35 Burst results for "Journal Of Nature"

Researchers recover 1-million-year-old mammoth DNA

All Things Considered

02:32 min | Last week

Researchers recover 1-million-year-old mammoth DNA

"You would think after being extinct for thousands of years, mammoths would have no more surprises. Well, the world's oldest DNA's samples say otherwise, to mammoth molars pulled from the permafrost in north eastern Siberia contained didna dating back to more than a million years ago. It's a big leap backwards in time that that's which was Luca Dillon is at the center for Paleo Genetics in Stockholm. And he says this mammoth DNI is twice as old as the previous record holder, which came from an ancient horse Now sequencing million year old knee like this was impossible. Just a few years ago samples that old were just too small to work with. Now researchers can see incredibly small samples, but it's challenging to put them together. Tom Vander Vault also works with the center for Paleo Genetics. Imagine if you're Edna is fragment that into literally millions of tiny pieces. It is a painstaking puzzle. Well, it's not only one parcel, it's actually multiple. Purcell's so imagine. You know, you have one parcel for the malice genome. But then you have another passage for the whole bacterial content of the examples. You have another possible for the human Dina for the paleontologists and us in the lab. Once they had finished sorting out the mammoth bits. The DNI gave the scientists a unique window into mammoth evolution. Delenn says the standard view holds there was only one mammoth species in Siberia a couple million years ago. What we find now is that actually we found two different lineages. We can't really say they're different species, but they're clearly two different genetic types of malice so that that came as a complete surprise to us. The ancient DNI. A also gives clues the origins of the Columbian mammoth, which lived in North and Central America. Here's Tom Vander Volk again Good kind of show that this Colombian moment is a hybrid species between two off the genetic lineages. So one is the new general image that we found in this paper. And the other is the willing mama genetic limits, So to say their work appears today in the journal Nature. Alfred Rocca of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne wasn't involved in the work, but wrote on accompanying editorial. It's an absolutely amazing discovery. It takes back field of ancient DNAs to Twice is far in geological time as before, and that genetic puzzling unlocks the possibility. He says that we may soon find more evolutionary play by plays hiding in super

Center For Paleo Genetics DNI Luca Dillon Tom Vander Vault Siberia Stockholm Edna Purcell Delenn Tom Vander Volk Dina Alfred Rocca University Of Illinois Central America Urbana Champagne
In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

All Things Considered

02:32 min | Last week

In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

"Would have no more surprises. Well, the world's oldest DNA's samples say otherwise, to mammoth molars pulled from the permafrost in north eastern Siberia contained didna dating back to more than a million years ago. It's a big leap backwards in time that that's which was Luca Dillon is at the center for Paleo Genetics in Stockholm. And he says this mammoth DNI is twice as old as the previous record holder, which came from an ancient horse now sequencing million year old knee like this was impossible just a few years ago samples that old were just too small to work with. Now, researchers can see incredibly small samples, but it's challenging to put them together. Tom Vander Vault also works with the center for Paleo Genetics. Imagine if you're Edna is fragment that into literally millions of tiny pieces. It is a painstaking puzzle. It's not only one parcel, it's actually multiple parcels. So imagine you know you have one parcel for the malice genome. But then you have another parcel for the whole bacterial content of the examples. You have another possible for the human Dina for the paleontologists and us in the lab. Once they had finished sorting out the mammoth bits. The DNI gave the scientists a unique window into mammoth evolution. Delenn says the standard view holds there was only one mammoth species in Siberia a couple million years ago. What we find now is that actually we found two different lineages. We can't really say there are different species, but they're clearly two different genetic types of malice so that that came as a complete surprise to us. The ancient DNI. A also gives clues the origins of the Columbian mammoth, which lived in North and Central America. Here's Tom Vander Volk again Good kind of show that this Columbia moment is a hybrid species between two off the genetic lineages. So one is the new general image that we found in this paper. And the other is the Willie Mama genetic limit, So to say their work appears today in the journal Nature. Alfred Rocca of the University of Illinois at Havana. Champagne wasn't involved in the work, but wrote on accompanying editorial. It's an absolutely amazing discovery. It takes back the field of ancient DNA's a Twice a Zafar in geological time as before, and that genetic puzzling unlocks the possibility. He says that we may soon find more evolutionary play by plays hiding in super Old DKNY.

Center For Paleo Genetics DNI Luca Dillon Tom Vander Vault Siberia Stockholm Edna Delenn Tom Vander Volk Dina Willie Mama Alfred Rocca University Of Illinois Central America Columbia Havana
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | Last month

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more Brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe unrelenting depression, the world was slow. And gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus of the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior, He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced. On average. There was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Severe Unrelenting Depression Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | Last month

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe, unrelenting depression. The world was slow and gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus at the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior. He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced On average, there was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Identical twins don't share 100% of their DNA

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | Last month

Identical twins don't share 100% of their DNA

"Called a clone of your sibling, scientists say, you may have a point. New research shows identical twins are not exactly genetically the same. Scientists in Iceland sequence DNA's from 387 pairs of identical twins that allowed them to find early mutations that separate twins. The researchers published in the journal Nature, Genetics. 39 degrees clear We are going down to 30 here

Iceland
Identical twins aren't perfect clones, research shows

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

Identical twins aren't perfect clones, research shows

"You're an identical twin, who's always resisted being called a clone of your sibling, scientists say You have a point. My name is Julius and I'm your twin brother. Now, Obviously, the moment I sat down, I thought I was looking into a mirror. New research shows identical twins are not exactly genetically the same Scientists and Iceland sequence DNA's from 387 pairs of identical twins that allowed them to find early mutations that separate the Twins. The researchers published in the journal Nature

