19 Burst results for "Journal Of Medicine"

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Readout Loud

The Readout Loud

08:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Readout Loud

"Patients, but most importantly, as you mentioned, Medicare, which balked at ad you helm and all but declined to pay for it in almost any conceivable way, has the same policy for all treatments like it, which includes the canon map. So in order for a site to reach patients in order for this drug to really do anything meaningful societally, aci has to convince CMS which controls Medicare to reverse that position or at least alter it such that lacona mab can be reimbursed for because the estimate is something around 85 to 90% of people in the United States who would meet the criteria for this drug that early stage of Alzheimer's disease are Medicare beneficiaries. So if the government doesn't want to pay for it, it is a nonexistent product. And that process begins, well apparently it's kind of already begun. I told us in the fall that they were already having conversations, you know, I don't know to what detailer or what legally they can share with a government agency when it hasn't yet been FDA approved, but they are definitely focused on this and will begin showing their data to Medicare, making the case that this is a drug, which, again, the price we don't yet know. So that's important. But this is a drug that provides value to society. And we've seen a few estimates of what that value might be. Icer the nonprofit that runs cost effectiveness analyses for new medicines and interventions said that between $8000 and about $20,000 would be cost effective based upon the benefits that it's demonstrated acy ran its own cost effective analysis, which may be unsurprisingly led to some relatively larger numbers, but even that was between 10,000 and I believe about $35,000. So in any case, all of the estimates are below what adje homee costs and I think we can reasonably expect that a site will not set a price outside of its own publicly disclosed cost effectiveness estimates, so this struggle will be cheaper than the last one. And as I mentioned, as Adam also went into the clinical data are less murky than those that accompanied adu home. So the expectation is that a site will have more success in dealing with Medicare than Biogen did, but that remains to be seen. And what about the safety profile of the drug? I think, you know, even I say even. But even the popular media we're covering the data in the New England Journal. But there was a lot of attention paid to some concerns about safety. What should people think about there? Right. So the most common side effect that we see with these types of drugs is brain swelling, potentially small bleeds in the brain. It's commonly called Arya, and most of those cases are asymptomatic, but in some cases it can be serious. There have been, I think, sort of, I think, three patients who have died in media reports, patients who are died that have associated with kind of these brain bleeds as brain swelling, that is the side effect that physicians are most concerned about. I think it's probably anticipated that there will be something maybe in the label about some cautious language about extra monitoring and these patients in the phase three study that acy run. I mean, actually, the rates of aria in the phase three study were actually lower than some of the other Alzheimer's drugs that we've seen, but like this week, for instance, there was a case report that was published in the New England Journal medicine about one of those patients that was also associated with patients who take blood thinning medicines. You know, a lot of people who are on blood thinners or take aspirin did that contribute to this sort of these bleeding episodes. And so that's something that I think will be monitored. It's not something that's going to derail the approval of the drug, but it certainly could, you know, maybe restrict the use of the drug for people who have who maybe who let's say were on a blood thinner who might be candidates for the kanab. I've talked to some physicians who are either sort of thinking that maybe those patients shouldn't be on the kind of map or at least those patients would require extra monitoring. And just to wrap up this portion of the podcast because I'm sure our wonderful producer Teresa is like, stop talking. Oh my God. Stop talking about all the time. We'll make the rest of the podcast very short. When Andrew home was approved before all the bad stuff started happening. There was this expectation that this could be like the biggest drug of all time and everybody who qualified was going to take this medicine and it was going to be this just massive new drug. I mean, not just in the eyes of Biogen, but in the eyes of Wall Street analysts and a lot of people thought this was going to be a really major new medicine is going to be that. Is that this moment? Or are we just seeing a slower phase in of new Alzheimer's medicines? I think the latter, I think the adjective debacle was in many ways a chastening experience. Obviously, for Biogen, which changed out its upper management in the wake of it. But also for analysts for everybody involved in this that maybe that moment where these prognostications were being made, everybody was a little over their skis. And I think part of why the feeling is different this time is because of a site itself, which has been much, much more conservative in its public statements around this, both in terms of talking about the pricing and in terms of talking about how building this building into a meaningful medicine will be sort of an iterative process, beginning, as I said with this expected accelerated approval, but then mounting slowly from there, both in terms of convincing regulators, but convincing the broader neurology community that it is a worthwhile medicine and also ESI has been relatively conservative in describing some of those safety risks that Adam mentioned and in describing the care and monitoring and conversation that will need to happen in order for families, patients, and physicians to decide whether a given person would benefit from this drug. So it does feel like everybody is approaching this one with the lessons of the last one. I haven't seen at least the same kind of Wall Street enthusiasm for this. I think as a reaction to both the shock and the backlash and everything that happened with edgy home, but also like I said, kind of following a size lead, which I think has been less bullish publicly and a little more I was going to say contrite, but that's not the right word. A little more showing a little more humility. Let's say, then perhaps Biogen management did circa 2021. Yeah, I think Wall Street has moved on from thinking that also drugs are going to be the biggest selling drugs of all time. Now they think that weight loss drugs are going to be the biggest. But that's a discussion for another day. I'd also like to move on and talk about JPMorgan, which comes up next week. Obviously, everyone knows that it's the sort of the biggest healthcare investment conference of the year out in San Francisco. I'm going Meg, you're flying out there. What's in store for you over the next few days? My plans are to wake up very ridiculously horribly early in the morning. I think our coffee service might wonderful producer Leigh Anne. She told me it starts at two 30 in the morning. So thank you Weston Saint Francis. Y'all are gonna say tell people how because it's in San Francisco on the West Coast and you are serving a largely kind of east coast audience certainly like the markets audience. You have to do these interviews. So insanely early. It's because we work east coast hours from San Francisco. And then also means that these CEOs who we are interviewing also have to be up at the crack of dawn or pre crack of dawn. To join us. Meg, I have also heard that you have the only interview with the new Biogen CEO, Chris. Yes, is in the 5 a.m. hour. So I'm very excited to catch up with him. Yeah, I was a little like mad jealous about that because, you know, we wanted to sit down with mister V bacher, but we're told that his schedule is all filled up and that the only media interview he's doing is with you. I mean, maybe you could get him in the 4 a.m. hour, I don't know. I will see his presentation on later Monday, but kudos to you for grabbing that one. Thank you. Well, it'll be very interesting, obviously, given everything we've been talking about with Biogen. New CEO who's come in who we know from his time running Sanofi in the interim. He's been doing a lot of Boston BioTech stuff and venture capital type stuff. So it'll be just very interesting to hear how he's thinking about the job and the company.

