35 Burst results for "Journal Of Scientific"

Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence

60-Second Science

02:35 min | 9 months ago

Ravens Measure Up to Great Apes on Intelligence

"Ravens are known for their exceptional intelligence. In fact there are sometimes referred to as flying primates. We knew they are very smart but nobody ever really tested this using a big and comprehensive test battery which also then really enabled us to say is the Performance similar to those of great apes or not simona. Pika is a cognitive scientist at the university of osnabruck in germany. She and her colleagues wanted to see how ravens would measure up primates across a wide array of tasks so they subjected eight ravens. To something called the primate cognition test battery. It's a series of thirty three different tasks. Designed to assess various aspects of intelligence among primates. For example one test is a game of cups. You may have seen it affair. He put an object under one of three cups. Move the cups around. And then guess which cup. The objects under other tasks tested the ravens ability to determine cause and effect or to understand different quantities. Peanuts were popular test item to keep the birds motivated overall. The researchers found that four month old ravens which you might think of as teenage ravens did just as well on most tasks as adult chimps and orangutans except on tests of spatial skills. Net was a little bit surprising for us but we use attests better. Which was designed to test primate cognition and these tasks which may make sense for human children may be great apes right now. We use this for a species which is very different. They are flying. they have speaks they. Communicate was a beacon. That don't have hands whatever so i would say. Yeah that may be the past. We used to test. The spatial skills could be improved. The results appear in the journal. Scientific reports kaley swift behavioral ecologist. Who studies crows and other corvettes at the university of washington. She says she was impressed by the results. In how comprehensive the tests were but says it can be hard to assess intelligence by comparing across species. I'd like to see a sort of shift in our language from comparing ravens to primates like calling them flying primates to rethinking like how we scale animals and not putting them on such a linear scale. Right we're like wow birds are smart as apes. It's amazing who would have thought it's like well. There's just a bunch of different release meeting all day. Their natural history informs different aspects of their physical and social cognition in like. It's much less linear than the narrative. We often tell. Intelligence she says is much more complex and variable and we think think.

Ravens University Of Osnabruck Pika Kaley Swift Germany University Of Washington
"journal scientific" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The pandemic is real. It's deadly, and we need strong cooperation within our communities. Chicago, the nation's third largest city, is among the first to announce a stay at home advisory. And it probably won't be the last York City is considering whether or not to close schools. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells CBS this morning testing and tracing our key. Now his community spread right now people in society infecting others. They don't have symptoms. They don't know they're infected. So we need to pull mortis sting into the community. Baseball shatters the glass ceiling with the first female general manager of the Miami Marlins air hiring Kim Ng, who spent two decades in MLB front offices. Baseball analyst Ed Randall. While she was with the Yankees, Derek Jeter was busy playing shortstop. He's now the owner of the Miami Marlins. Great credit for him to recognize her talents and to make history, former President Obama tells CBS News The reluctance by Republicans to accept Joe Biden's presidential win is putting the country in dangerous territory that has been Disappointing. They obviously didn't think there was any fraud going on because they didn't say anything about it for the first two days, But there's damage to this hand recount of ballots got underway today in Georgia, where it's Biden over Trump by about 14,000 votes lot to clean up in parts of the Carolinas swamped by floodwaters. Yesterday, this woman at a campground in North Carolina saw her sister in law swept away feeling lost because I'm saying you're pretty and God and she's okay and she's got onto something and that they'll find her tropical storm a does now have to see in the Atlantic. CBS is Elaine Cobb has details of the latest research on climate change, a new scientific study says. We've already passed the point of no return on global warming. Even if humans now reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero warming would continue. Published in the British journal Scientific reports, the study says the only way forward is to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. However, some experts say the study is too limited and two theoretical on the future isn't quite so gloomy. That was up 285 points. This is CBS News. Today. Stronger immunity and better nutrition are more important than ever. That's why a glands best gives you and your family more. That's healthy news for everyone. Only a glance best. We are just learning about the first steps to slow.

CBS Miami Marlins Joe Biden Kim Ng Dr. Anthony Fauci Chicago Derek Jeter Baseball Ed Randall York City British journal Scientific Yankees President Obama MLB North Carolina analyst Elaine Cobb
"journal scientific" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on WTOP

"On the hour. Your home for original reporting. I'm Steve Cave, and more states are issuing dire warnings about the coronavirus spike. Taking action or threatening to Gina Raimondo is Rhode Island's governor. That's where we're headed Folks. Total lockdown. If we don't start to get more serious and follow the rules. CBS's David Bag No. Dr Benjamin, Singer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says the number of covert hospitalizations in Chicago is fast approaching levels They haven't seen since the worst days back in April. The pandemic is real, It's deadly, and we need strong cooperation within our communities. Chicago, the nation's third largest city, is among the first to announce a stay at home advisory. And it probably won't be the last New York City is considering whether or not to close schools, Dr Anthony Fauci tells CBS this morning testing and tracing our key. Now there is community spread right now, people in society infecting others. They don't have symptoms. They don't know they're infected. So we need to pull mortis sting into the community. Baseball shatters a glass ceiling with the first female general manager of the Miami Marlins air hiring Kim Ng, who spent two decades in MLB front offices. Baseball analyst Ed Randall. While she was with the Yankees, Derek Jeter was busy playing shortstop. He's now the owner of the Miami Marlins. Great credit for him to recognize her talents and to make history, former President Obama tells CBS News The reluctance by Republicans to accept Joe Biden's presidential win is putting the country in dangerous territory that has been Disappointing. They obviously didn't think there was any fraud going on because they didn't say anything about it for the first two days, But there's damage to this hand recount of ballots got underway today in Georgia, where it's Biden over Trump by about 14,000 votes lot to clean up in parts of the Carolinas swamped by floodwaters. Yesterday, this woman at a campground in North Carolina saw her sister in law swept away feeling lost because I'm saying you're pretty and God and she's okay and she's caught onto something that they'll find her tropical storm A does now out to sea in the Atlantic. CBS is Elaine Cobb has details of the latest research on climate change, a new scientific study says. We've already passed the point of no return on global warming, even if humans now reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero Warming would continue published in the British journal Scientific reports, the study says the only way forward is to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere..

CBS Miami Marlins Kim Ng Chicago Joe Biden Steve Cave coronavirus spike Gina Raimondo Dr Anthony Fauci Northwestern Memorial Hospital New York City Derek Jeter Dr Benjamin Baseball Ed Randall North Carolina Rhode Island Elaine Cobb British journal Scientific
"journal scientific" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:54 min | 11 months ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on KOMO

"Bill O'Neill. Is that the editor's desk man with great personal time Amanda Factor. Coronavirus, hospitalizations, air rising and setting records in this country, the covert tracking project says now over 67,000 people were in the hospital yesterday because of covert 19. That's the highest since the pandemic began. The record was fueled by new highs in 18 States and Puerto Rico. A new study says. The world has already passed the point of no return when it comes to global warming. The study published in the British journal Scientific Reports warns that even reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero would not get things under control now. Researchers argue. The only way to stop global warming now is to extract enormous amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Pressure is building on President Trump to begin allowing President elect Joe Biden access to classified intelligence briefings. Let's go to our common news line right now A B C's and as delicate Terry's with us Good morning that has Good morning. Where's the stand this morning? No, it's been interesting to watch that play out. The president continues to refuse to accept the results of the election. He refuses to recognize Joe, but and as the president elect and refuses to concede, we're starting to see a break within the party. So you do have some lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Some Republican lawmakers who are continuing to stand with the president people like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Who continued, of course, kind of the same point the president has been making for. They're saying, you know, they're calling for recounts. They're saying the process needs toe play out in the courts, and they're reluctant to recognize bite and as the president elect, But on the flip side, you do have some Republicans who are breaking with the president. So you have you know the governors of Ohio and Arizona, both Republicans, who came out in recent day to recognize bite and as the president elect, and then you had Republicans, Republican senators Langford and grassy yesterday, saying they believe Joe Biden should be receiving this Classified intelligence briefings as the transition gets processed gets under way, And as Joe Biden takes, you know, gets ready to take over the range from President Trump. Langford even said if I didn't doesn't begin receiving those classified intelligence briefings this week that he would step in, so you're starting to see and Lindsey Graham we should point out another Republican who's been a close friend of the president. Also coming out to recognize Joe Biden has the president elect so you are seeing is starting to see some Um, split emerging within the GOP and some pressure building on Trump. But are there any signs that Trump will relent on this? None so far. Not so far. I think you know, so it's certainly something to watch. I think the more Republicans come out to break with the president and to put pressure on the president of the more pressure President Trump will face But you know, a lot of the Republican leadership is in a tricky spot because they are Mr Trump is, you know we're starting TOC reports that he's not planning to go anywhere in terms of you know, he's gonna leave the White House, but well, you know politically what will be around and that he's looking at it. Possible 2024 run. We were also reporting an ABC that he had been looking at launching Trump TVs so Republicans on Capitol Hill who hope to have some kind of political and political future in 2024. Might need the president on their side, so they're in a tricky spot, and that you know that they don't want Tioga on the president's bad side. At the same time, though, they're being urged by their Democratic counterparts to you, no respect, democracy, respect the process and recognized that the election results so they're in a tricky spot. It's all the more interesting cause I think the general feeling we're hearing from people inside the White House. That the president himself knows that he doesn't have a path forward here. But that he is just, you know, fighting this out through the courts and letting the process play out. Contesting the results. Kind of in a way to save face That he is someone who hates losing. He hates. You know, one of the worst things you could call someone. If you're President. Trump is losers, so he just is doing all of this to save face Tol..

