11 Burst results for "Joyce Klein"

"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

04:13 min | Last month

"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"Aerospace Manufacturing is between a rock and a hard place right now. Rock could mean rock bottom as in the bottoming out of commercial air travel after the cove in nineteen pandemic. While the International Air Transport Associations, latest data shows flyers have picked up since the springtime lows of ninety five percent off the previous year's levels. Forecasters still expect twenty, twenty, two end between fifty to sixty percent down from twenty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred levels. This is forced to reckoning industries forecasts for twenty, twenty and twenty, twenty one. Revenue has fallen costs are climbing. Business models are being rewritten. But. Sunday production will have to pick up from the subterranean levels as their remains widespread confidence in the long term outlook for commercial aviation. That sounds like a good problem to have. It will still be a big challenge for industry because that production ramp up is probably eighteen months or two years out. That is far too long to just grin and bear the cost of maintaining supply chain built for what is probably about twice the size of what is needed now. Finally and not surprising. We are seeing lots of layoffs factories closing. And already an uptick in mergers and acquisitions as industry consolidates. Through it, all the dilemma remains how can industry stay resilient and really to meet future production increases while facing frankly it's bleakest near-term forecast in memory. At. Least Industry can call upon experienced experts to help guide the way and I'm very happy to be joined by a trio of accenture is leading aerospace and defense advisors to discuss these issues. They are John Schmidt. Accenture Global Andy. Lead. Jeff Willis Global Andy Research leader, and Joyce. Klein. Digital lead in the North American Andy Practice John Jeff, Joyce. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thanks Michael. Thanks. My good to talk to you again. Thanks, Mike. Glad to have you all back. Now John Jeff I, want to start with youtube because we have access to the new accenture commercial aerospace insight report I always look forward to this report because it's about the only a Andy Industry Index report that regularly surveys and business leaders and incorporates responses alongside the data. Jeff your team puts these numbers together. What do you see happening with global commercial aerospace revenue this year, and next year Well as you mentioned earlier, we are in for some interesting times in the short term until things picked back up and the title of this edition of Arbor poor is in it for the long haul and we think that statement could not be truer. We're anticipating twenty twenty to be about thirty, seven percent lower than twenty nineteen in terms of overall aerospace demand. Then it's both across production and aftermarket emroe and services, and you know we don't think that anyone would disagree with those reductions and some might be a little bit more optimistic or pessimistic that. But all are essentially different degrees of badness now. That said the decline that we seem globally would have been even worse if it hadn't been for the Asia Pacific region and China in particular recovering far faster than expected not just in the aviation sector but economy that fundamentally drives the and as you mentioned earlier as part of this report, we poll C level executives across the globe for our forecast and they're thinking additional short-term decline and making corresponding capacity adjustments until demand starts to incrementally increase in the back half of twenty, twenty one and even then we're still going to be seeing global industry this down thirty three percent from two thousand and nineteen levels. Jeff, this industry has a habit of watching orders deliveries of large commercial aircraft with bated breath..

John Schmidt accenture Andy Practice John Jeff Aerospace Manufacturing International Air Transport As Joyce Andy Industry Index Jeff Willis Klein Asia Pacific youtube Mike Michael China
"joyce klein" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

04:15 min | 5 months ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on Business Casual

"And business I'm your host and Brew Business Editor Kinsey Grant and now let's get into it. In Our last episode I spoke with Joyce Klein from the Aspen. About why exactly minority owned businesses have struggled to secure loans through the government's paycheck protection program the program we lovingly refer to as P P, P and Joyce masterfully answered my questions and taught me a ton I think one step paints the picture well that I wanna just drive home one more time, just twelve percent twelve percent of black and Latte next business owners who applied for P. Loans reported receiving what they ask for according to a survey from global, strategy, group in May nearly half of those business owners said that they anticipate being forced to close their business permanently in the near future because of that. Now that you know that that conversation with Joyce, we tried to determine why that is why it's just twelve percent set of say one hundred percent, and the answer is of course systemic, but one of the biggest aspects of minority owned business is lack of access to traditional capital stems from this lack of relationships with traditional lenders, if a business hasn't say, previously secured alone through one of the big banks charged with carrying out P P, p lending. It was less likely that that business could get its fair share of. Of government stimulus when it came time for the checks to go out for me that brought to mind the idea that we're in this seemingly endless loop. Those with relationships with banks continue to foster those relationships while on the outskirts stay on the outskirts. How is upward mobility and business possible? If you never get a chance to shake the right hands and those striking to me so like a good start up employees. It got me thinking about the players trying to disrupt that loop to help those on the outskirts get. Get where they need to be and help them. Get the money that they need to get to survive now. That disruption I'm talking about is coming largely care of tech companies, the startups at the nexus of finance and technology the words will give it away. Often led by gregarious young founders showered, and all this funding from the sexiest species in Silicon Valley and New, York and the Fintech companies are doing more than just competing for who can have the most startup you name of this decade there, actually affecting real change. Change for small businesses that have traditionally been shut out of the vaults at big banks so today we're going to talk more about why Fintech..

