35 Burst results for "Journal Of American"

Ornithologists Attribute Owls Nocturnal Lifestyle To Cocaine Habit

The Topical

00:59 min | 17 hrs ago

Ornithologists Attribute Owls Nocturnal Lifestyle To Cocaine Habit

"Powell's when we're putting on our PJs they're just waking up to start their day and when we're waking up there in their nests putting on PJ's of their own but why scientists have long wondered about the predatory Birds unusual sleeping habits, but a new study now attributes the owls nocturnal lifestyle to their hard cocaine habits here at the details is opr nightbeat bird correspondent Charles, Dearborn Charles are you there? Who's asking me the topicals host? Leslie Price, you meant who like an oil says off that is just too cute Charles tell us more about this study a little scam gladly in a ground-breaking report released in the scientific journal Nature want to solid just said Bowdoin College in Maine made the case that all owls struggled with severe cocaine addiction that keeps them up from Sunset to the wee hours of the morning. Here's the studies

Charles Cocaine Bowdoin College Leslie Price Powell Maine
Fluttering Feathers Could Spawn New Species

60-Second Science

02:07 min | 22 hrs ago

Fluttering Feathers Could Spawn New Species

"Charles Darwin is most famous for his finches from WHO speaks he gleaned the idea that a single species might radiate into many but he studied other attributes of birds to like the rhythmic sounds some species made during courtship by fluttering, shaking or rattling their feathers together. Seen Star Wing there has been this fact that birds produce sounds with wings and tails or flight feathers. So there are species of mannequins that that do the sounds and there's hummingbird sent the sound Valentina Gomez Bauman is an evolutionary biologist and ornithologist at the field museum in Chicago she and her team have now observed that non vocal sound production phenomenon in another type of bird, the fork tailed flycatcher the researchers studied two groups of the birds in South America and recorded the birds making these fluttering sounds with their wings during morning courtship rituals. Ending combat between males. One of the two flycatcher subspecies is migratory the other stays put, and by carefully measuring the bird's feathers, the research team found that the migratory birds had longer thinner feathers presumably for some aerodynamic advantage. But that altered feather shape also meant the birds fluttering produced a different frequency, compare the migratory birds flutter. To the stationary birds. So basically, what we think is that because of loss of migration pressures for flight may influence the shape of the individual feathers to the point where the sound quality changes as well. The details are in the Journal, Integrative and comparative biology. Gomez bomb on says they're still not certain what role the sounds play in day to day flycatcher life. If the birds do indeed even pay attention to them, but she suspects the sounds may have some cultural importance to the birds in which case she says, the communication differences between the migratory and non migratory birds could further divide the two types of birds or in other words, give rise to the origin of species.

Valentina Gomez Bauman Charles Darwin Journal, Integrative And Compa Field Museum South America Chicago
Viral load is a puzzle in COVID-19

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

01:34 min | 1 d ago

Viral load is a puzzle in COVID-19

"Published in the Journal. Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine. Is suggesting that by wearing masks I mean this blowing my mind a I don't need face cream. Round, the mouth wrinkles and I need the eye wrinkles to show that I'm smiling under my mask. But apparently, by wearing masks, we could actually be improving our collective immunity two covid nineteen, and here's why I know. It's not just because we don't give it to each other but we could be making ourselves immune because when you're wear a mask if you are infected with the novel, Corona Virus It's at a lower dose and they're determining scientists increasingly that viral load is the key to this sucker. If you have a low viral load, you're either aced him dramatic or you don't get that. Sake. Loads are what seemed to correlate directly to severe illness and death. So wearing a mask reduces your viral load, but could still infect you. In. A way that would then lead you to would boost your immunity to the disease. Oh. So if someone breathes on you with cove in nineteen, but it comes at you through the mask, you'd get like the almost like an inoculation dose. Almost like an inoculation dose. So mattress mask wearing masks mask-wearing yeah. Could actually accomplish version of her immunity that doesn't kill a whole bunch of people. Yeah. So where a mask people. Boom. Yes. More more people.

New England Journal Of Medicin Lancet The Journal
Is It Time to Get Bullish on Banks?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:25 min | 1 d ago

Is It Time to Get Bullish on Banks?

"Welcome back to fast money banks catching a bid today in the back of a pair of upgrades, Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo. But the group is still underperforming the rest of the market this year and it's still about twenty five percent off of twenty twenty highs. Karen actually bought some banks today which ones Karen and why. Well. As you know I am long. Bang. Same Long JP Morgan Citi, Bank Wells Fargo and Bank of America. But I added to GP Morgan today and this is really a trading position. So I had calls and call spreads just expiring October Sixteenth. So I'm really just playing for earnings and I think it's setting up well into earnings because the stocks have traded terribly they've actually been a hedge on my making money on any other parts of the portfolio they kind of hedge that out but I think that expectations are so low now that. The. Bars Low I. think there's a good chance they feed. PHYA fairmount and if they don't, I don't think there's that much more downside here. But I'm just playing really for the short term I. Think this is too low for earnings and it's coming up October thirteenth they think they'll all be that week. You know I know you you saw this Wall Street Journal today Dan but I think that the headline of the essence of the headline really captures the that the bank's Love the markets in twenty twenty but the markets don't love the banks. Yeah I haven't listened. It seemed like an easy trade most of the year to fade every rally in the banks and they're having. been too many dramatic ones. The massively outperformed the broader market here to me. They were showing some relative strength, the beginning of September. But then there are no shortage of headlines I think the banking it goes back to some of the things that we were just talking about the rates where they are go the exposure to. loan-loss defaults and bankruptcies that sort of thing I mean they have a lot of exposure there and I think they're more reflective of main street, then Wall Street, and if you look at the performance from the investment banks who've been benefiting from all from the lower rates and all the stimulus monetary and everything, there's a huge spread there too. So to me, I think you could see Bankamerica back at Twenty I. think you see JP Morgan back in eighty I think you could see Morgan Stanley. Back Forty Bucks I think that they have one more leg lower, but to Karen point that mid October week when all of those banks that make up maybe half the weight of the XL laugh report is there a trade there I just don't know if you start that trade today on September twenty third for October sixteen

Karen DAN Jp Morgan Gp Morgan Wells Fargo Morgan Citi Wall Street Journal Bank Wells Fargo Goldman Sachs Morgan Stanley Bank Of America Bankamerica
Massachusetts man dies after ‘overdosing’ on black licorice

WBZ Midday News

00:17 sec | 1 d ago

Massachusetts man dies after ‘overdosing’ on black licorice

"Say the man ate so much black licorice it through his nutrients out of whack, causing the 54 year old heart to stop this case reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The FDA warns. Eating as little as two ounces of black licorice a day for two weeks could cause heart rhythm problems. The parent company of Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, is announcing it

New England Journal Of Medicin Columbia Gas FDA Massachusetts
Man dies from eating more than a bag of licorice a day

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Man dies from eating more than a bag of licorice a day