President Trump President Joe Biden Puerto Rico Trump White House Bill O'Neill Terry Contesting Amanda Factor editor British journal Scientific Rep Mitch McConnell Langford Kevin McCarthy Lindsey Graham
"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Sleep found that an ends that oldest these nets comes into play psychically during sleep they say this would suggest that a good sleep let your brain loosen up the nets, which in turn allows for changes in your memories. Paleontologist in China found fossilized fragments of a new species of theropod dinosaur. The findings published in the Journal scientific reports shows that Iris's Sir James Menendez was about five meters long with a typical Sarah, pod like naked tail but it walked on just two legs using its Fulham's Moore's hands the fossils dating back some monitored ninety, five million years to the drastic were found in Yunan province. A report in the Journal, nature is described traditional Chinese medicine as being fraught with Sita Science. It found the most obvious reason that traditional Chinese medicine hasn't delivered. Many cures is because most of its so-called treatments don't work as they have know scientifically logical mechanism of action instead, it uses a bunch of made up. ID's like vital energy or CI moving through magical channels called Meridians which supposedly have branches connected to bodily organs and functions, which can then be guided by acupuncture points. None of it has any scientific liberty add to that a hodge podge of. Potions based on mixtures of herbs and body parts many from rare and endangered species or extracted from live animals through extreme cruelty, which also don't work than throw placebo effect and you end up with today's traditional. Chinese. Medicine even the names phony the doctrines of traditional ancient Chinese medicine or actually invented in the nineteen fifties in the wake of Chairman Mouse Communist Revolution Mountain actually believe in ancient or traditional Chinese medicine. So he preferred modern Western medicine instead after all work, but he ordered the use of traditional Chinese medicine for the masses as it was more affordable. Clear example of the Soviet Union Communist doctrine of everyone being equal at some being a little bit more equal than others. Now health authorities in Beijing of envelope proposed new regulations, which will make it a criminal offence to the fame or slander traditional Chinese medicine under the new laws breaching what would become known as article fifty four would be punishable by public security departments for disrupting public order. Tim Mendham from restraint skeptic says, that's vaguely defined crime often used by Chinese law enforcement to police online speech the attorneys are making a big push for. Tracy and traditional Chinese medicine three taking around the world probably save as much as a branding thing, the branding for China's as a later in intriguing looking out to people etcetera. I'm just promoting Chinese culture even though traditional Chinese medicine in many cases, just part of a longstanding culture to resolve the point they're trying to push it. So the suggestion is that as China becomes if it can be more authoritarian, Dander, individual sort of. Place that suggesting that is a proposed article in new regulation that says that anyone who quite defames and slammed us TC. So that's the medical practice itself not the individuals who do it, but just the fact of traditional Chinese medicine. If you define well slanderous subject to punishment by public security departments, you might face criminal charges for picking quarrels, causing trouble and disrupting public order. Now this is. This is. Hong Kong now. Dan. It's very strange thing. This is apparently a vaguely defined crime that's some Chinese authorities. It's a vaguely defined crime that's often used by Chinese low and focuses to police online speech I, and it's an all encompassing thing is very very it's very out of. Criticism, which has been criticized within China as well as outside. Without is coming, I'm sorry we didn't actually made it that way but actually, yeah, probably talking about is different nation and slander different to criticism controls arguments but it's such a vague sort of regulation that could really be between interpretation than people in China who are concerned about law and order and and not going. I've escaping with the law and order issues could be very wide enough so that they don't criticize little. Plan. RIC will in any -Tarian regime there is that need to control and regulate the population isn't there you need to keep them under the hammer. If people start thinking for themselves, they may realize problems with form of government that's right and that that's Control, and that that's a huge deal in China and whatever whatever particular point towards whether it's medicine or or online activity he'll soon is what it can be used as a tool to get getting there and further control people, and so they just sits up I'm mindset by which people are frightened to actually speak out about anything and fortunately that's the way. China's increasingly going very sauce right to Bodies being in control for, like forty. We're. Getting things were getting better said from a Western point of view, and this is not part of your Raymond here with with a strength. Pasha because because the. Traditional. Chinese medicine, which has a normal medications about noxious. But also its practices such as using while animals, and that's the thing which leads on to the potential for things that are happy met like pandemics and know previous previous day makes. About the same of dealing with wild animals wage do not come from what they've been exposed to. That leaves you open to things. So this sort of rule supporting mean we've had problems with. An proponents Australia one of the groups are racist group in Sydney wishlist university while now being suitable because of promotion of traditional Chinese medicine and we associated products and including sort of promoting the teaching the rare animals. The. Game is being promoted with within China or internationally is concerned to the skeptics. Doesn't revolve around some some major pseudoscience and some huge consensus will specially with endangered species act exactly right. That's what after the criticism covid they didn't even know Scrapie this research group in Australia some of the stuff that will link to it with promoting. Killing endangered animals, they're still heavily promoting. And got a lot of sponsorship from China at the same time that's to Mendham.

China nets Sita Science mechanism of action Australia Journal scientific Soviet Union Beijing Tim Mendham Chairman Yunan Sarah Moore Sir James Menendez Iris Tracy Mendham Hong Kong
"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Paleontologists discovered a new species of dinosaur in Brazil the small lightly built theropod named a reticence museum Nali roam the earth during the Cretaceous period one, hundred, four, million years ago. The findings published in the Journal scientific reports indicate the fossils belong to juvenile with an estimated body length around three point one two maters as just over ten feet and a body mass of around thirty four point, two, five kilograms. Then you dinosaur belongs to a group known secure. So as a lodge group of dinosaurs which are more closely related to birds connoisseurs. And Studies found a link between erectile dysfunction and watching porn the findings presented to the European Association of Urology Congress showed that the more porn people watched the greater the level of erectile dysfunction. Your this found that watching porn was associated with a greater level of dissatisfaction with so-called normal sex with only sixty five percent of respondents rating six with their partner as being more stimulating than porn the studies based on the survey of three, thousand, two hundred. and. Sixty seven males focusing on their sexual activity in health of the previous four weeks researches found respondents on average watched about seventy minutes of pornography awake usually in sessions lasting between five and fifteen minutes at a time, they also found that around twenty three percent of men under thirty five who responded to the survey had some level of erectile dysfunction when having sex with a partner and those who watch more porn also.

partner European Association of Urolog Cretaceous Journal scientific Brazil
Speaker System Blocks City Noise

60-Second Science

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Speaker System Blocks City Noise

"Restaurants Schools Dennis Office. They're all keeping more windows open to increase ventilation and hopefully decrease the chances of encountering the corona virus, but letting in fresh air also, let's in more noise. Now researchers come up with a device that's like noise cancelling headphones, but for a building it looks the same principle, so he detects noise coming into the windows and. Considering the. Bon lomb and ACOUSTICAL engineer at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore device looks like a grid of small speakers and fits over an open window, a microphone samples incoming noise, and then sends the Speaker Grid. Instructions on what sort of anti-noise to omit. The result is to cancel out the incoming sound for example. Here's the sound of a commuter train in Singapore with no noise control. Now here's that same sound with the array of noise. Cancelling speakers turned on. Compare that to a closed window. The anti-noise device is almost as good, and it allows air to keep flowing into and out of the window. The details are in the Journal, Scientific Reports The devices just a prototype, so it's still expensive, and it doesn't block out all sounds it only masks sound at frequencies from three hundred thousand Hertz which includes the rumble of freeways, trains and planes, but even that could come in handy in a place like Singapore. Again base a plane flying past. Bond says Singapore already has a lot of green buildings that use natural ventilation, but they don inside this when you have a lot of openings in the building that noise comes in so you need. Some wake managed aid increasing noise. A grid of window speakers could do the trick especially if people prioritize peace and quiet over good view, which folks at home and do all