Joyce Klein Business Editor Fintech Kinsey Grant Aspen Silicon Valley P. Loans York
"joyce klein" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

05:47 min | 5 months ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on Business Casual

"All right and now back to the conversation with Joyce. Klein so Joyce obviously, when we're talking about the the timeliness aspect of this conversation, all has to do with people. Accessing Small Business Association in loans it's it's everything that we're talking about in the last three or four months, but what is the role of the traditional bank in all of this? How does this banking sector come into play when we're talking about this intersection of racial and Economic Justice Yes, so I would say that it was pretty typical for the government when it does sort of interventions in capital markets and credit markets to go with like the main players in our financial system, so it's not unusual for when treasury and the Federal Reserve or looking at a relief program or a disaster program. They go through. Through the SBA and they go through banks which are the main delivery system for those kind of products, and the issue is when it comes to issues of access to capital particularly for people of Color for women for other groups. What the issue is that? They don't have banking relationships They're not served by traditional banks, and so is the she was that there's no they haven't run the program through delivery systems that serve and reach those businesses We do a lot of work with orgnisations called community development financial institutions cdfi's their lending organizations. Sometimes they're banks and credit unions, but also often they're nonprofit community. Community based loan funds and their mission first, and they collect resources from a lot of different sources to make the kinds of loans that banks don't WanNa. Make 'cause they're too risky or because they're too expensive or both. They have a much stronger record of lending to people of color and entrepreneurs of color. They also do other kinds besides business loans so sometimes they're lending to consumers or families, but sometimes they're lending to business. They have much stronger records of lending to people of color of lending to low and moderate income communities that are the ones that typically don't have access and with the P P P. P, very few of those cdfi's were in allowed to be part of the first round of the PP more of them were allowed in the second round of the P P P, and since then some and they are much more willing to do. The smaller dollar loans than the larger banks are, and I think we saw a lot of coverage of banks going first to their existing customers, they went to people who had a relationship with an interestingly. It wasn't just you have like a business checking account he was. Do you have a loan from this financial institution? Right, which is which is a smaller universe. And I will say there were some reasons for banks to make that decision. There are certain things you need to do is a bank about knowing who your customer is and fraud prevention. If you have an existing customer, you have that information already. It's easier to process that loan, but it absolutely excludes people that have already been unable to access credit through banks. And that was a question I wanted to ask is what makes for a relationship with a bank is just I have a debit card with Bank of America..

Joyce P P P. P Small Business Association Bank of America SBA Klein WanNa fraud Federal Reserve treasury
"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"Week. The commercial aerospace supply chain is writing. The sudden collapse, the spring passenger air travel after the outbreak of the latest novel Corona Virus and it's cove in Nineteen, disease has upended fortunes in the airliner manufacturing industry. That matters because commercial aerospace is responsible for about three quarters of the whole aerospace and defense sectors business activity. Cash is king right now throughout the supply chain and companies are struggling to have enough liquidity, according to what several advisors and analysts tell aviation week. while. Liquidity is more of a function of the wider economic downturn inside aerospace. There are even bigger challenges. Where production rates were once being pushed higher now a Williams are slashing them cascading pressure down the supply chain. At the L. A. M. in the top tier level. It has probably never been more important to have insight into your supply chain. Joining me to talk about that need, and what to do about it are John Schmidt? The Global Andy Lead at Accenture and Joyce Klein. Accenture leader in applied intelligence in the North American amd practice John Joyce. Welcome back. Thanks might go good to be back so John let me start with you. It seems obvious that OEM's and tier ones want insight into their suppliers. But while that was always true, I used to be about making sure that there were no bottlenecks that slowed or stop record high production now things chain what of new conditions that demand and customers pay better attention to their supply chain. Might go and in many ways the aerospace industry you know has a clear split between the companies that are working in the Corso world, and does indefens- you in the commercial. As you say, you know the concern used to be, we have a supply constrained world with very predictable demand, right always pushing for more trying take need those increased rates pushed by Boeing and. and Airbus and in the current world that's changed dramatically to being more of a supply volatile with unpredictable demand in the defense and space side of things you know things have largely remained in a predictable demand with an increased supply chain volatility, so by just keep looking at those things, predictability and the the constraint or volatility the spy chain. That's where the primary differences. And Commercial. We know that demand is going to be directly related to the bounce back of commercial air travel and the relative rates airlines choose to bring back stored aircraft versus take more efficient models on order from the OEM's causing more volatility in and demand, variability and defense. It's a bit different again. Demand Israel remained and the supply chains been impacted by Kobe in some cases they're tier one two or three companies, who source both commercial and defense or trying to generate cash to cover expenses and other cases, local Cobra outbreaks, and our common actions are impacting the spires ability to deliver on schedule, known both cases, aerospace and defense companies need. To deal with all totally like never before whether commercial or defense. So Joyce. Last time John and I talked here on Chuck six with. He kind of gave me the peak and do some new technology you all were working on. It's a new capability to peer into the supply chain including using an algorithm approach that allows more predictive insight, potentially even the ability to hotspot. What factories might be in trouble in the future? Can you tell us a little bit about what accenture is working on? And how does this work? Yes, absolutely Michael Accenture? We've been working with our clients in the supply chain area for many years using analytics and machine learning. In fact, if you go back to last year's pariser show in our accenture shall a. we had a digital showcase. Demo that focused on intelligence supply chain, and what this demo is a together machine, learning and artificial intelligence, and we used I at supply chain Europe e data to really understand delivery delays identify missing parts. We also looked at the opportunity for Automation Muller. Doing now is we're bringing together? All Lot of data sets and we're using artificial intelligence to help companies deal with the increase in volatility manage. Manage uncertainty and really get at supplier resiliency. That's really the core of what our solution is all about now so for North, America a and D client what we've done is we've taken and artificial intelligence engine that uses the supplier Jadot and what we're trying to do. We're actually working to predict the number of days late or a particular part, and we're doing that by bringing together a supplier. Number roaches order number eleven worry day in quantity, combination you all that information, Heather actually identify the number of as laid the opulent part is going to be and so by knowing the number of days way them. What were able to do is fight and determine. Do I have enough inventory? As coverage or that? Particular part is ultimately if I Joan I need to make additional decisions around production, and so what? We've been able to do with our solution. Experience up to ten percent improvement apart availability production. And we're also able to change the role of the delivery service analyst. Previous lanes individuals really operating. All here. Allergy by getting parts then wall really. Burning that role inches, someone that now uses ena an ai a better and improve sagem around artists that are going to chase I which parts are actually GonNa come in on Hind. So is a big ship in enroll for a European andy manufacturer. What were you work? Combining European data identify how supplier performance impacts production I going into the bill curiel, and really understanding which parts going to eat away at looking at things associated with liberty warehousing. Delays and ultimately impact on inventory in I is break the. Material impact reaction. And you midst, Sicne reo analysis really are men. Wyatt's elaborate I delay is Tom Heart availability, then another component of what we're looking at financial stability of the suppliers really understand their. We had any handful I thought risks that may be occurring one of the things of the most recently taken all of these bread solutions. We've been bedded hoping it. Modeling I'm to the solution to really understand. Suppliers are located in a hot spots and when you. You look at Hogan Nights, little, capabilities. Deck! The other things that we're doing is we're not. Future. As rapid disease until there's obscene available men, the power also is on additional external resources is at the end of the able, really want to be able of doing being aware of that next potential risks occur. So, I'm just fascinated by this capability. Because Joyce as you mentioned, aerobics play a big part in aerospace manufacturing and I think that's a bit of a inconvenient dirty little truth. We don't talk very much about in the sector. About just win. Business was fine before covid nineteen. How much heroics took to get the product out the door and get it delivered to the end customers, and now you know from what I hear from lower level, managers and workers at suppliers This kind of level of insight wasn't something that their own companies who may have been very well aware of so I'm. I'm curious. How far does the predictive capability extend? Does it cover potential union strikes or other strikes? That may come up I.