"Year old Massachusetts man died of heart failure after eating a bag and a half of black licorice every day for several weeks. That's according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. The man identified by doctors on Leah's a construction worker with a quote Poor diet, suffered a sudden cardiac arrest in a fast food restaurant and died of the next day. Cardiologists at the local hospital there. Massachusetts General warn that eating even a small amount of licorice can increase your blood pressure. That's one last ride about the size of a bus has passed by Earth on its way around the sun. The

Massachusetts New England Journal Of Medicin Leah
Man dies from eating more than a bag of liquorice a day

WBBM Morning News

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Man dies from eating more than a bag of liquorice a day

"At 8 41. East Coast Man's Death is prompting warnings about what you eat. Ah 54 year old Massachusetts man died of heart failure after eating a bag and a half of black licorice every day for several weeks. That's according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. The man identified by doctors on Leah's a construction worker with a quote Poor diet suffered a sudden cardiac arrest in a fast food restaurant and died of the next day. Cardiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital says that eating even a small amount of licorice can increase your blood pressure. Jim

Massachusetts General Hospital New England Journal Of Medicin Massachusetts Leah JIM
Too much candy: Man dies from eating bags of black licorice

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Too much candy: Man dies from eating bags of black licorice

"Candy. A construction worker in Massachusetts dies after eating too much black licorice. Doctors say the man's bag and a half day bag and a half a day habit through his nutrients out of whack, causing his heart to stop. The problem, Doctors say lies in an acid found in black licorice, eating just two ounces a day for two weeks could cause AH heart rhythm problem. The report posted in the New England Journal of Medicine and

New England Journal Of Medicin Massachusetts
Trump and Biden's Diverging Visions for American Foreign Policy

WSJ What's News

04:06 min | 1 d ago

Trump and Biden's Diverging Visions for American Foreign Policy

"In our ongoing election coverage were taking a deep look at how president trump and democratic. Presidential nominee Joe Biden differ on major policy issues. Today, we're going examine foreign affairs mark. Stewart spoke with the journals national, security reporter Warren Strobel. A lot of attention in recent days to the Middle East obviously president trump is touting success with peace accords with Israel. Let's talk about the trump approach versus the biden approach. Yeah I mean in the waning weeks of the campaign here Mr Trump has secured really historic agreements from the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain to make peace with Israel and recognize it diplomatically big achievement. No. Matter how you count it. I think most people would agree but there are fundamental differences between the Republican Democratic candidates particularly when it comes to Saudi Arabia Mr Biden has said that he would review relations with Saudi Arabia, which is probably the most important US ally in the Middle East that he would consider stopping arms sales he's been very critical of their killing of the journalist dissident. Jamal Kashogi Mr Trump on the other hand has declined to put pressure on Saudi Arabia. Really. In any significant way he sort of dismissed defining by the CIA that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman probably ordered the killing of Mr. Kashogi and he has vetoed congressional moves to limit arms sales to Riyadh. Saudi Arabia obviously issues in the Middle East but also Iran. Let's talk about the different approaches there. Yeah. Here again, that's quite a stark difference Mr Trump. Two thousand seventeen withdrew from the Iran nuclear accord known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action on. He has launched a campaign of maximum pressure designed to limit Iran's ability to cause trouble in the region and try to force it back into talks. He's also by the way in recent days Mr Trump has said get reelected around will come to the table and we can make a deal real quickly. Mr Biden has said he would go back into the nuclear agreement. He would get the United States back into that agreement if Iran also returns to compliance. So again, Joe Biden is tough on Iran but he is much more. I think looking at diplomatic track to try and halt their nuclear program. Another region of interest is certainly Europe. Obviously there are economic issues, their political as well as military issues. When we look at Europe, how big of a role does the relationship with NATO play in this discussion? You know I think it plays a significant role. NATO's the probably the most important and one of the longest standing alliances that the United States has. Important economically in terms of the trade between the United States and Europe, and important strategically given its role in sort of countering Russia Russia intervention in places like Ukraine Belarus. Again there's differences here though Mr Trump has been pretty critical of NATO. He demanded that all the countries live up to. A promise they made to spend two percent of their GDP. Self. Defense, and there have been rumors that he might withdraw from NATO entirely or want to. This is Chris from Mr Biden who again stressing the importance of good alliances with Europe and other parts of the world. You. Briefly mentioned Russia, where are the distinctions in viewpoint and policy between the two candidates? That's a good question. I think the trump administration has been in terms of my reporting and analysis sort of a weird bee's when it comes to Russia Mr Trump himself. No has been quite friendly with and trying to strike a good relationship with Vladimir Putin, but the people in the middle and. Upper levels of US government agencies are taking much more dim view, Mr Putin, and actually you know the US has done a lot of sanctions and other actions against Putin during Mr Trump's terms. So there's sort of a kind of a bipolar aspect to his administration's dealings with Russia Mr. Biden. I think has been more critical. Putin personally and has said he would stand up to Mr Putin on things such as election interference the Russian incursion into Ukraine and other things like that.

Mr Trump Joe Biden Saudi Arabia United States Europe Iran Middle East Nato Vladimir Putin Russia Belarus Jamal Kashogi Ukraine Israel Warren Strobel Stewart United Arab Emirates President Trump Riyadh
Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

"A new study in the British medical Journal says access belly fat is associated with a higher risk of early death. Researchers say that fat in the middle of the body is a significant risk factor for diabetes related problems. And heart disease. But there is some good news, they say. If you carry your weight in your hips and your thighs that is associated with a lower risk of early death

British Medical Journal
Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | 2 d ago

Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

"It's been a record shattering year for heat in the American West and this weekend is going to be hot too. If it seems like heat drought and wildfires are all piling together it's not your imagination scientists say climate change makes them more likely to happen at the same time. As NPR's Laura Summer reports. It takes a lot for heat to make headlines in Tucson. Arizona as Stephanie Small, House realize listening to the radio recently a couple days ago he said well, no warning for today it's only be one hundred six. Apparently. We're not over a hundred ten everybody should join the weather but this year is getting people's attention. Small House says she's president of the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and she also runs a cattle ranch outside of Tucson in the twenty years that I've been here on the ranch. This is probably just the second time that I remember a summer that's dry on top of the heat the entire Colorado River, which is key for Arizona's water supply has been in a twenty year drought. Is there tension in the Vermont Community Right? Now ranchy community absolutely is their stress absolutely these rare events. Are simply becoming more common says, Mogi Sunday professor of Civil Engineering Boise State University in a study in the journal Science advances he says that trend is clear over the past few decades basically routes or getting more intense and hot years or getting more hud, and the cycle between them is intensifying droughts and heat waves feed each other. He says when the soil is dry more of the sun's energy heats up the air then it's hotter making more water evaporate causing more drought. It's climate change driven cycle via have to move past that traditional thinking of heat waves and droughts and fires separately. Because they would work together they. They are the reason that we are seeing so many disasters, happening disasters like the extreme. Across the West this year, what is happening in California is a preview of what we'll see every. We need to act. Now we do not have any more minute I'm not talking about the years we do not have any more minutes to cut our emissions because in a hotter climate he says disasters are teaming up lauren summer NPR news.