Alzheimer's disease Medicare Biogen New England Journal New England Journal medicine aci adu CMS Adam kanab FDA United States Teresa Andrew San Francisco Weston Saint Francis
"journal medicine" Discussed on Liberty Station

Liberty Station

03:59 min | Last month

"journal medicine" Discussed on Liberty Station

"Addition to other drugs or even down the NG tube when someone's on the ventilator reduced mortality. Every single American hospitalized should have received Ivermectin. Plus other drugs. 100% of them. 100%. It's safer than Tylenol. Now the FDA is being sued over this because the FDA put out false statements at its only horse paste and they had a campaign against Ivermectin. In November of 2020, the World Health Organization said Remdesivir under no circumstances should be used to treat COVID-19 because it doesn't improve mortality and it causes kidney damage and liver damage. The World Health Organization said that they were backed up by an ethical review and the European side of critical care. So when the World Health Organization said that, the California HHS should have called an emergency meeting and gotten all the Remdesivir off the shelves of every California hospital. And when I testified in the Texas Senate, I said the same thing in Texas Senate. I said that happened under your watch. You're falling asleep on the job. You falling asleep on the job and impatience and families had to defend themselves against Remdesivir. And patients and their families had to try to sneak in Ivermectin. And these grows breaches in the standard of care, the public should be outraged and they should make each and every doctor and hospital pay for this. Now, vaccinated or not, we need early treatment, the new risk paradigm, which I've recently published on our substack, is really important. The most important feature for risk now is if you've already had COVID, when you've already had COVID, the chances of any serious outcomes with the second infection are negligible. How many people out here have already had it? Just about everybody. You're good, a recent study by chin and colleagues published in New England Journal medicine in October of 2022. Show, 59,000

World Health Organization Remdesivir FDA Texas Senate California HHS Senate Texas chin New England
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:12 min | 5 months ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That really takes away one of the sort of drivers or triggers or things that's really exacerbating their sort of phenotype or their symptoms. So if you are able to get the patient to sort of embrace that approach, I do think that you will see that often patients will see benefits. I think it's something that has to be monitored. I don't think all patients will suddenly start having regular cycles and their hair growth isn't going to suddenly go away. But some patients may have more cycles, some patients may be able to conceive that way on their own. Without fertility treatment, but others will not. So I think it's something that I try to discuss as an option, but I think I shy away from saying like, here's a way to fix this because I think in all honesty it doesn't fix it for some patients and that's really frustrating if they feel like they're sort of somehow failing. What sort of speaks to how little we know, right? Because in some patients it works and some patients, it doesn't, you don't know which one's which, right? And it's really about personalizing care. Yeah. So I think it's a challenge, and I do think it's PCOS is definitely a disorder that just takes a lot of personalization because it's such a diverse heterogeneous disorder. The concerns and the goals are often very diverse. So I think no patient and no treatment plan quite honestly is exactly the same. And you know, years ago, I read an article in the New England Journal medicine about dec inositol and PCOS, which is a derivative of B vitamin. It seemed very promising. The kind of seem to fall off the radar. What is the role of that and or other supplements in the treatment of PCOS? I mean, I think it's still on the radar in the sense that people are using it. People are trying to study it. I think that there's been sort of mixed results in the studies that are out there. I think we're somewhat hampered by the fact that people are taking it in different sort of formulations and different ratios and different doses, dosages, which makes it a little hard to sort of figure out whether it's working. I will say anecdotally, I do have patients who seem to become more regular in their cycling when they're taking it.

New England Journal medicine
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"To see you is awesome to reconnect with you in Miami recently. I'm glad that I did not give you COVID. Experience. It's been four years since we, since we did this. And after seeing you, I thought it would be great to have you back on. And there's so many things, I think, that we could talk about, there's been a lot of research in science since four years ago. But I thought a good place an interesting place to start would be with this recent study that just came out this study that was published in the New England Journal of Medicine, a study coming out of China that showed that intermittent fasting had no impact versus regular feeding windows in terms of weight loss. Now, I know your expertise is in longevity and not weight loss, but because this study was sort of widely covered in the media and caused a little bit of a kerfuffle amongst fasting enthusiasts in the wellness world. In general, I assume you're familiar with this study and I thought it would be wise to kind of solicit your thoughts on it. Yes. So my understanding of the study was that they looked at long-term color restriction, plus or minus time restated eating. So either your color restricted severely, and then you eat within a window of 8 hours, I believe. Or you just coloristic. So first of all, it's really a pointless study because these long-term caloris station studies we already know that they're going to result in people regaining the weight back. There are two excessive and also most people don't realize that they're probably associated with these thrifty, meaning that the body eventually slows down metabolism. We know this from multiple colorization studies. So now you're stuck and there was an old New England Journal medicine that is showing that. So now you lose weight, but now your metabolism adjusts even lower than your adjustment per kilogram, body weight. So that means that you're pretty much condemned to regain all the weight. So it's a pointless study to begin with. And then in addition to that, you add the timeless eating, I don't think it's a valid argument. I'm not a big fan of 16 hours a day. I'm a big fan of 12 hours of fasting a day. And but I don't think it should be used against the 16 hours. Because it was just a study that I don't think should be done, not that way, and it doesn't really lead to any conclusions. Right. I mean, what was interesting about it? First of all, I was conducted over a period of a year, so at least according to the media, that was the longest term under which they had studied humans with some kind of setup like this. But the feeding window was 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., which I guess it's sort of like eating an early dinner. It's not that different than a normal feeding window. Yes, but again, you're also seeing it with severe calorie restriction. So 800 calories, 15 minutes. Even worse than what while for the other people did in the past. So these are these are already starting with something that is so extreme that. And at the end of the study, you can see that what we know happens in most cases, they start regaining weight. So starting the 8 or 9 months, you start seeing the weight regain, which is, again, what's been observed in so many studies. Right. I mean, they also identified no substantive difference in risk factors, which of course is related to longevity, but in your mind is that a function of the calorie restriction or why was that part of the result as well? Well, I mean, if you go from 25 to 3000 calories, 2500, 2000 calories a day to 1500 or whatever. Yeah, it's not surprising that an additional compacting it into 8 hours versus however many hours it makes no difference. So I don't think that says anything about fasting in general. I mean, fasting, first of all, is not 16 hours every day. I mean, fasting is a lot of different techniques from your work and some don't. And that one happened to, I think it told us that if you're already severely restricted, eating within 8 hours doesn't help you any further. Right. So we're going to define these different fasting modalities, what works, what doesn't. In your opinion. And how we're thinking about longevity. But before we do that, I mean, if you were to construct a proper study, what parameters would you set up like, what did they get wrong and how could somebody do this where it would show a legitimate effective results that would be reliable? Yeah. Well, first of all, you don't want to do severe interventions like that, right? Because people will abandon it. And then when they abandon it for a few times, it's worse than when you never started. So it's better to let somebody be overweight and even obese than take them to this yo yo cycles of losing a lot of weight, regaining a lot of weight, right? So we know that from studies previous study. So yeah, you want to, as we do, I have two foundation clinics. And we try to minimize the changes and try to be as effective as possible with minimal changes. And you want to probably take a couple of years to get there. So we have diabetes patients and people with cardiovascular disease takes a couple of years to convert somebody back really convert them into something that they can sustain for the rest of their lives..