Accenture John Joyce John Michael Accenture L. A. M. John Schmidt Williams Joyce Klein Allergy Joan I Boeing Israel Automation Muller analyst
Will My Supply Chain Survive COVID-19?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:56 min | 5 months ago

Will My Supply Chain Survive COVID-19?

"The commercial aerospace supply chain is writing. The sudden collapse, the spring passenger air travel after the outbreak of the latest novel Corona Virus and it's cove in Nineteen, disease has upended fortunes in the airliner manufacturing industry. That matters because commercial aerospace is responsible for about three quarters of the whole aerospace and defense sectors business activity. Cash is king right now throughout the supply chain and companies are struggling to have enough liquidity, according to what several advisors and analysts tell aviation week. while. Liquidity is more of a function of the wider economic downturn inside aerospace. There are even bigger challenges. Where production rates were once being pushed higher now a Williams are slashing them cascading pressure down the supply chain. At the L. A. M. in the top tier level. It has probably never been more important to have insight into your supply chain. Joining me to talk about that need, and what to do about it are John Schmidt? The Global Andy Lead at Accenture and Joyce Klein. Accenture leader in applied intelligence in the North American amd practice John Joyce. Welcome back. Thanks might go good to be back so John let me start with you. It seems obvious that OEM's and tier ones want insight into their suppliers. But while that was always true, I used to be about making sure that there were no bottlenecks that slowed or stop record high production now things chain what of new conditions that demand and customers pay better attention to their supply chain. Might go and in many ways the aerospace industry you know has a clear split between the companies that are working in the Corso world, and does indefens- you in the commercial. As you say, you know the concern used to be, we have a supply constrained world with very predictable demand, right always pushing for more trying take need those increased rates pushed by Boeing and. and Airbus and in the current world that's changed dramatically to being more of a supply volatile with unpredictable demand in the defense and space side of things you know things have largely remained in a predictable demand with an increased supply chain volatility, so by just keep looking at those things, predictability and the the constraint or volatility the spy chain. That's where the primary differences. And Commercial. We know that demand is going to be directly related to the bounce back of commercial air travel and the relative rates airlines choose to bring back stored aircraft versus take more efficient models on order from the OEM's causing more volatility in and demand, variability and defense. It's a bit different again. Demand Israel remained and the supply chains been impacted by Kobe in some cases they're tier one two or three companies, who source both commercial and defense or trying to generate cash to cover expenses and other cases, local Cobra outbreaks, and our common actions are impacting the spires ability to deliver on schedule, known both cases, aerospace and defense companies need. To deal with all totally like never before whether commercial or defense. So Joyce. Last time John and I talked here on Chuck six with. He kind of gave me the peak and do some new technology you all were working on. It's a new capability to peer into the supply chain including using an algorithm approach that allows more predictive insight, potentially even the ability to hotspot. What factories might be in trouble in the future? Can you tell us a little bit about what accenture is working on? And how does this work? Yes, absolutely Michael Accenture? We've been working with our clients in the supply chain area for many years using analytics and machine learning. In fact, if you go back to last year's pariser show in our accenture shall a. we had a digital showcase. Demo that focused on intelligence supply chain, and what this demo is a together machine, learning and artificial intelligence, and we used I at supply chain Europe e data to really understand delivery delays identify missing parts. We also looked at the opportunity for Automation Muller. Doing now is we're bringing together? All Lot of data sets and we're using artificial intelligence to help companies deal with the increase in volatility manage. Manage uncertainty and really get at supplier resiliency. That's really the core of what our solution is all about now so for North, America a and D client what we've done is we've taken and artificial intelligence engine that uses the supplier Jadot and what we're trying to do. We're actually working to predict the number of days late or a particular part, and we're doing that by bringing together a supplier. Number roaches order number eleven worry day in quantity, combination you all that information, Heather actually identify the number of as laid the opulent part is going to be and so by knowing the number of days way them. What were able to do is fight and determine. Do I have enough inventory? As coverage or that? Particular part is ultimately if I Joan I need to make additional decisions around production, and so what? We've been able to do with our solution. Experience up to ten percent improvement apart availability production. And we're also able to change the role of the delivery service analyst. Previous lanes individuals really operating. All here. Allergy by getting parts then wall really. Burning that role inches, someone that now uses ena an ai a better and improve sagem around artists that are going to chase I which parts are actually GonNa come in on Hind. So is a big ship in

