35 Burst results for "Jovial"

"jovial" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:01 min | Last month

"jovial" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam Webster's word of the day for November 25th. Everybody needs just the right amount of fuel to get going in the morning. For some nice McDonald's egg and cheese bagel is just enough to do it. Others might prefer a McDonald's bacon egg and cheese bagel. Or perhaps a sausage egg and cheese bake. And there are those with nothing will do but a hearty McDonald's steak egg and cheese bake. Four different breakfast bagels to get you going tomorrow morning. Give your engine a head start and participating McDonald's about today's word is jovial, spelled, IAL. Jovial is an adjective that means markedly good humored, and describes people and things that are cheerful or full of joy. Here's the word used in a sentence from The New Yorker by Jiang fan. Still part of the pleasure of dining at Margie's is its familial atmosphere. When Winston a jovial 17 year old senior at far rockaway high school stopped to chat while clearing dishes, it was hard not to feel like a guest at an intergenerational dinner. In Roman astrology, planets were named after gods, and people were thought to share the personality traits of the God whose planet was rising when they were born. Jupiter also called jove was the chief Roman God, and was considered a majestic type who was the source of joy and happiness. The Latin adjective jovially means of or relating to jove. In French, this had become the word jovial, which English borrowed and used to describe people and things full of cheer or joy. With your word of the day, I'm Peter sokolovsky. Visit merriam Webster dot com today for definitions, wordplay and trending word lookups..

McDonald merriam Webster Jiang fan rockaway high school The New Yorker Margie jove Winston Peter sokolovsky
Sebastian Reminisces About His Time in the Oval Office With Donald Trump

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:03 min | 4 months ago

Sebastian Reminisces About His Time in the Oval Office With Donald Trump

"Me share a story here. I was in the oval office with president trump. Just the two of us which rarely happens. The oval office has Well it has an entrance way from the out of office and then it has a little narrow door that goes to private eating area and little place for the president. Just sit and read. Didn't be by himself. And then it has the door to the the west wing where guests come through so you rarely in there alone. I was in with the most powerful man in the world and it is a humbling feeling truly as an immigrant to the united states. Somebody who wasn't born here. Who has an accident who always will who only became a citizen. Three years prior to be alone in the oval office is something yukon express. And i was in there on other business if i remember. Well i think it was Iran deal I was one of the two people though building. In addition to the president wanted to kill the iran deal. God bless into finally doing in the face of people like hr mcmaster tillerson mnuchin. All the other fake america first. And i was about to leave still talking about something to do with iran and the president looked at is hand. He got this very serious expression. Yeah he's a very jovial person. It's to great great sense of humor. But suddenly his face froze who's reminded of something on that piece of paper or just something came to mind when he said i really don't want americans to die on the korean peninsula. I did not want to get us into another shooting war in korea. He understood the threat. Remember the hermit kingdom under kim launching ballistic missiles over the japan intimidating our friends in our allies but despite never having said he went to a military high school but despite never having served he really undestood the weight. The inordinate responsibility carried by the person who is commander-in-chief

President Trump Oval Office Tillerson Mnuchin Iran America Korean Peninsula Korea KIM Japan
Longtime Poker Pro Layne Flack Dies Unexpectedly at 52

The PokerNews Podcast

02:10 min | 6 months ago

Longtime Poker Pro Layne Flack Dies Unexpectedly at 52

"Unfortunately we have lost a poker legend japan. I guess that's right where we should start six time bracelet winner lane flak unexpectedly passed away the other day man so sad found dead at his home on monday night. And obviously all these moments are always really sad arrested discuss but especially when somebody is young in lane was was was fifty two years old. He was a vibrant personality to say the least guy who always had a smile on his face. And the guy. Chad who i think of and tell me if you agree is like one of the geez you know. It's like back in the day in the poker boom. It's like layne. Flack would be mentioned among poker's biggest names and he's kind of held debt forever for twenty years and he keeps he kept popping up and popping up and popping up. It's just a tremendously as sad loss for the poker community It was it was felt you could see it across social media so many but wayne in sharing memories about him And just like you said reiterating that he was such a force in the poker world in a positive one at that. He was always putting a smile on people's faces. It has always cracking jokes. I seen a lot of people saying he had the quickest mind the sharpest wit and they had ever seen in the poker world and my interactions with lane over. The years seemed to support that He was always jovial. he was always Had some sort of quit that he was ready to rattle off and six time. Bracelet winner had the nickname back. Back-back flack which is one of the greatest nicknames in in poker and It's interesting so you went back to back bracelets of one two bracelets and back to back years of the world soccer two thousand to two thousand three but he really got the nickname back in one thousand nine hundred nine when he shipped back to back titles in back to back days at the i think it was the a. Poke knows a poker of legends. I believe it was out in. La so Yet a lot of repeats if you will in that moniker back-to-back flack and like you said just fifty two years old it just uh Gone too soon. Much like a good friend of his Years ago and gavin

Layne Flack Chad Japan Wayne Soccer LA Gavin
Haiti's Interim Leader Requests US Troops

The Takeaway

01:37 min | 6 months ago

Haiti's Interim Leader Requests US Troops

"We're joined now. By gary pierre pierre founder and editor in chief of the haitian times gary great to have you here. Melissa and also with us is friends swap Louis professor of political science at queens college at the city university of new york who specializes in haitian politics and immigration francois. Welcome to the show. So gary i want to begin with you. What has been the impact in haiti in the immediate aftermath of this assassination. Well the impact has been a shock on the population. Jovial was not very popular in haiti. And i i would say that. The poll was generous to the reality on the ground. It was deeply unpopular for a host of reasons but nevertheless He's assassination brought people together Because people well as much as we dislike of now he was a president and then Foreigners came and kill him so right now There's a period of mourning. I'm afraid the unknown is. What would the people's reaction be think that one of the reasons why the so-called prime minister closures ask intervention. because he's he doesn't know what the reaction of the people would be in also more importantly what the gang leader's reaction would be if they decide to come together and god forbid attack and it'll be total chaos and so now the situation fluid We're assessing what's going on and winning. Because there is a mourning period of fifteen days and so we wait.

Gary Pierre Pierre Haitian Times Gary Great Haiti Queens College City University Of New York Francois Melissa Jovial Louis Gary
How Running Slowly in Training Can Impact Your Ability to Run Fast

Live Your Own Fit Podcast

02:02 min | 6 months ago

How Running Slowly in Training Can Impact Your Ability to Run Fast

"Slow is technically hotter but what it does allow is. It's easy to relax mentally and physically to become aware of that fade back from what's going on in your body. Some of these people out there are going around training with a lot of tension which doesn't allow the feedback which doesn't allow them to make small changes and notice any of these changes while they're doing all of running. My first point that i wanted to cover was why if you can't run slowly like really slowly with efficiency and being really relaxed with your muscles how that is impacting your performance at running at foster spayed. Well first off if you can't run slowly comfortably and really relaxed. Then there's a few things going on there and the first thing we're going to talk about is tension so if you'll run retention and you can't relax then how you going to be able to get more energy more accuracy and more feedback when you are running slow all fast or doing anything that you do in your life so when we look at an example of great african runners you know and they're out for a jog and you can google and find these amazing kenyans going for a run together as a group and they running five to six minute as or non minute miles when they could run a marathon in two hours just two hours that they easy runny. Soya relaxed that you can see how relaxed they are. They laughing they almost look. They'd running on the spot and there's no effort whatsoever in have run. The arms are relaxed. You could say all of their muscles bang loose. They mon is loose. Obviously they they happy jovial and they able to do this in a really relaxed state in every sense of the word of relaxing. Mentally and physically.

Google
"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"That's up lucci. Co founder of jovial food on may twenty second. Carla passed away unexpectedly. After a brief illness. Carla's husband rodolfo will continue in his role at jovial and this month their daughter julia who was the inspiration for the brand will be officially joining joel to help run the family business. Thanks so much for listening to the show this week. If you're not yet a subscriber please do subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. If you want to write to us or email addresses h. h bt and npr dot org. And if you want to follow us on twitter at guy roz or at how i built. This could also find us on instagram. That's at how i built this. Npr or my personal account at guide dot roz. This episode was produced by jc howard with music composed by rum. Tina bluey. It was edited by grant with research help from derek gaels. Our audio engineer was patrick. Void after staff includes. casey herman. Rachel faulkner james. Del hussey julia. Carney farah safari liz. Metzger janet lujan lee an analyst over our intern is harrison. Vj choy and jeff rodgers is our executive producer guy roz and you've been listening to how i built this. This is npr..

Rachel faulkner julia Carla jc howard jeff rodgers rodolfo harrison patrick Vj choy casey herman guide dot roz Tina bluey h. h bt twitter derek gaels instagram Npr this week this month joel
"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:03 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"Been kind of a gut punch. It was but we also had a lot of people that were embracing the flower. They wanted to bake at home with something that they felt was pure so it was the product that we were growing in a different way than our usual channels. So you were selling in corn flour like all purpose flour at whole foods. Now we were selling it direct direct to consumers. Yeah and a lot of people. This word started spreading meantime. You're not getting traction. With i corn pasta whole foods pretty soon after whole foods. Dropped you from what i understand you. You decided to offer like cooking. Retreats in tuscany like for people to come to learn how to cook with and corn flour. We started to like host people and teach them how to do this right. Yes and the idea. Was that if you could just ask people to see and to hear the story then more people would know about it and it will take off. Sometimes i would sit with marketing. And i would tell them stories and they were like oh if people could just hear this they would buy our product so i started to think about it and i said i'm gonna try this so i think the first two times. I had no idea how this would go so i was going to teach the classes. I paid an influence her who popular in gluten free to come and do it but she also promoted the trump and that's how people came because they didn't really know us too. Well this was a. This is a food blogger. Who was influential. Gluten free world. And you said hey come and we want to show you what we do yes. She was called gluten-free girl at the time and basically all live in the same big villa which was beautiful. And it's a few steps from the pasta factory so i would invite important 'buyers or people also in the industry to come and take him on a tour of the pasta factory then we'd have a class every other day free time in between and after class we would make a traditional italian dinner that everybody loved but when we first started i worked so hard. I'd wake up at four o'clock in the morning to have breakfast ready by seven because everything was fresh. I wouldn't sit down until midnight. I mean basically would sleep for four hours and this is like manual labor your cooking and but we learned how to get better at it and i just learned that i have. I feel like. I have a gift for this type of teaching. I know a lot about food. So we're in the cooking class. There is are just on me. You know they they love it. I'm just wondering carla from a marketing perspective. Me you were really busy. You're running by nature. You're starting this new brand jovial and you need to get the word out about encore like it doesn't seem super efficient to start a full retreat and to spend your free time which probably had almost none teaching just twenty people at a time had a cook with encore. Doesn't seem like a particularly efficient way to market your product but just think of all the people that would see that on social media and wanna go but not be able to go. Yeah and i've always one of my business to be my own. I wanna do what i'm good at like. Staying true to yourself is the best thing they can do in a business. I don't i don't copy people i just. I just do what i feel like. If this is true to me and that was something that i have. That's unique. And once i started doing the getaways i would hear people talking about. I got to know gluten free consumer up close and personal and understand what was missing in their lives and i also connected with them on a deep level. And i'm i've had people come back six times. Yeah it just. It's amazing to me that you decided to do this. Which turned out to be smart because it was a way to get the the the word out about the food but like this is not. I mean when you look at like a pure piano right for your business. This is not a money generator you can. You can go on these retreats now and they're you know they're not bargain-basement cheap but i can't imagine because they're making really making money off of these things we try to break. Even my business has never been about money. If you looked at the margins on in corn they never would have happened. Unless i was crazy but i always felt like you know that i promise. I'm going to honor my consumer. If i did that the money would fall. When did you guys mean you. Started this. Business with your. Your brother is a is a partner ninety six or something. when did you become profitable. I think we were profitable after the third year. Not immensely profitable. And i think we had two years where we lost money. But we've renovate ship. I mean we had a very small warehouse that we rented for three thousand dollars a month for until two thousand and fourteen. We stretch that space. We outgrew that seven years before we moved out I think that in maybe two thousand twelve or two thousand thirteen. i think. America's test kitchen named heure gluten free pasta brown rice pasta. The best in in the us which i have to imagine just like was a huge boost for for business for the for the jovial brand. They actually did a couple of years in a row and they marketed that a lot and it really did. It was a turning point for our pasta and that really the gluten free pasta. Really begin to drive the jovial brand. Was that the engine that kinda helped to take off. Yes and it totally does today to. It's best selling product so as you started to gain more traction through gluten free pasta. Did you start to see more traction through the the anckorn pastas. I think think we. We introduced tomatoes cracker on crackers us and then because i have this passion for products and glass. We also came up with beans and last year. We introduced a grain free pasta which has taken off like key. Can't even believe cassava pasta. Yes because i feel like if i can create a food that can make a difference in somebody's life and fill a void and do it. Well then that's what. I have to do so grain. Free was becoming popular and i felt like i could do this. Well with no added ingredients. Nothing just cassava and water and That product has taken off Way faster than brown rice pasta. It's really really doing well. So now. The the brand jovial you're still based in connecticut. Righted sits headquarters are in connecticut. Yes we have a warehouse in an office but you make all of your things in all. Your products are made in italy. Most of your things are made in italy right. Everything is currently made in italy. But we do have about five years of new products and some of these products will have to be made in the united states. Because they're not products we can make in italy. So i'm very excited to you. Know i'll finally have a product that's made in the usa. Which i'm proud of wish you mentioned by the way you did win that lawsuit eventually and you did. Were able to buy out. The bio nature brandon is now yours. You own that brand. Yes when did jovial kind of begin to become a bigger brand than by nature if it if if it is it is when did you start to notice jovial kind of overshadowing bio nature's brand two thousand and eighteen two thousand nineteen. Yes you know. So many companies. We've so many businesses that we've had on the show founders. Some of the businesses are totally privately owned or or or Found around some.