New England Journal medicine New England Journal of Medicin Miami China cardiovascular disease diabetes
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Fat stores. I mean, cognitively, everything changes. It's very, very interesting. It's hard to go back to how it was before in terms of viewing food and so on. Yeah. It's totally different. Looking back over your stunts, all the magic, the endurance feats, which ended up being more dangerous than you expected or scarier than expected. Probably the 44 days with the water fast in London in a box because I think I went into mild organ failure and I dropped a 33% BMI, which was well documented, but it was the recovery on that. I think to this day, it's still screwed up my metabolism and my weight goes up and down really fast and it did real damage. Vitamin deficiencies of pigment. I would find who has been there 44 days. Food only water. I lost 60 pounds and 44 days. The plexiglass diet. Not recommended. Not recommended. Dietician will not have this on the multiple choice options. What did your refeeding look like after that? Well, that was a really interesting part. So after I did the 44 days, I was brushed to the hospital where I stayed for, I think, two weeks. When they started refeeding me, I think my phosphate levels jumped out of control and I almost went to shock and died, and that was the refeeding syndrome. We published a paper and then New England Journal medicine about the refeeding syndrome, which is because most hunger strikers in the past they do it in their very anti government anti, you know it's the first statement, or as I just did it as a performance piece. And therefore I was willing to give all my blood and all my urine to doctors and let them use it as research. So it actually became useful in the sense that there was a real documented study of the prolonged effects of fasting. 44 days or a starvation technically, yeah. Were there any of your performances on the flip side that you thought were going to be very difficult or very scary that were easier than expected for you for whatever reason? Nope. What is magic mean to you? Because you do so much more than illusion and magic. I mean, you really have sort of a full stack performer kit at your disposal. But what does magic mean to you? For me, it's just a beautiful performance art. It's something where and it's also like you learn a really difficult skill. It defies logic. And then you have an immediate reaction to it. So it's something you can do almost anywhere anytime. And it's also a constant pursuit of information, but information that isn't readily available. So it's like you have to dig up history, you read about a guy that had done something from a hundred years ago. He died took a secrets to the grapes. He spent years trying to understand how he did it and it's trial and error practice, repetition and then finally all of a sudden you're able to do these things that you had only read about. One was called the human aquarium, which is about a guy that could convert his body into an aquarium where he could store creatures. Another was I'm not kidding. Yeah. Another was a magician. Another was a sturgeon in his mouth and regurgitated. Well, anything. Anything that could live in water and land. But then you also find there's another guy that was the human dragon. And he could drink kerosene. It would float on top of gallon of water in a stomach, and then he would blow fireballs out of his mouth, igniting a huge fire, and then just when he thought that was the end, he'd use a gallon of water that was stored in his stomach and put out the fire. But of course, of course, one time he did it wrong and died. So and.

London New England
"journal medicine" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Home and spreading it to loved ones. there's also We would handle your child's exposure differently in terms of. What do we do. If your child has known significant exposure to cove in nineteen frankly are physicians and nurses are reporting among the vaccinated. Who are getting sick. It's a mild form of the disease That actually resolves more quickly than cove nineteen infections among the unvaccinated. I mean that is reasonable loan to convince me to want to get vaccinated. But what would you say to patient in your office. You know you have a sixteen year old who is reluctant to get back needed for various reasons. How would you convince them. Or what kind of information can be powerful to share with them. The first thing that the sixteen year old and parent needs to hear from me as my strong recommendation for the vaccine. I'm not basing this just on the idea that the vaccine safe. I'm not basing this just on the idea that the vaccine's effective i'm basing it on the fact that it's needed epidemiologically for that sixteen year old. That is we have data. Showing sixteen-year-olds are at risk and benefit from the vaccine and that we don't have alternatives. We are seeing These cases despite masking and social distancing we don't have an alternative to protect your sixteen year old I do think it's important for providers nurses to make sure our patients and their parents get the questions they have answered a good third of us are eager to get the vaccine. A middle third of us are complacent. We'll get the vaccine if it's easy enough to give and when we show up at a doctor's office walk to the clinic and find out that they're doing walk in vaccines we'll get it. If they do it in the workplace. They'll get a do it in the schools again but these people aren't making appointments for it. There's another third of us who just have questions. Is it really right for me. And frankly a lot of my parents just need to hear. Oh you've thought about my six jail. Who has this conditions on this medicine and you still think that person should get it or despite that reaction that child had previously to another To another medicine you still think the child should get it so i urge parents who have questions about their particular child situation to reach out to healthcare provider. Yeah absolutely we love answering these questions. And having these discussions with families one discussion. That i had not too often but occasionally is about the reports of the really rare myocarditis in males after. Mostly the second dose of the vaccine Can you talk a little bit. More about this Maybe the evidence behind the fda's review of this and buyer. Why should we still vaccinate young healthy adult males against kobe. Nineteen you know from the early publications. From the cdc to as recently as a publication. I believe in new england journal medicine yesterday. What we know about this myocarditis and And a related phenomenon. Called pericarditis is that it does appear to occur following an mri rene vaccine Such as the cova vaccine but very rarely and it's transient. It goes away. And it's mild for the most part it's mild It's the myocarditis which is an inflammation..

fda cdc new england
"journal medicine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"But you know so. Let's go back to vitamin c. Concerning what hospitals are doing our most hospitals using vitamin c. To treat these diseases today or is there still a resistance enormous resistance. I must say though. One unintended and beneficial consequence of this pandemic was. It is focused a spotlight spotlight on vitamin c. As is never occurred before and sort of like The expression goes to cat got out of the bag and a lot of vitamin c. Started being used early on the pandemic and in my judgment quickly. Got out there before the fda could start issuing mandates as to don't use vitamin c. for this or don't use vitamin c. For that and too many people are already getting dramatic results very early on the pandemic and entire network of hospitals. Some twenty plus hospitals in new york began using vitamin c with excellent results. Still not as good as they could have because even the hospitals that are using the vitamin c. And the positions that are out there that are fighting the establishment of using vitamins. D still aren't using high enough doses. That's another story. It's also very interesting to note that. Virtually all of the significant investigations on high dose vitamin c. and treating clinical disorders comes from china. About the same time that the Will hand area started getting heavily infected with colbert or whatever this infectious pathogen is or whatever this agent is one of the areas in china shipped manufacturing vitamin c. Shift fifty tons of vitamin c powder to wuhan kinda tells you that the chinese new right up what the best thing was to deal with that if you ship fifty tons of vitamin c powdered any city in the united states would have sat on the warehouse until the turn brown. I believe that. I read in the epoch times that they didn't article that covered it back. I don't know probably six months ago. It's a weekly newspaper that i get. I don't know if you're familiar with that but Yeah they they featured an article that said that that's what Went china was using to fight. Fed was vitamin c and vitamin of course but yeah and very effectively. Yeah well so. So what type of vitamin c. Cause i do the liposuction. We'll packets and i am also have bought. Dr mccullough's liposuction vitamin c. By the way he was on the show yesterday and he said he's a good friend of yours. so how. how awesome is that back to back that you guys sir. Yeah and so are you. Is i greatly respect his courage because he's out poking the bear in the eye and that was that's what needs to be done and he needs somebody brave to do it. So hats off to dr where cola and is long-term fight for medical freedom and doing things correctly as well as he's fighting against the political consequences which is unfortunately inextricably interwoven with everything that we're doing here. I mean you have on. We talked earlier. And i mean healthcare. Make no doubt about. It is a business and foremost absolutely. I mean just anybody i mean. Nobody likes to take that. Their doctors doing anything less than what's in their best interest. Well i'm sorry that's the exception and not the rule okay. I don't know why this shocked so many people of the pharmaceutical companies placed enormous pressure on doctors and doctors. Don't like to be hassled. So they just promote the pharmaceutical drugs. Make a lot of money. Say well this is what Our new england journal medicine said to do which is also supported by the pharmaceuticals but unfortunately the docs take it too far. And i can't tell you the number of emails. I've had over the years with desperate individuals begging begging their doctors in the intensive care unit to give their loved ones..