Julius Iceland Twins
The Good Culture

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:59 min | 2 months ago

The Good Culture

"My guest today is rebecca freeze. Rebecca is a workplace crusader who helps organizations transform outdated or non scalable practices into futures thinking market leading cultures where people can thrive on a mission to unlock smiles at work by making organizations. Better places to work so that we can all do work. That matters the place to our strengths and leads to success. She's an experience consultant. Field of transformation change management and innovation now rebecca's on a mission to help organizations not just be better places to work but exceptionally innovative engaging and forward thinking places. She's the author of the good culture. The leader's guide to creating a workplace. That doesn't suck and we are thrilled to have her here today. So much for joining me today. Rebecca you so much fan. I just love hearing people say that the title of my book it just come to my workplace now alerted us. The leader's guide to creative workplace. That doesn't suck great so we pretty much know what's going to be inside of there somewhere right. Don't do right. Oh my gosh okay. So interestingly so you say good culture isn't about you know all the frills like the table and all that so what is what is a good culture. you know. it's so funny because people ask me that all the time because of course we want to get culture and when you ask somebody what a good culture. What's it like to work in a good culture. They all know they all start describing A culture where they're supported and they can do good work and they're you know they're not micromanaged and and the opposite people know that what a bad culture feels like. Looks like they can have all those words. I can ask no hundreds of people the same questions and they're going to online on it so but the but the thing is people in organizations are like well. Okay we'll have like a fun place to work so we'll just like let's have a ping pong table here and then people can like it. They think about these like these kind of actions that aren't connected up to what you're actually trying to create so backing up when we when we talk about a good culture it's like well what is it because there's no one at necessarily picture that's going to be the same. It's going to be dependent on your organization and what you're trying to do and the work that you're trying to do right so when it comes down to it we're like a good culture is a a place where people can do their best work. Right where where people can thrive and be that's completely aligned with your strategy your purpose like what you're actually trying to do and so our definition of culture is how work gets done so it's all those things that are happening to make work happen so good. Culture is one that the lining with the strategy with your objectives. Because when you have that discord when you have a culture that is actually aligning with what you're trying to do. That's where you start to have problems. Right where where you know. All the work that you're doing isn't isn't matching up to what What you're putting in place from from people standpoint so this is really interesting for me because there are so many companies that don't have a good culture and they don't realize that they don't now like i feel like they say they do but the people would say fast batmobiles gonna ask you if you met may don't realize leadership doesn't realize correct. Yes yeah i like. I'm going to have a job for a while. Because you know. And you have account which inside but also like gives me. That's why. I call myself a crusader. Right it gives me the real truth but we want to get out there and really help people because we all deserved workplaces where we feel great. I mean our biggest at my company. Flynn is to unlock smiles at work right. So at the end of the day like so many people are working in cultures but they are probably unhappy there are disengaged in the culture is on aligned or not aligned with what they're trying to do there and they run up against that every single day and i agree with you. I think i think i wouldn't say that. They think they have a good culture but they may not know how important having kit to achieving their business objectives right so they might be like. Oh fine but whatever its work right like you know per job like what's the deal. They should be able to come in and do their job and like why do i have to be paying attention to all this other stuff. They see it as like amazon. Larry versus core business success. And that's the problem. Yeah and it's a huge problem and didn't gallup do study about what twenty three percent of your employees are actively engaged or something. Oh yeah. I thought you're going to say get his game journal. Nature like upset about that are engaged. I think we miss the strong. We're been kind of horrific you know it. It's it's To think about the fact that seventy five percent of the working population is either actively disengaged disengaged at work. Would you might as well just be actually engaged up

Rebecca Freeze Rebecca Flynn Larry Amazon
Progress Toward A Safer Psychedelic Drug To Treat Depression And Addiction

Fresh Air

03:29 min | 2 months ago

Progress Toward A Safer Psychedelic Drug To Treat Depression And Addiction

"There's growing evidence that psychedelic drugs can help people with mental health problems like addiction and depression. But these drugs also cause hallucinations and other dangerous side effects. So as NPR's Jon Hamilton reports, scientists are working to create safer alternatives. The drug ibogaine comes from the roots of a West African shrub. Small studies suggest it can reduce drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms. But David Olson of the University of California, Davis says using ibogaine is a treatment presents huge challenges. Ibogaine is like the Mount Everest of psychedelics. It causes hallucinations and potentially fatal heart problems. Also, it's really hard to make in large quantities. Olson in a team of researchers had a question. Can you take a really complex molecular structure like ibogaine and distill it down to its essential elements that give rise to the beneficial effects? Coulson's team started by giving the ibogaine molecules some nips and tucks be locked off the parts of the structure that gave rise to a lot of the deleterious effects and we left the part of the structure intact. It still was able to have anti addictive and anti depressant properties. The changes also left the substance that was easy to manufacture. The scientist named their creation tavern and tha Log or TV G, and they began testing it in rodents, including some binge drinking mice. Every single animal in the experiment. Reduce their consumption for alcohol, which was really, really surprising. TVG also helped rats that had been addicted to heroin, Olson says. Usually these rats relapse in response to light or sound cues they associate with the drug Tabernacle log is able to have this long lasting protective effect on heroin relapse. TVG also improved symptoms of depression in mice. All without producing any heart problems or behaviors associated with hallucination. Wilson, who has a financial stake in T B G, says drugs based on psychedelic substances have great potential because they work in a different way. They don't mask disease symptoms. Really designed to try to rewire the brain. The T B G results appear in the journal Nature, and it's still not clear whether they will hold up in people. But scientists not involved in the study say the approach has great potential. It's definitely promising it zah first step Gabriella Manzano is a researcher at well Cornell Medicine in New York and co author of a commentary on the T V G study. She says it suggest a way to make other psychedelic drugs safe enough to become mainstream options for treating psychiatric disorders. This provides a road map on how we could start tweaking these chemical compounds to make them very useful in the clinic. Keep the good parts get rid of the bad parts. It's still not known, though, whether getting rid of the bad parts will keep the drugs from being effective. Counter. Liston is an associate professor of neuroscience and psychiatry it while Cornell. One of the big questions in the field is is the hallucinogenic experience necessary for getting better. And there's some evidence both ways, Liston says. It's time to figure out what psychedelic drugs and they're triplets counterparts can really do for people with depression, addiction, PTSD and other disorders. Let's gather the data. Let's see what works. Let's make sure we understand the safety profile. But let's also be open to the possibility that these compounds could really help. A lot of people who need help. Listen, notes that one psychedelic ketamine has already been approved to treat depression. Jon Hamilton. NPR news

Jon Hamilton David Olson Olson Depression Coulson NPR University Of California ZAH Gabriella Manzano Cornell Medicine Davis Liston Wilson New York Cornell Ptsd Npr News
Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

60-Second Science

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

"Six million years ago a group of small mammals huddled in a borough in. What's now montana. They were good diggers most likely furry and petite. They could sit comfortably in the palm of your hand. I mean if you saw them running around today you probably think it looks like a small rodent of some sort like a chipmunk or or a a mouse or or something like that lucas. Weaver is a mammal paleobiologist at the university of washington. These little creatures didn't belong to any of the three main mammal groups on the planet today. Which are the placental. Mammals like us monitoring like the platypus and marsupials like koalas and kangaroos. Instead they belong to another now. Extinct group called the multi to berkowitz their teeth. Is what really distinguishes them from. From any other group of mammals they have these really bizarre molars with these multiple bumps on on the teeth which is where they get their name. Multi typically it just means many bumps. weaver in his colleagues have studied the fossilized skulls and skeletons of these animals dug up in montana. And they've given him a name. Philippe amis prime. Mavis friendly or neighborly mouse. The details are in the journal. Nature ecology and lucien. Weaver says drought or climate. Change may have killed the animals though. It's hard to be sure. But the critters were fossilized together in ways that suggest they sought out each other's company. That's a big deal because it's commonly thought that social behavior didn't arise in mammals until after the death of the dinosaurs. Ten million years after these smokers hung out together the narrative for decades his been that mammals that were living during the dinosaurs were mostly solitary rat like creatures that were kind of scuttling the night under the foot of dinosaurs. In so the fact that we're finding these multi berkeley mammals totally unrelated ancient group mammals. That's apparently exhibiting social behavior means that this was probably not uncommon among these early mesozoic mammals. And it kind of changes. The narrative of sociology is somehow unique to placental mammals. Even today social behavior is relatively rare among mammals but these findings suggest the need for company in some mammalian species is an ancient

Weaver Montana Philippe Amis University Of Washington Berkowitz Lucas Lucien United States
Hurricanes stay stronger longer after landfall than in past