Stephanie Small Arizona Tucson NPR Mogi Laura Summer Small House Arizona Farm Bureau Federation Colorado River Civil Engineering Boise State Vermont California Professor
Justice Dept move to make it easier to sue internet companies

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:32 sec | 2 d ago

Justice Dept move to make it easier to sue internet companies

"Department reportedly will submit a proposal to Congress today to curb longstanding legal protections for Internet companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Alphabets Kugel and forced them to shoulder more responsibility for managing content on their sites. Citing a senior justice official. The Wall Street Journal says the proposal would advance two goals the Trump administration outlined in June, encouraging online platforms to actively addressed illicit content and manage content. Other sites in fair and consistent ways. It's unlikely that Congress will take up the issue before the election. That's

Congress The Wall Street Journal Facebook Twitter Official
NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

The Esports Minute

02:13 min | 2 d ago

NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

"We're looking at a paper published by an associate professor, any PhD student at North Carolina State University. The research appeared in the Journal critical studies on Mass Communication. The goal was to see if college is worth programs have been more successful at crecy gender representation. East sports than professional sports have there are a few women who compete at the highest levels of professional sports. Rockets Karma is well regarded player who has spent time in. Her stoldas women, when major tournaments it so as fortnight, but for dependent environment that doesn't have fiscal differences creating a gap between genders us for to still almost entirely male dominated Nick Taylor co-authored the study and associate professor of Communication at NC State said in the journal quote five years ago we thought collegiate sports might be an opportunity to create a welcoming diverse competitive arena which. Was a big deal given how male-dominated the professional eastward scene was rapid growth of collegiate sports over the past five years has led to it becoming more professional with many universities having paid eastwards, positions, recruiting players at so odd we wanted to see how that professionalization has affected collegiate sports and what that means for gender diversity. The findings did not give us reason to be optimistic. For this study naked, his Co author interviewed Twenty One people involved in these sports programs. Eight of the people are part of Varsity programs with the other thirteen being president of their schools. Collegiate East Sports Club six of the respondents identified as women fifteen identified as men PhD Student Bright Style, the other CO author of the study told the Journal. Quote essentially, we found that women are effectively pushed out of eastwards many colleges when they start investing financial resources in east, Sports Program we talk lease sports might help to address the disenfranchise women in eastport at engaging more generally instead, it seems to simply be an extension of that disenfranchisement and quote. While an interview of twenty, one people isn't a perfect encapsulation of the wide-ranging college. He's worth ecosystem, all twenty one or in key rules of big programs meaning they speak for quite a few more when it comes to gender disparity. College eastwards still have a chance to be a place where we can create more inclusive east sports environments, but `gate-keeping in Tuxes D- are still real problems that women face in the space without focused initiatives that disparity won't get much better.

East Sports Club Associate Professor Mass Communication The Journal North Carolina State Universit Nick Taylor Eastport President Trump
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine enters Phase 3 trial in U.S.

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine enters Phase 3 trial in U.S.

"And Johnson says that has began the final stage testing of the vaccine. It involves 60,000 people on three continents. It becomes the fourth experimental coven 19 shot to one of the final stage here in the U. S. Does the earlier study in which the shot showed some promising results, According to the journal, The Wall Street Journal, Justyna Johnson might learn results from the trial by early next year. I have positive government authorization. The vaccine for emergencies might come afterwards. Lot of people have been concerned

Justyna Johnson The Wall Street Journal
The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

The Model Health Show

05:06 min | 3 d ago

The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

"Today we'll be talking about one of the most overlooked health issues that has been affecting our entire world and it's been overlooked long enough and I truly believe that right now is giving us an opportunity to actually change this. So, we're going to start this with a Meta analysis of four, hundred, eighty, five studies, and this is published in occupational and Environmental Medicine. And found that job satisfaction is one of the strongest influences on mental health issues. In Our world, most notably for depression and anxiety. The study noted a relationship also between our job satisfaction and physical health issues like gastrointestinal issues and cardiovascular as well, and this is echoed in several other studies including study that was cited in the Journal of chronic diseases. Taking into consideration array of risk factors and of vocations and an array of income levels uncovered that the lack of satisfaction in the work that we do is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease. Why don't we talk about this? Real health and wellness is dynamic. It comes from so many different things. It's not just about food you can eat the perfect. Personalized, unique blood type buddy type, every type diet. And go to work and spend half or more of your waking hours of your entire life hating what you do or being unhappy go into the place that you go every day or doing the work that you're doing instill still develop chronic health issues even if your diet is perfect, even if you're hitting the gym all the time, all of these things matter. Relationships matter our sleep matters. All of these things go into the overall code. The human that you are. and. This issue. More than any other time in our lifetime is something that we can change what's happening right now with the job market and all of the turmoil I believe is offering up an opportunity for us to change this because many people are working themselves in his sickness and don't even realize it. It's happening and they don't realize that it doesn't have to be this way now we're going. To discuss, there is a modicum of course of doing what you gotTa. Do you know getting the bills paid but we have to move beyond that and this is the opportunity to do. So we're GONNA talk about how we can actually do that today as well. But I want to dive a little bit deeper here because I scratched the surface in some of the issues that we see. The results of another peer reviewed study and this was published in two thousand fifteen finally direct link between job satisfaction and psychological distress as well as physical disorders. Now according to the researchers satisfaction with the nature of work that was doing was the strongest predictor for psychological distress for sleep disorders, headaches, and gastrointestinal problems what. You don't hear stuff like sleep problems caused by. Dissatisfaction with the work one is doing. The data exists, but this is something that we brush off really think about this. Again, we think somebody's illness quote comes out of nowhere where there are so many different factors like they eat. Perfectly they're exercising all the time. And we have to take a broader view of health now and take all of these things into consideration. And that's what I'm encouraging us to today. Another study. This was from researchers from the Ohio State University say that their work shows that happiness on the job or lack thereof appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental health. One of study authors noted that and listen to this is really interesting. And having a scale very satisfied satisfied to completely dissatisfied. They discovered that quote seen with the majority of people are either very satisfied or satisfied with their job, but we find that even they subtle distinction between. Satisfied and simply being satisfied has significant effects on your health. I would say our studies, main findings are you're likely to have worse health if you don't love your job rather than if you hate your job So did you catch that distinction? People who are just kinda getting by tolerating what they do, and maybe they're okay with their job. But if they don't love their work, not loving your work, not loving the thing that you do every day is far more of a predictor of negative health outcomes than if somebody absolutely hated the job. So that little subtle distinction of actually enjoying what we do every day is the strongest predictor of our health when it comes to the work that we do.