Singapore Schools Dennis Office Nanyang Technological Universi Bon Lomb Bond Engineer
"journal scientific" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The same thing with global climate change to how big is this? We're going to get into it next hour. This This book by Ah, Michael Shellenberger. It's great. I'm about halfway through it. I actually had him on today on students. America. Yeah. Do you really? Yeah, he's he's you know, incredibly brave guy and the stuff that he goes through. I mean, there are multiple instances in this book land. Where a claim that you've heard We've all heard 1000 times. You know of environmentalists, you know, alarmist sort of claim is he talks about it? He then calls the scientist who made it and the scientists tells him on the record. They misquoted him in the in the article. It was never true, and they never intended it to be true. Multiple instances of him actually confirming this stuff. It's pretty. It's pretty close. So you're doing climate change tonight? Yes. Does the climate apocalypse is tonight? The climate apocalypse? That is fantastic. I have to watch that one tonight. This is a guy who is student said incredibly brave. I think is one of the bravest people. In the world today because he was he was named the Time magazine Hero of the Environment. The Green Book Award winner he is hey often writes for The New York Times, The Washington Post. The Wall Street Journal Scientific American. His Ted talks on global warming viewed over five million times and what he's done is he's come out and said You know, they started coming after friends of mine and I said nothing and I really need to I mean, this guy is really brave. He is completely dismantling. Ah, the the apocalyptic view of global warming and the things he has to say We'll share them next hour and stool is gonna have him on the show tonight. But this guy is It's starting to come undone. All of these things are starting to come undone. And all we have to do is hold on long enough. Because they're starting to eat themselves, and there are brave people on the on the left that seem to be starting to come out. I'm anxious to see what happens to Shellenberger and his career by the way that the story was first posted on published by Forbes, But it was on ly up for a few hours and Forbes pulled the story. So the media is still Doing what the media does, but this is very good news. We'll have more on that coming up at the top of the hour. Glenn back getting.

Michael Shellenberger scientist Forbes America Glenn Ted The Wall Street Journal Scient The New York Times The Washington Post
"journal scientific" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"And popularized in liberal fascism By Jonah Jonah Goldberg. If you're listening today is your day. By his Woodrow Wilson singled out, not say Theodore Roosevelt. Wow, because theater Roosevelt was pretty bad. I really don't like theatre Roosevelt either, but I don't know. Wilson had a certain genesis equal when it came to Ah, Hating black people. Anyway. Ah, A few of the folks use it as an excuse to beat up on Glenn Beck even trying to make him into a mouthpiece for Leo Strauss. No, really. Others get bogged down in the question of motive. Ziff Ziff motives relevant to the substance of the debate, particularly when all of the defenders are unwilling or unable to offer much if any substance in Wilson's defense. Even as the paper gradually woke up to Wilson's hateful views, conservatives have began given no credit for being ahead of the debate. That's fine. That's fine. Let's just remember. Let's just remember. Ah, that we were way ahead. I don't care if they say we were right. I just want I just want them to understand. That they are now, right? They are now on the right track. The same thing with global climate change stew. How big is this? We're going to get into it next hour. This His book by Ah ah, Michael Shellenberger. It's great. I'm about halfway through it. I actually had him on today on students. America. Yeah. Do you really? Yeah, he's he's you know, incredibly brave guy and the stuff that he goes through. I mean, there are multiple instances in this book Land where A claim that you've heard. We've all heard 1000 times. You know of environmentalists, you know, alarmist sort of claim. Is he talks about it? He then calls the scientist who made it and the scientists tells him on the record. They misquoted him in the in the article, and it was never true, and they never intended it to be true. Multiple instances of him actually confirming this stuff. It's pretty. It's pretty close. So you're doing climate change tonight? Yes. Does the climate apocalypse is tonight? The climate apocalypse. That is fantastic. I have to watch that one tonight. This is a guy who is stew just said incredibly brave, I think is one of the bravest people. In the world today because he was he was named the Time magazine Hero of the Environment. The Green Book Award winner. Um he is he often writes for The New York Times, The Washington Post. The Wall Street Journal Scientific American. His Ted talks on global warming viewed over five million times and what he's done is he's come out and said You know, they started coming after friends of mine and I said nothing and I really need to I mean, this guy is really brave. He is completely dismantling. Thie the apocalyptic view of global warming. And the things he has to say we'll share them next hour and stool is gonna have him on the show tonight. But this guy is It's starting to come undone. All of these things are starting to come undone. And all we have to do is hold on long enough. Because they're starting to eat themselves, and there are brave people on the on the left that seem to be starting to come out. I'm anxious to see what happens to Shellenberger and his career by the way that the story was first posted Ah and published by Forbes. But it was only up for a few hours and Forbes pulled the story. So the media is still Doing what the media does. But this is very good news. We'll have more on that coming up at the top of the hour. Oh, yeah. All right, simply safe. The creeper slowly. Flies from one room to the next in the House..

Woodrow Wilson Michael Shellenberger Jonah Jonah Goldberg Theodore Roosevelt scientist Ziff Ziff Glenn Beck Forbes Leo Strauss America Ted The New York Times The Wall Street Journal Scient The Washington Post
Horses Recognize Pics of Their Keepers

60-Second Science

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Horses Recognize Pics of Their Keepers

"Recognize our friends faces. And we're not alone. Many social animals can identify individuals of their own species by their facial features. That's important because they need to be able to adjust their behaviour. Depending on who they encounter and research has shown that some species of monkeys birds and domesticated animals can even distinguish among different faces by looking at photographs alone. Scientists have also wondered whether domesticated animals that have coexisted with people for thousands of years can recognize different human faces for example. We've shared more than five thousand years of our history with horses. Plus they can live up to thirty years and may need to retain a great deal of information about this throughout their lifetimes. Foll just lay. Alon said of the French National Research Institute for Agriculture Food and Environment didn't experiment to find out how well horses can recognize individual people in photographs. She and her team. I taught the horses how to choose between two side by side images by touching their noses to a computer screen. The horses were then shown photos of their current keeper alongside faces of Unfamiliar Humans. They had never seen photos of any of the people before the horses correctly identified their current keeper and ignored the Stranger's face about seventy five percent of the time significantly. Better than chance. What's more the horses? Also preferentially picked photos of their previous keeper a person they hadn't seen in six months in fact even though the horses didn't get it right every single time at least as accurate and picking out the previous keeper as they were at their current one. The findings are in the Journal. Scientific reports the results suggest that not only can horses differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar human faces. They intuitively understand. That photographs are two dimensional. Representations of real life without any other cues such as odor sound. And they're even better at this than our oldest animal companion the domestic dog. In addition horses seem to have a robust locked her memory for human faces consistent with their long lifespan and history of domestication in experiments the researchers would like to test whether looking at photos of people that they have had bad experiences with in the past. Mike Class Horses to act anxious. Or even avoidance so maybe think twice before doing anything in a stable that might give a horse along

Alon French National Research Insti Mike Class Foll
How Herbivore Herds Might Help Permafrost

60-Second Science

02:45 min | 1 year ago

How Herbivore Herds Might Help Permafrost

"Arctic. Permafrost is melting and fast. That's bad news because these frozen soil store billions of tons of carbon. Just waiting to be unleashed. So is there a way to save the permafrost? One team of researchers thinks that may have found a possible solution. Vague animals urban offers animals. That you only plants back in nineteen ninety. Six researchers started an experiment called Pleistocene Park they fenced in about eight square miles of land in northeast Siberia and then they introduce different types of herb avars reindeer horses Moose Bison Sheep and other large critters since then scientists have studied these animals effects on the ecosystem. One outcome is that these large are before help. Keep the ground very cold cooler than it would otherwise be. The snow in winter is important for temperature because it doesn't insulating layer so the air in winter in the highlight juice much cooler than the saw Philip pirata vegetation ecologist at the University of Hamburg. So the idea of this experiment was to introduce a large herbivores and to a quantify the effects on temperature to see if they can actually protect permafrost soils against thawing and this works because The animals trampling to less insulation of soil against the cold air temperatures and results in a cooling effect freezing era of reaches the soil more easily. Priroda and his colleagues realize the significance of this effect so they pulled data from place to seem park as well. As from Sweden. To model what effect urban force could have on permafrost if they lived in large numbers in the the researchers found that even in a worst case scenario some four degrees Celsius global warming. These hobie voice in the model reduced substantially by a one point seven degrees on the average and this leads to a preservation of around eighty percent of the original. Today's permafrost area and with our hobby for effect in the model. So the control run. We found that only fifty percent of the permafrost area would remain by the year. Two hundred hundred so we can say that the effect of the heavy was in the model of lead to a substantial addition of Paraphra so the studies in the journal Scientific Reports. It may seem strange to have herds of horses in cold adapted sheep grazing the Arctic Tundra. But then again. We're living in strange times.