KIRO Nights

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Hurricanes stay stronger longer after landfall than in past

"January. Florida Bracing for Tropical Storm ADA High winds and heavy rains are expected it's forecasted to make landfall near Tampa Bay early Thursday. And as if a record number of storms this season wasn't enough, Researchers say Hurricanes are staying stronger longer this record year for named storms, Researchers say Not only your hurricanes getting stronger, but they're staying stronger overland. Study published in the journal Nature says Back in the sixties, it took an average of 17 hours for hurricane to start losing most of its strength. Now it takes almost twice as much. Scientists blame human induced climate change

Tropical Storm Ada Tampa Bay Florida Nature
How the gut protects the brain from infection

The Naked Scientists

05:10 min | 3 months ago

How the gut protects the brain from infection

"A brains sit cocooned inside a series of protective layers. They called them in injuries. And these together with a structure called the blood brain barrier keep out unwanted bugs nasties that could otherwise prove lethal forest. But how exactly the brains defense systems do. This wasn't known now. A new discovery is added an important piece to the puzzle specialized plasma cells these a blood cells that make antibodies is important potentially harmful bacteria in our intestines and then make their way up to the outer part of them in indies called the juror where they churn out antibodies and keep the brain bug free medical worthy. The thing that really got me interested in thinking about the brain is that there's increasing evidence that the immune system plays a role in a number of brain disorders so things like depression and anxiety and even the progression of neurodegenerative diseases like parkinson's disease as well as that. We know that the immune system is required to defend parts of the body from infection. So this could be important for defense against infections in the brain and in the ninja. So things like meningitis. How did you them. Pursue this to try and work out. How the brain was actually fending off infections. As with many studies in immunology we use mousers as a model and so the first thing that we did was to take meninges and look at them under the microscope and they were plasma cells in the sierra and they were not just got anywhere. They are actually lined up along. The border of large blood vessels that run through the zero. The these bug vessels are called venus. Sinuses the next question. When we find these plasma cells was empty they were producing to all surprise. We found that rather than producing igt. What's normally find in the body. They were actually producing an antibody. That's normally found gut so you've got this interesting observation an- tomic clear in the first instance of blood vessels running through. Jeez they've got cells that make antibody lining up along them. But the antibody they're making is one that you would not normally associate with the bloodstream. It's one that you would find in the testing. Yes so that was surprising. And i guess the next question was well duty cells actually originating the guts or are they influenced by the gut so to answer that we were able to use. Mice have never seen any sort of bug. They have no bacteria or any microbes in their intestine and when we looked at the dura from these animals they were no cells whatsoever but when we added bacteria back into their gut suddenly again the antibody producing cells reappeared in the era and even if we only eat put one type of bacteria into these mice a type of bacteria that couldn't go anywhere other than the gut we still saw the cells reappear in in the dearest that told us that those cells originated in the intestine. Your sort of hypothesis is the bacteria in the intestine. They educate the immune system and immune cells the intestine and what the cells then migrate from the intesting with the knowledge of how to make antibodies against those specific microbes. Up to the brain and take up residence in the meninges around the brain exactly and they specifically take up residence at the border of these d'oro venus sinuses. And i guess then the obvious question will why. Why would that happen. Why is the system being set up and the obvious answer would be. Maybe those cells there to protect The brain from microbes bacteria that originated in the gut into the bloodstream. When they're flowing through those at venus sinuses where blood flow is quite slow. It's an opportunity for the bugs to get out into the brain so to test that what we did was to remove all of the antibody producing cells and then we challenged mice with microbes into their bloodstream. And what we found was the bugs were able to get a cross into the brain as so it told us that really. We found a whole new defense system for the brain. What are you going to do next. We're interested in the signals. That might take the plasma cells from the gut to them. And jeez and then the other thing. I'm really interested in is whether this has implications for how we try and protect people from meningitis at the moment. If we vaccinated against meningitis we give that vaccine into the muscle but our study would suggest that actually if you want to make cells to defend the brain the route that you should give that vaccine is actually via the gut and so that's something that we look into the bodies a clever all thing. Isn't it minute klatt worthy there. She's basically comes university. Study describing that work has just come out in the journal nature.

Parkinson's Disease Meningitis Indies Anxiety Depression Klatt Nature
Flash of luck: Astronomers find cosmic radio burst source

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Flash of luck: Astronomers find cosmic radio burst source

"Something out there and it's a cosmic radio burst. Not the kind you're hearing on 10. 10 wins the kind that's coming from inside our own Milky Way galaxy that was picked up by telescopes. Scientists now think they know where the sounds come from. Magnet ours, which are dense neutron stars that crackle with energy. Dr. Jason Hessels, an astrophysicist at the University of Amsterdam, says the discovery could help answer some key questions. You're studying fast radio burst. I think we can really come to a deeper understanding of the formation of Galaxies. Both in cosmic past and also into the cosmic future, which is really quite important for us as human beings because that's really fundamental to understanding why we're here in the first place. The discovery of the radio bursts and their source was picked up by two very different telescopes. One was a $20 million eye in Canada. The other Handmade antenna involving cake pans put together by a doctoral student, the researchers reported in the journal Nature

Dr. Jason Hessels University Of Amsterdam Canada Nature
Lunar Water is More Abundant Than Previously Thought