Occupational And Environmental Journal Of Chronic Diseases Depression Headaches Ohio State University
Tesla aims for cheaper cars with new battery

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:56 min | 3 d ago

Tesla aims for cheaper cars with new battery

"Today is Tesla's Battery Day It was hosted in conjunction with the annual shareholders meeting for Tesla. Elon musk, searching for a cheaper way to make the batteries for his cars in an effort to make the cars more affordable. For more on this, we turn to the KCBS Ring Central News Light and checking with Tim Higgins in his tech and autos reporter for The Wall Street Journal in San Francisco. So, Tim, what have we learned through Battery Day about the future of Tesla? Well, Saturday is really inflection point for the company. Um you on musket basically spent the last decade trying to bring out an affordable car for the masses. The Model three. The problem with the Model three is that it costs on average about $50,000. They briefly hit the $35,000 price point of view about a year ago or so, but it wasn't able to stay there because it was just too expensive to make it at that point and still keep the company going. And so what you honor is trying to do is lower the cost of batteries, and that's what he announced today, plans that he say over the next three years would lower a battery cost more than half And promising a $25,000 vehicle. What kinds of things we don't have to get to terribly into the weeds on it are going to reduce the cost of that battery, how to make it better and cheaper. Well, I think that people were looking at today's event for some sexy new cool technology. Their president really disappointed because really, they're getting their through a lot of Prick technical ways in so in total there getting those savings and things like building manufacturing. They're going to start building their own battery, so different chemistry, different way of making the vehicle for the battery packs that sort of thing so kind of combination of a lot of like integration of Off the that the ingredients that go into a

Tesla Tim Higgins Elon Musk President Trump San Francisco Reporter The Wall Street Journal
Does Growing Almonds Really Waste Too Much Water?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:58 min | 3 d ago

Does Growing Almonds Really Waste Too Much Water?

"Friend recently related to me a conversation that she'd had with her Barista, a well-known coffee chain. The BARISTA's convicted that she always bristles when her customers order almond milk for their la tastes because she said growing almonds waste so much water. You may have heard similar things about almonds and their negative impact on the environment. For example, maybe you've heard that it takes a gallon of water to produce a single almond and perhaps like my friends Brisa. You've even been avoiding almonds or almond milk out of concern about their water usage but as is so often the case there's a little more to this story. It's true that almonds are a very water intensive crop but not really more. So then most nuts if we were all to switch to pistachio milk or walnut milk and prompting farmers to start growing more of those nuts instead of growing so many almonds, we'd still be using about the same amount of water. According to data published in the June twenty eighteen issue of the journal Science, the Non Dairy alternatives that have the lowest water footprint are soy and oat milk but not milk's still use significantly less water to produce then cow's milk and in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, almond milk may actually be one of the better choices because these trap so much co two in their leaves more so than other crops but getting back to water issues, the reasons that almond uses such a large share of California's water supply is that they make up such a large share of. His cultural economy. The growing conditions in California are perfect for almonds plus almonds are really high value. Crop farmers earn far more per acre growing almonds than they can growing other crops and demand for almonds has also skyrocketed in the last two decades in part due to a sustained campaign by industry groups to promote the health benefits of almonds. Commodity Groups that support almond growers have spent millions of dollars funding research into almonds, effects on cholesterol, appetite, blood, sugar, body weight, and so forth all in an effort to convince consumers that almonds are super healthy food and it worked although our consumption of other nuts estate relatively steady our intake of alms has. Over the last half century in addition to eating more almonds were also buying more almond butter, topping our salads with almonds baking with almond flour, and ironically even though almond milk doesn't really contain the same benefits as all men's it is also perceived as being very healthy and for consumers who want to avoid both dairy, and so the almond milk has long been the go-to

California
How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

Side Hustle Pro

06:17 min | Last week

How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

"Guys welcome back to the show. This is Michaela and I am so excited to introduce you to today's guest. Today's guest in the hot seat is our show Jones and our show. Hey, our show. Thanks for coming on the show you guys are. One of the people who I've learned the most from this year. Yes. I'm a part of your facebook group as you know. So is a serial entrepreneur and master of many trades. As we speak she's currently operating and managing capital CITCO keeping us all fly through the tease in the trap brand building Iowa's APPs for APPs by the pound all while running the designed blog and facebook group rant bill. So so on this episode, you'll learn how arshile created her first online business with less than a hundred dollars and is now an ECOMMERCE extraordinaire. The welcome to the show our show. Tell us. Tell us more about who you are and what you're currently working on. So. My name name, the journals like you said just. As hard to kind of Embrace that term entrepreneur. You know I put it in bio because it's the easiest. Thing that people can understand without you. Know me having to explain any further but I just you know part of me just doesn't feel like one I'm just a more of a creative. Think of these great ideas and I say how are bring this to light you know so I don't think of me. Oh. I want to create all these businesses I think while that'd be a great product that I could sell, and then it usually turns into something else So each thing that I've started historic off one thing and kind of morphed into something bigger you know. But definitely on my plane is just to be a creative lead who has the ability to see ideas before they're made and know that they be profitable and be fine. You know 'cause this for me it's like. The money is you know but I enjoy the process of it. It's fun to me. To see these things come to live come to life rather and so So that's GONNA. Margot here is you know entrepreneurship is kind of the side It's kind of the five part that happens along with being creative but I just a maker at heart maker. If, I didn't have this I probably be a crafter or. Someone at home like gluing things to get. Definitely have. Creative. Brain and five and like. You know you remind me of the quote unquote the phrase bias for action like you see that on a lot of people's by like. Like I love meeting people who really epitomized that because when you think of an idea, you're like Oh let me let me so I had this. Thought those product together. But before we get into the business as a little bit where are you from like how? Up Bridges Lewis's creative Well, Wa was born raised in Washington DC and I currently live in Maryland but it was partly because of my parents so. You know like most parents you know their idea of they were coming raised with the idea that she would come trade and I'm going to get a government job or something more steady. You know engineer doctor lawyer or something like that But my father kind of wanted us to go into a different direction in. So he kinda pushed us into the arts. Okay. So from a age I would say like eight or nine I always had eager to draw actively or play an instrument actively So. I played the cello. for about eight years amongst other instruments but kind of my heart was in art. So I kind of chose that as a thing I wanted to do. So I did art all through high school until school and then graduated went to these you in Richmond and gut graduated with a BFA. What I didn't realize was that I, didn't really have a plan for my life. And it wasn't like that in college I was like wait. So I'm supposed to like pain control like has wanNA. Make money. Like never even dawned on me that I'd like need a job I love. And so this is around the time that. kind of the DOT com boom had happened. So I learned fairly easily how to design websites and so that kind of kind of figuring out the creative side always had was able to keep a job based on the web design skills that I saw graduated with a BFA. Like I said. With his huge creative background but my but but my day job was web design So that kind of got me into building websites, understanding design understanding how the Web, works, understanding marketing. Social, media and and all that fun stuff and that led me into blogging. Okay. So then because I would get, I would feel questions about the blogging, hosting in how to set up a website and so I put blog. Okay. I'll put a blog. And I'll get all these affiliate links and click. Well. You know I figured out the system and I was making like a passive income about a thousand dollars a month and I was like, wow okay. If I had this thousand dollars a month bright IF I sell a product than I probably can like take another thousand dollars. and. So And for launched, I ended up launching capital. because. Capital city, we sell a wing sauce called capital city Mumbo sauce, and both of is in A. Wing sauce that we originally created is this assaults that you can get here in Washington, DC, metropolitan area