Arctic Tundra Pleistocene Park University Of Hamburg Philip Pirata Scientific Reports Sweden Paraphra Siberia Priroda
Were Turtles Once the Size of Cars?

BrainStuff

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Were Turtles Once the Size of Cars?

"Express. Look them to brainstorm a production of iheartmedia. Hey Rain Stuff. Lauren BOCOM here. Some of our favorite animals used to be bigger. The giant beaver of the Pleistocene was the size of a black bear. And the titanic. Boa was a snake longer than school bus and as big around as a tractor tire. There were hippo sized wombats humongous C- Scorpions and birds of prey. Size of small jets. We still have some giants today like the Blue Whale. The organism currently living on earth is a fungus that stretches some two point four miles. That's three point. Eight kilometers underground in Oregon but newby research published in February of Twenty Twenty in the Journal. Scientific advances beef up our picture. A stupendous geographic as a giant freshwater turtle the size of four door sedan which lived in the coastal wetlands of South America. Between five and ten million years ago before the Amazon River was formed. The study found that the turtle was one hundred times heavier and its closest modern relative and had the largest campus. Or Shell of any turtle ever known this whopping two thousand five hundred pound. Goliath. That's one thousand. One hundred and fifty kilos was also ready for battle. Some campuses were tricked out with front facing horns sitting on both sides of their head. Something scientists haven't seen before in prehistoric Turtles Marcello Sanchez director of the Paleontological Institute and Museum at the University of Zurich said in a press. Release the two Shell. Types indicate that two sexes of stupendous existed males with horns shells and females with hoernlund shells. Their shells were also covered in big scars and puncture marks suggesting a few things about dependence. These big brutes were fighters the males and females did look different and the males might have even fought each other for access to the females. The horns also have come in handy in fighting off another unspeakably hefty freshwater. Animal the purse. Soroush which was came in a group of reptiles related to alligators. That weighed nine. Point three tons and required ninety pounds or forty kilos of food a day just to get by all. Those dependence geographic was first described in the mid nineteen seventies. The current study has revised what we know about the size and abby distribution and ecology of this turtle beast because the vast wetlands of prehistoric Venezuela and Colombia could support such a heavy duty. Team of reptiles stupendous and her source. Probably duked it out until their ecosystem could no longer

Twenty Twenty Lauren Bocom BOA Amazon River South America Paleontological Institute And Blue Whale Oregon Marcello Sanchez University Of Zurich Newby Research Soroush Venezuela Director Colombia
Thoroughbred Horses Are Increasingly Inbred

60-Second Science

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Thoroughbred Horses Are Increasingly Inbred

"Every thoroughbred horse alive today is descended from three stallions and a larger selection of mayors in Seventeenth Eighteenth Century England. Since then no horses outside this lineage have been permitted to enter the bloodline. That's a problem. We analyzed genetic diversity at thousands of genetic markers across the entire genome in more than ten thousand thoroughbred horses from all of the major reading regions of the world. This is the largest set of horses. That's been examined in this way to date Emily Hill Professor at University College. Dublin and chief scientist with an ownership stake at an coin. Science Company called plus vital and what we found was that there has been a highly significant increase in inbreeding in the population over the last forty five years and probably the greatest increase in inbreeding is seen in the last ten or fifteen years. Thoroughbred horse production is tightly controlled. Artificial insemination is not permitted which means that breeding stallions get moved around a lot for meet ups with females. These so called shuttle stallions can meet with hundreds of mayors per mating season and there are two mating seasons one in the northern hemisphere and the other in the southern in our study ninety seven percent of the horses traced back to a single horse cold northern dancer arguably the most successful stallion the twentieth century and his descendants have been the dominant. Sar LINES IN AUSTRALIA AND EUROPE. For the last twenty five years. Northern Dancer won the Kentucky Derby in nineteen sixty four breeding pairs are chosen for their athletic prowess and competitive behavior leading to strong selection for genes related to muscle performance in behavior traits at all have come together in the optimal fashion to produce an elite athlete but without genetic diversity you can get health and behavior issues related to inbreeding. Thoroughbred is unusual in this most managed animal and even plant production systems have genetic monitoring in place. The thoroughbred has no genetic selection or population management. That is addressed of an industry wide level the steady by hill and her colleagues in the journal scientific reports hills genetic testing system is available through her company with the DNA of America and the DNA STALLION. We can make in silicone predictions about the likely level of inbreeding in the hypothetical. Full measure arise from that meeting

Seventeenth Eighteenth Century DNA Dublin Science Company Kentucky Derby University College Professor Scientist Europe Australia America
"journal scientific" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on NPR News Now

"A new study finds that fires in the Amazon rainforest are speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes Mountains mountains that provide water to millions of people. NPR's Richard Harris reports scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers. Now our research team has identified another threat to these important water. Sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles net smoke sometimes settle settled on mountain glaciers. Those dark particles capture energy from the sun. Like a patch of blacktop that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo Glacier these black particles along with dust increased meltwater runoff runoff during the peak fire season the study is published in the Journal scientific

Judiciary Committee NPR Amazon Washington Susan Davis US Ramirez Palma Leonardo DiCaprio Capra House intelligence committee Richard Harris Brazil Adam Schiff Trump Jerry Nadler White House New Orleans Nora Raum
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"A new study finds that fires in the Amazon rainforest are speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes Mountains mountains that provide water to millions of people. NPR's Richard Harris reports scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers. Now our research team has identified another threat to these important water. Sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles net smoke sometimes settle settled on mountain glaciers. Those dark particles capture energy from the sun. Like a patch of blacktop that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo Glacier these black particles along with dust increased meltwater runoff runoff during the peak fire season the study is published in the Journal scientific

Amazon Andes Mountains Richard Harris NPR Zongo Glacier Bolivia Brazil Journal Scientific France
Subtle Ancient Footprints Come To Light

60-Second Science

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Subtle Ancient Footprints Come To Light

"Fossil footprints helped. Tell us how ancient people lived but such physical impressions are hard to find your get all of these footprints from different species in the same time period interacting. And you can't see see them all the time and some of them. You never see with the eye that is but we can still detect them with the geophysical sensors Cornell University archaeologist allergist Thomas Urban. He colleagues used ground penetrating radar. GP are to detect invisible traces of footsteps in White Sands National Monument in New Mexico their GP device goes back and forth over an area in a grid pattern which ultimately creates two D radar. Graham the technique detects subtle subtle differences in ground density. Speaking about one set of otherwise imperceptible animal's footprints. He says these were caused by compression of sediment beneath the animals track in the day relate to the weight and momentum of the animal twelve thousand years ago the White Sands area was a large muddy flat which was covered Ford with footprints from various species. Urban is excited about the story. So many footsteps suggest for example the researchers found no evidence of shoes or sandals handles they did find human animal tracks crossing each other which suggests the prints were left during a hunt. The findings were reported in the Journal scientific reports. It's this sort of unique setting has recorded all of the daily movements of people and footprints. They're actually more than more than we even the because there are always some that aren't visible these techniques could be applied to older sites all around the world perhaps even to find dinosaur tracks that have been sitting quietly lightly waiting at long last to be found

Thomas Urban White Sands National Monument White Sands Cornell University Journal Scientific Reports New Mexico Graham Ford Twelve Thousand Years
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"Fires in the Amazon rain forest to speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes mountains according to a new study NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports the tropical glaciers like those in the Andes provide water for millions of people scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers now a research team is identified another threat to these important water sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles in that smoke sometimes settle on mountain glaciers those dark particles capture energy from the sun like a patch of black top that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo glacier these black particles along with dust increased melt water run off during the peak fire season the studies published in the journal scientific

Richard Harris Andes Amazon Brazil France Bolivia NPR Zongo Glacier
Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

