attacks on US personnel in China and Cuba. That's according to reports today from NBC news as NPR's Barbara spot reports it's prompting calls from Capitol Hill for an investigation. More than two dozen US government workers have been injured in a series of unexplained attacks in Cuba and China in each case. The victim heard strange sounds the US reportedly believes Russia is the main suspect and that it may have used new electromagnetic weapons in a state. Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she is quote horrified by the nature and extent of these assaults. The New Hampshire democrat is calling for a congressional investigation and says that Republicans and Democrats must be United in condemning these attacks. The State Department says its investigation is quote ongoing and that there is no determination on who. Or what is responsible for the health attacks fibrous front NPR news, Washington, the number of job openings in July, moved higher with more Americans also voluntarily quitting their positions in an indication. They feel confident about finding another job that's based on the Labor Department's monthly job openings in labor. Turnover survey known as jolts for short government says job openings or measure of labor demand. Rough by one hundred seventeen thousand to a seasonally adjusted six point nine million in July stocks gained ground today. The Dow was one hundred thirteen points to twenty five thousand nine hundred seventy one the NASDAQ was up forty eight points. This is NPR from. We d- news. I'm Jeremy Siegel to new San Francisco police commissioners were named today giving the oversight body. It's full seven members for the first time since April cake, you read he's Alexander reports. Commissioners have been scraping by sometimes unable to meet waiting for these new appointees. Tamale Taylor is a former state and federal prosecutor and now offensive attorney. She says learning about systemic problems in the SF PD which culminated in a review by the US department of Justice was heartbreaking because I do hold law enforcement to a very high standard. And know how important it is. For our officers to be guardians to be protectors. Marc communities that to me is the role city supervisors also approved the appointment of Dion J Brooker whose experience includes working with a nonprofit providing job training to kids in the Bayview, hunters point neighborhoods Brookshire and Taylor were appointed to four year terms. I'm Alex Emslie news. The Oakland fire department is investigating the cause. Of an early morning blaze at one of the city's largest homeless encampments today at least thirty seven people were displaced from their tense under the twenty third avenue bridge at east twelfth street. Melinda mean says she was awakened by the blaze in escape barefoot as it spread to her tent. I saw big orange light. And then I felt the heat in serious got up got my phone. Just ran out in got nothing else to pass the Renault fatalities from the fire, but a man was found dead and another area of the encampment. The coroner's office is looking into the cause of that death, which thirties say was unrelated to the fire in may have happened earlier. I'm.

US Hurricane Florence NPR Tamale Taylor China Russia Christopher Joyce NPR US department of Justice Jeremy Siegel National Hurricane Center Senator Jeanne Shaheen Christopher Joyce hurricane Coast ambulance Cuba Exxon Mobil State Department Labor Department Atlantic Ocean
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Climate scientists are struggling to figure out how a. Warming planet will affect different ecosystems like forests swamps grasslands so researchers looked back at the end of the last ice age to see, what might, be in store for us as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. They suspect some ecosystems could change completely in a century, much of the northern. Hemisphere was covered by ice sheets twenty thousand years ago then. The earth started warming up by ten thousand years ago. It was warmer by about seven to. Twelve. Degrees Fahrenheit Ecologists. Stephen Jackson, says that makes that period of history much like what greenhouse gases are doing to the earth now the change, over, the next, one hundred hundred fifty years is of similar magnitude. Globally to what we, saw during the last ice retreat Jackson worked for the US Geological Survey he and a team of more than forty. Scientists examined the fossil pollen. And vegetation to figure out how that ancient warming affected various ecosystems the researchers found huge changes after the. Ice age in Jackson's neighborhood in Arizona for example it's now desert cactus and Trump's mostly fifteen thousand years ago though what we'd see, there instead, is juniper Pinon woodland and evergreen woodland utterly different from. The vegetation we'd find here so as climate changes some forests may give way. To Woody shrubs or grassland or grassland could convert to desert. Writing in the journal science the researchers say they can't Predict exactly where and how fast these changes will happen for one. Thing the. Warming now is a lot faster than it was, at the end of the ice age instead of that. Happening, over several thousand years we're cramming all of that climatic change in two century century and a half and their historical record shows a. Climate going from frigid too warm now. It's moving from warm to warmer that may be different but Jackson says one thing is likely more unpredictability maybe even ecosystems that are totally. New and that poses challenges for forests wildlands and even fisheries and for people. Who depend, on them that's gonna create a great deal of chaos ecological chaos out there as they try to adapt and, respond, to those, changes these changes are happening now some forests in. The southwest are dying, and being replaced by smaller plants and shrubs ecologist David Beshir's at the university of Arizona says it's similar to what. Happened in the, past each Changes is very temperature sensitive and I think that's the most important takeaway message because that's what we're dealing with right now I. Think in contemporary times in the journal scientific reports Beshir's and scientists in Australia showed how quickly big changes can happen a. Heatwave in Western Australia. In, twenty eleven caused coral bleaching in the ocean as well as tree deaths damaging insect outbreaks and die-offs of birds all very different ecosystems responding to a warmer environment Christopher Joyce NPR. News You're listening to all, things considered from NPR news is a look at.