Facebook Washington Bridges Lewis Michaela Jones Engineer Doctor Lawyer Margot A. Wing Iowa Maryland Richmond WA DC
"journal american" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"journal american" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"They they imported a lot sort of extra of the end of two thousand eighteen because they thought the tariff's gonna go up in late two thousand eighteen and then they thought they were gonna go up again in March and attend out that those increases didn't come to pass because of progress in negotiations between. Zhang in Washington, but that sort of trepidation did cools bit of noise in the trade data, and we saw that in the first quarter that given the fact that imports with down sim aunt they were down three point seven percent, not a three point seven percent rate. So that was a factor that that was going on on the other hand, you know, Trump officials have been talking about the report today, and it is undeniably, a very strong tilt, my number and also foot four of Trump administration. Officials what the saying is, you know, a lot of people said that the tax cuts in acted in late twenty seventeen would boost growth for a couple of quotas. And then that would that would fade outs on this team this evidence that that wasn't a Suga high that that, you know, this the stronger is continuing finally Harriet as we look ahead to subsequent quarters. What are some of the challenges? We could be an -ticipant in here will looking at the reports on the fact that consumer spending motorists in the fuss to is is a bit of a worrying sign on the. Hand the retail sales report for March which came out last week was very strong. It suggested that retail sales really picked up at the end of the fuss cooed said you remember the beginning of the festival will be had the government shutdown. We have potable attacks. It seems to be loaded onset sinc- that could have been keeping people away from spending. So it looks like headed into the second quarter that consume as a puck top consumer sentiment remains high. Of course, the unemployment rate is extremely low incomes rising wages wising. So it does seem like a lot of the fundamentals for pickup in consumer spending. Definitely still in case. That's Wall Street Journal reporter Harriet, Tori, joining us via Skype from Washington DC with more on the GDP report Harriet, thank you so much. Thank you. Now onto some more headlines. From the Wall Street Journal American Airlines says first quarter profits suffered due to higher fuel prices and the grounding of Boeing seven thirty seven max the carrier says it expects the groundings to reduce earnings by three hundred fifty million dollars this year. The report comes a day after Southwest Airlines, which has the biggest max fleet reported that the grounding would impact flight capacity growth, Boeing, seven thirty-seven, max aircraft were grounded last month after two fatal crashes, and Indonesia and Ethiopia. A federal judge in New York has granted another extension to securities regulators and tesla CEO Elon Musk to resolve a dispute over whether musk violated an earlier court order regarding his use of social media. The two sides now have until April thirtieth to reach an agreement. Twenty nineteen is a big year for tech IPO's. And the Wall Street Journal's John stole says investors are willing to look past big companies like snap and lift hemorrhaging money lift which made his public debut last month. Lost nearly a billion dollars in two thousand eighteen and snap. This week posted a three hundred and ten million dollar loss on three hundred twenty million dollars in revenue. The thing that these companies are doing is they're preaching growth. And I think blue chips are often criticized because they don't meet an analyst expectation UPS is down earnings per share. Just weren't what people expected it to be. So they get dinged and everybody's like, well, you know, they're held the one standard. But why Silicon Valley held to another stand? And the answer is these tech companies are giving investors a message that they are growing and that eventually that growth will pay off with big prophets. And so they would point to Amazon dot com is probably, you know, exhibited of why you should be patient and stick with some of these money losing companies because the payoff in the long run is is quite healthy. If it actually does pay off. So what do you think are you willing to take a big bet on the promise of future profitability? Let us know by tweeting us at WSJ podcasts or by emailing us at what's news all one word at WSJ dot com. That's what's news for this Friday afternoon. I'm Anne Marie for totally for the Wall Street Journal..

Wall Street Journal Harriet Wall Street Journal American A Washington Elon Musk Trump Boeing Zhang Southwest Airlines Anne Marie WSJ onset government Silicon Valley New York tesla analyst Indonesia
"journal american" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"journal american" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"So somebody like that that they think looks good in front of a camera. They have to get somebody looks good because they don't say anything makes sense. So what about a ticket of Biden in Iraq? What about that? You're talking about fighting for president. Yeah. He's finished. He can't go anyplace. I'll be honest with you. He's he's he's history. You know, the president often says that an all the times the Biden is run for the presidency. Some four times if you take all the votes that he's received. It's about one percent of the Democrats have voted for Joe Biden. You know? I think Joe Biden would do a great job, and he ought to get the vice presidential nominee for the Democrats ought to be a Casio Cortes. That would be a great ticket from my perspective. Would you in fact, if you and I had to agree when you want Biden and Cortes to run against the president. Well, then make it awful easy for. That's my point. Absolutely. We gotta run Dr germ Lamar what's your website? How people get a hold of you. It's great news for America that Tom I got five bucks. And there's about one hundred sixty web pages. A lots of free information. Great news for America dot com. The doctor journal-american you're a great American and thanks again for coming on the Bill Cunningham show in my friend. We'll do it. Again, sounds good year. Great host across the country and God bless America. Thank you very much. Let's continue with more of a line becomes available. You know, the routine, but I tell you what Lameiro nailed it in two thousand sixteen. Absolutely nailed it down to the he was within two electoral votes. Ain't nailed and that guy saying right now Trump's gonna get three hundred and fifty electoral votes next year. We'll see what happens let's continue with more. Bill cunningham. The great American live with you every Sunday night. I needed new blinds..