60-Second Science

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

"Is scientific American sixty second science. I'm Suzanne barred some fifty six hundred years ago. People in the Egyptian city of here canopus did something. That's still a very popular activity today. They brewed and drank beer. We know this because archeologists examining the area near the ruins of a cemetery for the elite discovered a structure containing five ceramic. That's that would have been heated from below residues in the vats confirmed that they had once made beer and made that if these five vests were operated the same meantime three hundred twenty five liters produced which is equal to six hundred fifty cans of Budweiser Texas Tech University. Microbiologist Momento al-Massari. He says this ancient beer would've tasted very different from what are modern. Pellets are used to the Egyptian beer makers did use malted wheat and barley in the brewing in process but no one had mastered carbonation yet so the resulting grew was a flat. UNFILTERED malt beverage with a low alcohol content Elmasri colleagues recently sampled thick dark deposits from the herrick novelist fats. The chemical analysis confirmed that they were indeed the product of beer making being and not some other fermented food the tests also revealed other ingredients ancient Egyptians putting their beer the researchers found a high concentration of the amino acid pro lean which is abundant in dates and some other fruits. This result suggests that this could have been used or incorporated in the beer for flavor and maybe to add some sweet notes hops which act as both a flavoring and preservative weren't added to beer until medieval times. They use it hawks who was unknown to they need conditions conditions and we think that the US as it to preserve their beer the residues were indeed high in phosphorous acid a product of barley grains added during the fermentation process process. Phosphoric acid is often used today to prolong the shelf. Life of alcoholic beverages phosphoric acid via barley would have made it possible to mass-produce ask produce beer store it for extended periods and even transport it all consistent with the important role beer played in ancient Egyptian society it not only provided hydration and nutrition but was also part of religious rituals among the elite. The study is in the Journal scientific reports studying ancient beer. It has allowed Elmasri to reflect on the intersection of science and history. I teach a microbiology lab. We grew beer in the lab and the students see the whole permutation mediation process and thinking how engines were able to do a similar thing thousands of years ago. It's a very

Momento Al-Massari Elmasri Budweiser Texas Tech Universit Suzanne United States Journal Scientific Three Hundred Twenty Five Lite Fifty Six Hundred Years Sixty Second
Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 2 years ago

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata the Arctic because warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet meaning more and more sea ice is melting every year concerning the rapid loss of see I sat there for a lot of reasons. Tracy Z Goldstein. A researcher and conservationist at UC Davis she says one of those reasons is animals like ice seals. Need the ice to haul out on and give birth and other reason. As the Arctic warms the fish the seals eat maybe moving to deeper and colder waters so the seals have to travel further to hunt them for the combination of all of that over time is probably going to affect their health and their body condition and that will make them not just underweight but also more susceptible to diseases diseases may also be encroaching the upon Arctic marine mammals because spotting a trend here Arctic sea ice is melting coli unintended consequence of all of that but yes You know when they I used to be an ice bridge certain populations would remain separate from each other and so they couldn't come in contact and give each other they bacteria viruses etc but once those channels thought it to open animals were able to move further and came into contact with new species that they had not come in. Contact with in the Post Goldstein. In her colleagues documented the spread of a disease called called fo seen distemper virus from two thousand one through two thousand sixteen. It's related to the measles and causes skin lesions coughing pneumonia seizures and sometimes death in in marine mammals Goldstein's team scanned historical and Contemporary Marine Mammal blood samples for antibodies against the virus. They also hunted for evidence of live infections nasal swabs taken of mammals and they found that flare ups of the virus were linked to years with extreme losses. NCI's suggesting that open waters. Aided the spread of the pathogen perhaps along the melted coastline north of Siberia. Their analysis is in the journal scientific reports mammals that depend on ice to survive may already be slated for extinction and as the Arctic melts. Goldstein says in more frequent epidemics like this viral one could hastened the blow but humans may also be affected up in the Arctic. People subsist subsist on these species so they really rely on these animals for their livelihood and wellbeing and as those animals disappear as their habitat disappears. That's is also going to heavily affect humans in that area so overall I think overall health of the environment and the animals and the people up in the Arctic over time it's just going to continue to deteriorate

Tracy Z Goldstein Arctic Researcher Christopher Dodd Underweight Uc Davis NCI Sixty Seconds
Familiar Tunes Rapidly Jog the Brain

60-Second Science

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Familiar Tunes Rapidly Jog the Brain

"Remember scrolling through the radio. Dial hoping at tune you liked would pop out of the static. You never had to listen to long to know you'd landed on. A hit has a very strong remarkably strong. Hold on us so that we it's enough to be exposed to very brief snippet of familiar song wrong for us to be able to recognize it Maria. An auditory cognitive neuroscientist University College London chait entertain recently studied. Just how quick that reflects lex. Is they started by asking ten volunteers to name a feel-good familiar song like this. Then the researchers searchers handpicked his second tune it sounded similar but was unfamiliar to the volunteer. They chop to both songs into tiny ebbets. Each less than a second long and then randomly interspersed them into a six and a half minute long track of song snippets as the snippets played. The scientists measured the volunteers brain activity the network of one hundred twenty eight electrodes and they monitored changes in pupil diameter to assign of arousal muscle and the researchers found that the listeners pupils dilated more rapidly when they heard familiar versus unfamiliar samples with just a tenth to a third of a second familiar Melia tunes also triggered a two step pattern of brain activation almost identical to that seen in other memory studies. Where the brain I recognizes something as familiar and then retrieves more detailed information about it? That pattern was absent for unfamiliar songs and for the Control Group. The results are in the Journal. Scientific reports this the study does have limitations. It used a small number of songs. It was hard to mask. The purpose of the study from the participants and the control group ended up being primarily international students from Asia since they had to be unfamiliar with every single song so their native languages and music backgrounds were different from the experimental group which was primarily students from a European background. Still for clinicians. Who WanNA use music as a therapeutic tool for patients with dementia for example this study might provide a few clues varies a a lot of interest in trying to develop So to speak objective measures of music enjoyment of music familiarity and This sort of paradigm might be usable in the sort of context because it doesn't require the participants to indicate anything they just listened. Passively clinician simply have to observe the neural fingerprints of hearing that same old song.

Control Group University College London Melia Maria Asia
Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

"Komo Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America join me as I talked to Ken Burns about the moments that inspired his work as a documentary dementri filmmaker. You can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts. This is scientific civic. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Marine Heatwave in two thousand sixteen killed off a full third of Australia's Great Barrier Reef the largest coral reef system in the world and it's terrible watching your favorite ecosystems slowly. Di Carli can't go is a marine biologist at the University of Southern California Nia who's studied that coral bleaching event bleaching occurs when the waters around corals become too cold or too salty or too hot but mostly too hot and then the symbiotic algae that live inside corals which are photosynthetic food factories abandoned the coral which causes them to die because they're losing their nutritional source so they're essentially starving to death but coral can house multiple species of algae some more heat tolerant than others so sometimes in the face of stress the heartier algae proliferate delivery and that change offsets the damage caused by the exodus of the more sensitive species have processes called shuffling chemical in her colleagues studied shuffling in corals roles affected by the two thousand sixteen bleaching bet on the Great Barrier Reef and they found that adult corals can actually pass those reshuffled. Al Go residents along to their offspring in in their eggs pointing to a possible way. Successive generations of coral could adapt to warmer waters. If your mom can kind of crime you for the environment that you might be experiencing presumably would improve your fitness. The details are in the journal scientific reports so can this help corals beat back bleaching the pace of climate change and the frequency and intensity of the stress events is such that I don't think this is enough in face of so many threats. Even this trick may fail to provide relief for the reef. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Great Barrier Reef Christopher Dodd Alicia Burke Ken Burns Christopher Indonesia Di Carli Bank Of America University Of Southern Califor Australia Sixty Seconds
Early Butchers Used Small Stone Scalpels

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 2 years ago

Early Butchers Used Small Stone Scalpels

"Analyzing the flashiest classiest objects recovered at ancient sites but now they're giving a second look at the waist and finding that it to tells tales about a culture for example eight thousand year old poop oop recently revealed parasitic infections among people who lived in settlements versus their hunter gatherer counterparts and now archaeologists have examined another overlooked artifact small stone flakes typically thought to be byproducts from the production of tools like hand axes and cleavers it was not easy to convince us at the community music venue to study these items because they were regarded as just as whites run by an archaeologist at Tel Aviv University his team studied two hundred eighty three stone flakes flakes found in Israel at a site inhabited by our homo erectus relatives half a million years ago they found evidence of use like small fractures along the edges of the inch long on flakes but they also discovered bits of bone and flesh still sticking to the tiny blades flesh. That could have come from elephants. The big mammals were much more widespread back back then and were a prominent source of protein for early humans in that area the team then tested replicas of the flakes to butcher wild boars and deer and sheep and they concluded that such tools would have been really useful to ancient hunters for skinning hides filleting meat and scraping every bit of nutrition out of an animal details and photos of the small scalpels apples are in the journal scientific reports. Barkai also says the tiny flakes suggests these people were more sophisticated than they get credit for was known existent instant at the time so they had to everything by themselves and the fact that they survived and thrived for hundreds of thousands of years tells me that they were highly capable highly intelligent. I'm sure that there were no less intelligent than any smells there. We wouldn't be here.