italy two years four hours six times usa twenty people ninety six four o'clock tuscany last year nature two thousand America bio about five years first two times third year two thousand thirteen today three thousand dollars a month
"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:53 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"Loaf. It wasn't my kids still talk about the first lifts for like bricks because basically it absorbs less water than wheat. So i would keep adding flour to make it feel like the texture of reagan. Exciting new how to make sourdot. Yeah and then bake it. It wouldn't rise and it was terrible and then this one week we went on vacation. And i took the flour and the starter and there is nothing in this kitchen now. We were in. So i mixed up the dough and it was really late and i was tired and so i just decided to add more water and then the next day kind of plopped in this pan and oh my god. The best bread came out of the oven. I was like that's the trick. You too wet dough to to to throw into the the pot. And i didn't add is it's still way less water than regular loaf of bread but it was enough to get the bread to rise well and you didn't need it. Basically it's kind of like a no need brand and no need bread. I got an and this flower was still wheat. Bright but it's different because what it was like it's higher in protein content. It has a very weak gluten. So there are certain types of gluten or proteins in all other kinds of wheat that i enquired does not have so like pizza maiden in naples. These like double-o flower like that has very high gluten. Yeah it's chewy. That's where he gets us yet. Yeah but you can still make p delicious pizza and everything with anckorn. You just have to learn how to do. It and corn to be clear is not gluten-free. We should make. It is not good for you. Can't eat it. If you have celia disease okay so you start experimenting with this in. You're making corn. Everything like in corn bread and pastas and pies and stuff like that for julia and what happens to do symptoms go away. She started to feel better in about two months and then progressively better took about two years for everything to go away all right so now you know that you you have something that you wanna develop into a brand but who who's growing encore. Where do you get it while. So basically us this researcher. If i could have seeds. And he gave us the name of a farmer and he said we don't sell seeds but if the skies willing to share with you go for so everybody likes my husband. He drove to the farm. They became friends. The guy said okay. I'll give you the seeds. And then that weekend we had a school and of the dinner we sat across from the sky. We started talking. He said he was a wheat farmer. And i was like. Hey you interested in trying something new. And he said sure. I'm not making any money growing wheat. Talk talk talk about a a moment of luck here. It's an elementary school dinner. And the guy. You're talking to his a wheat farmer in you to be. You have a problem that you need solved in. How often do we get to. Just sit across the table from a wheat farmer. Who randomly meet. It just fell into my lap and he was an only a wheat farmer. He was like the best farmer. I've ever met because he was going to grow that wheat. No matter what. I mean we had no idea how many seeds you planted per acre like we didn't know anything and I think we planted fifty acres the first year. And i love this farmer because he would come in italy. You can pick your children up for lunch at elementary school. He would come in a gigantic tractor to pick up his daughter for school. And i would be like there's my farmer and He would just every once in a while. You guys got to come to the farm. Because i've never seen anything like it. It's like totally different. I don't know if we're gonna make it. And it did and we harvested it. And from what i understand by the way from from reading about this the yield is like a fifth of the normal yield for wheat. So like you might have fifty acres of this but like it's a v less than you would get from. Beiber is normal week though. Most of us eat. It's nothing and we've had to save the seats every year. We started with us original variety which will never change. So we've had to manage everything. It's it's a huge project are meantime you are starting you decide to start a new brand called jovial. You're going to continue to distribute by nature in the us but you're going to start this. New brand jovial and jovial was going to be built around and gluten free pastas. Yes a lot of advisers said. Don't do anything but in corn your year behind corn person. And i'm like it's going to take years to get people to know what it is. Yeah i can't do that. I need to come up with something else. Yeah yeah so you so you started when you start out with jovial. You didn't just start with the and corn pasta but she also had like black rice. Pass like full on gluten free passes yes. I didn't want my daughter to be eating a ton of starch and gums for the rest of her life. I wanted to be flowers. So i've always tried to make gluten free foods without those added ingredients so the pasta factory that makes our pasta actually started making gluten free. Pasta nineteen seventy film was a no protein pasta for people with kidney disease and they tweaked a machine and they got in on the gluten free pasta really early and they're really good at it so i said let's pull out all the stops brown sties slow drying everything. And you know who's going to do that for like who really cares about gluten free people well i. I wanted a good pasta. Yeah you wanted the bronze because that's more expensive because the most pasta we'd in in the us. Probably even in italy as just mass produced in. It's not extruded through bronze dies that that leave those that like nice textured posted. If you wanna buy you can go and buy more expensive. Yeah they use teflon. So it's like a nonstick pan through but you want a gluten free pasta to have that that texture to hold this off. I wanted the gluten free pasta. Be as close to regular pasta as i could possibly make it. And what did you start with you start with with rice brown rice brown rice okay so with brown rice brown rice to get it a little bit more flavor be closer to week flavor. Got it okay. So i think in two thousand ten jovial was born and now you already had this distribution network because through by nature. So i have to imagine it. Wasn't that hard to get to here. Products into whole foods and other health food stores. Right did you did you. Were you able to get the the on corn pasta into whole foods. Pretty quickly we did. They took it nationally and it was actually not too hard to get the products and distribution. But unfortunately they do not sell. They didn't sell people know. The brand and i was surprised by that. I was surprised because you thought consumers are like me. They're gonna look at the labels are gonna see. There's high protein content they're going to see. There's a high fiber content. They're going to want to try this but people are not like you. They don't do that in the grocery store. They walk by things a couple of times before they pick it up. Yeah i mean. I think americans are like faithful to their brand so once you get them on your side. It's good but they that's hard to get them to stop buying whatever they're buying and try something new so it did not do well. I think it took six months for. I corn to be off the shelf but they kept the other products. What were the other. The browns rice pasta dropped incorp pasta and that.

six months italy fifty acres next day one week first lifts julia about two months about two years first year nineteen naples fifth two thousand ten jovial seventy americans
"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:33 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"First purchase of a website or domain..

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"Before things got big. This was in the in the early eighties. Eighty five and i also notice that when we got to this apartment like i was obsessed with turning over forks and looking at tablecloths and everything in the house was made in italy and i was like wow this country sustains itself because backing connecticut everything was getting huge supermarkets and this little downtown that we had with a butcher shop in a fish market and everything was all closing down and and then i had this one memory of it's called the night of san lorenzo when there's a lot of shooting stars so we went up into the hills you could see the the adriatic coast and then we just sat there in. The sky was so clear and they were shooting stars everywhere. And i just said i wish i could live here someday. I was. I was totally hooked. I was thinking. Why did my grandparents leaves paradise. Yeah so that trip clearly had a huge impact on you And i guess when you went to college went to connecticut college i went to connecticut. College wanted to stay close to home. Because i didn't know if my father was gonna be alive or not. So that's where that's where in in your dad. Your dad passed away pretty soon after that trip. He did a couple of days before actually started college. Well and it got to the point where you had to decide your major so i was looking through the book and i said let me look in italian and it said if you majored in italian and you have financial aid. You have to spend a year abroad in italy and the program covers like your -partment which is stepping mouse mats me. That's me a half to go. It's calling me. So you end up spending your junior year abroad in italy and that year would be like chains rest of your life because year you met the man who would eventually become your husband and business partner rodolfo. How did you guys. how did you meet. yeah he. He was a friend of one of these distant relatives that i had that lived in modena. And he said oh. Let's my mother said. I should come and pick you up and take you to her house so you can say hi to her so we went to his house and been had just pulled up because his best friend live next door wasn't your husband. Yes he was gone as soon as i saw. I was like if. I'm pretty enough for you. You're my man. i just knew it. he was just. I don't know it just had this feeling and you hit it off right away. We were just friends. I mean we would. I would go in italy. When you're that when you're that age you have like this group of friends. And they all go out together. So on friday or saturday nights they would say. Hey do you wanna come to modern. Go out with us so the girls would sit on one side of the table. The guys would sit on the other and they would just talk all night long and i was. I'd get bored. You know they were talking about things like oh. Have you ever heard of like band row. They have these roll ons now. That work as the and i was like. Oh my god but They would always sit next to him because he didn't have a girlfriend. Was he a student. He actually had just finished military service and he had previously studied agriculture in bologna but his family had had some financial hardships so he had to go to work. So i guess youtube start dating and as a certain point you go back to the us to finish college. But then you return to italy in yoon rafa moving together right. yes and what. What were you both doing. He was working as agricultural company. And i had my first and only job as a translator but after a couple of months i got yelled at because i translated stainless steel to inox sizable stealing. It was an important company to those important. You know customer so the man who ran the place took me in his office and just yelled. I'm in. I just looked at me said i quit. You know so i. I've only had one job in my life and it was like two months and we were already having a hard time making ends meet. because in italy pe- people don't really make a lot of money in fear. Parents don't have something. It's almost impossible to get ahead and i didn't wanna be like my parents always worrying about money. I wanted to have a family. I wanted to. I wanted to do things. So i was very motivated to to get ahead. You wanted to start a business. I did and so i convinced my husband to go to the united states because one day i was like kind you can open up businesses states for like two hundred dollars and he said okay. Well so you convinced him and by the way to speak any english now. He studied german school so he knew no english. You convince him rodolfo. You convince them to go to the us and you're not married at this point right now but we did have to get married for him to get it. I got you just like he called. My my cousin was like a justice of the peace and we signed the papers. That was you get married to come back to the us and now what was the idea. What was the business you. we're gonna do. The first business idea was to move to miami and open up dna hut at the beach. So paige dina is like the flat bread that they make on the adriatic coast and they have these striped huts. And you just stuff them with pursued or ci user greens or tomatoes and that was our idea so we drove to southern florida and we actually stayed in a campground in a tent and it was very frustrating. Because nobody was going to give you the permit to open up in a hut in miami beach and so one night. I went to bed and i left my sneakers tent and when i woke up in the morning i put them on with no socks and there were these little teeny fire ants inside the sneakers and my feet and it was so painful. I looked at my husband. I started to cry. And i said let's go back to connecticut. I can't take it anymore. All right and you go back to connecticut. Did you go back to new london where he grew up. We love of my parents. I didn't have any with my mother. I didn't have any money so we were in the kitchen brainstorming and my brother and his friend were there. And i said we're going to open a fresh pasta shop with lake prepared sauces in the first town called mystic connecticut. And they were like you'll never make it. You need to make sandwiches and grinders and things like that so connecticut. Yeah so i was like all right all right so we found this man who made this really good italian bread. It was like twenty minutes away and so we would go. We would leave our house. Alight five in the morning. Pick up the whole load of bread. And and then i would weave in some italian thing soleil made. I made spinach pie. And we found an empty store and it was only five hundred dollars a month. We couldn't really afford a or anything. So i actually painted the windows backwards in red paint and this was. This was in like the late eighties. Right get was ninety one. Oh wow so if. I have my cinematic history correct. This is after mystic pizza. The movie came out probably. We didn't get many tourists though. It was premature local spy. And we also. My brother had loaned us five thousand dollars and we took fifteen hundred of that and bought this old famer cappuccino machine so we were the first people in town have cappuccino machine and.

five thousand dollars fifteen hundred rodolfo italy modena youtube two hundred dollars new london bologna miami friday southern florida miami beach two months first one job italian late eighties ninety one united states
"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:39 min | 8 months ago

"jovial" Discussed on How I Built This

"We spend a lot of time. Researching founders and their brands but every once in a while an idea grows from something we come across in our daily lives and about a year ago in the supermarket. I noticed box of gluten. Free spaghetti made from cassava flour intrigued. So i bought it and it was pretty great. The brand was called jovial. And i'd already been using their diced tomatoes and rice pastas and my cooking. For a few years they make olive oil and tomato paste and even cookies all produced in italy. But the brand is probably best known for its pasta's made from a wheat called. I'm corn and because i'm a sucker for stories on boxes i read about. How jovial helped revive this ancient on hybridize wheat. A type of wheat. That is not genetically modified so some people with gluten sensitivities can actually eat it anyway. I decided to dig around to find out more about the brand. I came across the story of karla bartolucci carla and her husband rodolfo grew jovial from shaky startup into a national multi million dollar brand over the past decade. They were inspired by their own daughter. Who had a sensitivity to wheat gluten but the journey to building jovial was filled with personal tragedy failures bad business partners and very slow growth. So i called up carla and we ended up having a wonderful rich conversation about her life about her working class upbringing in connecticut and most importantly about our mutual love of cooking in the weeks after the interview we stayed in close touch. Carlos sent me her on sour dough. Starter i sent her photos of my cornflower pizzas and then a few weeks ago. I received a small bottle of balsamic vinegar from modina. She wrote this ball. Sammy comes from one of the oldest vinegar makers in mota enjoy this black gold. Which i did and then a few days ago i got a call. That left me stunned after a very brief illness. Carla are lucci died unexpectedly at the age of fifty three. Even though we never met face to face it still felt like losing a good friend. And while carla wasn't a household name she was well known in the specialty food business and widely respected for her vision and integrity so while there are a lot of important business lessons to learn from this episode. We wanna think of it mostly as a tribute to her remarkable life and career a life that began in new london. Connecticut or carla grew up. The granddaughter of four italian immigrants. Food was really important to my family. My both my mother and father were really really good. Cooks my mother. She was just effortless in the kitchen. I never can remember one bad meal. Maybe one but she would also make vegetables really good she knew how to clean artichokes and cook them with parsley and garlic and a little white wine so that when you eat them they just melted in your mouth so as a kid i would just walk by this huge bowl of artichokes and just plop them in my mouth. They were so good. She made fresh ravioli. Yawkey tie attala with all kinds of sauces and you know my dad. He was a great cook to he. Didn't cook that often but he would make cabbage and bean soup. I'd never be able to ride. Can't replicate the flavor and you know my died. He he was fishing. So he had a lobster boat and lobster pots and we had a ping pong table in our basement. And i still remember that. Ping pong table being lined with trays of lobsters stuffed lobsters relatives and he also made wine in our cellar. We made wine and it was nice. You know but at the same time. I was growing up in america. And so i think when the My grandparents immigrated they didn't wanna be italian. They wanted to be american so they tried to lose their accent but they held onto these food traditions. Where you grew up in connecticut was it. Italian was irish. Was like most people of waspy. What you remember about the people in your in your town. I mean there was basically italy. People would choose a town that was similar to where they came from and so a lot of people there lived came from this one area of fun. Oh it's called and they actually developed a neighborhood that was called the fort and on the other side of the town was kind of the nice beach. Area were more wealthy people lived and my father was able to buy a piece of land on the night side of town and build a house for us so i grew up in a neighborhood with people who are better off than us. So tell me about what your dad did for a living. He was a bricklayer. Did he have like a small business. That he ran he tried. I mean he really wanted to own his own business but he had four children and so he ended up just working for construction companies. So your data's a bricklayer and you had three siblings other siblings. Were you the youngest. By the way. I was the youngest and Were you will you. The only girl. I was the only girl. Oh you're surrounded by boys. Yes so i was very competitive in at a young age because i just felt this pressured like to do good at just to do things that they were doing. Yeah all right so you grew up your growing in connecticut and from what i understand when you were sixteen year. Father was diagnosed with cancer. Yes my parents sat us down in the living room and told us and the next day i went to high. I was in high school in english class. And my friend's father owned the funeral home in town. And i said you know my father has cancer. Is that bad. I didn't even know what it was. And she just looked at me like yeah. Very bad and so That weekend. I asked my mom to drive me to the health food store. Missiles little teeny health food store had never been in. But i saw it when we were driving past it to go to the supermarket and i walked in and you know it smelled like full awful mix and was kind of weird you know with all the bulk bins and and i went to the section where they had books and i noticed the macrobiotic. I think that time it was called cure for cancer. It was a long time ago. And i asked my mom to buy and then i came home and i was like dad. I'm going to cure you of cancer. Mccook and he just he just was not interested. How old was your dad. When he was diagnosed he was he was fifty six. Wow but he had been to italy to reconnect with these relatives. Spy on his own wants and his final wish was to go back there so he was very very sick but he took one of my brothers. And i and we were therefore monkey. He wanted to go to italy knowing that he did not have a longtime love now. He died a few months later. He was also a little sick bear it but but the trip was amazing. That.