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:45 min | 4 months ago

Lunar Water is More Abundant Than Previously Thought

"Astronomers have discovered that water maybe far more abundant on the moon than previously thought water is is already being detected on the permanently shadowed floors of craters neither Luna polls with some never reaches and signatures for hydroxy polls that he's molecules made up one hydrogen and one oxygen atom has been detected on the lunar surface now, and you study reported in the Journal. Nature Astronomy is confirmed that water molecules comprising one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms. Good outage to uh-huh has been found in lunar regular. Even sunlit areas of the Moon, the observations were made by Sophia the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy a converted Boeing seven, four, seven SP airliner fitted with a two point seven meter infrared reflect telescope. The observatory which is operated by Nassar and the German Aerospace Centre de la was able to detect the molecules in the Moon Southern Hemisphere Safiya Project Site Alexandra Roy from dealer says scientists have been looking for water on the moon ever since the first lunar rocks were brought back to earth in the nineteen sixties. However evidence it's been hard to come by the first confirmation of Luna, water came in two thousand and eight from this moon. Meteorology Mabuhay aboard the Indian Chan One spacecraft which detected frozen on the shaded floors of Doc. Paula. Craters Sophia was able to identify the mistake fingerprint of water molecules in the mid infrared range at a wavelength of six micrometres in the vicinity of the the crater in the moon southern fear, and that raises some interesting questions where did the water in these non polar regions come from and how come it can persist in these areas without an atmosphere surface temperatures can read something like two hundred and thirty degrees. Celsius hot enough to cause water to evaporate under the hate of the light of Sun. Now, it's possible that micrometeorites which are. Constantly falling onto the lunar surface I carrying small quantities of water which deposited the lunar rocks during collisions. In the process, the water becomes enclosed in tiny glass bead like structures in the ground. Another idea involves a two stage process in which hydrogen from the solar wind riches the lunar surface combined with hydroxyl molecules on the ground to form water molecules. The data required by Safiya indicates that most of this water being detected so far lies within the substrate covering the lunar surface. Now, we're not talking about much Roy estimates. It's about the. Equivalent of a three mealy milliliter. A can of drink spread a resurface area, the size of a football pitch in reality, it means the moon still dry than the desert's of earth, but the quantity of water that's been discovered could still prove important future missions to the moon severe. We'll now observe the moon sunlit surface during different. Luna faces to investigate this water phenomenon in greater detail sinus that this will open up a new insight into where the water on the moon comes from how it's stored and how it's distributed across the surface. Meanwhile a second study also reported in the journal Nature Astronomy modeled areas of the lunar surface cast in permanent shadow finding that these so-called cold traps contain at least twenty percent of all the water is on the moon it seems small scattered. Cold trips are scattered across the lunar polar regions and could provide accessible water resources which could be used for drinking for making oxygen for breathing and making oxygen and hydrogen for rocket fuel. One of the study's authors. No, but Shraga, offer from the Planetary Science Institute says Future Lunar Rovers may have a hard time driving into date dot craters. With extremely low temperatures but smaller cold traps would be far more accessible. He says approximately ten to twenty percent of the cold trap area for water is fantasy contained within microcode traps must witcher less that a major across the discovery changes sciences perspective of water on the Moon, which until now is focused on the largest water as was situated within the broadest deepest craters at high latitudes astronomer. Johnny Horner. From the University of southern Queensland says these latest discoveries of water on the moon will play a major role in the autumn missions returning humans to the lunar surface in twenty twenty four. Ways, you can look at of them that he's much more general and the people took much. It's what really shattering this myth, the Walter Scott in the innovest, which is something that's been a bit of bath mindset. A couple of decades since got my career Walter is everywhere. It's just it's Walter ice rather than liquid. Well, what we found over the last decade of so it's the most lessons that we look the more West finding. Walter, in it never imagined, we're announcement of Wall Toronto Mercury it will not last thing to look what we're finding. The. Central Time there is Walter. The colts of the mode have been confirmed on the mall, the compound as more water than people my. Locations way will be able to access that won't actually from a technology on down the line I'm not hungry exciting locations, the future of kind of human space exploration particularly from the point of view I've going places and then creating your own fuel back to go on from that, which if you do that, it says a huge amount of because if you only continues feel. You've lost fueling. To take with you for whatever future and he wants to attack the problem is that launching prevented big Strong gravitational. You've got much better as well. So every time you wanted few, you've been going to use more fuel to launch fuel. So you have this kind of runaway way.

Nassar German Aerospace Centre De La Alexandra Roy Luna Safiya Nature Astronomy Sophia Boeing Shraga Planetary Science Institute Paula Journal Johnny Horner Walter ROY
Can't crush this: Beetle armor gives clues to tougher planes

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Can't crush this: Beetle armor gives clues to tougher planes

"Armor of a seemingly indestructible beetle offers clues for designing stronger planes and buildings. The diabolical, ironclad beetle can withstand being crushed by forces almost 40. 1000 times his body weight. In a study published in the journal Nature, a group of scientists say the Beetle is squash resistant because its its armor armor is is layered layered and and peace peace together together like like a a jigsaw jigsaw researchers researchers say say that that design design could could help help engineers engineers built built tougher tougher airplanes, airplanes, buildings buildings and and vehicle vehicle

Can't crush this: Beetle armor gives clues to tougher planes

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Can't crush this: Beetle armor gives clues to tougher planes

"Scientists now say that the armor of a seemingly indestructible beetle offers clues for designing stronger buildings and planes. The diabolical ironclad beetles. Just try that again. The diabolical, ironclad beetle that's quite a title it can withstand being crushed by forces of almost 40,000 times its body weight. In a recent study published in the journal Nature, a group of scientists say that the Beetle His squash resistant because its armor is layered and ah piece together like a jigsaw puzzle. Researchers say that design could help engineers build tougher airplanes, buildings and

Lullabies in any language relax babies

Red Eye Radio

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Lullabies in any language relax babies

"The words. A study published in the journal Nature. Human Behavior finds infants respond to universal elements of songs Despite the unfamiliarity of melodies and words, Researchers used 16 songs where their experiment from the natural history Song of discography. Debra Rodriguez, CBS News

Debra Rodriguez Cbs News
Coronavirus caused two-thirds of US excess deaths: study

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Coronavirus caused two-thirds of US excess deaths: study

"Effect between shutting down and people dying from covert 19, a study in the journal Nature Medicine scientists looked at the number of weekly deaths and 19 European nations. New Zealand and Australia, comparing how many would have died between mid February 2 may if there were no pandemic. The study found that 38% more people died in Spain then would have been expected without call that 19. There were significant excess deaths in Italy in Scotland as well, while some nations had no large changes, and Bulgaria actually saw a decrease Allison Keys. CBS News Germany today agreed to provide

Nature Medicine Allison Keys New Zealand CBS Spain Bulgaria Italy Germany Australia Scotland
Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

All Things Considered

02:26 min | 4 months ago

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

"To Pluto's, if you could mail folks back home, a scenic postcard that featured white capped mountains. That's because Pluto's Pluto's thie thie only only place place in in the the solar solar system system other other than than Earth Earth that that is is known known to to have have mountains mountains with with white white peaks. peaks. As As NPR's NPR's group group Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfield voice voice reports. reports. These These mountaintops mountaintops aren't white because of fallen snow. A tourist on Pluto's could take in all the sights that NASA's New Horizons probe discovered five years ago like a big, heart shaped glacier made of frozen nitrogen, methane and carbon monoxide. And just to the west of Pluto's icy heart. There's mountains. Tongi Betrothal is an astronomer at NASA's Ames Research Center, He says thes mountains are made of water ice. Whatever I some pretty is so cold that its hard Just like a rock on Earth. So that's why you can make mountains off. What Ison Pretty. The mountains are about 2.5 miles tall, like the Alps. They're mostly dark brown and red because they're covered in particles from Pluto's Hayes. The peaks, however, are bright white and because they look so much like white capped mountains on earth. Initially, it seemed logical that this this high high altitude altitude first first first call call call call from from from from like like like like on on on on years. years. years. years. But But But But now now now now he he he he and and and and his his his his colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues say say say say in in in in the the the the journal journal journal journal Nature Nature Nature Nature Communications Communications Communications Communications that that that that Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops got got got got their their their their white white white white in in in in an alien way on earth. Snow collects at mountaintops because at higher altitudes, thie air and ground or colder as a moist wind approaches a mountain it rises up slope, and it could On water condense their two from snow on clouds on top of the mountains on Pluto's. It's completely different. It's not snowing on Tito, he says. They're the atmosphere actually gets warmer at higher altitudes because of heating from the sun. The surface of these water. Ice mountains remains super cold, however, and because these tall mountains peak in a region that's full of methane gas, the methane becomes frost on the cold surface, so you you have have no no formation formation of of clouds. clouds. Onion. Onion. You You have have no no formation formation off. off. I I see see particles particles in in the the atmosphere. atmosphere. Every Every single single kills kills directly directly at at the the surface, surface, he he says. says. Something Something similar similar might might happen happen on on Triton Triton Moon Moon of of Neptune, Neptune, But But Triton Triton is is kind kind of of flat. flat. So So Pluto's Pluto's a a and and earth earth maybe maybe the the on on ly ly spots spots in in the the solar solar system system to enjoy white capped mountain scenery. Nell Greenfield's Boyce NPR news

Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfiel Triton Triton Moon Moon Nature Communications Communic NPR Nasa Nell Greenfield Snow Tito Heart Shaped Glacier Ames Research Center
"journal nature" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 5 months ago

"journal nature" Discussed on KCRW

"Now in the journal Nature astronomy, researchers say they have detected phosgene in pretty substantial quantities in the clouds of Venus, Susan Silva says she and her colleagues racked their brains trying to come up with a possible source for it. Obscure chemical reactions. Lightning meteorites. We have tried everything we can think of to explain the presence of phosgene through any avenue that is in life, and we've run out of options. Folks like astronomer Carl Sagan actually talked about cloud life on Venus in the 19 sixties, while the planet's surface is a furnace over 800 degrees Fahrenheit. Conditions are more hospitable miles up in the sky, but more hospitable doesn't mean the clouds are cozy. Yannis Pitofsky is a researcher at Mighty Close on Earth. This nice little puffy wide things that float in the sky are essentially water droplets. But on Venus, this cloud droplets are made of concentrated, so 40 casting, So could life really survive in such a hostile place? Personally, I think that it is very difficult to imagine, but it potentially could. And yet, when it comes to searching for life instead of looking at Venus, many astrobiologists have focused on Mars. And what are rich moons like Europa. Venus is like a giant unknown, right. It's one of the planets that we almost know the least about in our own solar system. Hillary Hartnett is a real Searcher at Arizona State University. She's thought a lot about phosgene as a possible sign of life on other worlds like planets that orbit distant stars. This paper's kind of exciting because it's not just that they found it on another planet around another star. They have pretty compelling argument that they detected it on Venus. That's big deal. It's in our backyard. A spacecraft could go check it out. Many scientists have already been clamoring for NASA to send a mission to Venus. This new finding will add more weight to their pleas. Bethany Ellman is a professor of planetary science at Caltech scene means that there is something we don't understand about Venus. So that either relates to atmospheric chemistry, geology or geochemistry or a life, she says. Life is the real attention getter on that list. But as Carl Sagan said, Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Mel Greenfield Voice NPR news..

Carl Sagan researcher Hillary Hartnett Bethany Ellman Susan Silva Nature astronomy Yannis Pitofsky Mel Greenfield NPR NASA Arizona State University professor
"journal nature" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"journal nature" Discussed on KCRW

"Now in the journal Nature astronomy, researchers say they have detected phosgene in pretty substantial quantities in the clouds of Venus, Susan Silva says she and her colleagues racked their brains trying to come up with a possible source for it. Obscure chemical reactions. Lightning meteorites. We have tried everything we can think of to explain the presence of phosgene through any avenue that is in life, and we've run out of options. Folks like astronomer Carl Sagan actually talked about cloud life on Venus in the 19 sixties, while the planet's surface is a furnace over 800 degrees Fahrenheit. Conditions are more hospitable miles up in the sky, but more hospitable doesn't mean the clouds are cozy. Yannis Pitofsky is a researcher at Mighty Close on Earth. This nice little puffy wide things that float in the sky are essentially water droplets. But on Venus, this cloud droplets are made of concentrated, so 40 casting, So could life really survive in such a hostile place? Personally, I think that it is very difficult to imagine, but it potentially could. And yet, when it comes to searching for life instead of looking at Venus, many astrobiologists have focused on Mars. And what are rich moons like Europa. Venus is like a giant unknown, right. It's one of the planets that we almost know the least about in our own solar system. Hillary Hartnett is a real Searcher at Arizona State University. She's thought a lot about phosgene as a possible sign of life on other worlds like planets that orbit distant stars. This paper's kind of exciting because it's not just that they found it on another planet around another star. They have pretty compelling argument that they detected it on Venus. That's big deal. It's in our backyard. A spacecraft could go check it out. Many scientists have already been clamoring for NASA to send a mission to Venus. This new finding will add more weight to their pleas. Bethany Ellman is a professor of planetary science at Caltech team means that there is something we don't understand about Venus. So that either relates to atmospheric chemistry, geology or geochemistry or a life, she says. Life is the real attention getter on that list. But as Carl Sagan said, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence..

Carl Sagan researcher Hillary Hartnett Bethany Ellman Susan Silva Nature astronomy Yannis Pitofsky Caltech NASA Arizona State University professor
"journal nature" Discussed on Instant Message

Instant Message

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Instant Message

"There was an article in the journal nature back in March of two thousand eighteen that this was about direct to consumer genetic test, generally. And it said when we compare the result with the full workup result. We're finding forty percent of the tests. The tests have false positives. I'm sure you guys have done testing comparing your results to full clinical work ups. How what what's your false positive rates? I mean, this is like. We go through the FDA process. Like, there's a reason our first mission was like seven thousand pages like the amount of accuracy like clinic. Like accuracy that we have to prove the clinical validity. And I would point to the fact that the majority of other clinical tests, the laboratory developed tests that are out there never go through FDA review you do. But what's? But in ninety nine point nine percent, accuracy. I mean, our our forest positive rates. So what they found forty percent false positives for tests that doesn't apply to you at all. You never have that that never happens. We do not. I mean, if you have to define false positive. Right. I guess I do what? Right. So so the so the question here, you read this article, how did he define it? I don't remember. I don't remember all on it. What we what we have found more often than not the way that we have converted some of the leaders of genetic testing centers like we had one one of the largest genetic testing senators like I was told I'm not a carry for or sorry. It was I think human Toma crisis. And then did Twenty-three me found us. It was like, oh, look you guys are wrong. Like, you told me I'm Carrie for hematoma crisis when and then sequenced herself and was like, wow. Like, you were you're right. And so more often than not like the technology is one of the beauties of the Gino typing technology is it's incredibly accurate. And and it's just we have we have were held to a much higher bar because there's not a physician involved. And so our accuracy are false positive false negative is just is pretty extrordinary in part. Because what is it buys you define it? What's that? I don't remember the specific nine two point one or it's like we don't have errors. I mean, it's very very very rare. And that's where show everybody thinks to Annan roll, Greg. Christopher Joanna for being here and thanks to Tanya, our producer. And thank you for listening. We've new episodes on Fridays. So as always make sure you subscribe to instant message on whatever podcast app have using Castro recently. It's very as always if you feedback. The is Email us at personal tech at wsJcom. We'll talk to you soon.