Tel Aviv University Barkai Israel Two Hundred Eighty Three Stone Eight Thousand Year Million Years
New species of dinosaur discovered in Japan

Watchdog on Wallstreet

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

New species of dinosaur discovered in Japan

"Scientist in Japan say they've discovered a new species of dinosaur Akito university researchers wrote in the journal scientific reports they can be a source japonicus was active during the Cretaceous period over sixty five million years ago the plant eating giant probably weighed between four and a half and six tons depending on whether it walked on two or four legs and makes this the largest dinosaur ever found in

Scientist Japan Dinosaur Akito University Cretaceous Sixty Five Million Years Six Tons
Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 2 years ago

Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

"Arrays raise with desert's but the extreme heat can curb solar panels potential. It's like your laptop or your home computer. If it over heats it slows down so there's this tradeoff between having a lot a lot of fun like in a desert but if it gets too hot the efficiency of those panels drops oregon state university ecological logical engineer chad higgins his team is interested in where photovoltaic panels should be located in order to maximize energy production in addition addition to moderate temperatures in sunlight they found the conditions for the most efficiency include low relative humidity and gentle wins that enhanced transfer of heat from the panels by analyzing satellite data for these four factors they created a map of potential solar panel productivity for different land types around the globe coming out on top agricultural crop lands and you think about it for a minute and it kind of makes sense what is agriculture but taking the funds raves and and converting it into a form of energy that we consume so there's this sweet spot where you get a lotta sun but it's a temperate temperature and that is where you get the maximum productivity and that's also where plants thrive other factors also favor croplands solar agricultural tre lands tend to be closer to population centers where there's a market for electric rather than way off in the desert their cultural lands tend. That'd be flat. They tend to be already disturbed so you don't have as many ecological conservation worries higgins team thinks that agriculture in solar can complement each other paving the way to a more sustainable energy future the researchers estimate that installing photovoltaic panels on just one percent of croplands worldwide would be enough to meet all of humanity's global electricity needs the study is in the journal scientific reports higgins hopes hopes the research will inspire collaborations between solar companies and farmers to feed the world and power it to a prospect that should brighten anyone's day. Thanks for

Chad Higgins Oregon State University Engineer One Percent
London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

60-Second Science

01:34 min | 2 years ago

London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you're a Germaphobe navigating the city there are certain certain mandatory rules of engagement use a paper towel to shield your hand as you touch the bathroom door handle lift toilet seat covers with your shoe touch buttons at A._T._M.'s and crosswalks awesome walks in elevators with a knuckle. The back of your hand never a fingertip. I know this because I am that person and a new study in the journal scientific reports somewhat justifies is my behavior because when researchers in London sampled all those kinds of surfaces in public shopping centers and train stations and common areas in hospitals what they found was a whole a lot of antibiotic resistant bacteria lurking there scientists swab sites all over London and ended up with six hundred samples of staphylococcus bacteria of those nearly half were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics like penicillin and Erythromycin and the hospital samples had significantly more drug doug resistant microbes which makes sense because hospitals are a place where they use a lot of antibiotics but if there is a silver lining here it might be how few staph bacteria were multi-drug-resistant drug-resistant in public places a mere forty seven percent because a few years back one in the same scientists swabbed London hotel rooms in found that eighty six percent percent of the staph bacteria. There were multi-drug-resistant which may not help you sleep easy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Staph London Germaphobe Penicillin Erythromycin A._T._M. Sixty Seconds Forty Seven Percent Eighty Six Percent
Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

60-Second Science

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

"Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jim David. Almost any cat owner will testify to the felines apparent indifference to humans when we call their names. But according to a recent study cats do recognize their names, or at least that we are indeed addressing them. It's just that they still may not respond techs associate talents of the names with summary laws or punishments. Suco syto a behavioral scientist and so fear university in Tokyo site. Oh, previously demonstrated that cats recognized their owners voices in the new work. She and colleagues investigated the reactions of cats to hearing human say their names, the study included, seventy eight cats from Japanese households and from a cat cafe a business where patrons can interact with felines Sitel. And her colleagues had owners say four words that sounded similar to their cats names until the animals bitch elated to those words and stopped responding next. The owner said the felines actual names. And indeed the cats had more pronounced responses moving their ears heads tails or meowing than they did two similar words or two other cats names. This study is in the journal scientific reports. The researchers also had people unfamiliar to the cat speak the names, although the felines responses were less prominent than when their owners called them. They still appeared to recognize the words when spoken by strangers. But does that mean cats know they're being called by name, very smell evidence? That cats have the ability to recognize themselves like us, so theoretical nation above van names is different from ours. But side Toews says she thinks we might be able to teach cats to recognize other words in addition to their names, our colleagues investigating whether cats Reaganite of cohabiting kids names, could this knowledge mean that humans could eventually train cats to respond to voice commands the way dogs do her. Her taps. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty second science. I'm jim.

Jim David Toews Behavioral Scientist Tokyo Sixty Seconds Sixty Second
"journal scientific" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Studies have shown it can help improve symptoms to tell us more which on by professor Barbara a hockey. And hi, thanks for joining us. Thank you. Can you tell us a bit more about a CD? Yes. So although some people sort of trivial is that because you know, they think oh handwashing that's not too bad. I mean, the point is that some of these people so severe in terms of their symptoms of contamination fears that they actually pour bleach on the hands or even sometimes they can't even leave the house because they're so concerned that touching anything in a public place might contaminate them in some way. So it's a very serious illness. So what kind of therapy? He's do exist in the moment. Well, at the moment, the most common one is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy, and it's called exposure and response prevention, so it's very special form. And what happens is maybe a psychologist or somebody helps them go through the treatment where when they have contamination fears. They have to say touch toilet seat or maybe even put their hands down a toilet. And then that prevented from washing their hands. So initially they get very anxious as you might expect. But slowly, they habituate in the exposure to this make some essentially become unafraid in and they lose the contamination fear, but many patients don't wanna go through this treatment. Because it so makes them so worried and anxious, and this is what inspired you why did you set out to design this up? Yes. So we set out to design the app because the two treatments. There are the cognitive behavioral therapy or the drugs, which the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors us, our is like Prozac. Only about sixty percent of patients respond to that. So this about forty percents that get no relief from the treatments. So what we've done as we've got these apps. One is a an app where you see yourself, washing your hands and the other app is where you see yourself touching these sort of disgusting objects, which obviously a related to catalyse fears, and what we've found is people. Do this four times a day for week? They actually get much better in terms of their symptoms as symptoms of greatly reduced and also we find that they become more cognitively flexible because basically cognitive rigidity is associated with carrying out these rituals habits and so forth. And what do you mean when you say coke native flexibility, well, sort of being very adaptive to things and sort of being able to switch to think of new things and not get stuck in these ritualistic behaviors. Right. And so you mentioned a video on the app of them, washing the Hanser could you talk me through how someone using the app when that use it, and how is it? Yeah. So they. They asked to use it for times a day in there, and that sort of keyed when to use it they have a window of opportunity to use it. And so they touch whether they're feeling well and how they're feeling and they rate their anxiety levels at that point. And then they watched the app and we also put circles on the app, which they have to recognize count. So that we're sure that they're actually looking at the app and they've been very accurate about that. So we know that they watched the app when it comes on. And then afterwards they rate again how anxious they are. And we've had really good reports back. Some of the people say I didn't use to be able to go on the bus didn't want to touch anything in sit on seats. People have been sitting on. But now, I find I can just look at my app and see myself, washing my hands, and I feel much better and other people who had the other one that's more can to a CB T type therapy say that are used to not be able to wash counter take my bins out. But now, I find that. I don't really have a problem with that. And so. They suppose seem to reduce symptoms by about twenty one percent. Which is great, right? So whereas coke native behavioral therapy company. Carry that around with you in your pocket, but with an op his death for when you need it. Yes. And it's really personalized medicine because it's their own hands that they're watching wash or touch these objects. So a paper was recently published in the journal scientific reports, and it's available to download open access, and when might people be able to download the app, we have one more experiment that we'd like to conduct just.