america Carlos Carla rodolfo italy karla bartolucci Sammy fifty six Connecticut both sixteen year four children one mota waspy next day connecticut Italian irish few days ago
COVID's Impact On Chinese Fine Wine Consumers

Italian Wine Podcast

08:26 min | 1 year ago

COVID's Impact On Chinese Fine Wine Consumers

"I'm going to be talking about the impacts on china's why market on how those impacts affected consumers buying behaviors. First of all this year. The buzzword hearing is locked down on but in china and we talk about lockdown. It's in the strictest sense one household household can only allow one person to go out once a day to purchase all the necessities unlike in europe. Or in the us where you have the luxury to go out and to do a lot of chores. In china it's really strict on areas. That are most affected by the pandemic. You're not even allowed to go all. There's a community officer who is on standby just to send all the necessities to you to your door. So this is the contact where talking about when we want to understand kovic impact on china this is also the circumstance under which a lot of the business have to operate for three months from late january to april. So this is something i want to want. Everyone who's listening in to bear in mind to keep it in the back of head on back of a mind to understand the corvettes impact. So i upon. I'm going to talk about cova impact on china's wine imports. So what happened to win. By the end of january china had locked down the whole country as a result restaurants hotels essentially closed and miss the most important chinese new year sales for anyone wondering how big and how important is chinese new year for a lot of wind merge and a lot of the a lot of them who i talked to told me chinese new year wine sales account for roughly twenty percent or even up to thirty percents of their i knew sales so imagine seven day period was lots okay and then imagine. That period was attended for three months. That's the challenge facing a lot of the importers in china and of course logistics were delayed because quickly the pandemic spread from china to the rest of the world Even when china in may and june recovered from the pandemic countries are like ryan's italy and you were in the depth of the pandemic dot affected global logistics while because we have the latest figures from china customs at a showed import volume declined by thirty percent. Thirty point eight percent to three hundred forty seven million leaders in poor value declined roughly thirty percent as well to u. s. one point eight four billion. This is quite significant. Because i want to joe attention to the fact that last year china's one import value already declined. We saw roughly ten percent job in volume terms and one percent in value terms because of the economic slowdown and trade war between china and was so the downturn. We are saying this year is a continuation of what happened last year as well. So that's you know might have a projection for what is to expect on what's to calm right okay. So next one. I am going to talk about because of the job in wine. Imports and how it affected merchants consumers and the price points are was sane on the shelves merchants of course when you have stalks that are meant to be depleted for chinese new year. That a stew setting in the warehouse. What you do when you have uncertainties facing forward you'll become a more cautious your becoming more cautious with your spending what to buy how to budget. That's natural response. A market exit suddenly. We're seeing a lot of merchants exiting the market. Unfortunately one of the examples with sane is from jovial. Many of you guys familiar with jovial so basically joe view is a wine and agricultural importing company backed by the tech giant nenova. Five years ago when it entered the market to stop two important should be winds. It costs a lot of fanfare and naturally they had the peak around twenty key bruns. Included a the biggest Organic winery madonna in in chile. And also jong here moe's fabulous wines earlier this year due to the pandemic it's general manager said they're suspending the wine business. This is not a small one time importer. we're looking at a company. Dots actually has the scale. That's the direct impact of the pandemic. I'm coffee cards. Of course a lot of wineries and importers were having zero sales in february in particular consumers when you have job uncertainty because of the pandemic what are you gonna do. You're becoming more cautious with. You're spending your accounting or the non essential standings unfortunate wine is counted as numb- essential on like you know maybe in france or italy or in the us consumers of course they're trading down if they are buying winds at all. They are really budgeting what to buy. You know what is the best value. What is the most affordable wine outing the market this can be reaffirmed by the expert on expert data we just from burgundy from january to september export volume to china shop to by roughly thirty percent and in value terms jumped by roughly around twenty percent and we see some increases in areas where Or shop elise. Those kind of increases assertion guan crew premier cru in terms of red and whites that Racing price-wise wines priced under one. Hundred orrin be is the most popular category one hundred. That's about fifteen dollars. So what happened to on trade and why on trade matters like any other. Why importers in in the war in europe or in the us traditional ones heavily dependent on trade on restaurants and bars and hotels to win. The pandemic happened especially in china. Were the strictness of the lockdown is so severe on so carefully scrutinized at enforced restaurants bars were treated during the pandemic on china. We're talking about country that has ten million restaurants chinese new year. Like i said completely shot during the seven day. National holiday dining sector alone lost five hundred billion. That's seventy six billion. Us dollars lockdown. Measure of various strictness were enforced from end of january to april lasting three months. Even in some cases restaurants were allowed to open. Are you can only do delivery service delivery service it go to. It's a growth factor at a hall make makeup for what's lost from in dining services and heidi loud. That's another biggest restaurant chain. China lost to five billion to stirring saint periods just to give you an idea of the severity of on-trade unfortunately among all the alcoholic beverage categories. Wine was hit the hottest. This is not said by me. This is actually coming from one zooming secretary general of china alcoholic drinks association which is the official drinks association in china. That's regulate Anything related to alcohol in china. It's very powerful organ and he basically said homecoming function for wine was essentially non existent as heavily relies on social consumptions such as restaurants to the decline with shoppers. A wong stall too short before giving any thinkers on the decline. But we can guess it's melted doubled. It's not a single digit

China Joe View Italy Europe United States Bruns Ryan Jong MOE JOE Chile Orrin France
Which Conor McGregor Will Show Up at UFC 257?

ESPN Daily

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Which Conor McGregor Will Show Up at UFC 257?

"Aerial. Thank you so much for joining me man. It's good to have you back my old friend pablo. It's good to hear from you. You don't call as much. But i do get very excited when you do reach out. Aerial halawani has covered mixed martial arts for fifteen years and he hosts the dc in hawaii. Podcast for espn. I don't call you much. But i call when it's important and it's an important time in your life right now in the life of conor mcgregor right now. You just spoke him in a big sit down four. Espn ahead of this. Weekend's big fight against us poor area so how would you describe how. Connor is feeling mentally right now. So that's a great question. Because i've been covering connor since two thousand thirteen since right before his have debut in. I've obviously seen all the extreme highs and lows of his career. Of course it's been a roller coaster especially the last few years when he became this This megastar this time around. Had you asked me which connor would be in front of me. When i spoke to him would it be the zen like connor. Would it be the trash talking. Connor the jovial connor. You know all the different iterations. I would've said it would have been the urinated conor mcgregor upset conor mcgregor the conor mcgregor. Who had big plans in two thousand twenty to fight. At least three times to fight manny pacquiao right. Reclaim his spot. As the man the king in may but none of that happen instead. What got pablo was actually got a very relaxed conor mcgregor accountable gregory who is like slouched in his chair. I've never seen him sit like this before he was wearing a new custom suit but he's wearing slippers as well sort of like all of us working at home these days as always already all we focus on the positive side. I was ready to continue and it didn't go that way. It is what it is. I still have that inside me now. I'm still ready to go of kept. Preparations are back. And i'm very happy to be back. Twenty twenty one. We're going to replicate this again. I'm starting the year force. Pay per view of the year and a very excited about that. He was very chill. He was very calm cool collected. I don't know if i've ever seen him that. Calm before fight. So i was pleasantly surprised to see that i wanna get into how he may have arrived at that mentality because it's been a year aerial since mcgregor last fought. That fight lasted forty seconds. It ended with mcgregor knocking out. Donald sironi so can you take us back to the aftermath of those forty seconds. What was the expectation for. What would come next for conor mcgregor so going into that fight. Everyone who's like izzy back. Is he still good. Can he stay out of trouble all this stuff and then he comes in there and completely. You know rex ceremony. What about its many style. Vegas is on fire. He gets on the microphone from town. He's calling everyone out. King is back. I mean it's just an electric seen. Only he can bring to the fight. Game had opportunity to go in his locker room afterwards and interview him. And i would describe him in that moment as happy excited actually even a little emotional as well i. I saw him get a little emotional but not satisfied. He wanted to fight february. He in his mind needed to make up for lost time because he didn't fight in twenty nine thousand nine. He spent more time in legal trouble than actually fighting twenty eighteen. The one fight against habib twenty seventeen. The floyd fight so he wanted to make up for lost time. He was pushing to fight the following month. And if not he wanted to fight in march and then of course in march everything changed and what was so interesting about what happened in march was instead of being upset. The press annoyed pissed off like the rest of us that are plans are big. Plans are big twenty. Twenty plans had been derailed. Connor almost took it upon himself to act like a politician. What does that mean. So like conner had a very close relationship with the irish people and they loved him right they had this amazing support towards him and dislike this unwavering loyalty towards him and in two thousand nineteen. They kind of turned on him. And you know you can make a strong case that they were in the they were in the right to do a lot of things to really upset them. Most notably punching that that old man in the bar that was caught on camera and so in march when the country is down in its lockdown. And everyone's depressed. He's doing these presidential videos. Truly down must began and it must begin now. The literally you go online. And he's standing there like president politicians what they should be doing. We must our airports. We must all non-essential business. We must cook all non essential travel. I wanted to call upon my people that were eight people of ireland. This fight needs us all and he started leading by example and he started filming his home workouts and he started donating millions of dollars in personal protective equipment and visiting children's hospitals like say what you about connor and twenty nineteen in two thousand eighteen. He really was on his best behavior in the early portion of the pandemic and really took it upon himself to be this sort of a beacon of light if you will or this positive role model for these people and and i think that he stepped up a lot of people didn't expect that out of him and i think it was sincere was genuine but you know to try to give back to community.

Conor Mcgregor Connor Pablo Mcgregor Donald Sironi Manny Pacquiao Espn Hawaii DC Gregory Izzy REX Habib Vegas Conner King Ireland
Frau Perchta

Mythical Monsters

05:13 min | 1 year ago

Frau Perchta

"The twelve days of christmas begins on christmas day. An end on january. Sixth the epiphany these days are traditionally full of charity. Peace and tradition but to those who have spent the year being naughty. This time is filled with horror for its during these twelve days that the belly splitter comes calling frown perr sta also called birsh or berta is often depicted as a rag clad old woman with a beak shaped iron knows long teeth and the cane perhaps more unsettling than the fro herself is her hyme schenn. The german word for cricket a ghostly chorus of weeping unbaptise children that follow her around on midwinter. night's much like santa claus the frau rewards those who have worked hard during the year with gifts and punishes those who have misbehaved. Her favourite victims are liars and cheats. But laziness is also particular pet peeve for example. She grows angry at those who eat meat on a pitney eve and at spinners who have not finished weaving their flax however she also hates those who work on holidays and do not partake in festivities meaning. She's a fan of work life balance work hard but not too hard. Unlike the jovial father. Christmas the froze punishment is more severe than coal in your stocking author jacob grimm of the brothers grimm rights. They tell the children on the eve of epiphany that if they are naughty bear will come and cut their bellies open but her other punishments are no less cruel. She is scraped glass across liars tongues and boiled people alive. She's also known to trample victims with her boots. The lore surrounding frau pashda is meant to encourage moral duties and social norms. Tell the truth. Abide by tradition and don't be lazy on the surface. These rules seem simple enough but the frau perfection and she is unforgiving to those who do not meet her expectations but as horrifying as this warning must be for children. Adults must follow frau perished as rules to bore suffer the consequences a stirred in her restless half-sleep alarmed by the sound of footsteps approaching her bedside. She opened her eyes but all that greeted her was a dark empty room. Moonlight spilled in from her window and a spinning wheel sat in the corner gathering dust surrounded by overflowing baskets of flax a sudden rotten odor made on a gag. It was like old meat. Scraps left out in the sun. She sniffed again cringing. What was that. She rolled over to face her husband. Yosef he was asleep all seemed well but she still felt uneasy and that smell when ana rolled onto her back. She almost screamed looming over. Her was an old woman. Her beak like metallic knows glinted in the moonlight framed by cataract cupboard is deep wrinkles and in her hand. She held a meat cleaver which she swung straight down toward on us belly on a screamed then. She sat up with a gasp. Her hands flew to her belly. But there was no bloody wound there. She looked around frantically. Yosef still slept peacefully beside her and the room was quiet. No sign of the old woman at all. It was just another dream. A horrible one on a laid back but her heart beat wildly. She'd had trouble sleeping since she lost her. Little vince oil. Actually she'd had trouble doing anything since last christmas when she leaned over his cradle to find his face blue and his body limp. She glanced at their closet door which was slightly ajar inside. their party. Attire was gathering dust. These celebrations had once felt so important but now revelry disgusted. Her smiling was a rarity and when she did smile. It was always followed by an overwhelming wave of guilt.