china Dr mccullough fda colbert new york united states cola new england
"journal medicine" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"And and i think you know. We need to in america and many places. Look at the data and say okay. There's no evidence at a harmless. But how much evidence is there that it helps us. And what's the bigger picture. The fact is despite the fact that the us has done a tremendous job actually sending out vaccines to other countries Last week at a much higher percentage of vaccinated and other countries the likelihood of variants like delta. Coming down the pike and causing even more disruption goes up and so. Why don't we just pause on on taking up that next dose until we actually know what it's good for and frost that that that the vaccines that we have in our bodies right now are going to protect us from getting very sick and hospitalizations. As as we've talked about on prior shows. I thought it helped in terms of increasing your ability to fight off infections. My wrong i thought that was the reason for the futures absolutely marjorie. Yeah absolutely did they. Data has shown Again when you look at Data that's coming. Out of for instance. New england journal medicine that was released in israel and some other countries it shows that yes when you get a boost or your antibodies go up. The question is is the. Antibodies going up significant and not. How much do you will be protected from severe illness in hospitalizations and are the antibodies. That are going up the right. Antibodies are they the ones that are actually gonna most significantly protect us against the virus so again the data that was reviewed by the fda. I was actually really pleased that they came out with up to moderate response. Saying let's hold the horses a little bit. Likelihood is that will recommend it for people sixty and older people who are more likely to need me need a little bit of a immune boost. But let's just trust that the vaccines are working well enough for the rest of us and that we need to really now continue to push on getting the vaccines distributed to people who haven't gotten any doses. Let's go to ryan in the car. Thank you very much for calling ryan. Heireann thinks so much question for the doctor..

america marjorie New england israel fda ryan Heireann
"journal medicine" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"The has declared that hospitals now because they're overwhelmed are going to start to deliver basically rationed care. You should not expect the same standards of care that you're used to expecting the healthcare delivery system because they're just not able to give me give some specific examples instead of having one intensive care nurse for two patients. It's now going to be one intensive care nurse for six patients with some help from non. Icu nurses because they're overwhelmed. You cannot transfer patients to higher level of care for things that they need to get done if they have very advanced cancers for instance because those hospitals don't have room if you need elective surgery their elective surgeries are being canceled. Traumas are still happening. Babies are still being born. These are the problems that we're having in a situation where you may think that because you're healthy and strong young you're not going to be affected but if you were to get into a car accident or you know somebody wants to deliver a baby and has a complication. It's going to be difficult for those things to happen. And so this is the thing that's occurring and going back to my experience in the last couple of weeks every single one of those patients in the hospital that were there in their thirties they're forties were not vaccinated and it's based on information. That's coming out that you're making decisions based on whether or not you should get the vaccine because you hear about side effects or you hear about things for instance about myocarditis. Well here's an article from the new england journal medicine. Peer reviewed published september. Sixteen two thousand and one looking at the israeli data with almost a million subjects in each arm. So what we have here plotted.

Icu cancers new england journal medicine
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Excess. But i not only. Do you want to know how risky it is. You wanna worse the safest place in the world. So i looked around. And i found out the highest death rate in the world last year from college was new york state where i trained so point one seven percent which still means you know again when you looking at taking a vaccine. It's experimental and risky. This is a ninety nine point. Eight three percent survival rate even in the worst place in the world last year so that was the worst place point one seven percent and guess where the best place was. Uganda not place. We attribute fancy medicine to but it was point. Zero zero zero zero four percent now even giving them some break. I people always say well but they probably don't report things they're okay but this is a ten thousand times improved but i think there's i think there's room for wiggle room there so there ten thousand times less likely to die in uganda. And it's also true in senegal in nigeria and taiwan and now india at the end of last year. Had i think a third of the desk that did and yet the three times our population. So really what's going on here. Well in in uganda and senegal those places in africa. They are free enough to walk down to the corner store and purchase hydroxy win over the counter no getting a doctrine awaiting line so they automatically gave themselves early treatment when they started feeling bad. They just routinely do that. So that's probably the the answer. If you look at countries that if there was a study done around the world and it looked at the countries that routinely used hydroxy would early. Often i dress clark versus the those that didn't like the united states and the death rate at i was seventy five percent roughly lower in those countries. It's come down. I think to about seventy percent overall now. But it's still they're doing better. That's a pretty good study and the study they tried to discredit with the fake study. They reported in the lancet and new england journal medicine where the data was being collected by and adult content model and science fiction writer. Storefront right. he can't make that up and it has been discredited. The people who set it early on. We're not taking seriously as far as like talking exposing it. And now everything that they talk about. The study ended up being true now. So the problem is The headlines in the new england journal saying it didn't work has discouraged people all over the country academic medicine all they have to see a headline in the new england journal in its done man so it was a it was a it was a con game. There really was. You can't think about anything but a takedown. So that's one of the reasons we have Some there's so much evidence there's over two hundred Period you papers now. Showing hydroxy flirting wars over eighty three. Maybe more now on either maktum now. Ivermectin seems to be working later in the course of the disease. And that's how like pure korean. People that work in the icy was sicker people. That seems to be a very critical drawing for them if you really turn them around so but as far as that we're not using them but not but this is why twenty years ago our world changed. We lost thousands of lives that horrific morning in september over the last twenty years with chaos ensuing brave men and women in our first responder communities answered the call and rushed into the unknown as we watched in horror as the morning unfolded before our very eyes. Three hundred forty. Three firefighters lost their lives that day and almost all our first responders who answered that call have perished sense. We here at the charlie. Kirk show are proud to partner with minute. Men coffee a company that is unapologetically patriotic and constitutionally based who honors all our men and women who serve and have served in the amazing country that we call home the morning of september twelfth america came together as one on our all who lost their lives that day and in the days and weeks and years to come i'm excited to announce the official coffee provider for this program. Minutemen coffee is proud to partner with the national fallen firefighters foundation nine eleven tribute roast the patriots. At minute men do not just want to honor. Those lost lives that morning but once honor. All our first responders and military servicemen and women with perished since nine eleven. They're seeking to raise awareness of the fact that they put their lives on the line for all of us..

Uganda new england journal senegal lancet and new england journal maktum nigeria taiwan new york clark africa india america Kirk national fallen firefighters f charlie
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"You catch cove in nineteen from other people and i'm basically hardly around other people and i messed up in. Very careful about social distancing. Wash my hands. And all the various things i mentioned last week i think god forbid a societies really just collapsing. There's a whole bunch of things going wrong and we have incompetent leadership and so they just go after the wrong things like the the people in leadership aren't getting the results. People are seeing that society's collapsing and so the leaders you have to make it look like they're doing something so they chase general red herrings or you're just pointless issues to try to bolster up their authority catalytic cracking down on you. You know god forbid You know the the leadership is in accomplishing anything. And so they're going to crack down on you because you're criticizing them and and to me that's just human nature the nature of power. So it's not. It's not surprising Like i'm not a doctor like medical vice. I have done quite a bit of research to the virus itself but You in terms of medical advice how to deal fit about whether those treatments work. Joe rogan's obviously a exceptional athlete. And you'll fear factor fame. He probably has exceptional immune system so could be that he would have a virus of any way office in the heat. Took the prescription. And also i have a on a Comment he didn't trump also legalize the right to try to remember that i mean. That was one of his initiatives as executive order that doctors have the right to use its mental drugs. They don't have to go through the arduous process and by the way the drugs are we're talking about the drug in the drug those of both. Fda approved drugs. In the case of the drug it was approved in the nineteen seventies. it has been used by millions of people all over the world quite safely. No drug is perfect. Of course if you leave read the fine print of just about anything that you take you see that there are there are there are side effects but nevertheless it is fairly conventional in terms of. It's up it's dangerous and it has been used for various ailments all over the world but yet you cannot talk about it yet. In last year you had the lancet which is one of the world's most premier medical journals and the journal and the new england journal medicine also very prestigious journal. Run the study which denounced the age drug and made claims that it was dangerous and ineffective and then they had to retract that study which was unprecedented. Never had they had that happen always a very well respected and known to do very serious vetting that would they would have to actually retract. A an entire study is actually a scandal for them and should be and it was even though it was wasn't nagged me. Neither one of us are health expert. Doesn't pay to get too much into the nature of the beast is You're just as more and more things go wrong. The people in power You democrats specifically need to explain why things aren't going the way they want him to end therefore they're gonna say 'cause we don't have enough power in they're going to try to gain more power and you'll krona viruses going back up and you're so you know blame it on the on vaccinated blame it on misinformation blame it on all these other things and saying it in order to defeat krona virus. What we need to do is you'll give more power to them. And you'll god forbid you have the situation where there's a distrust of the citizenry of by the government and people are starting to turn on each other in in. Maybe if the texas abortion ban..