Joe Biden president Bill Cunningham America Iraq Casio Cortes Lameiro Trump Tom I Ai one percent
"journal american" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Things so like when i'm talking to medical students we have to make this very specific distinction like when somebody presents with the neurological symptom presentation what i tell my students is the first thing you need to figure out as the phenomenology right let's say somebody their complaint is having difficulty walking with difficulty walking is not a a neurological phenomenon it's something the patient experiences so we have to figure out what the phenomenon is it weakness or visual problems or a taxila where right then there's a specific neurological thing happening that's the phenomenon could be gravitational problem to again if necessary could be orthopedic to go to bed these all those things can cause difficulty walking and then so that's nominal then if necessary localize it like we're eggs the problem actually coming from and then you can talk about ideology then which is what is the specific 'cause man so the patient may complain of difficulty walking let's say it's due to weakness i localized that to whatever the nerves and then the is a pollyanna rapidly pathophysiology than is is more is deeper than aetiology just like what is the disease what's the cause of the of the phenomenon that you're dealing with pathophysiology then deals with like okay there's an antibody binding to this protein which is causing that's the really specific physiological biochemical anatomical things that are happening that that are resulting in the natural history of the disease all of the symptom atallah ji diagnostic outcomes at cetera here that refers pathogenesis right the that's also the kind of the start of that or the or the source of that but for a logical more specific i guess you could say cellular or genetic or perspective so you will see those words oftentimes compared a lot of dictionary entries will say see also pathogenesis when they talk about ideology but i could see how a lot of people might get the term ideology confused with a lot of other things like epidemiology or like etymology or because they're they seem to have a similar route at the beginning which is like giving rise to giving cause to something so like in talking about the etymology of the word ideology what we're really talking about is how the word began that's specific to demolish the etymology has to do with the the development of words themselves ideology has to do with the causes of diseases or at least causes of kind of medical conditions i guess it doesn't have to just be diseases right it can be syndromes and really anything but like a condition right yeah ideology aetiology exactly if you have a syndrome it's pure clinical syndrome that is description of the symptoms in natural history in epidemiology said we have no idea what causes it night now you can't really call it an ideology we have things to like someone has a fever of unknown origin sudden ideology that's just a clinical description of the situation so that's why actually a fever of yeah it's a fever yeah right or idiom pathak polling uppity that means we don't know what's causing you know yeah it's our media pathak means and it really has to do with causes you know that's where the root of the word comes from the science of causes the science of of how something came to be what is responsible for it all of these routes relate good word good word right because it's one of those words i mean it's it's greek in origin and it kind of sounds like a lot of other words and in context it might not be that easy to figure out exactly what it's referring to but it's a good vocab word i think is you can use it you don't have to just use it in terms of medicine you can use it to win literally for sure and things care so guys a psychologist at seoul card dania published a review of parapsychology in the journal american psychologist are we supposed to who that is no way overview of parapsychology like like a craigslist view or just new only credulous view so journal american i call a gist american psychologist.

"journal american" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"Obesity journal american journal of american medical association okay jemma study big study all right from two thousand one to two thousand sixteen this came out all right they studied adults twenty an older and kids to nineteen about obesity so severe obesity rates in that period of time two thousand one and sixteen rose twenty nine percent among kids okay and it rose pretty dramatically for adults in rural america in the country so prized about any of this again immediate gratification we live in an age of immediate gratification i don't feel good i'll use drugs i don't i don't like my life all scape and part of the escape is sugar i told you this last week try to just to oreos your body is screaming i want another oreo eighty two scoops of haagendazs it's tough it's comforting you get a blast from fast foods salt sugar and if you're not working out like a mad person you're gonna get big and fast it's a lot easier to put it on and take it off and anybody knows that but if you succumb to abusively it's gonna kill you and i don't want you died.

obesity american journal of american m twenty nine percent
"journal american" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The opportunity miss hassle since two individuals have been mentioned and they will be the subject of conversation in closed session but for the american people's purpose would you share for them who khalid sheikh mohammed is and nasiri chairman hollered shake mohammed was the architect and mastermind of the nine eleven attacks his nephew ramsey yousef was behind the ninety three attack on the world trade center and hollered shake mohammad finance that operation he also was behind the infamous bojenka plot in the philippines tragically he was the individual who personally killed a wall street journal american correspondent and film that heinous act he also after nine eleven carried out an attack on a senegal tunisia and he had other attacks planned we were able to warn allies about a planned attack for example on heathrow airport mr nashiri was the emir of the attack in two thousand on the uss cole in which we lost seventeen sailors he also was behind the attack on a french ship the limburg and he was the al qaeda chief of operations in the gulf and the arabian peninsula thank you for that i think it's important to put into context when individuals are mentioned what their role was in terrorism and why are they were the focus of of not only the agency but law enforcement with that i'd like to recognize the vice chairman for any closing statements he'd like to mike thank you mr chairman first of all i want to submit for the record to refresh my colleagues memories the testimony of the nominee john brennan who quite explicitly repudiated the techniques and programs who expressed who's stated that he expressed his personal objections and some of his views agency colleagues which i think is a relevant piece of information when we consider mr brennan's testimony for those of us who decided to vote.

chairman ramsey yousef philippines wall street journal tunisia mr nashiri limburg vice chairman john brennan khalid sheikh mohammed mohammed senegal heathrow mr brennan
"journal american" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"His nephew ramsey yousef was behind the ninety three attack on the world trade center and hollered shake mohammad finance that operation he also was behind the infamous bojenka plot in the philippines tragically he was the individual who personally killed a wall street journal american correspondent and film that heinous act he also after nine eleven carried out an attack on a synagogue in tunisia and he had other attacks planned we were able to warn allies about a plan to tack for example on heathrow airport mr nashiri was the emir of the attack in two thousand on the uss cole in which we lost seventeen sailors he also was behind the attack on a french ship the limburg and he was the chief of operations in the gulf and the arabian peninsula this has been a special edition of the law fair podcast because it's a special edition of the law fair podcast there is no music if there would be it would be recorded by sophia again we are of course produced in cooperation with the brookings institution and of course you should go tweet the law fair podcast share the law fair podcast on facebook and by all means review and rate the law fair podcast on whatever podcast distribution service you use and as always thanks for listening.

ramsey yousef philippines wall street journal tunisia mr nashiri limburg brookings institution facebook heathrow sophia
"journal american" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on WDRC

"The american medical association surgery which is the surgery offshoot of the journal american medical association so and they looked a lot of data nearly four hundred thousand veterans across the united states who've undergone screening colonoscopy between two thousand nine and two thousand fourteen and it turns out that there was a correlation the rate of appendicitis and appendectomy in the first week after colonoscopy was at least four fold higher compared to these patients next fifty one weeks whoa and by so measures the increase was twelve fold so what's happening there well you the pending we know is a repository for the kind of bacteria that are necessary for healthy intestine and even under conditions where you have food poisoning because depending is a little bit of a blind alley its purpose is to store healthy bacteria and reintroduce them into the intestine after you've had a challenging bout of gastroenteritis but when you get a colonoscopy wash out the intestine and you also pump air into the intestine and then you physically instrument the intestine with scope and you move stuff around and it may be and this is near confirmed that there is a true correlation here and that's calling us copy puts people at some risk for intestinal disruption they could result in appendicitis so what's the alternative to a colonoscopy well for some people they have to have a colonoscopy they've had colon cancer polyps in the past they need to actually have a visual colonoscopy but there is a stool.

american medical association united states fifty one weeks
"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the online journal american greatness thank you both for being here we wanted to hear from both of you tonight we've been hearing a lot of criticism of the president lately we had former vicepresident biden on the program last week we interviewed michael wolff about his book this week we want to hear your perspective but and i wanna start at match slapped by asking about what we just heard from the president how much is this russia investigation defining his first year in office well if you took up a lot of time in a lot of coverage i think initially the white house didn't exactly do helpful things that i think as the year one a long most democrats i talk to judy believed that there really was no evidence that was ever presenter leak by the way this whole investigation has always been a lot of leaks and they're really did doesn't seem to be any hard evidence that there is any collusion most democrats i know have moved on to trying to attack clearly is mental fitness that the new theme they've moved onto these other things and they're hoping this special council can snagged the president on anything me and i think the american people were pretty fair if he doesn't find evidence of the underlying charge of collusion that i don't think the rest of its going to matter a chris busker has the president let this russia thing get under his skin too much and thank god i don't think so i mean he's had two he said to sort of thrust and perry with the media throughout throughout two thousand seventeen even into two thousand eighteen and there's been times of course from people so he should have reacted this way overreacted that way i think that's that's not who donald trump is but this is a an attempt to undermine and to overturn the last election and so donald trump sense is there is this i'm gonna push back on this this is not only us take on me as an attack on the office and on the process so i'm gonna i'm going to go back at this full force well of course as you know republican senators including uh james lycra he my interview today at the capitol say.