Accenture John Joyce Michael Accenture John John Schmidt Allergy L. A. M. Joyce Klein Analyst Boeing Williams Joan I Israel Automation Muller
"joyce klein" Discussed on Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

"On Thursday. May Seventeenth nineteen eighty four six Manley residents visited the Manley hot springs boat-landing it landing between noon and two thirty pm Joe mcvay and Dale Manage ASCII drove to the boat landing to launch McVeigh's boat mcvay thirty eight a wounded Vietnam veteran lived with his wife Alice across the river from Manley Madagascar twenty four live nearby with his is wife Kristen Albert Hagen Junior twenty seven drove to the boat landing with a load of brushed to jump into the river lime inclined thirty six Joyce Klein thirty and the client's two year old son. Marshall drove to the boat landing on their four wheeler for family. Outing Joyce was pregnant in it the couple's second child while no one realized it at first another area resident also visited the boat-landing sometime between we noon and two thirty. PM Fred Burke thirty at Trapper boated from his camp up river down the river to the boat-landing because he I'm on it to work on the truck. He kept a manly around four PM. Manley Resident Savvy Gertler drove to the boat landing with a car full of children and who wanted to watch the mighty ten and all river boil and churn while the winter is broke apart and sail down the river savvy reported. She saw quiet light landing but she noticed that Michael Silks Canoe was half off his car. When savy returned to the boat landing two hours later silks canoe was gone on when Joe mcvay failed to return home his wife Alice drove to the landing and found Joe's boats still there and a six pack of beer in his truck truck. She immediately began to worry about her husband. When Joe still hadn't returned home by noon the next day Alice called the Alaska State State troopers in Fairbanks troopers took her report but they thought Joe mcvay would probably show up within the next few hours. Gradually other friends and relatives began to worry about their missing loved ones the relatives gathered and began comparing notes about when they last saw the missing residents one person drove to the landing and notice the strange car. They feared this person could also be missing so they called the troopers and related his license plate plate number. When troopers ran the plate they realized it belonged to Michael Silica. A man wanted for the murder of Roger Culp in Fairbanks..

Joe mcvay Michael Silks Canoe Alice Manley hot springs Manley Madagascar Joyce Klein Savvy Gertler Fairbanks Kristen Albert Hagen Fred Burke Michael Silica McVeigh Joyce Marshall Roger Culp murder savy Dale Alaska
"joyce klein" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Shin keeps slowing there may not be enough jobs for all these would be workers coming off the sidelines I'm Mitchell Hartman for market place let's pull on that jobs thread then with this observation in an economy with three point seven percent unemployment a lot of us do have jobs yes but where are we working big conglomerates or smaller shops I ask because there are some signs things aren't going so well for smaller businesses and startups in this economy new companies that have actual employees in payroll to meet or starting up more slowly than they did before the recession that's according to data from the census bureau that the Associated Press dugout marketplace got some reports that entrepreneurship seems to be getting harder here's the data applications for new business is likely to hire workers and have payroll or sixteen percent lower than twelve years ago one reason stingy credit says business professor James angel Georgetown is his new rules for banks after the Great Recession define small business loans as riskier unless you have a yeah wealthy friend who's willing to Frank you some cash you need to find somebody who's going to lend you some money what we've made it much more expensive for banks to lend money to small businesses the number of start ups and hire people has actually been falling for four decades says Gerry Davis at the university of Michigan school of business nowadays it's easier for start ups to avoid hiring people full time he says they can just pay people one gig at a time if you can rent the parts of the business use temps rather than full time employees rent the factory then you can look a lot more like a virtual start up that you don't really need to create an enterprise with employees which raises an issue of economic mobility small businesses do most of the country's hiring so for many workers did the first rung on the economic ladder and a bigger share of start ups is now formed by historically disadvantaged groups says Joyce Klein at the Aspen Institute increasingly our pile of entrepreneur. it is more likely to be constituted up people of color and women and they have greater barriers and growing their business that may be a trend that we're seeing here in the census data new businesses are critical to economic growth says James Angela Georgetown they're not just with the hiring is there were the innovations is as well. I'm Scott song for market place. whether a recession is coming or not is one of those known unknowns right I mean one is definitely coming we just don't know when. and when people hear the R. word a lot of things probably go through their minds how much savings they have what the stock market might do on whether they are going to keep their jobs we asked you the other day to tell us what recession it makes you think of here are the jobs responses my name is C. and I'm calling from Michigan I work at a small college and I really love my job..