FDA Castro Gino Christopher Joanna Annan Tanya producer Greg forty percent nine percent
"journal nature" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And time now to take a brief look at some of the other stories making Uson science this week with a science report. And you study shows plant growth is increased across the world of the last thirty years in part because of the expansion of agriculture and also pilot Judah rising CO two levels caused by the use of fossil fuels a report in the journal nature. Ecology Nivea Lucien claims plant growth has increased consistently between nine hundred eighty two and two thousand eleven and that around sixty five percent of that change could be explained by three factors. Expanding. Crop lands rising CO two levels and intensifying nitrogen deposition. But before getting too excited, the plants may help save humanity from climate change. The researchers say the expanding agriculture is also causing a loss of soil carbon. And that is further increasing carbon emissions. Oh, it's making things worse. European researchers have reconstructed a virtual free dimensional in the NFL forex based on the most complete skeleton of the hominem ever found the findings reported in the journal nature communications suggest the thorax of the NFL's was similar in size to that among humans, but it had a very different shape making it likely that they breathe differently from HAMAs. Sapiens side is found the lowest section of the NFL slow Rex was wider, meaning that could breathe more deeply and taking more air than modern humans. And you study claims the red Brown and blue green pigments in birds aches, I evolved when our feathered friends was still Donoso's a report in the journal nature analyze fossilized eggshells from all the major dinosaur groups, scientists found preserved pigments in spotted and speak with patterns of the show of dinosaurs bowing to the group that includes modern birds. Meanwhile, the eggs of dinosaur groups that will list closely associated to modern birds, including triceratops in the plot is didn't contain any pigments. And so would have been rather plain. Life is the active herbicidal ingredient widely used in weedkillers like roundup is being discovering common. Brands of dog and cat foods..

NFL Donoso HAMAs sixty five percent thirty years
"journal nature" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Can consume anything in its patch. Change the way, we're staffing. Our hand crews we've gone ahead. And and and form them into strike teams. Cal fire captain Isaac. Sanchez says they stage those crews and particularly vulnerable areas. It was around this time last year into December that some of the most destructive fires estate history burned through the region. Jim Roope, Los Angeles. WW chain news time to thirty six. A new study says global warming could make your favorite beer more expensive. Correspondent John Stolnis. Gives us the bad news the extreme heat waves and drought that have been felled around the world in recent years could cut the worldwide production of barley, a key ingredient in beer if and when that happens Steve Davis of the university of California, Irvine says beer prices could double and in some countries, like Ireland prices could triple this isn't the first commodity that experts say could increase drastically of global warming isn't checked with prices for chocolate, coffee and wine. Also threatened to go up in the past the results appear in the latest issue of the journal nature plants. I'm John Stolnis. The department of natural resources is telling us of a return of a fish virus. Officials say the large mouth bass virus has now been located in cedar lake which stretches in both Al Kona and counties. The virus isn't new to Michigan. We saw it in the early two thousands in the southern part of the lower peninsula with some fish kills. But haven't seen anything since we haven't seen it this far north before or in this particular lake DNR hatchery manager, Martha van Amberg? She says Fisher regularly infected in some way in the waters, but there is little risk to humans, and the fish are still edible as long as they are cooked properly to thirty seven is our time. We are under that freeze warning until eight AM how cold will get traffic and weather together on the way. What does building a better Bank? Look like it starts with building Capital One cafes warm..

John Stolnis Martha van Amberg building Capital One captain Isaac cedar lake Jim Roope Sanchez Los Angeles Michigan Al Kona Steve Davis Irvine DNR Ireland Fisher university of California
"journal nature" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Let me ask you just one thing about this, like this is like one of those like pepease for me. Do you think that doom and gloom stuff works? I mean, I don't know if it works, but I think it's accurate. Yeah, I think it's accurate. I don't think it works. I think I think there's it's been tried for a long time and we haven't seen much behavior change as a result of it. So I'm actually not convinced I get what was written that report and how it's a ten years and. The degree rise in how're seeing the ramifications of it now, but I still don't. I think that report needs to be written in the context of what's actually going to make people change. And I think scientists constantly saying, you know, this is going to happen and it's creeping closer. Has it worked? So maybe our message message or. Yeah. I mean, something has to change have about India note of optimism. Oh, yes, please do. Okay. So one of the things that caught my eye this week as an article published in the journal nature medicine. So you know how like these days, if you get stitches, they dissolve when I was a kid like you actually had to go back to the doctor and they rip those puppies out and it was really painful and now they don't have to do that anymore. And what if you had a way to help even bigger problems like nerve damage? So one of the things that happens when peripheral nervous system is damaged. Let's in the Perfil nervous as you've been talking about things that coat not beyond the brain and spinal cord. If those purple. Nerves are damaged. They actually do regenerate. So unlike nerves in your brain or tracks in your brain that don't spontaneously regrows your nervous system can regenerate, but regardless of age. So even regardless of age, although, for you know, in some cases, the obviously the bigger the damage, the harder it might be regenerate at cetera, but but yeah, you can get nerve growth and it can be sped along by a little bit of electrical stimulation. So in the past up until now, I should say the best way to do that was during surgery. So if you're having surgery to repair some kind of nerve damage during the surgery, the surgeons can actually electrically stimulate those nerves and that sort of gets the process of of regret going. Now, what if I told you that you could have a similar process like the dissolving stitches, but this electrical stimulation, I don't follow like dissolving electrical stimulation. How does that work? Yeah. So this group at the Washington University school of medicine in St Louis and northwestern developed this. Device that they can the implanted in rats that's biodegradable and what it does. It stimulates the nerve for a certain amount of time. And then eventually just dissolve or degrades gets taken up by the body. I guess every time I hear the word electrical stimulation, I think metal electrodes and like, how does that biodegrade? So yeah, I don't know. The people can can look up the actual study to find more details exactly what the materials are. It's the studies called wireless bio resort -able electronic system enable sustained non pharmacological neuro regenerative therapy nature about this. And so essentially what it is it's it's device that's wirelessly powered the transmitters outside the body can think of it as like, you know, when you put your cell phone down on a charging, Matt. So here's a similar similar way in which this this thing works an an apparently. It eventually just gets re taken up by the body. I'm sort of like bio degrades in. Just something that can be passed that sort of. That's fascinating so they can keep the electrical stimulation there for a couple days. So not just active during surgery, but in the hours and days that follow, like we know a lot of athletes use this kind of lexical stimulation technique to promote like either muscle regeneration or nerve regeneration, as you're saying, does this, this must be tiny..

nature medicine Washington University school o India Perfil Matt St Louis northwestern ten years
"journal nature" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on KOMO

"Go here next dot com In Los Angeles are? Investigating another sex assault allegation against Kevin, Spacey the. Los Angeles County sheriff's department has presented a new sex assault case to prosecutors who will then decide, if Kevin Spacey will be charged with a crime no details on what the case involves this would be the second sex assault case against Spacey. That's under review in l.. A. the I was handed over to the LA county district attorney's office, in April Spacey. Is also under investigation for salt and then tuck it and London Jason Nathanson ABC news Hollywood and Argentine police. Officers drawing praise for breast feeding a hungry baby who was not hers officers Celeste, yellow was on duty at a children's hospital in Buenos IRA so when a social worker brought in six siblings who've been removed from their parents. And the baby, was malnourished, she said in this interview. On the Argentine network America Tom okay shut allergy heard. The, baby crying and. As a mother herself of a sixteen month old. Yellow recognized the baby was hungry so she asked for permission to. Breastfeed the baby a collie Ag-, posted on Facebook a picture of her doing. That and called it a grand gesture of love a yellow has. Since been promoted to Sergeant Scott Goldberg ABC news found in southern Siberia a ninety thousand year old bone fragment, from a, prehistoric female whose mother was Neanderthal and whose, father, was. Dennis Sullivan it's the first time a first generation offspring of these human ancestors has been found reported in the journal nature. This is ABC news KOMO news time now twelve, oh four KOMO AAA traffic every ten minutes on the fours will in Shelton a structure, fire on highway three near mill creek has. The roadway completely blocked in this. Could go on for the next several hours drivers can, use highway one on one and railroad avenue to get around the closure but. Again highway three continues to be blocked in both directions..