president vicepresident biden michael wolff white house chris busker russia judy perry donald trump
"journal american" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Choose a different medicine a different medicine what would be a good alternative give wells archeologist you must know that well that's practicing medicine immunized should not do that over the radio 'cause everybody's individualized end there's no cookbook formula to us he really have to call you dr figure out what's best for you as an individual prairie okay so you can check that out the journal american association of dermatology is the issue the phones you're gonna be ringing all day today mmhmm all right there are things about the flu season you and i get into our discussion of vaccines and this year the vaccine may not be very effective any way which has been the case more often than not in my memory you and i as i said disagree on this because i think they're just too many vaccines floating around a which is a subject that we can dig into in a different circumstance where what about the vaccines that are available for the flu season if people want why would they bother if it looks like they're only 10 percent effective well yes yesterday the news is not good about this year's flu vaccine the most common type of flu being seen america is influenza a h three n two the same severe strain that dominated last flu season in australia where the winter flu season has just wrapped up this season's vaccine was only about ten percent effective against the h three n t strain but other types of flu are circulating including influenza ah one n one and a couple of influenza be viruses and the flu vaccine is very effective against the strains every one eight six months and older should be getting vaccinate according to my humble opinion and the cdc's in the ccf advise you to wash your hands off into prevents spreading flew and.

flu vaccine america influenza australia cdc wells american association of dermat ccf one eight six months ten percent 10 percent
"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The outside with the costume underneath pauline could you put a little brandy in this coffee in order i love about this to you is the these are questions i like everybody has about superman and as it turns out the person drawing superman in this period had no idea what the answers for your it's it's funny when you when you hung around khartoum cartoonists even as a kid you had the sense that the unreality that was their life in their work had become a kind of reality discover the sunday comics were likelin you were growing up surrounded by the guys who did the comics well there were glorious so imagine a sunday morning when sixteen full pages of comics arrives with the newspaper in the comics are so important that they wrap the newspaper it's not like the front page of the daily news or you know the the journal american uh with all the important headlines are wrapping the comics it's the other way around and these pages are the size of a newspaper broadsheet and the color is beautiful and this has been going on for decades really since the turn of the century and the the pages were so big that for kid you could not realistically sit in a chair in read the comics you had to spread them out across the floor just like you're almost eur hamas strip image of a kid reading the comics it's hard to recapture what a big deal newspaper comics were for a long part of our history in particularly at the very heart of the american century so i'm gonna ask you decide prince valiant the comic strip that your father drew for decades and that you wrote for 24 years until you father died in two thousand four describe with the strip was about prince valiant was the.

pauline khartoum 24 years
"journal american" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Mas who with mort walker produced sam strip and salmon silo in the conversation opens with with jerry do much threated diner and jerry says why does superman have a cape ann kurt says i dunno jerry do moscow's on why does superman's cape swirl around him even when he's standing in office i really don't know jerry when superman on dresses in a phone booth how does he knows clothes will still be there when he gets back i haven't the faintest idea jerry consumer man fly when he's wearing his business suit on the outside with the costume underneath pauline could you put a little brandy in this coffee in order i love about this too is the these are questions i like everybody has about superman and as it turns out the person drawing superman in this period had no idea what the answer score your it's it's funny when you when you hung around cartoonists even as a kid you had the sense that the unreality that was their life in their work had become a kind of reality discover the sunday comics were like when you were growing up surrounded by the guys who did the comics well there were glorious so imagine a sunday morning when sixteen full pages of comics arrives with the newspaper and the comics are so important that they wrap the newspaper it's not like the front page of the daily news or you know the the journal american uh with all the important headlines are wrapping the comics it's the other way around and these pages are the size of a newspaper broadsheet and the color is beautiful and this has been going on for decades really since the turn of the century and the the the pages were so big that for a kid you could not realistically sitting in a chair in read the comics you had to spread them out across the floor just like you're almost eur comicstrip image of a kid reading the comics it's hard to recapture what a big deal newspaper comics were for a long part of our.

mort walker jerry pauline cape ann moscow
"journal american" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Pay are you fairly compensate are you reviewed properly and adequately do you have benefits do you appreciate this benefits are your wages going up like they should be going up are you appreciate it or not is your company taking care of you in the future are they paying for your health care do you feel as though they are on your side and this relationship this employer employee relationship it in decline in its leading to you this building undercurrent of employees retiring as soon as humanly possible get me out of here so it's an every man for themselves a konomi every man and woman for themself the american labor force has less we and more i and then than it has ever had so americans are are are again today and this is a shortterm blip or a trend just recently we've seen in this is as as we come back from the great great recess sza as the unemployment rate has dropped from ten percent all the way back down to four point four percent as of this last june this last august latest report but as we ha americans have recently become more satisfied with their jobs eversoslightly mostly because their expectations today their expectations now of what you would what you really think you deserve or get out of your employer those expectations of just cratered so satisfaction is actually come up a little bit because we just expect less as employees we have had a generation today the they don't leave leaving romanticise any more about a company running alongside them for the longhaul come on with me let's get to the finish line together nobody even thinks that anymore let's not even a thing there is a recent wall street journal stunning just updated just came out the percentage of workers who have long term financial support from their employers i want a measure those numbers in review those with you today i wanna compare today's numbers with what the workforce look like only only only a few decades ago so let's talk about some data from the epr the employed benefits research institute again through the wall street journal american sense of retirement security has dropped and i would say that to say the least 1993 not talking about that long ago twenty four years ago seventythree brazil you as workers felt confident they can afford comfortable retirement comfortable retirement almost threequarters of.

unemployment rate wall street journal brazil romanticise twenty four years threequarters four percent ten percent
"journal american" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The moment that you will judge him on i mean you you also wrote in that law called the journal of american greatness ad and some of the people you worked with their such as michael anton who's now a national security council adviser some of them were pretty close to steve bannon the former white house chief strategist do you think it's actually good to have bannon working outside the white house now that he's in a better position to help propel some of the eye is that you mean share with him well baron has always been completely incompetent at propelling any ideas and he's actually been totally confused about the ideas themselves in terms of policies and in sort of larger intellectual picture so i think it's better to have him out of the white house but i don't think he'll be the anything but counterproductive anywhere do you feel that it'll actually allow for some com and some orderliness in the white house for in an to the outside and i think it's a positive step i think it can't it it it can't hurt but at the same time the the problem in the white house was not steve bannon it goes all the way to the president so i don't think it's enough and i don't i don't see how this white house can can really dig itself out of the hole that it's gotten itself into so what happens now with your policy journal american affairs where to go from here it's exactly the same the journal was always interested in the policy in the ideas i for a time thought that trump might be a semi adequate vehicle for that i have clearly changed my mind on that but the the larger ideas and policy remain the same and they remain actually popular that's how trump got elected in the first place and i think the fact that no more serious candidate was able to recognize the deep problems facing the country a which go back long before trump is how trump got elected that's julius crying editor of american affairs thank you for joining thank you the groundbreaking comedian and federal veteran civil rights activist dick gregory has died at age eighty four and nprs camille adumin asky has its remembrance in the early 1960s dick gregory stood out because as he put it.

