35 Burst results for "Journal Cell"

Ancient DNA Rewrites Dead Sea Scroll History

60-Second Science

02:26 min | 6 months ago

Ancient DNA Rewrites Dead Sea Scroll History

"The Dead Sea. Scrolls are religious manuscripts. They were written from the third century BC to the first century CE. They were discovered in nineteen forties and fifties in caves along the shore of the Dead Sea and the parchments have been the topic of intense, religious, literary and historical debate, and they also continue to be the subject of scientific analysis including DNA. The idea was to try to match and also be apart. Fragments based on their genetic identity named you based on the animals from which they were made. Were Harvey is a molecular biologist at Tel Aviv. University his team sequence the DNA from bits of scroll dust, almost all disclosed that we samples were perhaps surprisingly found to be made out of sheepskin we found that were made out of cow skin, and that's a big story here for hobbies, colleague Noam Mizrahi from the university's Department of Biblical studies picked up the story. The scrolls he says came from a place called courant. A three days walk from the cultural. Cultural Center of Jerusalem Mizrahi. He explains that the people of Coumarin were an extremist group with apocalyptic predictions who harshly criticized the views of others. Therefore, he says there's been long standing debate about how much the scrolls unearthed from this sect and Ron represented just this factions, views or more general, Jewish thought at the time now the presence of cow skins in a desert region, inhospitable to cattle, his provocative, because it suggests this the cow made scrolls do not reflect. The. Community of Iran, but rather brought from the outside written at the outside and reflect the broader Jewish Society of the fears. That finding is in the Journal cell. Several. Other lines of evidence point to the ancient Coumarin Library, containing a broad diversity of texts, Mizrahi says genetics have added a new dimension to studies, complimenting his analysis of the content and language of the parchments ear I discovered that the material of the scrolls, the very biological material from which the scrolls are made is informative, and as telling in terms of the very questions I was trying to clarify for myself, and for other scoreless. In other words. Sometimes you need the subtext in this case, literally the material under the writing.

Noam Mizrahi Dead Sea Cultural Center Of Jerusalem M Tel Aviv Coumarin Library Iran Department Of Biblical Studies Harvey Coumarin Journal Cell Jewish Society Of RON
"journal cell" Discussed on a16z