professor Barbara hockey Hanser twenty one percent sixty percent
"journal scientific" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Is extraordinarily difficult for me to switch between these radically different modes of thought from journal scientific writing to popular science communication. It's like being what's multiple personality disorder, multiple personality disorder. Right. It's like I go from this like, hyper detailed review or comments are like at the level of granularity that would make your head exploded they make my head explode. And then switching to like where it's like, oh, I don't need that level of detail. You know, and like there is no picky reviewer. I mean, there are certainly picky critics, but. Yeah. But you know, what I mean? So it's really hard. Oh, I could totally understand that. And this is the advantage of not having those well-developed journal writing skills, actually, that's a good point. Yeah. Maybe a trade off. I don't run that conflict because there's nothing to conflict with. Yeah. You're more harmonious integrated human. I am I am actually climbing. I'm letter ladder to have peaked experience. It's true. Okay. Yeah. So maybe if I want to get more into science writing out suck more in my journal writing. Stop doing. Well, I enjoy it too though. So it's tough when you enjoy multiple things that are so different from join that's a whole other topic of conversation. Let's talk about selling. Can we move into that drives me wrote this really fascinating book, which really lay down a basic truth about humanity is that pretty much even if superficial different permits everything in the world today is is in some form of selling and people's jobs. Shahryar depends on how well you can move on move some. So can you talk a little bit more about this, fundamentally, what do you think the fundamental if you had to think in terms like, you know, other animals, it's not like monkeys or selling other monkeys? But they are doing something resembling. What destroying is? That's interesting. I thought about it much cross species. It could be something that makes humans. I mean what I never terms our brains allow us to do things that other species can't do. And one of the biggest ones is collaborate even though other primates obviously can collaborate but collaborate, but also will also. Are able to do is collaborate across great distances and that requires at least some capacity to persuade Wu other people to join your cause. So my hunch is at their probably wasn't ever Lucien area advantage to people who were adept at persuasion and influence. It'd be surprising. If it didn't if there wasn't because the people weren't adept at that probably didn't get others to go along with them and protect them. And do all this things is an interesting question about other species. I haven't really thought much about it. It's wonder whether like the collaborative activity in other species is we can consider it selling. I haven't thought about that. Probably isn't in. It probably isn't some ways. I'm there's wooing obviously species for reproduction. But I don't know. I just don't know enough about one book that I haven't finished back here somewhere. It's you've million books behind you by FRANZ of all who's had emerged from the tala gist. Scott respond enough to know, how smart animals are. And it makes me curious about that. I don't know a lot about animal thinking, well, that's a really good point that he made. And I surely don't have the answer. But just in thinking about it seems like it's more linked to the Machiavellian system. We see in monkeys which is quite developed. You know, it's funny because you use the word cooperative. You know, sometimes that's anti-theft like do you distinguish between like dark triad selling and cooperative like non zero-some selling? Yeah. No. I know I see where you're going. I mean, one of the arguments of the so I would say that dark triad selling is a form of manipulation great. That's right. And whereas I think in one argument to the book is at that kind of selling that that low road kind of selling is becoming tougher today because of information parody, but is like taking the low road is easy in a world where sellers have huge amounts. More information and buyers buyers don't have any choices where buyers don't have a way to talk back today. Not fully. But today buyers have a lot more information a lot more choices in a lot more ways to Allama west talk back. So you know, what you're calling the dark triad selling, you know, the sort of mock you..

Allama west Wu FRANZ Scott
"journal scientific" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on Probably Science

"Blister beetles are the same species are able to tweak their chemical cocktails to target different types of bees in different environments. That means the Beatles literally smell different Californian than they do an Oregon. This extreme divergence had led researchers, suspect the Beatles could be on their way to becoming different species. I dunno mimic, but for LA Glendale, they all smell like axe body spray. I'm not seeing what makes these like the well. That's what they don't be a different different still parasites. Do. Cool shit. Those aren't dummy parasites. Those are just like gang rapist Paris. That's all rain. They trick the man and they're like, yeah, get a woman. Like what the hell is happening here. This article compares them to the little kids in trenchcoat. Stacked on each other. Well, they do that thing in the sands of them heavy desert and they crawl up at least eleven inches on their grass stocks, but it wasn't Oregon go up four inches. So yeah, they're, they're becoming different. And they're saying one of the reasons is the Mohave the sand is hot, so they dislike hot sand and they try to get farther see parasites. They're just like us. So that's cool. Thank you, Michael Marsh. For setting that in what we're talking about animals and love. Yeah, back to cap penises. Are you never left. When a man is tied of cap penises, he's titled life. I'm putting this story the top of the show. Andy giant pandas can tell mate from the cools. Scientists have investigated the coals of giant pandas and is not good news randomly seeking date. Panthers can identify each other from the sheep light bleeds at a distance of up to twenty meters. That's pretty close. I'm impressed. They can only decipher the sex of a potential mate if they are less than ten be Zohreh. That's I can do that. Yeah, unimpressed. And that's basically just the length of this rule bit more than this room. Is it you've never experienced when you're like lady's yelling at you for like twenty minutes away, hey, and get closer. I'm so bad, a sexy real pandas in this story, so they can only decipher the sex potential in in contrast, animals living on the open savannah, such as African elephants could communicate over distances of one kilometer. Research is recorded the fleets of giant pandas that investigates how far the sounds traveled in dense bamboo thickets. They found the typical bamboo forest habitats within it. The iconic animals can recognize each other's sex and identity, but opening over short distances after finding 's, say Benjamin Shelton of San Diego zoo institute for conservation research indicate that most acoustic communication doesn't detailed place over very short distances. Ten to twenty meters wants mates to be located. That findings published in the journal scientific reports could help shed new light on the breeding habits of giant pandas. The work could help conservationists estimate population levels by recording, vocal activity majoring the breathing's season mating and breeding could be tricky if as for the giant panda, the iconic animals live mainly solitary knife and counts as a row outside of the brief mating season sent can give away information such as sex size identity and homeowner state. But pandas also have a vocal repertoire that is particularly important during the breeding season. And the giant Henry is listed as to extension with. With not even two thousand individuals fill to remain in the wild oughta fish insemination is using captivity with animals are often reluctant debris. Here's a theory because these guys are dying out and they have very limited ability to hear their prospective mates via vocals. -ation. Right. Are humans only successful because we're so good at cat calling just theories because we're loud and annoying. Yes, yeah, thousand percent, yes. But maybe this is why we've all the call because it works through that they wouldn't be going extinct. Also, maybe the pan is wanna go extinct. Yeah, maybe that's it's not a problem. They're just like, I don't wanna fuck anymore. I'm super over this. Yeah, they're depressed fans and they wanna die. They just wanted to kill their whole species because what are they get like as a human or other animals like horses get TV shows and dogs. But when pan is are on TV at their only on TV because they're in Panajachel, do you know? So it's like, what is the point of living? I'll just sit Bamba how come no panda base sitcom yet..

Panthers Oregon Beatles LA Glendale Panajachel Michael Marsh Paris Bamba Andy Benjamin Shelton San Diego zoo institute Henry twenty meters thousand percent twenty minutes eleven inches one kilometer four inches
"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:57 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"In what's being the most dangerous man space flight. Since the Columbia space shuttle disaster, the Soyuz spacecraft has suffered a mission aboard, just two minutes after launch from the back in cosmodrome in the central Asian Republic of Kazakhstan the spacecraft was carrying two expedition fifty eight crew members to the international space station. When they saw is if g rockets core stage suffered a sudden engine failure cool to the third stage has been disconnected. And in just a moment, the second umbilical tower will separate. Power onboard, and there's the second tower. Oxygen launch command has been issued seven, six. Four, three, two one. Engine that maximum liftoff Pindar is liftoff of the so use MS tin to the international space station carrying Nick Haig and Lexi of Chinon to the orbital complex. Nick hangs first time to watch to space sealed trindon's. Second hearing good first stage performance for the silliest delivering nine hundred thirty thousand pounds of thrust from its four boosters on single engine. I stage it's still use, measured sixty eight feet in length and twenty four feet in diameter, spurning liquid fuel for the first two minutes and six seconds of flight. Kamler. One thought the ever seen as well on board that you know. Well, thank you poppy everything proceeding as a intended for today's fly. Now just over a minute into it. Flossy of the Soyuz is about eleven hundred miles per hour. News. Well. And in well, copy everything looking good preceding nominally can't we have the escape tower for the us? Now jettisoned everything. Continuing nominally four strap on boosters of dementia, and they've completed their job, dropped away in announced toot of twenty eight statute miles Soyuz traveling about three thousand three hundred fifty miles an hour. He did. Seven. Of the. Separation. Enable power. Thirty seconds into the fight. So he's traveling about forty, seven hundred miles per now. We are in weightlessness accordance Ellison station. Bye. Keys whose have they eleven forty. Two seventeen is the time of the failures. One on a is eliminated copied shroud. Well, well, on worth we have. Always had, and the power is on coffee table. So what does recommendation. Personal. The deceleration. Through? Yes. You knew. Yes, little sour is one. Ballistic this, the man is son from central their puppies. You know, just point seven. We feeling rotation. The Gelo is Billy down for this. Win. Seventy two and building down there that there has been an issue with the booster, and we are standing by for information and we continue to get it from the Russian flight control team. But everything seems to be the crew. We had good come with them and they are okay team here in Michigan. Troll is working with their counterparts in Russian, getting more information on the issue with the booster that has changed as launch plan, getting more information which will provide as as soon as we have a little bit more and we can confirm now that the crew has started to go into the ballistic descent mode, they'll be going in a sharp landing today, and we're continuing to get more information from our counterparts at the rose cosmos space agencies to the peace to have happened as the full liquid fuelled strap on boosters. Nine by Russians is the first stage sip rated from the launch vehicles. Core second-stage is the Russians cool. It one minute and fifty eight seconds after liftoff. This boost the separation which takes place at an altitude of forty five kilometer. It is one hundred and fifty thousand fate involves a spectacular maneuver known as a curl of cross in which full boost boosted single Tena sleep. Flip outwards away from the coast stage only investigation suggested the debate, the foul to separate cleanly, either slamming into the core stage during the coral of cross maneuver and damaging the side of the fuselage or remaining passionately attached and possibly tearing up out of the fuselage