James Angela Georgetown Gerry Davis university of Michigan school Associated Press Mitchell Hartman Aspen Institute Shin Joyce Klein professor Frank Michigan Scott sixteen percent seven percent four decades twelve years
"joyce klein" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on KCRW

"To avoid hiring people full time he says they can just pay people one gig at a time if you can rent the parts of the business use temps rather than full time employees rent a factory then you can look a lot more like a virtual start up that you don't really need to create an enterprise with employees which raises an issue of economic mobility small businesses do most of the country's hiring so for many workers did the first rung on the economic ladder in a bigger share of start ups is now formed by historically disadvantaged groups says Joyce Klein at the Aspen Institute increasingly are pie of entrepreneur. it is more likely to be constituted it up people of color and women and they have greater barriers and growing their business that maybe a trend that we're seeing here in the census data new businesses are critical to economic growth says James angel a Georgetown they're not just with the hiring is there were the innovations is as well. I'm Scott song for market place. whether a recession is coming or not is one of those known unknowns right I mean one is definitely coming we just don't know when. then when people hear the R. word a lot of things probably go through their minds how much savings they have what the stock market might do on whether they are going to keep their jobs we asked you the other day to tell us what recession it makes you think of here are the jobs responses my name is C. and I'm calling from Michigan I work at a small college and I really love my job..

Joyce Klein Aspen Institute James angel Georgetown Scott Michigan
"joyce klein" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"We thought Hey let's do some oppression fund so we separated all or short films from academy standards films that are forty minutes or less and put them in their own festival yeah a lot of losers are part of this in India sometimes it gets a bad rap for being one of maybe thirteen states no tax incentives for production but we still have a thriving film production industry so we will make sure you represent and does the filmmakers work on you know how to showcase that we have an Indiana spotlight program an award which we have a two thousand dollar cash prize and and the war some of the best past current future filmmakers as well small Harlan someone down just recently that there's a new cash prize award for it in the shorts Film Festival it's called the Jenny bear bait ski legacy award Jenny is it is super special to heartland she's been a jury member of ours for years be on all the tassel together in a war to begin to studio release Helms called the truly moving picture ward can you've been on a jury three years and I love her critical eye for films since of humor she just she's a fantastic and he's been a great supporter of ours but you know beyond that to she is living with a LS Lou Gehrig's disease and she had beat the odds and I'll let you know do we talk more about that but really we you know the mission of heartland to inspire filmmakers and audiences to the transformative power cal machine body that missions are really we wanted to have a film award in her honor the best capture the trying to the human spirit in someone capacity to inspire others just like Janet Jenny does the other special thing is that there's a documentary film about any concrete polygyny permit his story which was part of our Indiana's father program last year and won our audience choice award so not only is he part of this in the short Harlan history but two degree volunteer to serve this just make perfect sense for us to partner with with Janeane jazz joys in their entire family to honor Jenny with this cash prize award of eighteen hundred dollars this year Jenny Verbitsky legacy award and it is very very special and the recipient of that should feel very honored receiving this particular award with us as I mentioned is author Joyce Klein men who is Jenny's mom but she also co wrote Jenny's memoir ALS saved my life until it didn't and has been traveling the world with the documentary grateful the Jenny Verbitsky story Joyce it's nice to have you with us how are you I am great thank you so much for having us on it's just such a pleasure to be with you slash your heart you know house Jenny doing she made me she does her spirit just to survive she she really a pretty special a very very lucky to be able to say that I'm a mom yeah every day is very important and what does that what does the juniper basically legacy award to mean to all of you in the family yeah it I think they our water I mean he hardly like great says been so special to chatting on Jenny and this is a huge Lagerfeld and be able to become a juror I don't think people have a handicap related disadvantage what they get left out of doing stuff being a part of things but Jenny being able to be part of the like the war even when she can't physically move she can still think a hundred and fifty percent and she can get her opinions and she put some miracle she still be pushing harder and then with in the years which is the heart of the jury it's not so much to her and then like they said to have a film and that if she started to and have it be the personal ad with an audience choice all would like this thing was amazing but they have this legacy more on top of everything it just looks like a you know a cherry on top of that hello Jenny is taking out her lipstick experience and turn it into something that she continually wants to make a difference for people you know that's a book started because she used to joke that she was the guy who are they allowed she just kept thinking out how to deal with that and it kind of like she just wanted to make a difference for people so let's put some of those fall down the paper at the worst case scenario so we'd be able to read what his mom has done but into so much more than just blue which states an area we're just feeling honored and privileged all of that you know I I I told you last time that we spoke that I really and you you agreed you know I believe that this has been with the the documentary in the book and the and and all of the army you know that time surrounds her and cheers for her ice I really believe it's keeping her alive you know keeping a motivated every day to continue and I I just think you know as I look back joys and I'm just looking because you guys have been on the festival circuit if you've been on you moving like like crazy around this world good in traveling this festival circuit and now I look at the poster the great full of the poster and I see in nineteen awards if I can count on right nine awards around this world is that amazing or what yeah just and then the heart to me to it but that's all that I have been able to go to people have literally pulled me aside and just say thank you I mean you know when we were at yeah that's what we were going to happen you notify the remaining at questions and then we fortunately laden allow me to tell Jenny talked out I try to screw them quickly as the questions are done by can be out there in the lobby selling the book and I hit people grab my arm as I'm writing by he talked to you thank you thank Janet Cleveland the now the difference she made and it that that it's a phenomenal to be able to be a part of that in the C. grateful spreading the word like that such a visual beautiful representation of her now great read tell me if they see if a film has been in the festival before and million award winner and then and then goes on date they don't come back right they don't come they don't come back and be a part of that the next festival you know sometimes you might do some some fun special thing so it's never fully ruled out as kind of a special presentation but yeah so socially what happened last year at that grade pull one or I need to its ward in July and indie shorts and then all the winners play again in October which is mostly Peter comes out too so we still have a showcase all the winner so we did bring to get back on course screening last October but yeah you never know what the future holds so we'll see what happens in the shorts international Film Festival as we mentioned in its second year and Greg did you what did you learn from the first year about putting on the largest short Film Festival in the Midwest that tell you won't do again this year or you've changed a little bit this article you whatever after working a ten day festival that it will power when in a to fall working four days it was like last day like this is it I think it's a great trial by fire for some of our new employees but you know I love it it's great I think people if you have a short film I mean nothing that it's that it's easy but you know traditionally get a short film you win an Oscar qualifying contest will such as any shorts or something else you can really go for essentially zero to hero for lack of better term you can have this the stone that when the wards plays the cuts will certainly can go on to potentially being Oscar winner within the span every year to which is pretty crazy music teacher county to put tens of millions of dollars in the promotion and advertising and Oscar campaign so that's the thing that's so going back shorts really are authentic their passion project for people that can be calling card yes but really he told the think strong story and less than forty minutes I think you're really shows a trial as to the filmmakers cell yeah and if anything I just learned that does a great community realize you can try new things will be successful our demographics grew our mental filmmakers who came to town we had more attendance in the first year the standalone event that we did with the shorts all within the castle the year prior in October so yeah there is hunger for short films and people taking a risk in on different topics unknown commodities which are different short sell we were on the right track which can make it bigger and better down the road all right that is Greg servic any eighties you're gonna find just those type of films that's what you'll see during the Indy shorts international Film Festival it takes place in new fields twenty fifth through the twenty eight and go to in the shorts dot org in the shorts dot org to see the list of what's happening and see where you can meet directors and producers and filmmakers and lots of cool things that are happening during this festival joys Kleinman in for Jenny what is next for you guys where you're going next Grateful will be shown at the end Indianapolis Israeli and Jewish Film Festival I believe it's on the twenty six then we will be showing and then we'll be in court sounds which is outside of Seattle Washington that's the timbre plan we also got accepted to the Toronto lift off so it continually amazes me but and it all started the kind of really fun to think that we started at the first annual India international short Film Festival I feel like we're growing as they're growing and it's fun to be a part in that way and going to other festival the one thing I have seen is that as I you know I'm a little prejudiced because I'm here in Indiana but I think heartland and what they've done with the short film fest in there you know what the the big festival in October I didn't realize how special it was until I started going to other festival to compare and they just do a amazing job really an honor to call this home as we spread our wings and all other places that's a good start Joyce Klein man and Jenny Verbitsky the story began in a band a memoir ALS save my life until it didn't get your hands on that in the documentary grateful the Jenny purpose key story to the audio version of Jenny's book should be coming out very very shortly we're just doing the final touches on it and this has been a request from a lot of people with special handicaps the more more people are listening to book making it happen in the short indie shorts dot org for tickets Greg sort of vague the director film programming for Harlan film enjoys Kleinman.