Joe rogan new england journal medicine a Fda the journal texas
"journal medicine" Discussed on Tom Roten Morning Show

Tom Roten Morning Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on Tom Roten Morning Show

"And then they rolled straight into the Emergency use authorization where we all got the jabs but even the fda now in the licensure packet for bio intech. There's a clause in there where they specifically admit that the databases that they had hoped would be able to detect. These kinds of adverse events have turned out to be inadequate so that's the fair system v safe etc. The fda now admits they were inadequate. Then as if that wasn't good enough the fda played another little trick with this licensor normally. There's there's a group called the ver- back. It's an acronym the vaccine related but biologics advisory committee and Any time the. Fda comes up to a decision about whether or not to license vaccine. This independent scientific group has to review the same data that the fda insiders have reviewed. And there's also supposed to be a period for public comment associated with those ver- back meetings but the fda decided that there was no controversy here and absolutely no reason to convene the normal br back meeting which by the way the ver- back is still meeting. But they're talking about lou vaccines and some minor issues so they. They're they already got their scheduled meeting. They're just not going to talk about these vaccines. So the fda Totally bypass their normal process for external review In the case of these because they said there were no controversies and so there was no reason to have that review. I think tat is an amazing statement. just just to assert that there was nothing controversial here now. Another thing that's fascinating was that they issued this authorization to bio intech the day before. Two major papers dropped. That showed that the adverse events in the new england journal medicine the adverse events were much broader than they admit to in the licensing package and The other paper is the one that shows the natural. Immunity is Broader and Last longer than the immunity caused by the vaccine there. Some another paper also from israel that showed that the effectiveness of the vaccine to protect against infection disease by delta was lower than than with the previous strains in the other thing. That's fascinating about the fda package is that they completely disregarded all the delta data it's all based on the alpha and beta data which is now obsolete so you got a license for a vaccine that doesn't exist yet on the shelves here in the states based on data for viruses that don't exist anymore in the states that makes sense. It's it's unbelievable it really is. This has all been very eye opening for all of us. Dr malone and is i thank you for the work. You're doing to get the truth out across america. Thank you for taking time this morning. To come on this program and I just hope that That you'll be able to continue to get the truth out. We've been talking to dr robert. Malone the inventor of the m are in a technology dr milan be safe and thank you again for coming on. Thank you and enjoy life and paradise right..

fda new england journal lou Dr malone israel dr robert dr milan america Malone
"journal medicine" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"The nuggets at that sweet spot of stretching the imagination stretching the believability. But it's still not so far out there be dismissed right away at boy. You just keep these questions coming. Ck so Number one is that we site are stored our source correct. It's like because people make these claims and you say it sounds too good to be true than we doubt it. We question it. We just lost trust so we always start. Did you see the two thousand twenty one april issue of harvard business review. Did you see that. New england journal medicine said this. Did you see on the on. So we cite our source and the second thing you can. You came up with a sweet spot of a statistic. It can't be old news because that's an eye roller bow by your wasted my time and so honey come up with him. Recency equals relevancy so when we are looking for these statistics he studies these research. Your something that just happened. Two months ago ads. Relevancy and recency an urgency to our pitch. So do we say. Did you see the study just two months ago. You see already the browser up. Because oh it's so it's more relevant. John kotter out of harvard said. Do you know the number one prerequisite for change. Glad a sense of urgency. So you just asked to key question because if we're coming up with statistics once again that show it's getting worse than it's costing more than it doesn't need to be killing this many people that people don't need to be suffering here and it's recent you are packing in urgency relevancy and immediacy in a way that people are more compelled to act So do you as an expert again because you breathe tons of news and research. Data's reports how do you pick up the juiciest thing of the filter down to the thing that the staff is gonna be right hook and i recommend free stats and we want scope. Because we just don't want money money money because maybe our decision makers maybe that's their top priority..

harvard nuggets John kotter New england
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Current

The Current

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Current

"This book is called relaxed dammit. Tell me knowing what you know. We spoke in a number of times As as i've said earlier you were debunking. Sort of scientific quackery. What was the impetus in writing this book now well studied misinformation and how pop culture represents science for for really decades. And i got the sense that you know. We always talk about the big things. Matt you know things like You know vaccination hasn't seen incredibly important Climate change at gmo but these same forces impact our decisions that we make day to day so You know the as you point out the gimme because it takes place over a day. And i really look at all those all those decisions and it's kind of an excuse to to look at those social forces you know Fearmongering misrepresentation Through a new lens and and get a sense of look this impacts all of us and you know is a few tools we can. We can cut through the noise. You say that. We live in a knowledge era paradox. What does that mean. Well we've never had so much sciences. We have right now. We've never had so much access to science as we have right now. You know you could go on on google right now. I think he can do it right now. And and you could find studies from the new england. Journal medicine the Jama incredibly easily right. And even when i started my graduate work..

Matt google new england
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Gerry Callahan Podcast