Birsh Jacob Grimm Frau Pashda Berta Santa Claus Cricket Yosef ANA Vince
How Covid-19 changed Wine Consumer Behaviors in China

Italian Wine Podcast

06:52 min | 1 year ago

How Covid-19 changed Wine Consumer Behaviors in China

"Today. I'm going to be talking about cove. Ed's impact on china's y market and how those impacts are affected consumers buying behaviors. First of all this year. The buzzword we be hearing is lockdown but in china when we talk about lockdown. It's in the strictest sense you know one house. Hoed can only allow person to go out. Once a day to purchase or the necessities unlike in europe or in the. Us where you have the luxury to go out and do a lot of tours in china. It's really strict on in areas that are most affected by the pandemic. You're not even allowed to go all. There's a community officer who is on standby just to send all the necessities to you to your door. So this is the context where talking about when we want to understand covets impacts on china this is also the circumstance under which a lot of the business have to operate for three months from late january to april. So this is something i want to want. Everyone who's listening in to bear in mind to keep it in the back of her head on back of a mind to understand the couvert impacts. So i applaud. I'm gonna talk about cove ed's impact on china's wine imports so what happened to wine poured by the end of january. China had locked down the whole country as a result restaurants hotels essentially closed and miss the most important chinese new year sales for anyone wondering how big and how important is chinese new year for a lot of wine merchants. A lot of the lot of them who that i talked to toad may chinese new year wine sales account for roughly twenty percent or even up to thirty percent of their new sales so imagine that seven day period was lost okay and then imagine that period was extended for three months. So that's the challenge facing a lot of the importers in china. Of course logistics were delayed because quickly the pandemic spread from china to the rest of the world even when china in may and june recovered from the pandemic countries like france. And you know you us were in the depth of the pandemic so that affected global logistics while okay so we have the latest figures from the china customs at a showed. Import room declined by thirty percent. Thirty point eight percent to three hundred forty seven million leaders in poor value declined roughly thirty percent as well to u. s. one point eight four billion. This is quite significant. Because i want to draw attention to the fact that last year china's one import value already declined. We saw roughly ten percent job in volume terms and one percent in value terms because of the economic slowdown and trade war between china and us so the downturn we are saying this year is a continuation of what happened last year as well so that you know have a projection for what is to expect an what's to calm right okay. So the next one. I am going to talk about because of the job in wine imports on how affected merchants consumers and the price points are with saying on the shelves. Merchants of course when you have stalks that meant to be depleted for chinese new year that still sitting in the warehouse. What do you do when you have uncertainties facing forward more cautious. You becoming more cautious with your spending what to buy how to budget. That's natural response. A market sudden seeing a lot of merchants exiting the market on. Fortunately one of the examples with sane is from jovial. You guys are familiar with jovial. So basically jovial is a wine and agriculture importing company backed by the tech giant noval five years ago when it entered the market to stop important distribution winds. It costs a lot of and naturally they had a peak. I think around twenty key bruns including the world's biggest Organic winery and madonna in in chile and also jong here moi x. families wines earlier this year due to the pandemic it's general manager. Said they're suspended in the wine business. This is not a small one time. Importer were looking at a company. That's actually has quite a scale dots. The direct impact of the pandemic unperfect cards of course a lot of wineries and importers were having zero sales in february In particular consumers when you have job uncertainties because of the pandemic what are you gonna do. You're becoming more cautious with your spending. You're cutting all the non essential standings unfortunate wine is counted as among unlike you know maybe in france or italy or in the us consumers of course they're trading down if they are buying winds at all they. Are you know really budgeting what to buy. You know what is the best value. What is the most affordable wine out in the market. This can be reaffirmed by an expert on expert data. We just saw from burgundy out from january to september export volume to china hong kong jumped by roughly thirty percent and in value terms jumped by roughly around twenty percent and we see some increases in areas where the balaj ablation or shaba lease on those kind of increases Guan crew premier cru in terms of red and white store decreasing price. Wines priced under one hundred orrin. B is the most popular category one hundred. That's about fifteen. Us dollars

China Hoed ED Europe France United States Bruns Jong Madonna Chile Italy Hong Kong Orrin
Gustav Holst: The Planets

Classics for Kids

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Gustav Holst: The Planets

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. Astronomy is the science that studies the Sun Moon Planets and other objects in the sky astrology is not a science. It tries to show how objects in the affect people's lives on Earth Gustav. Holst loved astrology and he composed his planets to be musical pictures of human nature. Holst started composing his First Planet Mars. The bringer of war in nineteen fourteen just before world. War One broke out. Mars was the Roman God of war. All the planets in our solar system except Earth are named for God's from ancient mythology. In Roman mythology Venus was the goddess of love. But host was interested in astrology not mythology. So his Venus is the bringer of peace. Venus is sometimes called the evening star because it's the first pinpoint of light you see in the sky after the sun goes down. But, light from stars twinkles when it passes through the Sky, light from planets doesn't. Next up is the planet that Holst actually composed last. Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun. So it's trip or orbit around the Sun is the fastest. It's named for the Roman Messenger God who had wings and host called his mercury the winged Messenger. Mercury is the smallest planet in the Solar System Jupiter is the largest. Jupiter King of the Roman gods was also known as Jove. That's where we get the word jovial, which means cheerful or jolly host titled He has Jupiter the Bringer of jollity. Jupiter is full of great tunes. Host later turned this one into a patriotic song. Gustav Holst called his planets seven pieces for large orchestra. You might say, wait a minute. There are eight planets nine. If you're a pluto fan how come host on the road seven well, first of all host finished composing the planets in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixteen, and Pluto wasn't discovered until nineteen thirty also host based his planets on astrology which looks at how the other planets affect us here on earth. So no earth. Even, though the planets is the most popular piece, go stop host ever wrote he didn't think it was his best work, but he did like his planet Saturn the bringer of old age. Saturn Jupiter. In Roman mythology. There are other planets with rings, but none of them are as spectacular as the rings around Saturn humorist, Mark Russell joked that Saturn's rings are made of lost airline luggage, but they're really made of dust and ice. He only planet named for a Greek rather than Roman God is urine us who was Greek God of the sky. Rotate for turn on an imaginary line running through their middle called an axis. The access usually runs top to bottom with a little bit of a tilt like you see on globe but urine this is so tilted on its axis that it looks like it's spinning on its sign. Posts Planet Uranus is the magician. And his Neptune is the mystic. Neptune was the Roman God of the sea. In Neptune host created a really unusual ending for the planets. A double choir of women's voices join the orchestra singing with no words. And at the very end, only the voices are left and they just fade away.

Holst Naomi Lewin Gustav Gustav Holst Venus Mark Russell
Jubilant crowd celebrates Biden's win in Providence, SW of Boston

Ron St. Pierre

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Jubilant crowd celebrates Biden's win in Providence, SW of Boston

"Run. Islanders react to the declaration that Joe Biden is the president elect on Tyler du Mont. From NBC. 10 covers that Jovial jamboree Saturday evening in downtown Providence THISS activist marching band taking to the streets for song and celebration. After numerous networks, including NBC News, declare Joe Biden the president elect, Will we play in protest? We play in song, We play a celebration. We play when the community needs us. And right now this evening, it was Massively clear that the community needed us. We haven't played so much in the pan down and it just feels really good to have been safe. We've been good, but today our souls needed it. Our city needed in our community needed it. A small group gathered along South Water Street to participate. Dancing along for democracy. It's a big step in the right direction. We have a black woman coming into the Into the office as BP, which is huge Supporters on both sides gathered here at the State House earlier today, with pro Trump voters, saying they aren't giving into the results of this election without a fight. At the end of day, we realized what's going on in the country. More Trump supporters also gathered in Warwick holding signs with claims of voter fraud. Even though the federal election commissioner told CNN this weekend. There is no evidence of it. Nothing's over yet the president hasn't conceded.

Tyler Du Mont Joe Biden Islanders Nbc News NBC State House BP Donald Trump Warwick CNN
"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"Now. A network defense grid like saks has to process a whole lot of data. But more than that it has to do it efficiently. This type of data handling is central to jovial right down to the types of variables that it offers. All the data types from Algal are present, but the list was expanded bit one more niche. Side example is jovial native data type for handling coordinate or vector data call duals, and basically it's a specialized array that always has two elements. Duels are really good example of how jovial is tailor made for real world problems x y coordinates are used constantly for geospatial data. So it's not surprising that their core element of jovial. On a technical level bets nothing groundbreaking it's just an extension to what Algal offered, but you can do roughly the same thing with any other language of the time. But looking a little further gets us into the more interesting and newer territory. so-called status variables are more surprising inclusion. In more modern languages, a status variable would be called an enumerated variable or see just an. They allow a programmer to define a list of possible states for a variable and then reference those states by name. It's a convenience thing but there's a lot of little intricacies to that. I think are really fascinating. For instance if you're programming missile tracker, you may have a status variable bit can be set to either ready launching, flying or eventually exploding as with bullying you can't directly store any of these states in memory you can't really tell a computer. Oh Yeah. I have the variable set a to explosion. The compiler has to know how to handle that. Eventually each status gets into some numbers, the computer to shift around but the actual state names are much easier for a human to understand. It's an abstraction that makes life a whole lot easier for the programmer, and as far as I can tell, jovial was the first language to add this feature another one of many I to come out of this relatively obscure language. But. There's one more data type that I WANNA get into that to me is mind blowing. But. Jovial calls, tables and entries are another place where we can see this type of really high level abstraction at work. Now, this is for the language takes a really modern twist. The reference manuals described tables as a quote collection of data objects. Jovial had objects before nine, hundred and sixty. That's a really big deal. Objects are a complicated topic in themselves, but simplified things considerably think of an object as an abstract way to describe data. You'd find an object once by telling the computer, what kind of data it hopes. Then you can create a new instance of that object and fill it with new data as needed. Objects make handling complex data sets easy and pretty failsafe. Generally, speaking object oriented programming is seen as a really. Think. It first gained steam in the sixties and Seventies. But here we have jovial doing a very, very similar thing in the late one, thousand, nine, hundred fifties. To be totally fair entries jovial aren't a hundred percent what we would call today but they're starting to get just the edges of the idea. Correct. Each entry has its own internal items that store data, and you only define that entry. Once you can create new instances of that entry by expanding the table that holds it. And practice it can look at a lot like a very primitive object. But the reasons jovial has these entries are locked different than the reasons objects became popular. Gills, designed tables and entries as a way to handle data streams more nicely. You have some incoming chunk of raw binary data. You can tell jovial to treat it as a set of entries of some given format. Then you can treat it like a set of variables. It's simple. It's fast. It's effective and this is a really good way for programmers to hand wave away complicated data. As long as you know at least roughly what the input or output data looks like, you can just convert it into some nicely named variables. And really I think that entirely sums up the spirit of jovial. It's a high level language. The borrows a lot of the best ideas from Algal. But it also compromises and has low level features where needed. Sure, you can stay up and object land, but sometimes you need to look at raw data and whole Schwartz and his team made ways for programmers to stay safe from the hardware. They also let them get down and dirty when needed. It's practical without being overly pretentious. And when the high language was enough, jovial even had the ability to write inline assembly language. It really seems like Jovial was built. So programmers had no reason not to use it. By the end of April nineteen fifty-nine, most of the language design was completed and Schwartz published the first full documentation of the project. The first compiler is working by the beginning of nineteen sixty and the self hosted compiler was running by the winter of the same year with a working compiler. In hand, it was time to get down to the actual. Task if we can remember that far back, it was time to actually program sacks the process of creating a new language and doing actual program ended up being the exact right decision in practice jovial was relatively easy for programs to pick up at least after a little bit of work you see the team had developed a respectable language and different compilers even. But documentation would take a little bit to catch up with this state of the art. Coding Schwartz quote. The initial capability didn't provide much tutorial assistance. So the learning of language was not easy and the documentation although it was improved with time wasn't the best for beginners. But those who were responsible for training and criticises lack of good teaching AIDS also pointed out that once people got over the hurdle of learning jovial, there were very few questions and very few problems in using what they learned. Most people found language relatively easy to retain and used for everyday work and. I've been digging through a lot of the reference. Docs four jovial and it's true what they say they are pretty dense. The MOST official versions? Span multiple volumes each volume being somewhere around three hundred pages long it's not the most useful teaching material that's for sure. But I think the SCC team can be forgiven a little bit in that regard. There weren't any language is at this point that were beginner friendly. I mean computers in the sixties and fifties. Really beginner friendly to start with. That being said jovial is a good deal more user friendly than contemporary languages and a Schwartz pointed out once trained up programmers found language easy to use day today and really that was the point. All the initial programming for Saks was completed pretty soon after jovial hit the scene. I've seen it estimated that the entire system had well over a million lines of code and took a combined fourteen hundred programmer years worth to complete now. That's a whole lot of code. No matter how you cut it. In, context, it becomes impressive. Sadly, all these systems are pretty military. So we don't have access to all the gory details. We just have reported estimates according to the book, the closed war by Paul, Edwards the copays for Saks, was roughly four times larger than sage, but it was completed in half the time that is the power of a really good programming language. Program tackle more complex problems more easily. Over the early nineteen sixties, saks expanded out and jovial snuck along for the ride..

programmer Schwartz saks Saks AIDS official Paul Edwards
"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"Sage was really the first step in a long process of digitizing America's defense systems, and as the Cold War continued more large scale projects would start to emerge. Experienced programmers like Schwartz were in high demand so it wasn't long before he was working on one of these next generation secret projects. In nineteen, Fifty, eight, the strategic air command control system or saks started. This was touted as something like a super sage. The plan was to use knowledge gained from the development of sage blended with newer technologies and create a more sophisticated command and control system. The entire project was to be overseen by strategic, air, command of the software side of things was contracted out to SEC. This must have given gills flashbacks. Sacks was slated to have even more features complications than sage. The network was planned to be larger, handle more types of communications and even be hardened to nuclear attacks. In other words shorts was facing down a repeat of all the problems that he experienced at sage if Sachs was going to be completed in a reasonable amount of time than a radical solution would have to be figured out. In this regard timing was everything. Just as Schwarzenegger's Co workers trying to find a way to make sacks feasible a little paper was published. Of course, I'm talking about back S.'s nine, hundred, Fifty, eight paper that laid out the first description of Al.. Also known as goal. The. Paper it was circulated very widely among programmers and eventually it would find its way to Schwartz. Desk at STC. He recognized right away the language like L. could be a solution. But it would needs some changes. According from shorts yet again, quote. Based on the experience with sage and the reading the AL description I recommended to the SAX development managers price my transfer the use of a high level language to program the system to my a number of other people surprise the recommendation was accepted. In quote. Honestly it shouldn't have been that surprising. High level programming languages were just starting to get popular and with sacks towered as the next step in defense technology, it makes sense to pair it with the next step in programming. Using a high level language would be flashy, would also make programming much easier and hopefully much faster. So Al. the spirit of practicality a new language was starting to form in the latter half of nineteen fifty eight Schwartz submitted a more formal request for this new programming language project. Was a short document, but it laid down the outline of this future programming language and plans on how would be developed. Quoting from shorts quote. The title of it was Oviedo our version of the international algebraic language. It was a brief description of some of the language concepts which could be implemented in order to develop the. program. This paper was accepted as the beginning of the project and the first work was begun in quote. Sadly by Jules own admission, he throughout the original design doc. But the project was see a lot of changes during development. So maybe it's not that big of a loss. One first changes was the name it seemed that no one really liked calling the language of. Early on the project team suggested that the language be renamed jewels on version of Al and that would stick. But besides the name change allow the rough ideas about jovial would remain constant. The details would kind of be ironed out on the fly. The primary goal was to develop jovial into a tool that could facilitate the development of Saxe. Basically making a new tool before you get down to the real work. The rest of the languages goals were heavily informed by this jovial had to be easy to learn and easy to work with. It also had to be able to handle large and complicated tasks. From working on. Sage. Gills. Also knew the jovial would need to be really really good at logical operations and flow control while also being able to handle low level hardware access. Algal fit the bill for a lot of those needs. So it would serve as the template for the new language, but they would need to be a lot of tweaks and additions made to really get things to fit is these changes to Al Gore's established formula where the more interesting bits are. One of the big differences comes down to core methodology jovial had to be designed as a language, but a compiler would also needs to be developed. So Jewish team couldn't just right up a language dock and then be done with it. The compiler had to be just as important as the language itself. So you can clearly see this thinking of play in the design of the compiler. You See. Here's where Schwartz did something that I think is really really clever. From the beginning he decided that the jovial compiler will be written jovial itself now. That should be a little bit. Bending believe it or not most modern compilers are built this way. For instance, the gene you c compiler is written in C These types of compilers are called self hosting because while they can compile themselves. As far as I can tell, jovial was the first language to use this approach. An initial reference compiler was completed in assembly language, and then once there was a way to convert jovial code into binary being tired from pilot was rewritten. In Jovial, Schwartz didn't just do this to flex his team's programming prowess. There were actually a few really good reasons for this departure. For one at forced jovial to be a true general purpose programming language compilers are perhaps surprisingly some of the most complicated programs out there. So having self hosting as a goal served as a really good guidepost for the language if you can write a compiler in jovial, then you can write just about anything. The other big reason was portability. Self hosting means that there's almost no machine specific code in the entire tool chain for the language to bring jovial to a new computer, an initial compiler would need to be written in some version of that computers programming language. But then the magic happens using the first compiler you bootstrap into the self hosting jovial written compiler. Then any updates to the compiler is very easy to port over with no new code. This type of planning and development was only possible because the jovial team had to build the language and the compiler together. It's very in line with the same thinking that went into Algal, abstract your code and you're programmer away from hardware, but it's an approach that the Algal team wasn't able to take. When we get to the actual language itself, we can also see Al goes big impacts. The general structure of jovial is almost identical to its inspiration. It has all the same core functions as Algal, right down to if statements loop switches and all the math system. and. In general, the two languages use very similar syntax which means just looking at code side by side they look really similar. Pulling from back says language definition saved a whole how to work for the team at SEC? But it was just a starting point for the new language. One easy place to spot the difference comes down to our good old friend variable.