Kevin Spacey assault Los Angeles County April Spacey Los Angeles KOMO Jason Nathanson Sergeant Scott Goldberg Dennis Sullivan Facebook Buenos IRA ABC Celeste America Tom Siberia Hollywood Shelton mill creek ninety thousand year
"journal nature" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Tumors in they found it the the bis disc treatment at very high pressure of hydrogen could basically of reduce the melanoma tumors and was for australia remarkable instead of heated applications but it's not you know if you think about you know the the actual utilization or application of a hyperbaric chamber in normal life in our in clinical practice though it's it's not it's not too easy to do is that's why not much research was done in tel two thousand seven when there was an article published in the very prestigious journal nature medicine in that article they found that hygiene was varying neuro protective improved vented their toxic damage from a senior profusion injury that was induced via middle cerebal ardial coaltion in a row model worker and basically when this happens we have this hypocrisy or this in a boatload blood flow to the brain in different things you caused lots of free route lots of oxidative stress net end up causing necrosis and in cell death in while the different problems and heightening gas was very effective at at preventing that from happening and it was done at a very low concentration only note two to three percent which is below the fond building level has to be higher than four point six percent of the explosive and so now we can see that hygiene gas could actually be utilized in a clinical setting because it's not final and an an and now ten years later were the japanese government has now approved hydrogen inhalation as an official medical procedure for post cardiac arrest patients because they're finding that it's it's actually more effective than conventional treatments alike hypothermia because when a heart stops it's not it's not so difficult to get the heart started again you get the heart start again but a lot of people died shortly after because when that blood it goes throughout the rest of the body in history.

nature medicine japanese government australia official three percent six percent ten years
"journal nature" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"An artificial virus has been created that scientists hope will help in the fight against antibiotic resistant superbox the research appears in the journal nature communications terry egan reports bacteria resistant to antibiotics presently killed at least seven hundred thousand people worldwide every year because of that some experts fear the world is heading for a time in which mine at cuts and grazes coot if they became infected prove lethal consequently alternative treatments for infectious diseases a badly needed the molecules developed by scientists in london a microscopic and have a structure similar to that of natural viruses they act though like guided missiles blasting through the cell walls of drums and as a result they are less likely to become ineffective as bacteria mutate into new resistant forms mex react nav is one of the research is our faith more i cub gortat because you can can a number of syria to buddhist stopped and we'll be talking membranes traditional bonds you do have to toss because he'll membrane e the on to be active at all in futures say the scientists such viral molecules developed in the laboratory could be used to deliver therapeutic genes or to a tech bacteria hiding within cells what they hope is that the virus will lead to a whole new army of molecules with the potential to stop the progress of antimicrobial resistance that was tiny even in many european nations asylums for people with mental illness closed decades ago and patience moved into accommodation in the community it's a process known as d institutionalization a recognition that those living with mental health challenges onto usually dangerous and have human rights in croatia in spite of government commitment to change the situation thousands still live in residential centres often with little power.

"journal nature" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"An artificial virus has been created that scientists hope will help in the fight against antibiotic resistant superbox the research appears in the journal nature communications terry egan reports bacteria resistant to antibiotics presently killed at least seven hundred thousand people worldwide every year because of that some experts fear the world is heading for a time in which mine at cuts and grazes coot if they became infected prove lethal consequently alternative treatments for infectious diseases a badly needed the molecules developed by scientists in london a microscopic and have a structure similar to that of natural viruses they act though like guided missiles blasting through the cell walls of drums and as a result they are less likely to become ineffective as bacteria mutate into new resistant forms mex react nav is one of the research is our faith more i cub gortat because you can can a number of syria to buddhist stopped and we'll be talking membranes traditional bonds you do have to toss because he'll membrane e the on to be active at all in futures say the scientists such viral molecules developed in the laboratory could be used to deliver therapeutic genes or to a tech bacteria hiding within cells what they hope is that the virus will lead to a whole new army of molecules with the potential to stop the progress of antimicrobial resistance that was tiny even in many european nations asylums for people with mental illness closed decades ago and patience moved into accommodation in the community it's a process known as d institutionalization a recognition that those living with mental health challenges onto usually dangerous and have human rights in croatia in spite of government commitment to change the situation thousands still live in residential centres often with little power.

"journal nature" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"This is a sad with it's hilarious it's written by young tech blogger who obviously buys and every lie and distortion this read the first paragraph blasting aerosols into the sky to reverse climate change seems like an exciting proposition but it may be too dangerous to attempt if we try and if we suddenly halt global warming from this kind of geo engineering it could cause more damage than climate change itself according so anything we do to fix climate change could make it worth by blasting air resolves into the sky global warming is a pressing problem it says and some scientists believe that sending a plane to spray sulfate aerosols into the sky will help cool down the earth in a study published in the journal nature ecology in evolution what am i favorite magazines researchers used models here we go again with models to predict what would happen if we sprayed the aerosols for fifty years you know what would happen we would caused massive global cooling that we couldn't stop so yet another brilliant effort a brilliant plan to stop the warming spraying aerosols into the atmosphere for fifty years could end up killing his all by freezing us to death i'm not reading paredes i'm not reading sattar i'm reading actual news stories written by people who believe all of this cnn claimed that an unmonitored asteroid could slam into earth during government shutdown is debunked did you know that cnn is reporting this cnn was reporting last week that an unmonitored asteroid couldn't slam into earth during the government shutdown but that claim of cnn was debunked by over scientists an on monitoring asteroid was gone cram us ram a during the government show what is it was mad the asteroid was livid that we were closing the borders to illegal immigrants who are principles still matt on the eib network news radio 1040 who here's some great news if you missed the deadline to sign up for health insurance or more importantly if you sign up for a plan that you're just not happy with you.

climate change global warming paredes sattar cnn health insurance eib fifty years
"journal nature" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"The first paragraph blasting aerosols into the sky to reverse climate change seems like an exciting proposition but it may be too dangerous to attempt if we try and if we suddenly halt global warming from this kind of geo engineering it could cause more damage than climate change itself according so anything we do to fix climate change could make it worth by blasting aerosols into the sky global warming is a pressing problem it says and some scientists believe that sending a plane to spray sulfate aerosols into the sky will help cool down the earth in a study published in the journal nature ecology in evolution what am i favorite magazines researchers used models here we go again with models to predict what would happen if we sprayed the aerosols for fifty years you know what would happen we would caused massive global cooling that we couldn't stop so yet another brilliant effort a brilliant plan to stop the warming spraying aerosols into the atmosphere for fifty years could end up killing his all by freezing us to death i'm not reading paredes i'm not reading sattar i'm reading actual news stories written by people who believe all of this cnn claim that an monitored asteroid could slam into earth during government shutdown is debunked did you know that cnn was reporting this cnn was reporting last week that an unmonitored asteroid could slam into earth during the government shutdown but that claim of cnn's was debunked by other scientists an on monitoring asteroid was ghana cram us ram a during the government show what is it was mad the asteroid was livid that we were closing the borders to illegal immigrants principles still matt on the eib network london here's some great news if you missed the deadline to sign up for health insurance or more importantly if you sign up for a plan that you're just not happy with you.