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Gerry Callahan Podcast

"Turtaboi coming off of big big golf tournament where he raised a lot of money for turtaboi is good congratulations Maybe next year. I'll show up and have some fun sound like you had a good time right turtles. Quick to blast jerry. A lot of people are looking for you. Were they actually jerry. I'm glad you're here for two reasons. One we couldn't get piers morgan. We wanted some some neanderthal creighton. Who attacked simone biles. And we tried to get Piers morgan or or clay travis. And they blew us off so we got you and also you have young kids. I want to get to this. Because i can't imagine how infuriated i would be. How just insane insanely angry and upset. I'd be if i had young kids. Who were in whatever third grade. Sixth grade eighth grade. And i knew because of these these these crisis actors in the white house That would have to mask them up for school. I'll just to do anything. I wouldn't mask children. We all know. Children don't belong masks. Children are not susceptible to the virus. The virus does not kill children period. You know it's just performance art and yet you're going to have to do it if you want your kids to go to school it just. I can't imagine and your ears yours unhinged as i am about enhanced. What the hell are you gonna do. Turtle boy you gonna. We're not gonna. We're not going to do it well. It's a legal decision. You're gonna home school. what are you going to do. We've so it's a local decision your local school committee decides it. And we've already. We have a little insurrection. Going of parents here in the school district and there is a plan. There's a school committee meeting coming up. Believe me in the next couple of weeks. You're going to see all over the state school committee meetings and why everyone should vote in your local school community. Good everyone vote. I'm talking about now. If you think that your little your neighbors are going to get together and you're going to defeat in the state of massachusetts. It's it's not the state of massachusetts. It's your local school board. You not the state of massachusetts doesn't decide if your kids wear masks did you move. Did you live in the state of massachusetts. You know how people think you know how they will react to this. They're already parts of massachusetts right. It's not gonna work that way. It is not gonna work that way. You know what's gonna happen. There's going to be one case in your town and they're gonna say oh time to double mask. You know before. Ben past four ninety five have you jerry. It's a different world out here. People are different. We're not all like communists out east. Who all thinking people like this red areas out here. Not i know you. You ran for school committee. You've got waxed which is too bad. I was rooting for you. But they don't they don't like your kind. In massachusetts people. Independent thinkers people who read like just mask up and be a sheep. And i swear to god you will see people. Today in massachusetts particularly in boston and cambridge messed up. Not one of them knows why not. One of them knows why. They're suddenly wearing a mask again. They're all vaccinated. They're all vaccinated. Some of had kobe. They obviously do not need masks. Everybody knows it's just theatre everybody from but well maybe not biden but harris and fau ci and will linski. It's all political theater. We know that it doesn't matter in a state like massachusetts. It doesn't matter in in new york rhode island connecticut. Ah california this this is going to be right now. We're already well already. A very divided nation already. We see you know like things when you see the january six hearings and you realize you know that there is. There's this great divide in this country. People who think what they think the by is on the level there are people like that and then there are others like us who know better and we realized you know the the southern border is being overrun by design. We know that we know january. Six is being treated like insurrection. For a reason it is all by design. It's all political. We know that you know that this started started before. Biden those the same masks stupid mandates from the cdc whol that new New journal medicine in the trump campaign to saying this spouting in the same nonsense about the masks the same thing. That's that's not true. There were we didn't know what we know now. We didn't know that zero children have died from cova without a serious underlying conditions zero. We know we saw this yesterday. Will linski was on. I forget one of their networks by demonstrations that were either cnn nbc at. She says the death rate for children with covert is much higher than for influenza phil curve a a covert influence or he. He's really good on this stuff on twitter and tv just ran the numbers. It was a flat out. Lie the head of the cdc. Harvard trained a bullet showing lansky flat out lied. Now why would she do that for political reasons. Correct just to. I mean they want to keep the fear porn. Going and last time people were supposed to wear masks. How long ago was that four. Four five months ago may thirteenth. You got biden talking about us turtle boy before to you know walmart and people yelled adamant it was. There was tension. There was the scenes in stores in offices or even out in public where people and we saw them. They're all over social media. People said where mass kicking gonna kill us all and it's it's all. This is really intense debate. Divide it's going to get one hundred times worse now because there'd be more people like turtle boy thankfully who no it's just theatre who no. There's no reason to mask up particularly children. So you're going to do your best turtle but it's all i'm saying i respect your your defiance and but you know how intense the the the nancy's the cairns you know the i do. Yeah they are. I hope you're i know that. But i think it's going to be different this time around. You really do. You cannot gonna be worse. No it's it's you cannot give people a taste of freedom and then just take it back like the people that there's going to be people this time who are compliant previously..

massachusetts piers morgan Turtaboi jerry simone biles clay travis creighton fau ci white house new New journal medicine golf biden linski cdc Ben cambridge rhode island harris boston connecticut
"journal medicine" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"You <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Telephony_Male> meet them <Speech_Male> have them <Speech_Male> call me <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> year. You <Speech_Male> are a joy. <Speech_Male> What a great question. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Why <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wouldn't a doctor prescribed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dennis prager show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> live from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the relief factor pain-free <Music> <Advertisement> studio. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We have a mexican <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> friend. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Eighty two year old <Speech_Music_Male> mother and mexico <Speech_Music_Male> tobin <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> was in the hospital <Speech_Male> very low <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> oxygen levels <Speech_Music_Male> and difficulty breathing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> She was <Speech_Male> given ivermectin <Speech_Music_Male> pack <SpeakerChange> home in <Speech_Music_Male> four days <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> as this last <Speech_Male> doctor said what is <Speech_Male> the harm and trying <Speech_Male> leave <Speech_Male> your doctor. 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Md <Speech_Male> there are some exceptions <Speech_Male> excel <Speech_Male> exceptions to every <Silence> rule. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> there's no <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> there's no group that <Speech_Male> is more sheep like <Speech_Male> their groups that <Speech_Male> are tied like professors <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> gender studies <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> but <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> they they <Silence> are sheep. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Cdc <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> says jump <Speech_Male> up five times. <Speech_Male> The doctor <Silence> jumps up five times. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Jama <Silence> writes this. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's the end. I don't <Speech_Male> have to inquire <Speech_Male> the journal of the <Speech_Male> american medical association. <Speech_Male> Said the <Speech_Male> sun is cold. <Speech_Male> The sun is cold <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> all these anecdotes <Speech_Male> about the sun providing <Speech_Male> heat <Speech_Male> their <Speech_Male> stanic total. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yep <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's correct. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Mike <Speech_Male> el segundo <Speech_Male> california. <SpeakerChange> Hello <Speech_Male> mike <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Music_Male> i know. For fact <Speech_Music_Male> as many people know <Speech_Music_Male> that since <Speech_Music_Male> nineteen eighty six <Speech_Music_Male> essentially <Speech_Telephony_Male> three or four years ago. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Telephony_Male> new england journal medicine <Speech_Music_Male> and the journal american <Speech_Telephony_Male> association <Speech_Male> have been knowingly <Speech_Telephony_Male> intentionally publishing <Speech_Male> nearly <Speech_Telephony_Male> fraudulent unscientific <Speech_Telephony_Male> bias <Speech_Male> research reports <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> They've <Speech_Telephony_Male> been doing this to <Speech_Male> promote gun control. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> most of these reports <Speech_Male> use multiple. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Not just one or two <Speech_Male> but by the way <Speech_Male> let me just say. <Speech_Male> Forgive me. Because i have <Silence> so little time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> you reminding <Speech_Male> me of something. <Silence> What is <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> what is <Speech_Male> the england journal <Silence> of medicine doing <Speech_Male> reporting <Speech_Male> anything <Speech_Male> about gun control <Speech_Male> if they have an article <Silence> about <Speech_Male> treating <Speech_Male> bullet wounds. <Speech_Male> That's that <Silence> makes sense. <Speech_Male> You're he's <Speech_Male> right. Though they editorialize <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> including <Speech_Male> on on racism <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> no known <Speech_Male> worldwide <Speech_Male> as a <Silence> medical issue <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is <SpeakerChange> a biological <Speech_Male> issue. <Music> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Good <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> news <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> male female <Music> <Advertisement> hour coming up.