Schwartz Sage Al SEC Sacks Al Gore defense systems saks America Saxe programmer Schwarzenegger Jules L. Sachs
"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"jovial" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"In Two thousand eleven London's Heathrow Airport made a major upgrade. The air traffic control systems have running off some fairly old IBM mainframes. Now, it has worked for decades, but as of late and it started to become quite a big problem. Over the preceding years, the computer had crashed a number of times and without the machine running no flights could safely go in or leave. So why are the airport so slow to upgrade well, back comes down to a software problem. The entire system was running code written all the way back in the nineteen seventies, and it was an old enough language that it wasn't very easy to get up and running on a new computer. The upgrade would be expensive and it took Heathrow some time to save up for a flashy new air traffic control system. Now. That's a pretty common story. There are a of important systems that rely on downright archaic technology, but the specifics of this case well, those take us down a bit of a rabbit hole. The vintage code, the kept Heathrow running for so long was written in a language called Jovial. Now, you've probably never heard of it I know that I hadn't until very recently, but I'm willing to bet that it's impacted your life in some way. Jovial was designed for military use specifically to make it easier to program large scale defense networks in the United States. Since, then the language has spread into all corners of aviation. Air Traffic Control is just one example planes ranging from the be fifty two to the U2 and even some parts of a Boeing seven five seven. All RUN JOVIAL Communication satellites, cruise missiles, and even rocket engines have all been controlled by this niche language. It's been in the background of geopolitics and air travel for well over fifty years. What exactly is jovial and maybe more importantly, why is it in? So long lived. As it turns out that second one is a pretty tricky question to answer. There have been countless programming languages developed since the dawn of computers and of those most die out pretty quickly. Jovial. Success is an interesting case of what makes a programming language stick around. But it also gives us a window into how the larger field of programming I started to form. Welcome back to Agean of computing I'm your host Sean has and this is episode thirty, eight, jovial, the evolution of programming. This episode we're getting back into one of my favorite Chandra's the more esoteric, but we aren't just going to talk about some obscure corner of computing for no reason I have a larger goal in mind. A, while back, I put together an episode the covered Fortran I compiler is and how programming languages were originally developed and most importantly why they were developed in the first place. Now, that's really just the start of a much larger story. Programming languages are a big part of the world today even if most people don't come into contact with the source code directly. Languages like grasshoppers as zero or John Backers as Fortran were really important steps. They were just the beginning they weren't the end of the process. I mean computers nowadays don't even run Fortran. Just like with human languages, the tongues that we used to talk to computers have changed a whole lot overtime. Existing languages of. Dialects. Developed for different uses and eventually totally new languages appear it's a pretty long process and it's a complicated one but. It leads us into the Modern Day. Today we're going to look at how languages evolved but to do so I'm going to focus in on a microcosm of this process. Specifically, we're going to be examining jovial a language developed for the US military in the latter years of the nineteen fifties like four Chan. To be used in in very niche applications today but unlike Fortran, it was developed after the first handful of programming languages came into use jovial was created early enough that nothing was set in stone but was late enough to the game that we can see how adapted other languages for its own use. More importantly I think jovial gives us a wonderful case study of why some technology dies out while others thrive. So, let's get into it. What exactly was jovial and why was it made in the first place? How does it fit into the larger story of computers and why does it still show up an air traffic control systems today? To start things off, we need travel all the way back to nine, hundred, fifty eight, and the earliest dawn of programming languages. By this point, a handful of high level languages already existed Fortran. Flow Matic and many others were already well under development. But there's a difference between invention and adoption there's some lag time. The fact was that most programmers didn't really care about these new languages on the block part of the reason for that comes down to the attitudes around computers in the era the idea of a programmer didn't really exist. Well unless you're a grace hopper, but she's always the exception to every rule. Most folks who actually used computers were mathematicians, engineers, or some other stripe of scientists. Computers were a wonderful tool and the field is growing quickly, but it wasn't fully separated as a specialty in its own right. And how computers functioned made it really hard to specialize in just programming to put things mildly in the nineteen fifties. Computers were a lot more hands on. You couldn't really get away with just programming them. You had to know the computer inside and out hardware and software went hand so much so that some systems still has to be programmed using jumper cables. So if you wanted to program a computer you better also on a dig around and its hardware. Attitudes about software development mirrored this rough state of hardware usually end up programming in machine code. That's actual binary data that a computer understand. If you're lucky, you might be able to use assembly language or something slightly more readable to US humans. You need full control over what the computer was doing to get anything accomplished and these primitive low level languages offered that. The flip side. They were really really hard to program in. Fortran and his contemporaries offered an alternative. Instead of mucking around in bits and bites, you can write out a program and something that's. Roughly more akin to English, and then you run it through a compiler and it's translated into machine. Code. It was a revolution in the making, but a pretty slow one. There was resistance to this change. Programmers were worried that four tram with able to control a computer as well as something like machine code. And in some cases, these fears were totally correct. Mini early programming languages had problems in this regard. So they offer the ability to write lines of assembly language in the middle of your program. In theory, this meant that a programmer could drop back down to low level languages when needed, but mainly stay in the realm of four tram. But in practice meant that you're now pro coming in two languages at once and I shouldn't tell you this but that's a recipe for disaster. For programming languages to take off both the technical and the more socio political issues would have to be corrected for. But there was one last little issue at play. You see at this point, nearly every computer was unique. Mass produced computers were first starting to appear in late fifties but the mass in that term is somewhere in the tens of computers. Each of these slightly different computers spoke a different version of machine code and they had to be used in a slightly different way. So, someone working on an IBM seven Oh one for instance, couldn't really sit down and make the shift to programming for any AC. High.

United States programmer Heathrow Airport IBM Boeing Agean Chandra John Sean Chan
"jovial" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"jovial" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You can find Jeanine online by going to her wealth matters dot com that's her wealth matters dot com joining great to be with you once again on today show how you been I'm doing great I'm waiting for her you know summer I think we skip right by spring so and back around the winter sure what if we take I'm ready to ride my bike one has been an interesting year in many ways all right absolutely yeah yeah for people who are trying to stay inside because of the you know covered situation this isn't helping yes yes it's an extended winter feeling continuing on but brighter days hopefully ahead I think actually on last week's show the weather for it we've been talking about weather forecast looks like it's going to be nice and bright the following week so we should pull out of this builder mint and then ended up not being the case this past week so I'm not gonna make any predictions for the weather than we had a couple of nice days and then it just went right back down of complete reversal yeah so yeah really thank them pretty funny well we got a great show on the way today a little bit later we're gonna talk about some easy ways to ruin your retirement so if you want to find out how you can ruin your retirement just stated the show will cover those ways for you on today's show or listen to it and then not do those things and you won't ruin your retirement we're gonna dive into all of that coming up soon as well but I will talk about longevity risk you know I think it's a really important conversation but it's also one it's kind of funny to talk about because living a long time is supposed to be a good thing why would we describe it as such a risk and this conversation I think everybody should have when it comes to putting together a retirement plan and you should be talking about this with your financial advisor but before we get into the financial elements of all that just for some perspective and background you know last time I checked Jeanine the death rate for human beings hovers around what about a hundred percent I think yeah I don't know anybody's getting out of here alive if but interestingly even though that's the the the death rate is a hundred percent life expectancy has continuously gone up over time and before we talk about the risks of living a long time for that perspective on this one can you tell us a couple of things first on my mind is how old is your oldest client I have an eighty eight year old client okay who is actually quite spry and talking with someone who's live that long you know she's a little bit physically and give stated that she gets around in her small apartment and she's very jovial she's a lot of fun to talk with but you know there are some definite challenges there that's a great thing to hear though that you've got an eighty eight year old still as you said spry I mean that's like anybody at eighty eight would be happy to be described as prime and sharp as a tack and sharp she's very sharp yes two great compliments of that age what about in your own family Ginny in woody have longevity in your family who is or was the longest lived person I think it will immediate relatives are in the eighties and it makes him you know eighty eight is probably the latest one but I do have a great great aunt who live to a hundred and five really wow in South because she lived in I think was South Dakota so hardy hardy group I she was one of what's interesting about that group because we we tend to think that today's generations are the longest living generations and they are in many capacities and and statistics show that but the folks that lived through World War two or even before that the Great Depression have been a very hearty our group of people my great great aunt was one of twelve children they all lived to adulthood to late adulthood it's very interesting she was a hundred and five I was blown away wow that's amazing a hundred five hard to fathom that in some ways they they've seen a lot because if you if you go back you know from I think she died a couple years ago and you go back to the beginning of the twentieth century and a lot of things have happened in the twin size range quite a bit that's for sure yeah yeah amazing all right and then last night lease and that's gonna be a hard number to beat I was gonna ask you who's the oldest person you've known personally you know outside of family or clients but it sounds like maybe that family member has the icing on the cake there well yeah she's definitely the oldest one I am actually a neighbor of my parents who was a neighbor for many many many years she was ninety eight years turning ninety five and I was visiting my parents with my children were young at the time and I said well we'll see you next year she said I hope not I said okay right mature she was very fortunate in that she had a lot of family in the area even though she lived independently her grandchildren and great grandchildren would come over and get it working you are helpful with the house do things like that but she was able to live on her own till the very end mmhm which is pretty amazing that is cool well thank you for sharing that you know it's interesting because some companies are investing millions of dollars into that concept of significantly increasing the human life span and that it's clear that longevity is a coveted thing I've heard some folks say that the first person lived a hundred and fifty has already been born things like that all the time but why can live in a long time be considered risky because on the surface those two things don't really seem to go hand in hand it seems like a again a good thing well either living a long time not just successfully but happily is going to depend on your health and if you are living a long time and you're incapacitated in some way or you have memory care issues most people don't want to be in that situation so there are a lot of factors that influence whether that's really a good idea or not because we tend to think that we want to live a long time as the current age that we're at twenty five thirty fifty one and whatever where we're active and mobile and we can make our own decisions but you know I schedule everybody has experienced folks that get into their later years eighties nineties you have some serious challenges with memory and the ability to reason and function as well as physical so the risk for people living so long is you are very likely to outlive the money that you've saved unless it's done properly and your expenses are not so high and that's the biggest challenge for most people living along time comes down to quality not just quantity for many folks that makes a lot of sense with this big concern over longevity how effectively would you say the average person has addressed those financial challenges in their plans well you know when you look at the statistics that a third of the folks over sixty five have not done a very good job and maybe it's because they were living paycheck to paycheck they were not the you know a lot of blue collar earners or they didn't earn a lot of money and so they're living on social security and so that's not a lot of money and as healthcare costs increase they go to Medicaid so it's not been fast lifestyle or accommodations for most people so a lot of people have not done this very effectively and you know we've had two very big downturns in the last twelve years in in the economy in the market and that affects these people too much more significantly than those who have changed so if your in your sixties seventies and eighties and you're living through this it's very significant had to quality of life a lot of people I think Jeanine's say that their main retirement goal is indeed not running out of money obviously makes sense why that's the case that's kind of a worst case scenario situation have you seen people who actually have run out of money in retirement probably not your own clients but folks who maybe of coming to you after that becomes a realization or of a real possibility for them what I know of people who ran out of money from other clients her other adviser stories and in there usually sometimes they're people that just are not coachable they don't listen they over standard their withdrawal rate is so high and they take more risks than they need to take and then they take risks with money decisions that are very harmful to their overall plans there then that's what you see when people run out of money it becomes a very desperate situation actually I do know someone personally who is our husband was making some huge amount of money I mean like a million a year at one time and he died and was nearly bankrupt so his surviving spouse is having to leave extremely fruit goalie and hoping that her children will take care of her and she's only in her room early mid sixties not in a position to be in it's not a good position to be in and there's are there are a lot of things that need to change that when that happens and if you have a family that is compassionate and generous you're lucky not everybody is has that benefit exactly ma'am so what if somebody does come to you primarily because they're afraid of running out of money what kind of plan do you then put together for them to help assuage that fear and and solve that problem well we have to go through what your expectations are so first we have to see where you are in your plan if you even have a plan so what are your investments doing how did you get here and then we have to have a discussion of how investment strategies work how portfolio strategies work vis a vis your exact order say dreams and goals that's very important but you have to have realistic expectations especially if you're sixty five and you're gonna live to ninety five that's thirty years in retirement where on permanent vacation well a lot of people don't think of it that way so the plan has to be a holistic plan that is going to be successful and that requires some coaching of investor behavior and and that's what we do with a lot of clients who come to see us as we do a lot of coaching and discussions explaining how things work what are you doing it in it's not accusatory it's just X. explaining consequences if you do this then this these are your options are this is likely to happen and a lot of people have said they've they've very much appreciated that because they had no way to measure what they're the outcome of their decisions would be otherwise permanent vacation also known as a permanent unemployment thank you click on that makes it rings true even more anything for something yeah so if you're wondering where your income is going to be coming from or how to create an income in retirement as you are even getting close to retirement or in retirement and now you're getting a little scary because of the recent downturn in the market I would encourage you to give our office a call and talk to Gracie you can call eight three three her plan that's eight three three four three seven seventy five twenty six and we'll get you on the calendar we can have a fifteen minute phone call you could come in and we can start meeting we we don't even have to come in right now.