India forty minutes eighteen hundred dollars two thousand dollar fifty percent twenty fifth three years two degree four days ten day
"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"I'm with two of Accenture 's aerospace and defense leaders joining me are John Schmidt, managing director and the global indie lead at Accenture and Joyce Klein Accenture digital lead in the North American indie practice. John Joyce, welcome back. Thanks. Michael. It's prom season in the aerospace and defense sectors, getting ready for its big annual to do. We're talking about the Paris air show later in June. Of course this year, there are certain to be many issues that fuel the chatter from the chalets to the flight line. Accenture has been studying and working with numerous industry executives ahead of the air show, and I want to find out what you're hearing and seeing so Joyce, let's start with you and the many technology themes that seem to be emerging in the backdrop for industry many, many of the stories we write about at Aviation Week these days, revolve around digital disruption. What are the technologies that executives are grappling with right now? Thanks, mike. There's a lot of them, we can go actually in a bit of a spectrum and talk about things like artificial intelligence machine learning extended reality, virtual reality blockchain are distributed ledger technologies as well as get into aspects relating to advances in quantum computing. It's a wide spectrum of capabilities are being deployed and clients are asking for help across those different capabilities and deploying them themselves. It's a pretty exciting time the old new technologies like three D printing that were zaps, correct and robotics. Yep. And I o t exactly. It's a, it's a pretty wide spectrum of opportunity, according to centers research, many executives think that artificial intelligence will have the greatest impact of these technologies on Andy how so yeah, it's pretty exciting actually because artificial intelligence provides us. The ability of. Really looking at apple -cations within their internal operations across the enterprise, everything from HR to finance to supply chain in as well as the aftermarket as well as extending into changes within the customer. Experience is a pretty exciting time. You know, a lot of the work that we're doing. I'll just pick on supply chain as an example, we can see applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning around supplier, delivery and better predicting when that part is actually going to arrive. We can look at opportunities from inventory, optimization in the aftermarket. We look at things around predictive maintenance when is that part actually going to fail? And how can I be more understanding of when that part is going to come in, so that I'm ready for the overhaul and actually can do that? Turnover are swap out much more efficiently. Predictive maintenance something, we've been hearing more about well, we've been hearing about for years, but you're talking about predictive supply chain. That's really interesting. And that gets to my next question. Which is indie companies not surprisingly wanna make money like any other business. And I hear so much about the importance of making sure that tech investments provide an ROI, what is that? And how to companies make decisions or make good decisions to increase the likelihood of an investment making good. Yes. Michael, that's actually quite interesting in the sense that one of the things that we're seeing is that as we're gonna z are making investments in digital innovation. Only twenty two percent of large organizations are actually receiving benefits that are driving growth, and we're finding that those organizations, are what we're calling the champions. So it's very important than an organization spends the time upfront in terms of making the right decisions as they're making these investments. So there's a few things to call out here, first and foremost. Let's talk about the fact that we're be moving beyond if you will the science project a few years ago. This was all about making just testing and understanding is something gonna work sky was the limit. Exactly. Let's test, augmented reality. Let's see if this is not pilot might work. Let's try the use of analytics over here. One of the things that we're finding is science projects. We're beyond that, and what clients are doing. Now is really. Looking at what is the our why to your question? What is the business case? And so that movement is actually quite exciting, and it's, it's getting fueled actually by the fact that people want to actually build sustainable solutions, so because its business case driven we can do a proof of concept if the business cases realized we can quickly move to pilot, and then we can scale that opportunity this application of digital in this manner, is also part of what Accenture is talking about around helping clients make that wise, pivot. It's about keeping the legacy business running, but no one where you want to invest around innovation and the future, so that you're actually keeping the lights on while at the same time moving the organization to that next frontier from digital perspective and managing that digital transformation going forward, and maybe not necessarily cautiously, but going forward without a lot of waste exactly the process. Some those we've seen on this transition about the science projects instead of doing. A pilot which could have even been something in a conference room, then moving to proof of concepts, and moving proof of value, which may brings in a little bit more real life to it. We're seeing more clients saying, hey, this thing makes sense. And we should be doing this. And let's look for minimum viable product, something, we can do quickly and get out there, and then really prove it in the real world, and maybe one little unit, or one line or one part of the business. And then when we get the real data from real operations now we can go make improvements to it. So it's under minimum viable and scale quickly. And in fact, you know, Accenture we do a lot of that through our innovation hubs here in Chicago. We have one of those, and it's where we bring together, a lot of our digital technology talent to be able to quickly, you know, design and then implement solutions just like this. So it's more about this. Minimum viable product. It's not just simply what can you achieve? But it's what's going to