dennis prager journal of the <Speech_Male> a new england journal mexico the england journal california
"journal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"journal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Couple of minutes here. So struggled through power lines and cancer. You've come to wrestle with the pitfalls of epidemiology. What brings you into the den of nutrition and living in la fantas near the beach. Doing freelance science journalism and working on screenplays. Probably still not making any money so my friends were wrong about. At least my ability to get rich. Writing screenplays i call up my editor at science and say look. I got to pay the rent next month. I need a story. I could turn over quickly. The have anything. I could write that all generate a paycheck and so researchers have just reported there reporting on the first results on the dash diet dietary approaches to stop hypertension. It's low fat. Lots of fruits and vegetables dietary approach and the papers coming on the new england journal of medicine and they have a pre print. They have a pre release copy. It's embargoed so i should write about this. And you've never written about nutrition and health science never written about nutrition. No okay so he's pretty desperate if he's giving you this because this is a little outside. It's one page in the magazine. It's not a lot going on so the way you do one page story right. You call up the principal investigator. If the articles have been published yet you ask the pi interview him you recipe for the names of a couple of other people who know about the research could comment three interviews for one page doing your job so it takes a morning to do the interviews and afternoon to write the article today and a half. I get my rent money. What i didn't know about this article is that had been leaked to science in advance ended had been leaked with the list of researchers who i could interview. This is what year this was. Nineteen ninety eight or nine. My editor gives me the list. Doesn't tell me it was leaked or if he did. I didn't pay attention. So i get the article. I call up the principal investigator. Larry appel johns hopkins. I interview him. I asked him for the names of people i talk to. I call up one of the people on the list. This is a former president of the american heart association at the university of alabama birmingham. And this person tells me that they can talk about the paper or the loser. Funded and i say it's this. We're talking about a diet trial. The new england journal of madison. Nobody lose funding for talking about that. It's going to be not gonna come out to after the embargo the woman she refuses to talk to me. She won't tell me anything i said. Look if there's something wrong with this paper let's go off the record not for attribution like woodward and bernstein and the garage with deep throat. Tell me what's wrong with this paper. What the issue is. Because if you don't tell me i'll never know and i'll report it incorrectly. She refuses even to do that. So then i get off the phone with her. I call up one of the people. That larry appel. Johns hopkins is given me. And he's a researcher who darts yelling at me. This guy is the the grand old man of the field. I don't know this any starts yelling. Mary over the phone that there's no controversy over salt and blood pressure and i am not calling about tom. Blood pressure professor calling about this diet trial that lowered blood pressure in the new england journal medicine and he continues to berate me that. There's no controversy. So i get off the phone with him and i call up my editor science. I said i had an american heart. Association former president refused to talk to me because she would lose her funding. She said if she did. And then i had this other guy yelling at me that there's no controversy over salt and blood pressure when i'm not writing about song blood pressure. There must be a controversy about tom. Blood pressure that. I know nothing about so. I'm to write up this article. Get my paycheck. And then if you don't mind to look into this assume salt pressure controversy and see we're missing and i spent the next nine months reporting that i interviewed about five people for one magazine. Article turns out that it is one of the. Most vitriolic controversies in the history of medicine and even though already by nineteen ninety eight. We'd all been eating low salt diets. America for fifteen to twenty years. It was clear that the randomized control evidence never really supported the intervention and that was backed up by a lot of bad epidemiology and research is assuming that associations were causal that weren't and that were even questionable associations to begin with and while i was doing that story this fellow who was yelling ma. I like to joke. He sounded exactly like walter matthau over the telephone by the way he's still alive. He's about one hundred one years old so while i'm running him down as a scientist that's argue Evidence that may be. He understands nutrition and diet far better than i do anyway. While i was interviewing him this walter matthau character was clearly the you know i spent ten years of my life. Studying bad science was clear. This guy was one of the worst scientists. I'd ever interviewed my life in the bottom five. At least and i thought i had interviewed the worst. He took credit not just forgetting americans to eat less salt but eat less as well for the low fat diet. We had all been on since one thousand nine hundred eighty four so at one point i call them my editor and i said look. This guy was involved in this controversy fat controversy in any way fat. There's gotta be a story there. You're the message. From nobel dreams and bad science was that bad scientists. Never get the right answer. you know. it's just. It's too hard to get the right answer to go in being sloppy and slipshod and lazy and ambitious and get a right. Nature's and that kind. So i said you know what i'm done writing about salt. I'm gonna write about fat. No idea what the story is. I've been eating. I've been living in la whites and probably a fifteen percent fat diet. The would have been proud of me but if the dogma was based in any substantive way on this fellows work. There's a story there. And i spent a year writing that piece. I interviewed the hundred and forty five researchers and administrators for one magazine article. The big fat lie. No this was the soft science of dietary fat. So this was. The salt story was calm. The political science of saul political and parentheses and the fat story was called the soft signs of dietary fat soft and parentheses. They both won national association of science writers science in society award after you wrote these two articles one on the soft science of fat and the other on the political science of salt. What made you decide to go. Even further and write what would become perhaps the biggest and most controversial piece you wrote at least in the newspaper and i believe it was for the times magazine. Wasn't it new york times magazine. I wanted to write a book. When i was done with the to science articles on whatever was happening in medical science that could lead to these kinds of mistakes. Remember my obsession. As pathological science the nutrition aspect of it is just an interesting vehicle through which to explore. And i realized that if i did a book then i would go broke. I was married. I had responsibilities member. I had come out. Forty thousand dollars in debt. Just doing the cold fusion book was clear. I didn't work fast. And i didn't wanna work fast and that i would not be able to get an advance large enough to cover the time it would take to do the book so i was living in new york. I was having lunch once a month with an editor new york times magazine. 'cause among other things. We shared an affinity for the same local french cafe in the village and we would talk about story ideas and we decided it might be a good idea to see about balanced. Ask the question. What caused the obesity epidemic. And i said to the sky. When i was reporting the dietary fat story for science i had had met with a administrative from the nih. Who said you know. It's interesting when we told people to go on low fat diets in nineteen eighty four. We assume we really didn't have the evidence. Support the heart disease connection and the message. My story is a never got that evidence but we thought if nothing else would be telling people to avoid the dentist calories in the diets they avoided fat. They'd lose weight and that would take care of the obesity and overweight at the greatest risk factors for heart disease and he said lo and behold now obesity epidemic and apparently people stopped eating fat and eating more carbohydrates in that ghanem fatter so. I always had this two hypotheses for what caused the obesity epidemic which you can see in the day to begin somewhere between one thousand nine hundred seventy eight nineteen ninety-one and it coincides with two fundamental changes in the american die was embracing of the idea that a low fat diet is a hard healthy diet so carbohydrates in general go from being considered inherently fattening. Which is sort of the conventional wisdom until the nineteen sixties and then they get transformed into heart healthy diet foods and you may be too young to remember this but we all stopped eating butter and started having pasta and bagels every day and low and behold everybody starts getting fatter. The other thing is high. Fructose corn syrup cayman nineteen seventy seven. Seventy eight type. Fructose corn syrup fifty. Five comes in which can replace shar in coca cola and pepsi and by nineteen eighty-four saturates the beverage industry and this coincides with the beginning of the epidemic and people.

new york Larry appel johns hopkins ten Forty thousand dollars fifteen percent fifteen one thousand next month one page Five today Johns hopkins two hypotheses nineteen eighty-four ghanem one three interviews Mary hundred and forty five researc american heart association
Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