Jeanine
Historic Oil Bust Delivers A Gut Punch To 1 High-Flying Texas County

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Historic Oil Bust Delivers A Gut Punch To 1 High-Flying Texas County

"People in the oil business are familiar with the cycle of boom and bust prices. Soar prices plunge but they've never seen anything like twenty twenty when the pandemic abruptly brought prices to record lows even below zero. Npr's John Burnett reports from the Permian basin the heart of oil country in West Texas on a normal day in Andrews County look in any direction and stretching to the horizon. You'll see bobbing horseheads of pump. Jacks sucking up oil from deep in the earth but these are anything but normal days right. Now it's scary honestly Linden pertain. A well technician standing in Mesquite. Scrubland that overlays. What experts call a Monster Oilfield? We drove out here. Usually you'd see you with all these good wells. That historically have done a lot of production. They would usually all pumping and kind of looks like caterpillars all running across the landscape. You know and that's not happening right now. All across the vast permian that straddles West Texas and southeast New Mexico. Wells have been shut in in the Argot of the oil patch. American oil companies are pumping a million fewer barrels a day than were just two months ago. According to the Energy Information Administration all the big players out here Exxon Mobil Chevron conaco Phillips have slashed for Andrews County. The effect has been cataclysmic. The county is considering layoffs and the city of Andrews will hold off repairing streets and building a new city hall when you have a community that receives about eighty five to ninety percent of their tax revenue for minerals. It's a serious threat. County Judge Charlie Falcon follows the news. And here's about other cities. Taking a hit from closed. Businesses and Hospitalizations Andrews has had only twenty one cases of covert nineteen and most people have recovered. Nonetheless was Texas is getting a double dip of trouble. Not only do. We have all drop. We have corona virus. And we don't know how long it's going to stay around. You know what people not working not been able to shop not being able to you now sell oil Creates SERIOUS PROBLEM FOR US? Bob Stewart's welding and machine shop. His lost half its business amid the paralysis in the oil patch. A few jobs keep trickling in stewardess Paul and lumbering and jovial. He's done this for nearly forty years. He survived downturns before. But he says he's never seen demand if that rate like this whole world. There's no airplanes fly. There's No car driving cruise ships cruising. There's no summer vacations. Golic's we're producing a lot of oil for a world. That's not using not consuming Bob Stewart is grateful that he has not had to lay off any of his hundred ten employees. He got more than a million and a half dollars through the federal government's paycheck protection program. But that's not going to last forever. It's kind of nine eleven you over. You know what I don't know what it looks like. What comes out. The other side is going to be different with more than twelve thousand active whales in Andrews County. Hydrocarbons have been good to this community. There's an air conditioned Rodeo. Arena a waterpark and new little league baseball diamonds. The schools have a planetarium and an Olympic sized swimming pool. All over town. Grieving motorcycles and ski boats are parked in driveways and behemoth pickup trucks. Roar Down Main Street though the one two punch of the pandemic and the oil bust have left the region staggering. It should not have come as a complete surprise. Every oil addicted town has been before I've been interviewed by the media three times and every time it's when Andrews is on the map for some dubious reason with the Economy Russell Shannon President of the National Bank of Andrews says established companies. That saved for a rainy day. Will weather this bust a lot better than others as I. Try to tell some the younger ones when they try to get in the business. There's a storm cloud out there just because you don't see it today doesn't mean there's not one on the horizon. I mean we've just historically we've seen it too many times. The oilfield workers with six figure salaries thought it would never end. Even though it always does Mighty O. Fernandez was laid off three weeks ago. As a workover rig supervisor now he's realizing just how good he had it. While I've noticed so much didn't realize how much I spent when I was at work breakfast lunch. Taking guys out to buy food. You know of course you want to you know. Give your guys. Hey good job in here here. Some steaks baked potatoes or something for doing you know working to butts. Fernandez sits on his front stoop and Andrews having a smoke and catching the night air after a scorching hundred and four degree day. Now he stays home helps his teenage son with his homework and he tries to keep a positive attitude. I used to worry a lot The Bible says not to worry about what tomorrow because we don't even know we're GonNa make it more so I just have faith and just believing that it's GonNa come back together. The question is when and how long folks can hold out John Burnett. Npr News Andrews Texas.

Andrews County Andrews Bob Stewart John Burnett Texas O. Fernandez National Bank Of Andrews Mesquite Linden NPR West Texas Technician Twenty Twenty County Judge Energy Information Administrat Exxon Mobil Chevron
"jovial" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

We Need To Talk About Ghosts

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"jovial" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

"Yeah. I do hope that it was him that you communicate with and that he was a piece so a heart attack at forty four kit out. Pardon my French but you know we'll tell you what puts it all into perspective Zona. You've ruined my day now. Just thank you for this. I'm joking you haven't you've just made me become very. What's the word reflective shower say like Miller? Yes Indeed Mirror. Wow well if you have a story like Johnson. Keep it to yourself because I don't WanNa cry joking if you ever story is beautiful as that. And it's heartbreaking us the Senate in Bob's Paranormal Lake justed so sending IAGO stories to contact at talk about ghosts dot com. We've had a few reviews and we've had a few emails in truth. Yeah I'm not really in the mood of the story to read them out and B. Jovial and we've gone on for forty five minutes so I think that's adequate enough so we will read out all the jovial of next week bloody hell what a way to end the show. I'm sorry everybody I don't know why I've took the southern San. I've angered me self. That's what the issue is. I've angered myself. It's not your storage storage as you completely to a fall for this joking. I'm joking but an emotive story. That's a good story should do though. Isn't it rarely? I've much sooner? Have a profound effect of a story. Then restoring go. Well you go a dose. Fbi to condoms earth sides. But you know what I mean so. Thank you just for that story sincerely. I'll be telling people what story and that a sign of a good story as in. I'm telling it now. But I mean I'll be in the pub allowed saying get onto this hour heartbreaking sisk and how terrified how supernatural and how wonderful so well done eleven out of town for that story. Just I hope that all of tastic week. Don't forget we'll be having extra episodes out this week so that we can just have some nice chats and you can hear someone not talking about the c word and we can all escape for a little while into our little minds in our case little minds anyway so BECA will. I don't know whether she's coming on the Patriot more after this. Actually because she's gone out to do some shopping which is allowed to. Yes so it'll be me on the Patriot one after this show. Yes if you're a patriot. You lucky things and this week. I'm going to be looking at and discussing the haunting of a house in healing where you may have heard of this where it's very famous one in. London where people feel compelled to leap to their death from the roof. Yes very eerie. So you WanNa find out about that you need to go and Senator John. Www DOT PTA dot com forward slash. Talk about ghosts if you don't want to do that. Absolutely find none of my business but if you go and share the show tell people about Lee Review. Wherever you listen to podcasts. That'd be great. It all helps. So our Becker will be back with me for some of the. We don't need to talk about ghosts through the week. In the meantime. Make sure you look after yourselves. Be Nice just to be nice. It's quite simple. And if you've got a story to tell US Senate in contact at talk about ghosts. Dot Com okay is evolving lovely and. I love each of you dealing not in that way. Well no I'm joking Bekker's not look meet. We the cats away. The mouse will get much trouble if she has this enemy. I will speak to you all through the week tatty by..

Johnson Bekker US Senate Becker B. Jovial Zona Miller Fbi Senate San BECA sisk IAGO Bob Paranormal Lake Senator John Lee London
Positive Vibes

The FCMFIT Podcast

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Positive Vibes

"Well here. We are another week in lockdown. Absolutely yes still here just. It's such an odd time but we are making the most of it you know. We're trying to make the best of our way because we the last podcast we did was pretty pretty heavy. I listened to all you know. We were very deep. We were trying to rewrite the world and do all those things but I think ultimately the thing to do at the moment is to remain positive. I know it's a kind of a common saying that's remain positive. But it's a fact and I think with lots of difficulties that people may be having at the moment whether it be through the work or family in lockdown food shortages. All just just various different things you know. We have to try and look at the good things that can come from this whole time. Absolutely I think you know we were saying the other day. We quite lucky here where we are small village. Everybody's been very sensible whistle able to do our dog walk one. Maybe two at the very most Bush if we push but we try to stick to one. I mean we. Normally two three dog walks a day. So obviously that's a bit unfair so we're trying to tell that but everybody is abiding by the rules and and getting on trying to get on his best. I can say is. I've never seen so many people walking outside before we walk a lot. But you know it's amazing you know. These people have never seen walking around. Yeah family's going on walks. I mean we've been here for six years and there are some Celis new faces that have appeared who are subtly doing their power walks. And it's a great thing actually to see that in the sense that you think the importance of exercise it's even being advised by the government even though there is a pandemic the one thing you can do is go out. Exercises walks book was about and is about. You know a whole basis that it's exercise nutrition. Well and you know that that's important. Whatever it doesn't it shouldn't really needs to take a pandemic to realize exactly. Is the key things in life. If you invested it will pay you by and you will hopefully have happy about better life so is actually talking about good things that have a situation like this. He actually looks like maybe lots of people. Out there. Valuing being outdoors valuing the fact that they need to exercise. Yeah you said the whole family is you know. I've seen you know parents with two three kids on bikes. Obviously there's less traffic so it's safer so that's quite nice to see and as I said. Many people doing power walks and jogging. That we've not seen before so that is definitely a positive. I just hope that when this is all obviously over and people are better than the lives that they keep that side of their life up because it is very important very easy to put exercise at the bottom of the list of things that you have to be more people. Busy lives the end of the day. I think what happens? Is that you get up in the morning. You go to work do you start you come by you know the last thing people a lot of people want to do is do any more exercise they feel like maybe they have done their exercise for the day so like you said hopefully through this time they can value it might enjoy it. I mean it doesn't even have to be kind of the exercise may be that you know that we do made the excise SEM FITTERS. You know that is kind of Jiming exercising. It can just be actually moving and getting out outdoors I think will say. I hope that they're valuing being outdoors. Stop so whether you're excising walking running whatever you do walk your dog. We've always very much been pro. That that's part of our life. Sectionals phone we we did. Sem Fit there was a whole section life. Because it's what we wanted to put out there. It's really important to get out into the light into the fresh air. So you know that was well. We've noticed like a mass reduction in noise pollution. Which for me is absolutely incredible. If you can sit there you can peacefully think and you have got lorries and cars and things zooming past. So that's another thing so we're onto another thing which is a positive thing about this whole situation is that that is. It's like every day. We go out the lost damning where we where we live. Sunday afternoon Sunday early evening. Such especially in the summer it would be pretty quiet but every day is pretty. Yeah and there's something quite wonderful about that and someone said the other day so I live in even back in the seventy S. And he's really old fashioned. You know whether it wasn't so much traffic and there wasn't so much noise pollution wasn't only sort of thing. I think you know today. We we live in a very quick world things yesterday and we expect them to be here and now you know communication the way people communicate get information get for me to be and saw of made people against their wishes in a way have to take a step back and listen to me even now. We're in our house but even now you would hear the calls you would here. You know this this time of Day. So there has been a real kind of almost reawakening of of your surroundings. And where you live is it. Sounds you can hear the birds singing obviously spring the birds there so it's lovely to sit in the garden and listen to the birds world on the nose of the traffic. We've seen more light. Bunny rabbits out and about folks is derived appearing catalogue of Kurt so many cats are literally walking down the road and I can see them going. Yeah I like this course. And so he got so we'd never ever encountered My worry for them for the cats. Go back to normal. I think owners need to be very careful because you know they'll will become accustomed to the father. There's not a lot of traffic about and so they are sitting quite happily in the rose on the pavements. And it's very sweet to see that but I do worry about when the traffic comes back. So yeah there's definitely positives so go back to importance of exercise and fitness for people. Are People going out and about? That's right the Miami. Some of you not quite gone off were work from home still needed a motivating about getting up and getting out is really really important. Isn't it to exercise your body every day? Absolutely think the guidelines thirty minutes a day of movement. You've got to get you know the heart pumping you've gotta get the joins move in. You gotta get your ligaments and your muscles moving. You've got a walking is weight bearing exercise you know so even just going for good bruce thirty minute walk every day that. I'm being a lot better than be sitting at home watching TV or on the computer. So you've got little garden if you don't WanNA got backfield worried than even a small garden just walking up and down. You listen to the birds as I said just getting some Russia and as you said weight-bearing especially as we get older really really important because it keeps the bone density high and as we get older. That's what's GonNa degenerate as well as muscles ligaments intended so weight. Bearing exercise is very gate offering this whole time. Oop Go into a bit more during this podcast but you know we should look at this time as being time where we actually find new things maybe revisit things ourselves thing cabal stuff and maybe hopefully when we get through this and get on the other side. We have moved back with us we have. You might backing go. You know what that was crazy time. Lots of really bad stuff happens. Lots of worry lots of anxiety but at the same time I managed to salvage something I wonder. Also you don't a bit more of a spiritual thing. All at my spirituality you know in the universe what you out you get back and I just wanted has as a race. Maybe we all out that that we were getting it was getting too much too fast paced too much going on too much pressure and we were sending that message to the universe to say you know humanity needs to stop. We need to take a chill pill. We need to regroup. We need to go back to basics and so many people were feeling that the universe when they guy this is gonNa feel horrific and horrible but the outcome is actually GonNa be a positive one. Because you're just literally go bang and calm down and take jovial and regroup.

Kurt Bush Miami Russia Bruce
Is Zion Living Up to the Hype for the Pelicans?

ESPN Daily

06:04 min | 2 years ago

Is Zion Living Up to the Hype for the Pelicans?