actually provide a little bit of a return in what the midterm is at or near term and more than just a little bit of return. I mean, the hurdle rates are still a hurdle rates and. Getting these things across. And so I think one of our objectives is to work with companies to say instead of twenty percent next time the survey goes out. We want to see that double triple so that we can start seeing the promise these digital technologies. Workforce remains a pain point for industry, but it's not just sourcing enough workers. There's technology theme here too. It's also about sourcing the right kind of skilled workers Joyce Witter companies looking for in regards to technology and future workforce. One of the things that we're seeing is that balance between new hires that are digital natives and really have an expectation of what the work place is going to be for them against the war. The incumbent workers, if you will who may be shy and embracing new technology, so becomes that balance for the organization where they need to be capable of understanding both types of employee's, and basically, providing the tools and capabilities to be attractive and keep, and maintain if you will those digital natives while at the same time, upskilling some of their more seasoned employees who might need some help and guidance on the use of some of these newer technologies. So it's an interesting perspective in terms of that, that actual balance, and they think one of the things that we're seeing is that organizations really need to make sure that their understanding appreciating how to how to manage through this, in fact, one of our surveys. Gently highlighted that a majority, actually, it was sixty seven percent of Andy executives believe that forty percent of their workforce will move into new roles that require substantial reskilling, just due to the impact of technology. We yeah. We call that employees velocity. Right. Ability to move people from one function to another from one line to another and doing it in such a way that they can quickly adapt to the technologies that are being used and it's going to create a need for work for future to limit different than what we're looking for today. I mean, more dapple more technologically savvy, and it's going to be an interesting transition. And speaking of savvy struck I was looking through the tech vision report that eccentric puts out, and there was a, a element in there about talking about how workers need to have social media savvy is just one of the many skills, and that just kind of blew my mind about the idea that you need to think about your workers being able to get on social media, whether it's linked in or Facebook or whatever else and. How to use that for your corporate benefit as a workforce skill. Absolutely. And I think it's also that aspect too of just understanding that fine balance between your outside of work activities in your inside work activities in how to make sure that your appreciating that persona that you're projecting internally at work, and then outside of work when the other things that, that report was highlighting along, socialist. We used to say smack right, S, M, C, social, mobility, analytics in cloud, and what we're finding now is when we survey, that's basically table stakes technology for any company in this industry to have their hands on. And so to do that. I would see the people within the company need to be able to operate in social case we end companies need to be provide mobility to their workers, and I can't remember a time. I've had this gushing with somebody said they didn't want their police to be as productive with that device in their hand as they are at their PC. Uh-huh. So one of the other acronyms you all talk about his dark, dark technologies and John, I want you to explain that in a moment. One of those refers to quantum computing. And it struck me just a couple of weeks ago. I was listening to an investor conference the CEO of Honeywell Darius idem Zick was speaking to an analyst on stage in the analysts about Honeywell's projects in want him computing. And I thought, wow, this is amazing. This is a kind of a someone say older school industrial in conglomerate. And here he is being asked about quantum computing, so what stark in wire. Indie bigger older companies looking at it. So Dirk power term, we've come up with DA Q where the D stands for distributed ledgers or blockchain, the as artificial intelligence. The are is all elements of reality augmented mixed virtual reality in the qs quantum. And what receives an emergence of L? For these technologies. And, you know, joy of our clients are actually already kind of exploring these technologies in house, not to necessary to the extent that they're being deployed. And, you know, at scale probably the closest and the most precious one to the executives survey. Art official intelligence, these days on the other hand, when we sit quantum to go to that it is surprising to have analysts, questioning the CEO of a major company like Honeywell on their plans for quantum. And I think the answer he gave his spot on in a sense, I think what he said, was, we have to look for where this is going to be a game changer for us. And then go deploy which goes put Joyce's saying no science projects. We're not going to just go and play around with this and see what happens, we're going to think about. We're in our business. Do we have problems were solution or technology? Better solution like quantum can help us much like the blockchain conversations. We were having two years ago when people say, let's do buck chain. Well, wait a minute. Would we try to sell with Jane? And there are some particular use cases, if you were with blockchain. Being deployed in our industry, and we've been doing some with our clients, as well. I expect quantum to travel the same path those two years ago. Maybe we thought blockchain would be two years out. We wrong think the same going to be the case of quantum. It's progressing really fast. Well, I wanna go high level and talk with you, too, about some other issues like the max aircraft China and other big issues facing the industry, but before we do first Latina quick word about our sponsor. We've moved experience in the aerospace in defense industry Accenture helps companies on is digital technologies to improve operational performance enable competitive differentiation, and drive profitable growth to none more, visit extension dot com slash era..