Breaking Biotech

09:04 min | 3 years ago

Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

"So I'm glad to be back and I have a great show for you all today. We have some real spicy stuff to get into. Some of them have commented on twitter. But yet it's it should be good so I'm GONNA start off today by talking about some biotech news. Some little updates that we got some press releases and then a follow up by talking about Gillian ads at Rim decively data. We're going to touch a little bit. On the New England Journal. Medicine study that they published followed up by a report that was provided by our friends at Stat News. So that's going to be good and then the final topic. I WanNa talk about is stem line. So you know. One benefit of being in this volatile environment is that there are buying opportunities right now and one that I do see is a company called stem line. So we're GONNA talk about them and why think thereby right now so with that? Let's get to some of the news that we saw this week and first thing I wanted to touch on his after sys mostly because I just talked about them in the last video but we saw actually in the last couple of weeks that the FDA has authorized after says to initiate a pivotal clinical evaluating multi stem cell therapy in patients with Cova nineteen with induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. So some of the stuff that I talked about in my previous video was that I wasn't sure if the face to that. They're currently undergoing with their collaborator. In Japan was going to be a pivotal study. And it looks like it will be for the Japanese system and then this study that they're launching that they launched in the last couple of weeks is going to be the pivotal study for them domestically here in the United States so the primary endpoint is ventilator. Free Days Through Day. Twenty eight and they're beginning to open sites this quarter so I'm not sure exactly what that means in terms of when we can expect data. I would think maybe late Q. Three probably in Q. Four we'd see some data for this which could be a big boost for the company. Also what we learned in at the risk of opening another can of a drama this company they announce a public offering a twenty two million shares at two dollars and twenty five cents for about fifty million dollars in proceeds. I did say that I was expecting them to announce another offering and that is what we saw earlier than I expected. I really thought that they were GonNa wait until maybe later in the year to do this but while the songs doing okay I guess it's a it's an opportunity to do so so with another fifteen million dollars in cash. This should give them another six months or so and you know if they do see some good data from this pivotal study it would likely boost the stock quite a bit more before they have to go ahead and raise money again. So that's after says. I'm still saying on the sidelines. I'm still not super confident. In that data we originally with their phase one so I have no real sense on whether or not I think the date is GonNa be positive but I hope it is that this can get rolled out and it can actually start helping patients that have covert nineteen and areas going to move quickly to immunogenetics which is a company that kind of fell off my radar ticker symbol. Is I m you? They have a compound called says a to Mab Guven Akin and yes. I did practice. That's all I can say. A properly for metastatic triple negative breast cancer and I kind of talked about is the potential for this drug. It's it's a unique formulation so that they can really target the cancer cells and hit them with this tailored that is toxic to all sales. But because it's tethered to something that specifically targets cancer cells it would primarily affect them and kill them so the primary indication they're looking for is triple negative breast cancer and they had done in a sense study to confirm their previous face through results and there was some concern with safety but the sense that he was actually stopped for compelling efficacy. So that's great news for them the PDF date is June. Second of this year. And we'll see if the FDA is going to go ahead and approve the drug so that they can search treating metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients. They have a plan readout for your cancer in the second half of twenty twenty and they're also still enrolling patients for positive her two negative medicine breast cancer so I think that that trial read out is going to be particularly important for the company. And I'M GONNA keep them on my radar and pay a little bit better attention because I think that if they do see positive data there. The company has a a much larger patient population. Go after so Yeah so it's good for them and hopefully they'll see a positive result at the PDF eight anime. Keep an eye out for that trial moving on. I WanNa talk a little bit about Amarin. Because they had their earnings report while ago and what we learned is that they're cute. One Twenty twenty revenue beat estimates at one hundred and fifty million dollars and I had said previously that. I thought their estimates were sandbagged in anticipation of better results. And that is what happened but unfortunately none of this matters because they do not have pan protection in the United States given the ruling that we heard a little while ago so regarding to the appeal and the generics the CEO is not expecting at risk launches. But they are willing to file an injunction. I've talked about that in the past. This is not new news but they did also say that. In the event of an appeal loss Amarin would be willing to launch a brand engineering version. So this is an interesting strategy in order to allow them to maintain market share in the space because if they launch a generic version immediately. You know by the time another generic comes to the stage Amazon's already going to generic Kinda solidifies their position in the markets. There's not going to be really an advantage to patients taking a another third party. Generic other than Amazon's now the only issue with this is that the generic price is going to have to be competitive with the other companies. That launched generics as well. So in this way they're gonNA lower the amount of total revenue. Get but there's a lot of uncertainty in the company. I'm still not sure what I'm GonNa do with my shares. The stock has bounced back a little bit. But you know if they don't win appeal I assume they're gonNA see further downside until we actually start to see the kinds of numbers that start coming in given the new pricing of generic version of Amarin. So we'll see we'll keep you posted on what I do. I'm tempted to buy a little bit more and lower my cost basis by I'm I don't feel great about that either. So we'll see all right. Let's talk about Gilead. Everybody so first thing I want to touch on with Gilead is this New England Journal. Medicine studied that they released regarding the compassionate use of Rendez severe for patients with severe cove. In nineteen so Gillian been at the forefront of the media when it comes to this rendez severe drug that they're hoping to get approved and they initially had rendez severe offered only as compassionate use for patients as is still undergoing phase. Three trials right now so some people who are really severe severely affected by cove nineteen could apply to to take severe and what they did is they published a study with fifty three patients who had taken it under this program and really it wasn't a placebo controlled trial so for me. There's no real conclusion to be drawn. They said that a majority of patients were discharged. But because there's nothing to compare it to doesn't really mean much Another thing that's worth complaining about for the studies that they didn't even measuring viral load. So we don't even know if patients that were taking Severe head lowered viral loads in. You know we could figure that out by comparing baseline to treat a data. But they didn't do that so it's Kinda left in the dark here. The company itself has terminated a study in China with severe patients because of low enrollment. And they're awaiting the publication of these data to announce in-depth review the result. So that's one thing that we can also look forward to see is the data that we're getting from this low enrollment patient population in China. And they are doing a mild to moderate disease study in China. So that's still ongoing. Takes been seeing on twitter. Pretty disappointing a lot of people complaining that the New England Journal of Medicine shouldn't publish the study given that it was you know. There's a conflict of interest and there's no placebo and you're not new to academia. You know it's a cartel. The big name journals really only published stuff. That's like really hot off the press type thing. So of course there's huge problems with this study and Gillian's not even shy to mention them in the discussion so they clearly outlined limitations of the study. And everybody that I've seen on twitter isn't really taking that into consideration they think Gilead just willfully blind to the fact that there's no control. Obviously they know that. And if you want to throw the New England Journal Medicine under the bus or publishing this year but throw the entire institution appear review under the bus. It's a horribly flawed system as somebody. Who's coming from academia? I've seen this all the time you know. These journals are a cartel that gate keep science. So that unless you know people or your science is so particularly compelling that they'd be willing to publish it but if you WanNa talk about the academic system and publishing. Let's have that conversation but to call out this study in particular is being. The true hope written the true problem in the world of publishing. This is not the one for you

Gillian Twitter Gilead New England Journal FDA United States China Amarin Amazon New England Journal Of Medicin New England Journal Medicine Stat News Mab Guven Akin Severe Twenty Twenty Rim Decively Japan Respiratory Distress
More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds

Radio Surgery

01:11 min | 4 years ago

More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds

"And it's looked at a three decade long study about prostate cancer treatment, and it was a comparison study. So so many men think oh, you don't need cancer. Are let's say so many men are led to believe I mean, historically were all led to believe if you have cancer, you should get out of your body's you get a treated out of your body a cancer in your body's not going to do anything useful. And for some reason men have been pushed to do nothing about cancer. Well, here's a study a three. Decade-long study that looked at treatment versus no treatment for advanced prostate cancer in men, they looked at what happened to the men who got treatment versus didn't get treatment. And the study suggested that the benefits were in the men who got treated for advanced cancer. And it was published in the New England Journal medicine. The study started to see three decades have started before nineteen eighty nine and they'd go on to note that prostate cancers and number two cause of cancer deaths in men number one is lung cancer. There's one hundred sixty four thousand cases of prostate

Cancer Lung Cancer New England Journal Medicine Three Decades Three Decade