a16z

10:34 min | 7 months ago

"journal cell" Discussed on a16z

"Club. I'm Lauren Richardson and today. We're talking about a new approach to prevent viral infection specifically. We're discussing a recent article published in the Journal Cell Titled Development of Crisper as an antiviral strategy to prevent such covy to an influence from the labs of Marie Larussa David Lewis and Stanley At Stanford our discussion covers the differences between this newly developed prophylactic antiviral strategy traditional vaccines and antiviral drugs. How can target a huge range of viruses and the next steps needed to go from paper to practice? I'm joined today by a sixteen Z general partner. Dj Ponte and bio team partner. Andy Tran but before we begin. Here's my summary of the article. Prophylactic treatments are those that you take before exposure to prevent infection in this article. The authors developed a strategy using crisper casts prophylactic against Krona virus influence at infection irises inject their genetic material into host cells which then hijacked the cellular machinery to generate more viruses. The idea presented in this paper is to use the Cleveland activity of Crisper cast to destroy viral genomes and thus prevents viral replication as a reminder crisper cast is a two part system. I cast enzymes are proteins that cut nucleic acids either are night or DNA in this article. They were using version of casts called casts thirteen D which recognizes cuts. Arnie this is appropriate since both influenza viruses encode their genome in the other part. Crisper element are short customizable Arnaiz that guide cast to the correct sequences for cutting authors called their system pacman and it targets Pacific regions within either the SARS covy to genome the virus that causes nineteen or the influenza agyekum earlier strains of which have caused past pandemics such as the Spanish flu and H. One N is responsible for many cases of seasonal influenza. The authors expressed crisper casts in lung epithelial cells which are the main targets of these viruses. And show that they were able to inhibit viral and infection. So that's the high level summary. Let's start with the big picture of what's happening with cove in nineteen vaccine versus treatments. We are in this global arms race if you will to really develop therapeutics and vaccines as fast as humanly possible. There's been so much hype and anticipation to a lot of drugs. One thing that is important. Is that these. Drugs are not miracle cures or silver bullets. What is really important to note as that to really get us back into having some peace of mind to return to normalcy. We really need ultimately to have a vaccine prophylactic for the broader healthy population the challenge or certain viruses. And we've seen this in other cases beyond Kovic is at some viruses are really hard to hit with vaccines one that I've dealt with. Research wise as Ding. Dang is a deadly example because it has antibody dependent enhancement. Ad said the second time you get it. It's that much worse and it's really hard to come up with a vaccine fort. Yeah the general idea. Is that the your body creates. Antibodies against a pathogen but instead of being effective antibodies. They actually helped the pathogen. So the second time you see it like in the case of Dang it actually helps enhance infection as opposed to preventing infection. So there is some whisperings in the current Richer that this may be happening. Which would be real blow to vaccine? Development definitely would make krona that much more difficult because many of us may have a primary infection already with minimal symptoms and we may feel like okay now. We're in great shape. Bright for some viruses would mean have antibodies and for the next time with easier eighty turns US upside down and actually if it is true that Krahn virus has this effect then. The worst is yet to come unless we have some sort of way to handle it. Yeah certainly makes the goals of serological testing the opposite of what you would expect instead of identifying people who have antibodies that could return to the workforce identifying people who might be now extra susceptible to a secondary corona virus infection both affect scenes and this crisper based approach are prophylactics but they have very different mechanisms of action. So let's start with just the key differences between what a vaccine does versus what this crisper prophylactic does for vaccine typically what you do is you have some dead part of the virus that is injected into create some sort of antigen something for your immune system to recognize such that you develop. Antibodies and those. Antibodies suppress any future live infection and this approach is tricky in that you have to think. About what Antigen you want to use that story. What the designers but really it's harnessing your own immune system to do the work and just kind of catalyzing and other innovative areas are in vaccines so vaccines. Where instead of giving a antigen you give Arnie sequence that. Actually then your body than uses to produce the antigen that is of value to your immune system to read up on the other extreme. You have antivirals are Tamiflu. Tamiflu is small molecule. It's like a drug that inhibits enzyme that the virus needs and by doing that. It kills the virus. What