"Were in Dallas for the pelicans overtime loss to the Mavericks. Second night of a back to back for New Orleans obviously but we didn't see the Zion. We've sort of been spoiled by over the last month. So what did you get from Zion? On Wednesday night. I saw someone who had to go through a little bit of adversity. There's two different things working against him in that Dallas Game One. It was the first time he played on a back to back. You didn't see his legs under him. Early actually play but gets the block on Williamson Williamson. Took his time getting up court. You may be subbing out of the ball game here. He is drew and Lonzo Ball. We're GONNA come on up to him. Hey man you you're right you you tired. Are you going to play? You GotTa pick one. The other thing. Going against him was Dallas they started Maxi Kluber alongside of kristaps porzingis specifically for Zion Williamson two. That might have been forcing a psychotic burst that is just perfectly played deep that still by Dallas Cleveland's doing A. They went to the formula. That's been working. Which is the. We're GONNA get the tallest guy we have can defend him to do it. And then have another seven footer. Awesome plus footer at the Rim Ryan got blocked inside again. It's not possible in less. Cleber is being this physical and allowing time for kristaps ticket over there. Lieber six ten obviously porzingas seven three. Those have been the only really match ups that have given him problems when they played the box. Janas guarded him and then you have the Lopez twins behind him. Protecting the RIM defers Lakers game. Anthony Davis guarded him. And you had jovial and Dwight rim so that combination kind of went against his favor so walk me through a little bit of the process on the back to back portion of it because this is obviously part of the Adjustment For Zion. So where do you find the line? If you're the PELICANS in trying to get him experienced doing things like back to backs that he'll be asked to throughout his career and then also sort of adjusting him since he is still getting fresh on the court after an injury yeah so initially David Griffin the PELICANS executive vice president of basketball operations who should have a shorter title. It's a mouthful say every time I don't know I mean if you're going to have a title let's go big with it like if I'm going to have a business card the whole front of it's going to be my title and the backs. Just going to say fits. There's not not my first name. Just I'm pretty sure that's what his business card says. I haven't seen one but I'm pretty sure that's it has to read like that initially As I was coming back from the injury. Grif said he wasn't there. Were probably going to take it easy on back to backs. Now the good thing that kind of worked into their favor there was January. Twenty second was when he made his debut since then the Tuesday Wednesday back to back that they just had was the first time they had a back to back so they got to let him get games under his belt. He mentioned to his own Tuesday. You know I have to do the recovery if I want to perform the way that I'm capable of performing as you try to push for or is this your mutual agreement Little bit of both but I need a push for myself because I gotTa do the recovery of I want to be able to perform. We do every night with that. Being said coming off the knee injury there were reports that he was learning how to walk differently. How to run differently? I mean when they're watching him and they're monitoring and what are they looking for his indicators of his health very funny to me because I think George Sodano said that I think on ESPN broadcast and it just kind of blew up. He's learning how to walk and anybody who's been through physical therapy at any point that I for any sort of knee. Injuries foot injury. Whatever it is can tell you. They will relearn how to walk in physical therapy. The learning how to walk and run differently was more about little things in his gate that they wanted to fix. The biggest thing that they really wanted to correct at that time was how he landed when you go back and watch how he landed at. Duke with these huge one handed slam traffic. He's landing on one foot one of the big things you see. Now when he goes up for a dunk whether it's an alley whether he's just throwing it down to hands. He tries to land on two feet as much as possible. Zeile yeah that the to hand flush and a great entry fee for Lonzo Ball over Kunst buck to finish that would KUPA gotta be thinking. What in the world so. It's little things that maybe you don't know at nineteen years old that the Pelicans are trying to instill in him so they can take a little bit of stress off of his knees. The biggest thing you just said is nineteen if you listen to Zion. He'll make sure he tells you. He's nineteen in just about every other interview. I feel like I mean but doesn't right like we are so busy trying to make him either the savior of a lead. That doesn't need to be saved or the reason that we're over. Hyping somebody to the point that people ridicule how much we talk about it but you look at it at some point. Say this is a nineteen year old kid. We're talking about that is absolutely crushing in a limited sample size. So let's turn the tone positive here for a second you're looking at a nineteen year old kid. What he's doing is unprecedented right. It's absolutely unprecedented. Feel like every other night we were finding ways to start a sentence with Zion Williamson. Doing something and we ended it with Michael Jordan or Shaquille O'Neill or Tim Duncan or wilt. Chamberlain the goes on and on and on. And you're like that doesn't make sense.

Pelicans Zion Williamson Williamson Dallas Zion Williamson Lonzo Ball Cleber Dallas Cleveland Dwight Rim New Orleans Anthony Davis Maxi Kluber Mavericks RIM Lieber Janas Michael Jordan Basketball Chamberlain
Mitt Romney catches backlash for impeachment vote

Forum

05:11 min | 2 years ago

Mitt Romney catches backlash for impeachment vote

"There were two articles of impeachment against the president abuse of power and obstruction of Congress related to a July phone call with the president of Ukraine and which president trump press the Ukrainian leader to investigate former vice president Joe Biden Democrats allege that trump withheld approved military aid to Ukraine as leverage for his own political gain then with help witnesses and evidence and later investigations president trump denied any wrongdoing well some of his Republican supporters agreed with Democrats that with the president did was wrong but said it didn't merit removal from office and yesterday he was acquitted on both counts of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress only one Republican this internet rami of Utah voting to convict the president for abuse of power here with us as we wait for the president's reaction and pure white has reporter I used to Roscoe Hey you show hello and NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey snow hi Kelsea hi there and I usually start with you Bill Clinton as we know apologized after he was acquitted he apologized to the country for and he said putting everyone through the process that is not expected today no not not at all in in the president did speak this morning at the national prayer breakfast and he talked about this and it may be given a preview of what he might say he talked about what the country have been put through a terrible ordeal by some quote very dishonest and corrupt people and he also said something to the effect of when they impeach you for nothing then he was saying are you supposed to like them basically but he's saying that he's impeached he was impeached for nothing so he's not acknowledging any wrongdoing on his part at all or or is that what the idea that he did anything and inappropriate he is not saying that Kelsey as I Asia said the president had a somewhat somber but jovial tone as well as that at this prayer breakfast as he said he was put through a terrible ordeal I'm in in many ways some folks are saying he kind of was refraining what happens that Republicans who voted to acquit they were not necessarily all of them doing that and saying that he was necessarily vindicated do you think we will see more of this tone in today's remarks well I mean we definitely expect that the president will continue this if he was feeling that way at a prayer breakfast which is typically a bi partisan non political events this event that he has more or less that called for the sick sole purpose of being political and partisan we expected to gold quite a bit further well you know his supporters might say he has every right he's very angry he feels he was unjustly put through this and we got another sense of the tone last night when the president retweeted a video denigrating Mitt Romney as we said that Romney was the only Republican to also vote for convicting the president on this video you know it's very insulting it calls him in a secret asset for Democrats and then president trump's son Donald Trump junior tweeted out a picture of that Romney in loose jeans it's called mom jeans and it has the P. word on it this vulgar slow for women that his father also used in the access Hollywood tape so I you know I Usha I'm just warning do you think we'll hear any of that kind of scorched language against Mitt Romney today I wouldn't think that scorched we as the president at some of his rallies he they do get he may get a bit raunchy but not I didn't I didn't mean there aren't you hardly you don't need royally because way in yeah I they yeah I think rami absolutely I I you can never say a hundred percent but I would be very surprised if he didn't at least make some type of a remark related to rhyme even if he doesn't name him when you look at the president's Twitter feed which is the way that we can look at and kind of get a sense of what he may be feeling when you look at what he tweeted after his acquittal you didn't get a lot of her rate I'm the best I'm the greatest but you did get like you pointed out that tweet about Romney and then you got another tweet this morning about if Romney had done more against former president Obama when he was running against him maybe he would have been president if you went after a bomb of the way he went after me so it does seem like this is very much at the the front of the president's mind right now the fact that Romney voted against them now Kelsey I you cover Congress I'm I mean do you think that Romney will get any credit for his vote from any Republicans the Republicans I talked to extensively yesterday more or less said that they were aware that out of senator on these feelings that they they weren't they knew that he would likely go a different way and none of them that I spoke to were really interested in holding it against him particularly it was very interesting talking to some of the folks in leadership who said that this was a vote about each individual conscience in each individual's beliefs and that there would be no holding it against him I sent a Tory leader Mitch McConnell did a press conference and he was asked repeatedly if Romney would be in the dog house or if there were any repercussions and he said that in the Senate the most important vote is your next vote and that he works well with Romney and he expects that he will continue to be a valuable valuable member of the Republican

Congress President Trump Ukraine
Movember: Early detection is key

Mo'Kelly

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Movember: Early detection is key

"Everybody's got a moustache why because its mould them Burr and we're coming down to the end of November and I know you've probably heard me on ten calmly junior I probably sitting with prices for a minute or two later on tonight for me when the US of a major earlier today and this really serious and it's something that more men should be willing to discuss now animal Kelly show we talk about some of these health issues all the time if only because to Wallace sharp is are walking medical dictionary if there's a procedure he's gone through it if this is a medical terminology or billing issue he's had to deal with it so it's something that we talk about more often but men generally don't usually want to talk about issues such as like testicular cancer or colon cancer and I would wonder I know what I'm not saying it is a both I'm just saying because it's something that men should know do you as a man know how to examine yourself for testicular cancer or symptoms of that signs of that do you know what the symptoms and signs of colon cancer all are you willing to have a colonoscopy by age fifty this is my last weekend in my forties I'm not happy about it I'm struggling with it I'm not going through a midlife crisis because I damn sure know that I'm not mid life anymore I'm on the wrong side of that mid life crisis and that's a crisis but none the less and I say it with a jovial spirits the reality is is something that we as men have to be willing to be honest about and I always say you can lie to me just don't lie to yourself these are things that we use men must need to take care of another words do you know the symptoms of within large prostate do you know what how that manifests itself as far as urination frequency of urination at night stopping and starting out of urine flow when you trying to go to

Burr United States Wallace Testicular Cancer Colon Cancer Kelly
Sex Worker Rights with Alison Spittle and guests Miranda Kane and Niki Adams

The Guilty Feminist

09:02 min | 2 years ago

Sex Worker Rights with Alison Spittle and guests Miranda Kane and Niki Adams

"I'm a feminist but being in the changing room at Yoga when pregnancy yoga comes out is an object silence for me because to me they look like handmaid's because they don't talk the very pregnant and I've got excellent posture there's just a sense of godliness to them it's the yoga that's Donna don't get me wrong I should have that wanted the end to your warmed up the one at the end again because I think you're gonNA find it's really funny and creepy and judgmental I'm a feminist Bush I watched it a violent there's more I watched the Oh I didn't because I like to psychologically assess people while being low key aroused at the same time it is it's going to admit it also I think like I love people watching a Vita interesting I love People Watch true crime because you watch true crime and you're like what would I do in this situation would I escaped being murdered but I watched the light into go how do I not give John from Brighton the hand job the Go-to the pool how do I I'm a feminist bond I try not to judge people who watch la violence because I know I know that seventy bright feminists women love it and I'm actually on a level and what HAP- group which there's a lot of laws on that WHATSAPP group but deep down a China watch a few episodes every now and again just to keep up with what's up shop but when it's over I'm like thank God I love the group and the Group tends to stay little buoyant between La violence it'd be one since the group started buck honestly there's a part of me that just goes what are these people seeing everyone says all but it's great because it allows people to talk about gas lighting yes because you're witnessing live gaslight batstone coach reason that's like saying all we've put live homicide on the television and because it's really bringing the question of homicide to the four but you provoking it but a lot of women now look at that and go I don't got to happen to me but you've made it happen and now you're saying so women realize it shouldn't happen but you've made it happen Catholic women that watch levion this is not a very real way I feel like I am the gas lighter I am the one saying you don't have to watch this going to have to participate in this yeah I do watch it to learn about gaslight but also if there is a hunch up the added bonus I'll say them I just like watching a do vague overshadowed very quickly I'm just like Ooh I wanNA give myself to be honest someone else do it I'd rather watch wouldn't do it yeah yeah I'm not GonNa do it back for nineteen minutes support the person that this to me it's watching that how clean is your house show I don't clean my what someone else cleaned their Lou end of story turn over Little Bit Madman yes all watch that man in very well suits women appreciating those men it's wrong I see that I also guess lip Gina who standing in for Tomas Brussels cocktails on eighteen and I've a feminist but I have this desire to say I don't normally drink at work lack I deserve metal I'm aware that most of you don't drink at work but medians do so I feel very proud of myself saying I never drink before work or at work I'd like my if you're an x ray here radiographer was like I virtues at work to assure you tonight your justice is Captain John Sylvester. We're about to take off I just head on she does the exhibit differently I'm GonNa sip it very slowly your the quality of your beyond minded anyway oh she's nuts uh-huh that's basically undoing nice no I support you I am a feminist Bush like using misogynous swear words and I'm trying to stop so like Beach Yeah Oh it's so progressive sometimes I just WanNa go what's up bitches yeah you you shouldn't so I really liked the word motherfucker insist that can ice love it sounds like a jelly fucker jovial swear right that's not very nice about moments you know so I thought of thinking of a different word to describe motherfucker as trucker fucker dice gender-neutral this well you know truckers can be men or women and but I've come through proper word for it now it's called Matt and that's mom partner Max motherfucker the listen to you work no do you think sorry do you think mash a trucker from the middle of iron and listens to the guilty feminists see we could change who's your progenitor neutral I went to university every Christmas every night we would give the boys an episode of the Philippi show and the flip show was about it was he was reading a forerunner of House doc shaggy dog puppet he was washed up detective he was dictated to painkillers. How old were these kids there was an evil nemesis the anti was called Hedberg because he was German and Tom used to do his voice and be lying Filipi I've been expecting you please come in I have made a muffins and as it developed on it was clear that head bail was gay and very much in love with flew p so you could say very positive gay characters but I look back on this now and initials on show the puppets hide you're right yeah they probably welcome thank you there we go retrospective even making stuff woke that's what we should do everything then I think you'll find the eighteen was quite a great feminist attacks

Bush Painkillers Hedberg Partner Matt MAX TOM Nineteen Minutes
"jovial" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"jovial" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Thing with green new deal getting shot down. Scott, Scott, what you said is very profound. Only you forgot to mention one thing they're stepping on landmines the day late in the ground. No foul. It's their own. What's funny comes back to roost is they they know where the landmines are because they planted them there. And they're still stepping on them jumping on him. With both feet. So scott. So now, what Trump said, you know, that everyone's getting get so tired of winning, you know, the win. An and it's finally happening. Now, you know, the Republicans used to be they couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper bag now. They're starting to win because of Trump's president. I think you're right. They keep this crap up. I e the Democrats they're gonna find themselves not only not winning back the White House. But actually losing the seats that they gained in the house of representatives. And then they're really going to be in a sling. Oh, yeah. Worst enemy. Yeah. I agree. Well, listen to have a great night Scotty to haughty to all right, man. Scott, assuming Scott from Scotty. I'd love to know the background behind that nickname. Well, I called him that being jovial right said growing up everybody call me that or something to that effect. I may be I'm paraphrasing professional wrestler. Yes. That's where came from. Okay. Unfamiliar with that gentleman. It's it's always a distinct pleasure to have you in the studio except for maybe tonight. But. Anything coming up, April, sixth bright, Indiana. The. Shift restaurant and bar show. Okay. That'd be great fantastic. Adam opening day opening day. And then when you got the the derby coming up. We gotta do that, man. Coach lou. Go cyclones tomorrow night Wednesday night back at US Bank arena under the playoffs. Start. They have four or five more games. And then the playoffs start offs. Why? Goes to the playoffs. Yeah. I want to win a game game. This team will actually go to the playoffs and win games. Unlike other Cincinnati sports teams down we'll take a break..