Gary Australian National University Japan United States Karen Queanbeyan Atta Australia professor Seattle Nikolay LA Missouri New Zealand Newton China rod Boswell Dan Killa
"journal scientific" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Well i gotta say i didn't think i was a big fan of fishy stuff but i was able to some of that salmon up stage boy howdy stuff thanks sure the recipe thinking going to have to give this fish for breakfast thing a second chance will as i said it is nutritious delicious and brain tastic lee sop ariffin yes speaking of which what exactly do you mean when you say that fish makes us smarter and better sleepers will that's what a growing body of scientific research suggests you're saying that scientists have researched this and concluded that fish makes us smarter in sleep that i know right i mean it sounds like a big wet fish kissed to the fish industry but it's a real conclusion recently published in the journal scientific reports so what did the study find women the a team of researchers from the university of pennsylvania including john hung liu jennifer pinto martin alexandra hanlin in adrian raine decided to put a long known theory about a mega threes to the test omega threes hang on a second guy roz zuhdi what exactly zuhdi omega three polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in foods like seeds grass fed beef shrimp and fish thanks you're the best skyros mega threes in my right yes that's right a mega threes would serve course invisible in generally tasteless to us humans are special acids found the oils of these foods and it's believed that omega threes are good for human health that's the theory that these researchers from the university of pennsylvania were trying to prove right right and for a long time scientists have found links between omega threes and human intelligence that maybe omega threes can help our brains grow and develop especially when we're young in so what did these researchers find this team from the university of pennsylvania was interested in learning more because a lot of the earlier studies done by other scientists.

alexandra hanlin adrian raine university of pennsylvania john jennifer pinto roz zuhdi
"journal scientific" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on Here & Now

"Say in science and in our case that's regeneration of a tissue to put that free generation dresser together you need the box of parts we're looking for the lists of ingredients that are important during regeneration and you also need the instruction manual that tells you what were to put the parts together in bloom in her team have been studying regeneration in an you'll like fish called the lamp ray the adults are very spooky looking i will say they have a sucker mouth that they will attach to the outside of fish and eat them from the outside in the lamp ray can regenerate its spine going from paralyzed to swimming again within months and bloom in her team just discovered the list of parts involved in that process they compared that list to humans and other mammalian genomes and found that we have many of the same parts that lampre is used to regenerate the findings were published in the online journal scientific reports and our particularly exciting because they open up the possibility that we might have the right ingredients to regenerate what we don't have yet is the instruction manual she explains it like this we're speaking the same language but we might not have put the words together in the right sentence to get the same meaning yet so that gives us hope that it's not something that we don't know how to do might be that we don't know how to get it done at the right time in the right place the next steps for her team will be to try and compare the list of molecular materials in the lampre to other animals that are also good at regenerating their spinal cords one scientists have put together the list of parts and the instruction manuals of enough of these regenerative animals they're hoping they'll be closer to figuring out how to start regenerative abilities in us to for here now i'm page pfleger here knows a production of npr in wb you are in association with the bbc world service i'm lisa mullins bureau doubt this.

pfleger npr lisa mullins bbc
"journal scientific" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm karen hopkins all in the united states there's a holiday that goes hand in hand with romance so much so that nine months later there's a spike in the number of babies born valentine's day wrong it seems that people in the us and other predominantly christian countries have been having some very merry christmas is indeed that's according to a study in the journal scientific reports scientists have long wondered why in western countries birth rates spike in september and early october revealing our qantas reduce phenomenon postulates theories of logical of tuition to the solar cycles luiz russia of indian university coled the study he notes that nine months before this baby boomlet is the winter solstice and when the day's grow shorter than the night grows long while human seem to turn to procreation for recreation however visser qantas was built scorn observations pretty much restricted to northern hemisphere countries and also culturally christian countries and some data suggested there might be something cultural going on so for instance in israel it was previously observed that the communities or associated with different religions have birth peaks and at different times of the year to try to separate the cultural from the biological russia teamed up with each one a gun solved saw of the gulbenkian institute of science in portugal together they come through data on a planetary level comparing countries in the northern and southern hemispheres and countries with predominantly different cultures in this case christian and muslim but they didn't look it when babies are born they look to see when during the year people around the world google the word sex you wanna saw what we fouled first visit holco searches for sex off whole vehicle proxy for sexual epa at sexual sexual interest in when revoked the close one hundred thirty countries have onto world what we saw with each country as a particular signature peaks and valleys interest in sexual content sauces with those patterns were most similar for countries the cheered a similar culture this means that if you leave in a culturally christian country whether you're leaving the northern hemisphere in the southern hemisphere you are more likely to have a new cuisine sexual appetites around christmas but if you live in a muslim country the are much more likely to conceive of on either healthier than at the at than at the.

united states israel russia karen hopkins valentine luiz russia gulbenkian institute of scienc portugal google nine months sixty seconds
"journal scientific" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Bush to the journal neurology found that a daily serving of leafy greens might help scientists from rush university and tufts university studied 960 people between fifty eight and ninety nine years old none had dementia at the start of the study which lasted ten years the volunteers completed tests of cognitive capacity in memory each year they also filled out detailed dietary questionnaires people who ate the most green leafy is a little more than a serving a day were significantly less likely to experience measurable cognitive decline than those who ate the least about one serving every ten days the researchers figure that greens eaters were giving themselves a boost equivalent to knocking about eleven years off their age this study as observational which means we can't dry any cause and effect conclusions but it does suggest that developing a taste for collard's kale spinach and other greens could be good for the brain another study published in the journal scientific reports suggest that kids who eat fish about once a week perform better on iq tests the investigators from the university of pennsylvania studied 541 chinese school children enrolled in fourth fifth and sixth grades food questionnaires sought information about fish intake the students were queried about how often they consume fish in a typical month sleep 'quality was also assessed by asking the parents to report on things like sleep onset delay sleep duration and daytime sleepiness intelligence determinations were performed using the chinese equivalent of the wexler intelligent scale for children the kits who ate fish at least once a week scored almost five points higher on their iq tests compared to the children who hardly ever ate fish frequent fish eaters also had better sleep quality this may help explain some of the brain benefits the authors.

Bush rush university university of pennsylvania daytime sleepiness wexler ninety nine years eleven years ten years ten days
"journal scientific" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"journal scientific" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Mrs scientific americans sixty seconds sites i'm christopher dodd yacht to all as houston begins recovery efforts from hurricane harvey and new storm threat hurricane erma is barreling west towards the caribbean and florida we have few defenses against hurricanes lashing rains and win in storm surge but nature does provide one wetlands acting in two ways to reduce the impacts of storms uh they reduce storm surge by acting as a as a wall or a barrier and uh they act as a sponge by soaking up the the water style the countdown guy rainfall michael back the coastal scientist at the nature conservancy and the university of california santa cruz he says as we've paved over swampy coastlines we've changed how storm water slow or for an analogy a little closer to home rain falls on your driveway is going to run straight out into the street rainfalls in your garden is going to soak into the ground and so when you've done that at the scale of whole watersheds there's no place for the water to go when it rains but some wetlands do remain back in his colleagues teamed up with the insurance industry and using the industry's risk assessment models asked how much more damage would hurricane sandy of delivered if all the eastern seaboards wetlands were god and they found that marshy coastlines save some six hundred twenty five million dollars indirect flood damages or about one percent of sandies total cost researchers also battered ocean counting new jersey with thousands of hypothetical storms using flood models and they found that wetlands cut flood damages thereby sixteen percent compared areas of the county were wetlands are gone the studies in the journal scientific reports next it's up to local governments in the insurance industry to take notice certainly we hope that we will continue to conserve wetlands in part for their intrinsic beauty and for the importance of nature but he says by putting a price tag on the economic benefit of wetlands it might change the conversation about conservation thanks for listening for scientists who american sixty seconds science i'm christopher anthony out.

houston hurricane harvey scientist nature conservancy insurance industry christopher dodd caribbean florida university of california christopher anthony sixty seconds six hundred twenty five millio sixteen percent one percent