we're talking about today is interesting. Because it has some aspects of both it's prophylactic like a vaccine but it has the complexity or at least sophistication something more like a drug especially in the sense that it's not necessarily directly looking to stimulate your immune system but to give you really new functionality tackle viruses and in particular in some ways it makes sense because crisper in bacteria evolved to kill viruses. It's interesting there's ask the question. Could we modify this mechanism that nature's order to come up with not for bacteria is to take advantage of it but for us? It's almost the most natural application for crisper. Chris has been used for so many different things. But I mean it evolved anti viral. And so here we're using it an antiviral application in a George. Church has his great line. That crisper isn't really gene editing. It's early vandalism right back. You're you don't want to edit infecting virus. They want to destroy. It is a very natural sort of analogy between their crisper. Part being the hardware the infrastructure the platform and bioinformatics part thing the software and that you can imagine as new viruses come up once you sequence the viral genome already sort of caught in that region as great. You have stuff off the shelf. If they're not then is just a bioinformatic question to find a different conserved region and then just put new payload in. But it's not starting from scratch. It's not discovery. It's literally just taking your chassis. Doing essentially AL almost like a software update for the new thing. You have to deal with and rolling out that update and this is a pretty dramatic paradigm shift. From the way we traditionally think about either vaccines or buicks. What are the really exciting things about his work? Is that with this Chris base approach. You can engineer guides specifically target certain regions of the SARS Cov to Gina. What they actually did is performed Baath informatica analysis that aligned a lot of the published sequences. And then what they were able to find is that just by creating six crisper are guides. You can target about ninety one percent of the sequence corona viruses. And that's really important. Because a lot of these regions there are conserved among Brcko viruses. Like do you SARS burs. Gino for instance use of these multiple crisper. Ironies is really a two you can increase the range the number of viruses that it can target but you are also safeguarding escape and mutation and resistance because viruses are super fast to mutate. And so if you were just using one Guy Darnay that the virus would only have to change one or two base pairs so that it was now resistant to that guide. Dr a views six and they're targeted in these super highly conserved regions like. They have selected. It's so much harder for the virus to evade all of those. So that's a real benefit to this. Approach is both the number of current viruses that they can target and the prevention against a rapidly evolving strain. And it's beautiful to work that the paper showed six barn is cover ninety one percent and literally. If you have twenty two Chris and as you can cover you know basically a hundred percent of targeted Cronin viruses and obviously. There's a lot of engineering issues to iron out once once you have this. You could literally have one prophylactic that someone can take to cover off. Future Chronic viruses. This article is definitely a proof of concept paper. They were in cell culture they were using lentiviruses to deliver the crisper nuclear aces the guide. Arnaiz and the SARS covy to fragment construct and virus is Gene Delivery System. That works great in the lab but would not be feasible in a clinical setting. So I'm curious what you guys think. The next steps are that are needed to validate the feasibility of this approach. It's really important to test out the genome. Editing dynamics kinetics editing efficiency. All in a live context they demonstrated ability to cleave SARS Cov two fragments and then also reduced replication in human lung but the sales but it didn't have the authorization to handle the dangerous virus so it's not alive. Iris Yeah One of the things I really enjoyed about. This paper was that they were not only looking at ours covy to and Krona viruses but they were also looking at influenza and they showed that this crisper prophylactic would work against alive influence a virus. So that really helps. Kind of bolster the feasibility of this approach. Another key thing. Of course it's a crisper modality which is plagued with you know crisper related issues which is off targets and the like and of course delivery is always a big challenge for a lot of crisper systems. How do you actually develop the appropriate delivery system or vector to really safely and efficiently? Get it into a good amount of human cells for this reflective. Actually feasible and use will would be key as well delivery. It's another opportunity for engineering. And there's a lot of different avenues one can take this Vida's especially create so many respiratory issues. There's on potentially natural form of delivery through the lung and then in principle maybe discontent Breton. You can almost imagine the day when before you leave the house to go to the grocery store you take a hit off your crisper.