Scott Trump Scotty White House US Bank arena Cincinnati Indiana Coach lou president Adam
Giants CEO apologizes after altercation with wife

CBS Sports Radio

07:29 min | 3 years ago

Giants CEO apologizes after altercation with wife

"But this afternoon around noon. CEO of your San Francisco Giants Larry Baer got into a physical altercation with his wife in a public park in San Francisco. TMZ picked up the video nineteen seconds long. It's not good. Obviously, it's not good. Pam bear. Larry's wife has her phone or his phone excuse me. He goes to grab it. They get tangled up. She gets knocked to the ground. It's really what happened. I got into that. He went and grabbed the phone try to grab the phone out of a right hand. They got tangled up the chair to govern. She fell. Here's Larry bears. First statement from about two o'clock today. Regrettably today, we had a heated argument public over a family matter. We are deeply embarrassed by the situation and have resolved the issue. Here's a second statement from today. I'm truly sorry for the pain that I brought my wife children. And to the organization is not reflective of the kind of person. I that I aspire to be. But it happened, and I will never, and I will do whatever it takes to make sure that I never behave in such inappropriate manner. Again. Here's Pam bears statement. I would like to clarify the events of today. My husband, and I had an argument and public about which we are quite embarrassed. I took a cell phone. He wanted it back. I did not want to give it back. I started to get up and the chair I was sitting in began to tip due to an injury. I sustained in my foot three days ago. I lost my balance. I did not sustain any injury. Based on what happened today? They're in. I always have been and still are happily married. That's from Pam Baker. The foot thing she I I mean, I'm not saying sh-. She absolutely could have heard her foot three days ago. But that's not the reason why she fell to the ground at least from what I saw on the video. Now there it was a really weird start this entire ordeal. Because initially when it was reported. It was reported that Larry Baer dragged his wife to the ground. He did not do it. He did not drag her to the ground. Say knocked her to the ground. Okay. But it was reported to be on level ten. Like, Ray rice mad video that disturbing video. So when you see the video. Some people's initial reaction, especially the ones that I've talked to were while it's not that bad as what I I thought true, not as bad as we all I thought still pretty bad though. And you can't really eliminate. L A level when you're talking about physical altercation, and especially about altercation between a man and woman. You can't eliminate wasn't as bad. It was not level ten it's like level seven or six or five at doesn't fly with me. John's on woman heaven, I don't care if you're grabbing the grab phone paper keys. You don't do that. It looks awful. So initially it was reported to be much worse. And then people were starting to say, I it's not as bad as what? No, you're right. It's not as bad as what it was initially reported to be, but it's still pretty damn bad. And I have a problem with with certain people online talking about that. Particular part of this that it's not as bad as first reported. Well, where are we right now as a society, do do we have to see a video of a woman being hit in the face for us to go to that? For us to get to that conversation. Does she have to be hit in the face for us to say, it's a physical altercation. Is that where we're at? Because you can't do this to a woman. I'm sorry. It's very bad. Look. I don't know what's going to happen. I don't I'm just wondering where we're at. I mean, he didn't hit her. He didn't smacker. Tussled with her. And there was an altercation, and it was physical. No doubt about was a physical. You're not gonna convince me it was verbal. You know, I think it's unfair. To say, well, it's at this level, or it's not at this level. It's still a man and physical altercation with a woman wife or not. I have some questions about the video for sure. TMZ purchased the video throw it up online pretty quick, it's nineteen seconds long. But there's a coup- there's a cut in there. Edit when Larry knocks pant when Larry knocks Pam off the chair. There's a quick edit to Larry walking away, and one of the things I heard today in and actually popped into my mind when I first saw this. Why didn't Larry help his wife up? If you're not your wife to the ground. You're not good girl to the ground accident or not. You didn't help her up that looks really bad walking away. But then again, it's an edited videos of Diddy. We don't know. Did he go back after the video was over? Because every time there's a video that comes out in the news. You have to think what happened before and after because we only get a certain bit that shown to his right here. We only got one thousand nine seconds of what we know for a fact happen nineteen seconds. That's all. Multiple reports are saying that they were into an argument, fifteen minutes all the way up into that point for fifteen twenty minutes. They were arguing up to that point. So I mean, I don't know. I don't know what we're going to do with this as fans. Just a broadcasters. Just telling you how I feel and what I saw. That's all I can do how I feel and what I saw can't speculate. I'm not going to get into speculation of. Well, what goes on inside the bear house? I I don't know. I don't know. How do we know? This wasn't just a weird situation that happened. You know, you've been into an argument with your significant other. Maybe it has maybe it hasn't reached that level. It's inexcusable if it does for sure. You just don't put your hands on a woman for any reason for any goddamn reason ever. That's where that's where I'm at. Obviously, very disturbing video. Executives in sports owners and sports they should be. But they're not held to the same standard as athletes are because this if this was an athlete, white or black. We may have a more jovial tone about this. If it wasn't a giant. Because well, not jovial town. That's a really wrong thing to say. I should say the the mood around here would be a little bit lighter. Because it doesn't impact. Everybody's so much. The I retract that statement, it doesn't impact everybody's so much. So wouldn't be so down you understand what I'm saying? Is if it was an athlete, we would just be talking about it like we do everything else.

Larry Larry Baer TMZ Larry Bears San Francisco Pam Bear Pam Baker CEO Ray Rice Tussled John Diddy PAM Nineteen Seconds Three Days One Thousand Nine Seconds Fifteen Twenty Minutes Fifteen Minutes
"jovial" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"jovial" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"We know that there are benefits and disadvantages for being safe with our money and for taking some risks with our money. So we want to talk about that balance and where and how we can achieve it. But two thousand eighteen was the first year in a decade where we had down years in the markets. Do you think that that serves as a reminder to folks that we do need to have some balance in our financial lives? So one of the things that we had the re privilege of doing our had the privilege of doing an early January was meeting with one of my clients with a couple that they have been clients about ten years and. When they came in. He walked in. And it's just is jovial and relaxed, and you know, just everything's great just kind of just there. So he's seventy she's sixty eight and she came in. And she was just you could tell she was just kind of nervous and a little bit uncomfortable. Honestly. And so we sat down and just began to visit a little bit. And and she just kind of interrupted or she said what's happening. What's going to happen to us with all this volatility in the market? How are we are we okay, and she was just by Franklin just anxious and nervous? And so I was able to spend time with her count addressing that. And basically the majority of their funds or large portion of their investments or an accounts that have guarantees a large part of the funds that they have invested with us or an Eric counts that have guarantees that. If the stock market goes down their value of their account does not go down, and it has a guaranteed income stream attached to it. And so I was able to spend time with her just kind of walking through. Okay. Let's go back to here's the account. You on your the guarantees that are built in. And these particular accounts had are. These were actually annuities that this particular was in and with some of their money and these annuities have lifetime income earned. And so I was able to show her that whether she lives to eight eighty eight ninety eight or a hundred and eight am either. How long's she lives? The income. Annuities is guaranteed for life is guaranteed. First longest she's gonna live in just kind of talking through that Loeb. Whether it was just amazing. You could just see the stress going away the Zayed's kinda beginning starting to diminish you could just see her starting to relax and by the end of the meeting they were both just laughing and just excited about their retirement again. And he he he understood the knew the entire way of of these last few years that the income was guaranteed and. Anyway. But for her to finally get it and start to realize that they could Chica just the income. That's huge receiving that. She was going to save this month should also receive it again next month and the next month and the next month, and that her income which is going to continue to come in just really helped her a lot to be able to fully enjoy began to fully Rian joy her retirement. It's amazing. The the change in perspective and outlook that we can have when we are confident in our financial status, and again two thousand eighteen whether it was an anomaly or whether we see more volatility moving through two thousand nineteen and into the future. It did give us some second thoughts and a lot of people were less than fully completely confident. That's not a place that we want to be we want to understand the structure of our plan. And know that moving forward, regardless if the market's up down or sideways that we will be making progress and be able to maintain our comfort and confidence and lifestyle. That's why the family from fest financial do offer the opportunity for a complimentary review just like the the couple there. You can have a little bit more confidence in your plan. If you know, you have the right kind of plan in place, and if you've got questions or concerns would like to make sure that you've got that kind of financial structure and support and stability pick up the phone and.

Loeb Zayed Franklin Rian ten years
"jovial" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"jovial" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Get out go meet people. I know. I know I know you're absolutely right about that. Just make. His wife because I'm I was always for the war. I think what was idea you love the way your reading your Nazi websites there. No one. Jovial guy. Fred nut. Hey, listen. I I think by we'll come. We'll probably come around this thinking all all of this. All this all this people that go back and forth from Syria and Afghanistan. Legal Somalis this people from Pakistan live, Bergen county, boss county. It's nice go out. Enjoy the day. What are you sitting there with your Nazi stuff? What he wearing a helmet now too. If you own a bayonet. I am. That kind of stuff. Don't you? You don't you? Losers. And they know the iron crosses. Yes. Look that stuff. Don't you? Cabinet for likely. I have a whole basement silver. But usually, you crazy Nazi types, very serious grim. You're like a fun happy guy. What's the deal? You know, I I exercise and eat like, you know, you gotta March around the yard. Areas. Schnitzel, you know, and you know. I I should be mad at you. Because you're a sound like a Nazi there. But you so friendly. Listen, you know, when you want to recruit people, you got up your friendly. You can't be a hard ass about it. Okay. All right. I don't know what to make of this. Call. That's terrible Bergen county nuts. Hey lives near you. Probably. I'm afraid. Go to Doug in New Jersey. Hey, doug. Yeah. Good morning Marquis. We're talking about a Cossio before thank of it. If she applied for a job as a Bank manager and showed them horizon. Yeah. It was a bartender. They tell it to put a hat and coat on and get the hell out. But yet she gets a job on the finance committee about three hundred million population country. Well in her defense when she was bartenders, she did work. The register. Committee. Hey, les, Moonves kids this guy credit for chutzpah this less move? He's now going to arbitration to get one hundred and twenty million. Why not? This sleazeball slimeball doesn't give up he's going to arbitration. Now, they are meeting now to discuss the arbitrator will be I suggest not a woman get a man to be the arbitrator. You are and w Excu HD two. New.

Fred nut Doug Bergen county Bergen Pakistan Cabinet Bank manager Moonves Syria New Jersey Afghanistan
"jovial" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jovial" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The third annual painting with the pros will let the kids customized their own NFL jerseys next to twelve former and active players, Tony pretty good stuff. There the NFL given back in of course. Exciting. Pro Bowl stuff going on all around town this weekend, though. I gotta be honest. Feels like the game is the least exciting part of all the actual. I think it is. Did you see any of the skills challenge last night a little bit? I watched a ton of it. But because there was basketball. But they have that whole NFL IX aside from the practices, which are great because it's all wide open. Everybody's jovial the players sign autographs. They spend a lot of time with kids, you know, and aside from the practices, then they have the whole NFL experience, which is just really cool. Then you have the skills competition. They have the flag football game going on tonight. And then finally the Pro Bowl comes and hopefully it will be a good fun game. I'll be out there with the FAM. Yeah. Great event for Orlando. I sadly will not be out there. I was out there last year. We'll be out this year. But you know, hopefully, it doesn't rain on you. Yeah. That's what I'm hoping more than anything. And of course, you know, for the city as you mentioned brings in millions and millions of dollars. And of course, we love that six forty nine news ninety six point five WDBO a lot of folks not loving the ride on I four eastbound right now get to Jackie in a moment. First Tom Terry with the weekend in full five day forecast. Brought to you by southeast deal appliance warehouse. All right, Tony the weekend is coming up. We have some pretty big changes coming..

NFL Tony Tom Terry basketball Orlando Jackie five day
"jovial" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"jovial" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Action star. Chris Pratt is Mary. Katherine Schwarzenegger, and that Chris will have to deal with. Father-in-law? You're not good enough for my daughter would wind though, I was slugging it within the. Chris. Terminator father in law. Your bad, bud. Was never that. Squeezy? Wedding service. Do something old something new. Borrowed it. Suddenly the would if you heard. It gets you. But he sounds jovial does and doesn't have any more. No. He doesn't know. He does not. All right. Not that you're you know, lusting after him or anything, but can't help. But notice or Chris Chris Pratt. I love Chris Pratt. Yeah. And he definitely went from dad bought not dad bottle and became you know, a superhero garden to the galaxy. And now, he's Catherine sorts of women and men all over are like. Good luck. Hearing this. I don't know the full story. Okay. That you were told by customer service somewhere in the area that you and your wife Kelly or getting on their nerves. Yes. To our face. It was over the phone or the phone would have been rude by like, well, okay. It was directly to our faces. And I was like did that just happen. Will you share? Why? Yes. I will. Yes..

Chris Pratt Katherine Schwarzenegger Catherine Kelly
Roman Polanski sues Oscars organisation over his expulsion

The Mark Levin Show

01:56 min | 4 years ago

Roman Polanski sues Oscars organisation over his expulsion

"One thousand i n o v i t e dot com california police department pushing back against allegations of racism where three young women were stopped and questioned the women who are black were guests at an airbnb and say they were stopped for being black in a white neighborhood while being considered suspects in a burglary they plan to sue the real to california police department on grounds the stop was racially motivated but chief mark clings says body camera footage tells a different tale no time did we actually handcuff anyone we actually allowed them to exit the vehicle and re remain freely walking about with our officers cling describes the interaction as jovial airbnb leaders say they want to talk with the town about how to avoid future incidents grenell scott fox news city mayor bill de blasio calling the resignation of state attorney general eric schneiderman over sexual abuse allegations a shock but also other sex assault victims in the city to come forward saying claims will be investigated and academy award winning director fights back after he was expelled from the organization that gave him the oskar polanski wants due process the selfexiled director is fighting what his lawyers termed as his illegal expulsion from the academy of motion picture and fine arts in a letter to the academy's president polanski's lawyer wrote the only proper solution will be to give mr polanski reasonable notice of the charges against him and a fair hearing two percent his position with respect to any proposed expulsion adding were not here contesting the merits of the expulsion decision but rather your organization's blatant disregard of its own standards of conduct polanski fled the us forty years ago after being found guilty of raping a thirteen year old girl michelle pollino fox seen carrie underwood florida georgia line and jason aldean the leading nominees for the cmt music awards.

Attorney Jason Aldean Georgia Florida Carrie Underwood Michelle Pollino Contesting President Trump Assault Airbnb Bill De Blasio Scott Fox Mark California Director Oskar Polanski Eric Schneiderman Burglary Thirteen Year Forty Years