Stephen Jackson NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Christopher Joyce juniper Pinon woodland David Beshir Western Australia Arizona Australia university of Arizona US Trump one hundred hundred fifty year fifteen thousand years twenty thousand years ten thousand years thousand years two century
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The mass production of plastic in the mid twentieth. Century eight billion tonnes have been manufactured and, when it's thrown away it, doesn't just disappear much of it crumbles into, small pieces it ends up in soil in fertilizer in, rivers, lakes and oceans, at one of rocklin slabs Kennedy Bucci prepares to make her own, micro plastic from the morning's collection so we have here is a coffee grinder Some ugly looking black plastic This is the PawSox To measure their effects that includes the. Tiniest fish fish larvae she's got a bunch in a beaker of water also contains ground up plastic. Particles under a microscope the larvae. Has got is translucent you can. See right into it Like. A big teardrop on the fish. Stuck in it you can see Have a line of black shaped black things those of the micro pasta I can see that definitely see that two. Or three places Yeah In another. Lab the team keeps hundreds of grownup fish and bubbling tanks stacked six feet high fat. Head minnows Bucci says they make good test. Subjects they just kind of end up, eating whatever is floating around in front of. Them said you stick your finger in there at? All They try, luckily they don't have teeth but they don't need. Teeth eat, micro-plastics it's like a soup in rivers and lakes and oceans chemical, soup plastic can shed the. Chemicals it's made from it also attracts other chemicals in. The water that latch onto it. Toxic industrial compounds like PCB's for example tracking. All those chemicals is researcher Clara Tyson's, job so right right now we're starting with the context of plastic polyethylene polypropylene polystyrene but there's Time this happens all, the time Something it seems really, great and then you don't think and. We've become, so, dependent on it Markman says testing what plastic does, to the tissues of fish, matters not just, to the fish but to us. We eat fish that eat, plastic so it's a question of are there things that transfer to the tissue as the, plastic itself transfer to the tissue the chemicals associated with. The plastic, transferred to the tissue in, fact, plastic does get into. Fish tissue, plastic fibers from clothing for example there's a lot in police found fibers. In fish from San Francisco Bay she bought a washing machine for, her lab and washed lease clothing and lots of fibers came out and. It's not just in the water. It's even floating in the air if you, put a piece of double sided sticky tape on, the lab bench for an hour you come back and it's. Got four, plastic fibers on it so far they do know that micro plastic particles can sicken. Or even kill larvae and fish the things we don't know what are all the sources where it's coming from so that we can think. About where to turn it, off and once it gets In the ocean where does it go which is super. Important because then we can understand how it impacts life in humans Rochman says she's ready to spend the rest of her career finding out. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Kennedy Bucci rocklin San Francisco Bay Christopher Joyce NPR Rochman Markman researcher Clara Tyson eight billion tonnes six feet
"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Flooding and even when there is money to buy out some long suffering homeowner it can take years the real problems that it takes so long for somebody to go through the process and get to the ed and they never know with their actually going to make it to the and nrdc and other groups are trying to change that so that if you're a repeatedly flooded homeowner you can lock into a by a with fema before the next flood at an agreed upon price congress is currently weighing whether to give fema that option but that's too late for the people at bridge point town homes some of whom asked for a by out more than a year ago gower i called of john knipper the day after the remnants of hurricane hhirma had passed through his region erma caused more flooding oliver charleston including his house his power wasn't back on yet so you're at home uh election a coronel at the other weapon charge why so he told me he got several more four inches of water so again he's the ripping up carpet tearing out base boards removing watersoaked inflation he says he's sick of waiting for fema to make a decision maybe five years from now john will give you the money for your house but you know we don't know why i'm so why keep me let players bincoletto monitored watt out editorials i'm selectquote lump sum up twenty months him up where he launched his getting extended the match what you're really aggravating capel never told me that at least one elderly couple has moved out since i visited bridge point he says he thinks he'll stick it out a little longer but some of his neighbours feel like they just can't take one were flat i'm sarah mckinnon and i'm chris for joyce npr news and later this afternoon on all things considered we'll take you to the front lines of a price war in the grocery industry the only two german grocery chains aldi an lido both of which are aggressively expanding into the us bringing lower prices with them.

nrdc fema oliver charleston bridge point sarah mckinnon chris john knipper capel joyce npr aldi twenty months four inches five years