Chris base Arnie Dang Cleveland Journal Cell Titled influenza Lauren Richardson Andy Tran general partner Dj Ponte seasonal influenza US partner Marie Larussa David Lewis Kovic vandalism Vida Stanley
"journal cell" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

13:54 min | 7 months ago

"journal cell" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"As the common cold. That's that's very common. So you know. If fifteen thirty percent of the common cold is composed of chronic viruses. We know at least two of those corona virus or are in the same family that been identified to make at least in one case. There's been neutralizing antibodies. There has been crossed immunity. Then you'd think why why not test that let's get. Some animal. Studies started on that. You know he could have animal studies. There was an article that I was reading yesterday. That was saying that they're hoping that they've found some antibodies in llamas that they're hoping they're going to be able to because it's seeming finace because of these. Antibodies in Llamas. They they've they're hoping they can either. Transfer them to people or learn something about how these antibodies are created. But Llamas seemed to be here. It is llamas. Could be the key to fighting new crow viruses. Research says make that larger. It says It may sound bizarre to but llamas could be the key to finding new corona virus researchers from Belgium or MEM- remember. That's the Big Lady that Oh showing you earlier. She's a health lady and the United States published an article this week in the Journal cell that highlights the potential use of Lama antibodies to prevent Kovic nineteen factions. Antibodies from a four year old Belgian Lama. Name Winter Show promise in blocking corona virus from infecting cells according to research from the University of Texas Austin the National Institutes of Health. And the get high said that game. G. H. E. N. T. University studying early forms of the virus. Researchers have found an antibody in winter that effectively attached itself in neutralize spike protein in SARS cove one and Moore's cove a researchers believe that particularly antibody which has been found in other lamas well can be injected into an uninfected individual to protect them from getting infected with the new corona virus. Yes I think you know. There's there's lots of avenues for you know therapeutics in you know in addition to like repurposing drugs Monoclonal antibodies. You know being able to basically identify. Antibodies that do neutralized SARS Cov virus whether they come from llamas or humans and basically identify the specific antibodies that can bind to that spike protein. That you just mentioned which is that region. It's known that the antibodies Bein. Their neutralize it. It's also the region that that is used to get inside of the cell so monoclonal antibodies. I think are really big You know possibility for promising therapeutic because you can then I mean the problem is growing like large scale manufacturing them right so like if you can identify these antibodies and then manufacture them you can inject them people and then potentially get some protection. The problem is is that. That's not like it's going to be a short lived protection it's GonNa be. It's not like it's not like a vaccine where your body's making its own antibodies. And they're and they're more longer-lived but so in areas where people getting exposed. Perhaps you could give it to them and it would stop them from getting but how long we short live we. Well WE DON'T. I don't know I mean how it's you know. It's probably enough to like if you're a healthcare worker your first line. I Responder People. That are definitely like being exposed to large doses of the virus That that could be a promising area but also I think even just treating patients like that have already been infected. You know so. That's that's also another so like in combination with some of this other stuff like from desert ear Which is you know. It's not like a a silver bullet but it seems like it's also prompting promising probably with combination of other other factors as well But yeah the Mona monoclonal. Antibodies is really. I know there's like general big company. They're They're they're growing some large get once. I think there's I they. They isolated from human mice or something. But there's other companies that have isolated from humans that have been affected So you know. That's that's definitely A promising area for sure and the good thing about that is that have you heard of antibody dependent enhancement dome. So that's a big concern All right so so basically when you when your body is exposed to a pathogen like a virus your your innate immune system you know the first line of defense like neutrophils things like that are making hydrogen peroxide trying to kill the virus. But then in the background your adaptive immune system and I'm just totally generalizing is you know is is also working in the background. And you know. Part of that. An adaptive immune response is to produce antibodies. So you have memory cells. That are making antibodies that are specific to bind different regions. Up on the virus and neutralize them. Prevent them from getting inside of the cell and so The adaptive immune system usually takes about seven days. After you're exposed to the virus right. The problem is antibody dependent enhancement so sometimes a neutralizing antibody is an antibody that can bind to the virus and neutralize it. Stop it from entering yourself right. So you're doing its job but you sometimes make antibodies that are non neutralizing or don't do as good a job. They don't find his tight or something. And then you can have. What's called antibody dependent enhancement and this was like a big problem for the RSV vaccine Back in the you know like most kids get RSV. It's a respiratory tract infection. The most kids get it by the time they're too Like an there's no vaccine that that are that's given Back in the sixties there was this antibody dependent enhancement happening. Some clinical studies with toddlers and some problems got really really sick in a couple died but what happens is basically the antibody binds that. There's a couple of things. Antibody binds the virus and can basically change its conformation and allow the virus to get into the cell better than you become like you get like a higher viral load and then you don't have antibodies neutralize it and it just it could be more could be could lead to death The other thing that happens is the antibody binds. The virus doesn't neutralize it but it like makes us crazy. Immune complex activates your immune system to just go haywire and it causes all sorts of pathology. And that's what happened with the Toddlers so there's a few viruses that this happens with and unfortunately corona viruses one like this has been identified with SARS cove one Virus in I think marriage is well where So this is also a problem with vaccine so like people