climate change global warming paredes sattar cnn health insurance ghana eib fifty years
"journal nature" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on WJR 760

"Aerosols into the sky to reverse climate change seems like an exciting proposition but it may be too dangerous to attempt if we try and then we suddenly halt logo warming from this kind of geo engineering it could cause more damage than climate change itself accorded so anything we do to fix climate change could make it worse by blasting aerosols into the sky global warming is a pressing problem it says and some scientists believe that sending a plane to spray sulfate aerosols into the sky will help cool down the earth in a study published in the journal nature ecology in evolution what am i favorite magazines researchers used models here we go again with models to predict what would happen if we sprayed the aerosols for fifty years would happen we would caused massive global cooling that we couldn't stop so yet another brilliant effort a brilliant plan to stop the warming spraying aerosols into the atmosphere four fifty years could end up killing his all by freezing us to death i'm not reading peredes i'm not reading sattar i'm reading actual news stories written by people who believe all of this cnn claimed that an on monitored asteroid could slam into earth during government shutdown is debunked did you know that cnn is reporting this cnn was reporting last week that an unmonitored asteroid could slam into earth during the government shutdown but that claim of cnn's was debunked by over scientists an on monitored asteroid was gonna cram us ram a during the government show what is it was mad the asteroid was.

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"journal nature" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on AP News

"Journal nature covered the entire consonance over 65 years researchers looked at 10 different factors that could change population numbers including war drought animal size protected areas and human population density for the a p i mark rise from the rivet well desk the directors guild of america is that with its choices for top picture a p entertainment editor ah schools gabriel has looked at the memory jordan peel is one of five directors were up for this year's directors guild of america award for outstanding achievement he is nominated for his movie get out also nominated greta wig who did the coming of age movie ladybird hillier modell toro who won the golden globe for directing on sunday also scores his first dga the nation this for the shape of water another first timer is martin mcdonough for three billboards outside ebbing missouri christopher nolan is also nominated for dunkirk it's his 4thdj nod when this will be announced february 3rd a moscow wells gabriel auto sales in china shrank in december but sales overall and 2017 were up 14 over the previous year is the popularity of suvs helped offset a drop in demand for sedans china's association of automobile manufacturers says last month's sales of suvs sedan and minivans shrink by point seven percent from a year earlier to 26 million weakness in chinese demand setback for global automakers looking.

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"journal nature" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on KKAT

"A study in the journal nature finds that war time is the biggest threat to africa's elephants rhinos hippos in other large animals since 1940's six more than seventy percent of africa's protected wildlife various built inside a war zone at some point yale university ecologist josh taskin said the more often fighting breaks out the steeper the drop in animal numbers desk and said areas with the most frequent battles lose about a third of their mammal populations each year there's fighting researcher said the animals were killed more often by poachers or for more bushmeat because people near war zones are poorer and hungrier i'm john stolnis president trump's large lee got an f or a d for his first year in office according to a quinnipiac university poll of american voters only sixteen percent of respondents gave trump in a while thirty nine percent failed him and seventeen percent gave him a d another 16 percent of voters gave him a b 11 percent graded trump asleep clues such a sweet lovable animal and people would want to cut him and they'd come up and they get close to them and it would be this instant oh my dad didn't want to touch as like to get the stinky dog away from me even after we'd give her a bounce would still stink very stinky both bad breath and bad gas i asked the vet and he said some dogs are just stinky does your dog each scratch stink for crazy come to dynamite for help d i n o v i t e dot com be omega3 fatty acid flaxseed think alfalfa the digestive enzymes that are cooked out of regular dog food ingredients convince me that it was definitely worth trying after about a week he started snowing normal my husband and i were really kind of a.

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"journal nature" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And there was a study this week in the journal nature communications that predicts california will only get drier as sea ice disappears in the arctic so are we looking at a future filled with even more fires in california law that alarming yeah i think that eighty of us we study the than even people who don't understand that with warming temperatures ah you're seeing the same effects that for example warming ocean temperatures have on the probability of damaging uh or hurricanes you know they don't drive uh eddie single hurricane but the increase the probability that that might occur and and that's what we're seeing is it does just stick a deck of the kind of dry fuels uh that we are seeing at the end of the year with a humans expanding more and more into wildlands in more and more of these kinds of uh a seasonal like nisshin's i don't think there's any question that we're going to be looking at more this in the future and i know you're you talk to fear right now from a workshop on restoring chaparral landscapes after fires give us an idea why that is important yeah so uh chaperoned ecosystems have been relatively understudied uh with respect to their uh the effects of multiple fires on them uh end they cover a large landscapes in california a lot of the central coast in a whole lot of the uh southern california and indeed to the four national forest down here may be out in the annual miss name they're really large lease rebellin's and uh the ecosystems are are somewhat undervalued people like trees the alike shade i'd la cool temperatures but but chaparral supports a surprising amount of carbon uh it's very important to water infiltration to water recharge in the ground water uh to uh supporting water runoff into keeping sediment on the hills here which ends up in people's homes in on on highways if there isn't vegetation on the landscape and there is a lot of biodiversity san diego tally is the most diverse county.

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"journal nature" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"journal nature" Discussed on The Science Hour

"That probably means they're going to be really close later on just the same as if they get on like a house on fire it's the intensity of how they relate to one another that matters just ask me on my beautiful brother and we'll have comment as we go along by the way from claire ainsworth his science journalist and expert and developmental genetics in other words she's very clever so prevalent she understands designer drugs are going to talk about them now i'm they could be getting a bit closer according to some raw the exciting synthetic biology there's just being reported this week in the journal nature what they've done is to tweak a microscope the organism by altering the genetic code that makes it and cleared ainsworth i'm looking you of i called it right say faucet while he's made the proteins but but he's native lots of things and that people if you say that pricing to most people will nothing stay cholera an egghead something but actually proteins all tanya tiniest molecular machines that g d jobs around the body some of the along and strong for may hugh muscles contract for example others asserted lobby ones that to'make white for example the cell somehow has to store all the information that it needs to make all those those thousands of proteins that might you work visor how does it store that emerged now does it my won't proteins to make more shape they need to be and how stretchy on all stretching b well the the easiest way just assault with the pricing itself so if you sort of go to my a supermarket skype in a safety for paris freezes and look to you i quite and yungchuan of the it'll clubby proteins apology see if stretch shatter long necklace of little building blocks called amino acids i and there are a total of about twenty those of the eu's routinely in biology the sequence of this let me know that if once you have in the necklace will dictate the final shape the protein than and the drop that it can day writes a case on following the chain court that you've got yes i regret remarks ratings they are made up of strings of amino acids and something needs to tell the amino acids walk.

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