Accenture John Joyce Honeywell Michael Joyce Klein Accenture Andy Aviation Week analyst John Schmidt Paris mike CEO Joyce Witter managing director
"joyce klein" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"joyce klein" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Two triathlons opening a medical practice in writing and publishing her book called ALL save my life until it didn't last year. We sat down with his mom, and the director of the film about Jenny titled grateful, the Jenny bear Bisky story, and it had just gotten off the ground, and I can't wait for all of you. And for me to actually here where this award winning powerful documentary is today. So joining us once again is Amy posit, she is a film producer. She's casting associated talent fusion, and she's also a producer and executive producer for this particular film. Awesome. Here is Paul Nethercott the CEO at studio Nethercott and the director of grateful. Joyce Klein minutes here Jenny's, mom. Hi there. Great to be here. And she's now an author Darren Morris here, he's the executive director of the indie film festival. How are you for having me? It's nice to meet you in person. There's a lot of us in this room starting with Joyce because we want to find out how Jenny's doing Jenny continues amaze me as you said she was diagnosed it's been ever ten years ago. Now, given eighteen to twenty four months to live and either we give it to her. She finds a carrot to keep moving forward. And she stays with a positive and amazing attitude that I don't know how she does what she does. But she definitely leads the payoff, and we have a huge village that supports her in the process. Yeah, we're really lucky and there's so many people that know her and know her story in a lot of it is due to this wonderful documentary you become an author. It's actually my daughter's the author the okay have written it with her. But she is the official author of the book. And it was it was. Three years in the making. And it was an absolute joy to do it with her. Let's people ask how do we do it? And I have a big ipads that have a keypad with it. And we projected it through apple play onto our TV. And she could see the words I was typing them can. She can fortunately still speak people that know people L S most of them lose voiced by now, but she is still able to speak. So we've had blast in. We're we're real excited because we've had a couple different blogs websites that have asked us to do some s guest articles for them. Because look so Jenny I've been writing those now, so it's been fun. Sometimes in the midst of crisis and illness that it changes everything. Yeah. I mean. Yes, I mean jenning I always had a close relationship now, it's just take into a whole 'nother level one of the comments Jenny makes it's been in her Volker, spin interviews that you know, being that she physically can't do anything that she's dependent on everybody. She's had so much more intense an in-depth relationships with people around her. She. Said she had three wishes one of them would be that she didn't have LS, but she wouldn't wanna lose all the lessons. She's learned along the way the book is saved my life until it didn't. And we've been very lucky that the different festivals. We've been they've allowed us to sell the book there. And it's just the film is amazing. I mean the documentary is great. But it only gives you a small Sniffen where the book goes into a lot more details about how Jenny has managed how she what she's created around herself and managed to live in a world that gives her lots of Joyce Jimmy's. Mom, and we'll let you certainly know how to get a hold of the book, but will jump over to Paul Nethercott. What kind of year has it been for grateful? The Ginny Bisky story. It's been remarkable. It's been amazing. It's been rewarding inspiring surprising surprising. I I'm we screened the film surprised at how many laughs how much laughter there wasn't how many tears too that's been consistent every time. We screen the film that we've had very strong emotional response audience. It's an award winner. We've been in sixteen for will we've been either screened at or will screen at a total of sixteen film festivals. Officially now. So far we've won several awards and one of the highlights was winning audience choice. Award. India shorts highlight was winning audience choice award at Sedona international film festival in our same group of films. There's another short documentary that it just. Award about two weeks before that really. And so people really respond to this film, and I'm very thankful, and what are what has been surprised for you this past year? Well, I.

executive producer Joyce executive director director studio Nethercott Ginny Bisky Darren Morris Joyce Klein Amy CEO India apple official producer Joyce Jimmy Volker twenty four months Three years ten years two weeks