giving giving the vaccine people's immune response some people can have that antibody dependent enhancement. And that's what was shown happen with these with the SARS one there is some non human primates studies at that did that In also animal studies as well. So you know the thing with monoclonal antibodies. Is there a little more specific? Because you know they neutralize and you're like growing them up like you've done that tests as opposed to just letting your immune system do its thing and then potentially you may have this like non neutralizing antibody that could cause problems. But that's kind of the concern and I know that vaccine people that are working in vaccines. They're working on. I'm it's like they're concerned about that and completely trying to like figure that all out so just strange virus it. It almost seems like there's multiple viruses. There are yeah so I mean there's an it's funny that it's kind of connected to this antibody dependent enhancement. There's there's been quite a few different like forms like mutations that have been identified but to particular in that spike protein region. That's an important region because antibodies bind there. And because that's the region like that you know the viruses to get into the cell and so There's been there's been two major like Strains that have been identified and one of them. So it's an in the spike region and that's ASPARTAME glazing mutation and basically in Asia in China It the the the dominant form is the aspartame the original quote unquote for him And then in Europe and also in North America this other this other form the glycemic mutant is prominent and there's been studies that have shown looking at like okay looking in parts of Europe different countries in Europe. That have this predominant form that they're basically there's a higher mortality rate but didn't actually measure the infected patients of you know it's kind of like correlation but What's interesting is that? There's there's actually been a genetic link to this this mutant so There's studies there's been march gilded antics genetic studies that have found that Asians about twenty percent of Asians have a a a basically a Nucle- tight change in a gene that encodes for approach as that's involved in this you know basically allowing fires to get into the cell but that basically prevents them from having this new mutant that's predominant in Europe and also in New York In North America in general because my friend Michael who got it his mom who got who's in her seventies is Asian and issued kicked it and That is interesting. Says there's something so they're they're wonder if she has that snips we. We were genetic report that we have like. We've got one that's like a new viral ports. A free one where we're kind of putting some of these interesting snips which don't mean anything. I mean like just information. That was interesting. There's a lot of researchers out there trying to like figure out of genetics is involved in this. But the thing that's interesting about that mutation is that The it's in that Spike Region. And it's where the antibody binds and and there's A. There's like a theory going around because that's Pacific region. It's been shown in cove one to 'cause antibody dependent enhancement. So there's a theory that potentially that mutation is causing people's immune system to hyperactive eight and basically become more active and it can lead to a mortgage severe Copa Nineteen illness. That's not been shown like it's stopping shown at all so But it's interesting right. It's interesting how in Asia and China particularly I mean about one percent of the population. It's like less than one percent has the other mutation the the glycemic mutation. That's in New York. It's in You know in in most of the United States but That that in less than one percent of the population in China. How's that form so we're in? Japan has a very low mortality rate. Correct yeah they do I know that that I was mentioned that vaccine. That's one thing that they're investigating. I mean there's all sorts of differences in handling the whole. You know from the beginning. Just how you how you handle my resume like this. There's too many factors to like say one thing but you know there's there's lots of. There's lots of possibilities and I think that that I think that eventually there's going to be therapeutics. That are identified. You're not me multiple ones? Maybe and I think vitamin D is going to potentially play a role there But I mean just like things like does appear and the monoclonal antibodies. And then you eventually like A vaccine will you know eventually you know be be available but I think until that until that point. I do think that things will be identified. That just kind of help us like deal with us like better. You know what is going on with blood types. One of the things we talked about earlier. You asked my blood type. O positive wise. Oh positive better. Well there's there's been some data and this was also identified with SARS Cov one That people with type O blood they They make antibodies. They make type A antibodies whereas people with type A blood Antibodies against like they make an against the B Antigen and so the type. Antibodies were identified. So there's been studies looking at people with type O blood or type Type Abe lied and also type B and Type O blood. There's like less less frequency of getting covert nineteen so as opposed to having a severe form. It's just like you're less likely to contract it and it stopped because the type a antibodies that people would typo blood make neutralize the they basically bind to that region that spike region and neutralizing antibody prevent it from the virus from entering the cell. So that's at least. That was the mechanism that was shown with Sarge Cope. One so it's thought. Oh well the same. We're seeing the same pattern where people typo are protected from SARS COV to possibly. That's that's also. Why but another really interesting thing. Is that people typo blood we were also talking about these like blood clots and like I mean. There's all kinds of crazy things you read. I mean I'm reading all these publications just and then the other thing is all eats. Publications are being uploaded on before the peer reviewed and I mean some of them are just a mess anyways. But you know you kind of just take it with a grain. Salt where these clots are like. You know. There's clots people that are healthy and young certainly people that have severe cases. People like older people people that are Preexisting conditions and stuff and the TYPO blood people have lower levels of this van. Will Lebron factor which basically is involved in clotting and it's been shown that that bond will Lebron factor also Is like is higher. It's higher in people with cars. Two has shown. Also be that SARS Cov one and it's involved with clotting so having lower levels may somehow even help protect against that's a theory it hasn't been shown.