chief strategist white house baron steve bannon president trump editor civil rights dick gregory journal of american greatness michael anton white house camille adumin asky
"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The moment that you will judge him on me you were you also wrote in the blog called the journal of american greatness ad and some of the people you worked with they are such as michael anton who's now a national security council adviser some of them were pretty close to steve bannon the former white house chief strategist do you think it's actually good to have bannon working outside the white house now now that he's in a better position to help propel some of the ideas that you share with him well bannon has always been completely incompetent at propelling any ideas and he's actually been totally confused about the ideas themselves in terms of policies and and sort of larger intellectual picture so i think it's better to have him out of the white house but i don't think there'll be anything but counterproductive anywhere do you feel that it'll actually allow persson comb and some orderliness in the white house for in an to be out so side and i think it's a positive step i think it can't it it it can't hurt uh but at the same time the the problem in the white house was not just steve bannon it goes all the way to the president so i don't think it's enough and i don't i don't see how this white house can can really dig itself out of the hole that it's gotten itself into so what happens now with your policy journal american affairs where's ago from he it's exactly the same the journal was always interested in the policy in the ideas i for a time thought that trump might be a semi adequate vehicle for that i i've clearly changed my mind on that but the the larger ideas and policy remain the same and they remain actually popular that's how trump got elected in the first place and i think the fact that no more serious candidate was able to recognize the deep problems facing the country a which go back long before trump is how trump got elected that's julius crying editor of american affair thank you for joining us thank you the groundbreaking comedian and federal veteran civil rights activist dick gregory has died at age eighty four and nprs camille adumin oskoui has its remembrance in the.

michael anton chief strategist white house president trump editor civil rights dick gregory journal of american greatness steve bannon white house persson camille adumin oskoui
"journal american" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"I mean that means that you're gonna be able to feed your family for weeks so that's that's a fantastic deal again it's something that every family should have and people at the office here friday they said that it tastes like home cooking such a good dozen tastes like garbage taste really good apparently so go over prepare with ben dot com eight eight eight eight o3 fourteen thirteen and get your emergency food supply just in case something badgered happen nine nine bucks is not a is not a high price for peace of mind okay so may here's where trump is right about robert muller in the entire left suggesting how dare trump how dare or he even suggest all these things okay so andy mccarthy has a really good piece today over at the journal american greatness which is basically the trump defense journal but any mccarthy is a in honest thinker so this is not just a in a kneejerk trump's defense peace and he says that the problem with special counsel we've been saying this all along is that the investigation that moeller is now engaging in is too broad ranging to actually pick up on the original mandate your member of the original mandate was to investigate whether the trump campaign colluded with the russians in cyber hacking the dnc and then releasing emails that was the original mandate it has now expanded to include trump's finances trump's associates you could see a case certainly where muller investigates and he goes in from finances and you find something totally unrelated to russia that's criminal or a problem and that ends up being scandal takes down trump wants to have a special council these sorts of things happened is exactly what happened with kenneth starr remember monica lewinsky never claimed sexual harassment michael wants you never claimed sexual assault monica lewinsky was consensual affair but that was uncovered by kenneth starr in the process of investigating the paula jones allegations and that in turn assassintated that bill clinton when he committed perjury was going to be impeach so this is the problem with special counsel's and this is something.

michael paula jones russia robert muller emergency food perjury bill clinton kenneth starr assault andy mccarthy harassment monica lewinsky dnc moeller special counsel trump defense journal
"journal american" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on Science Friday

"I gotta go johnprattofthenationalinstitute of fans isn't standards and technology we're going to take a break when we come back your science road trip stay with us thisissciencefriday on my roof plato if you visit romeandi hope you do i haven't been here already one of the things that stands out is the number of ancient structures that you can still see today and it's not just massive slams a rock over 2000 years ago the ancient romans built peers and breakwaters and other structures out of concrete and some of those structures are still standing what did they know about concrete that we don't because we see concrete crumbling on our roads today writing this week in the journal american mineralogy researchers underneath unearth the geology and chemistry secrets of that ancient concrete and how the interactions of sea water with volcanic ash actually make the roaming concrete stronger has it a juice joining me now is one of the authors of that report maridijackson is a geology and geophysics research professor at the universityofutah and an expert on roaming concrete welcome to the program drjacksonll listeners to this show no that concrete is is one of my favorite topics i don't know why but i'm fascinated by it so i am delighted to speak with a fellow concrete geek like yourself it's fadia testing staff it is interesting case a what's this week are what did the romans know about making their concrete that we don't do theromans had a very differing framework for making the cement fabric of their concrete the first step was to mix volcanic ash with lime that is calcium oxide cal signed from limestone and water and in the architectural monument say used freshwater and in the marine concretes these seawater this produced a very potent reaction called a puts alanakraus action the created a really robust framework of coherence.

professor theromans 2000 years
"journal american" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"journal american" Discussed on WDRC

"And the here's some you some information about calcium calcium intake has become controversial lately because it's thought the uh all the calcium fight its way into the wrong places into your arteries or into your brain and so do what the good news of the bad news on calcium supplementation i wish to prefer okay will start of with the bad news but there's a good news aspect to this story of journal american heart association reported this month in a story entitled risk of a schemic stroke associated with calcium supplements with or without vitamin d the background of this was there is controversy surrounding the risk of schemic strokeassociation with use of calcium supplements and so they did a study of they looked at uh nearly twenty seven hundred patients who had a first episode of nonfatal stroke and then they began to look at their vitamin d consumption of which vitamin d they consumed whether it was a high dose of asserted the calcium they consumed of i looking at calcium uh without vitamin d and what they found was there was an increased risk of stroke at high doses of vitamin d greater than a thousand milligrams per day in fact the risk was twofold twice as high for individuals consuming vitamin d greater than a thousand milligrams per day now i've long recommended this is as of both six or eight years ago oh what i became concerned about too much calcium going into the arteries i've scaled back on my recommendations of calcium even for window with us to proceed i give them to or four most six hundred milligrams of calcium per day would lots of magnesium had other cofactors of course including vitamin d but the interesting part of the story now here's the good news is that for individuals who took vitamin d there was no increased risk of stroke it was almost as if the vitamin d told the calcium to go to the bones and the to the arteries very interesting study of they conclude this study suggests the calcium supplements given as monotherapy that is alone at high doses may increase the risk of stroke.

american heart association vitamin d eight years