Spike Region Llamas China Asia Europe New York Lebron University of Texas Belgium respiratory tract Journal cell Moore G. H. E. N. T. University North America United States Japan
"journal cell" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Supplement to problems to super loose is found in Splenda locale sodas and thousands of baked and fried goods many of which also contain cars a study published in the peer reviewed journal cell metabolism this month found that consuming sucralose with carbohydrates could decrease the body's insulin sensitivity and the brain's response to sugar because the study included a small sample size that lasted only two weeks it's hard to say exactly what kind of long term impact those changes could have on people's health according to one of the senior authors I'm Marlys Majerus ten this morning this is a story that hopefully will put you at ease maybe put a smile on your face because of so much serious news that we've been hearing about for the past couple weeks it's a story about one fleeing suspect who probably won't make the ten most wanted list police in Pembroke pines Florida have issued an all points bulletin for a cash out the animals not considered armed or dangerous but it has managed to elude capture since late January the department tweeted wanted unknown cal description female and brown with a white hat faster than it looks and talented fence jumper enjoys polls clearly authorities have a sense of humor charging the cow with moving violations uttering false checks and fleeing and eluding officers Pam Coulter CBS news a lot of nice puns in there I have to remember some of those around here if you have travel plans when people probably nervous right now because of all the news about the corona virus so that's why he wanted to use and when it went to the Philadelphia International Airport to get the latest it was a quiet day at the airport with little to no wait yes a lot of sorts in Florence brown says they had about eleven flight cancellations and they expect more of the same over the next thirty days with travel restrictions between year but those who did show up for flights I would suppose that ten Miami jazz in the gardens that you make the best of their trip despite closures and cancellations due to culvert nineteen but they cancel it due to the virus but I'm still going to be with family during my time at our Airbnb ladies calling us and she's like all this stuff shutting down any sure you someone in common we're like oh my gosh like brown says they are taking extra precautions at the airport to.

Marlys Majerus Philadelphia International Air Florence brown Pembroke pines Florida Pam Coulter CBS Miami Airbnb
Mouse babies born from cells that were transformed into eggs using a 'chemical cocktail'

Marketplace

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Mouse babies born from cells that were transformed into eggs using a 'chemical cocktail'

"Scientists in China are reporting a way to turn nine the eggs cells in mice into egg cells capable of producing mouse pops Joe Palca has the story granulosa cells are special cells that surround immature egg cells in the ovaries by treating those granulosa cells with a chemical cocktail researchers at Nang K. university in Tianjin were able to coax them into behaving just like normal mouse eggs these new cells could be fertilized and planted in surrogate hosts and produce fertile mouse pops the researchers say humans also have granulosa cells and that the approach used in mice could someday be used in human fertility treatments the research appears in the journal cell reports Joe Palca

China Joe Palca Nang K. University Tianjin
Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

"Not easy to study the development of the human brain. The brain is very unassessable especially the early fetal stages. It's just not ethical thirty we study normal healthy. Human Brains University of California San Diego Biologist Alison Mojo Tree. He says researchers have instead relied on animal models. The human brain is so much different other species that were desperate to have really a human model so he can study the human brain. Now Moody's team may have that model title in the form of small globules of brain cells. They've created in the lab. These piece is structures developed from stem cells that are bathed in a culture of nutrients along along with proteins that control gene activation as the little structures grow their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells and they will form connections and disconnections will form functional synapses that will later on turn into networks after two months the mini brains even begin to limit brainwaves and you can record every week to see how the activity has changed and when they reach about six months of age we see a growth exponentially initially in the number of connections opposites that they can make and at around ten months their brain activity compares to that of premature human infants there prematch which following the same trajectory as the human brain does that could make the mini brains very useful for understanding how our brains become wired early on and they could also provide insights nights into the development of neurological conditions such as autism and epilepsy these very early stages are exactly win some neurological conditions appeared and and behalf the possibility to help millions of people with neurological conditions that mood tree also cautions that as technology moves forward ethical questions will. I'll start to emerge someone my ass. Are they conscious or are they self-aware. Can they feel pain. I think we are in Graz zone where this technology could who'd evolve to something more complex and then I think the ethical question would be what's the status of these miniaturized brains military says is that same question has formed the basis for the rules and regulations governing the use of animals in the lab which can serve as a model to guide the mini brain research the findings in the Journal cell stem cell in addition to shedding light on neurological development. Many brains could also help reveal how the human brain evolved and play a role in an improving algorithms for artificial intelligence. These piece is brains may produce some big

Human Brains University Of Cal Alison Mojo Tree Journal Cell Stem Cell Graz Moody Six Months Ten Months Two Months
Brain waves detected in mini-brains grown from stem cells

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Brain waves detected in mini-brains grown from stem cells

"Have for the first time growing miniature brains from human stem cells that produce brainwaves a report in the journal cell stem cell claims the tin grew hundreds of size brains from stem cells for ten months and monitor their neural activities using electrodes roads the organizers started producing the brainwaves after about two months early signals were sparse and had the same frequency similar to what scientists seeing the brains friends of preterm babies but as the media brands continued to grow they began purchasing brainwaves at different frequencies and the signals appeared more regularly suggesting the neurons

Cell Stem Cell Ten Months Two Months
"journal cell" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"journal cell" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"We can both eat the same two thousand calories and i might gain weight on that diet. You might lose weight just because of how your metabolism set. We all have a unique metabolic fingerprint. That's going to determine what the calories do that. We consume now. I'm not saying the calories don't matter. This is a unit measurement that gives us a baseline measurement. We got right cannot dislike fully make it religion. You know that's that's dangerous because again. It's gonna work for some people because some people listening there was like i've just measure my calories count my macro. I win you know but that doesn't happen for everybody. Everybody got to understand that because again we blame the other person so i just matter of fact. I'm gonna pull a study up right now. It's the points that you're bringing up a really interesting thing. I think you know a great place to try to get somebody to you. Know have them say they lost twenty pounds n._f._l. Easy to them. That's always the hope that's always the goal and i think that's why there's so much dispute going back and forth between carnivore diet <hes> if it's your map rose there's all these different diets and people getting excited but it's usually like a guy i like myself who who utilized a low carb diet. I used to weigh three hundred and thirty pounds and i've nowadays we in the thirties and i feel so darn good about. I wanna share with everybody and then sometimes you're thinking hey the only way i can share this. Get people excited about if a bash everybody else over the head with a baseball bat of why i'm doing it but it's i realized it's there's not a reason to do that because the people that are counting their calories. They got healthier year then. Let it be. It's they got in better shape. That's cool. That's why you're good what you do as well as just like. We go then phase of like wanting to bat but there's so many different paths to the goal so listen to it so this was a study is was published in the journal cell till peer-reviewed prestige journal they found that the presence of a certain type of gut bacteria actually blocked people's intestines from absorbing as many calories from the food aid the the bacteria in your gut determine airman how much is getting shuttled from your gut which are gut in a sense is kind of leg..

baseball two thousand calories thirty pounds twenty pounds
"journal cell" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"journal cell" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"We can both eat the same two thousand calories and i might gain weight on that diet. You might lose weight just because of how your metabolism set. We all have a unique metabolic fingerprint. That's going to determine what the calories do that. We consume now. I'm not saying the calories don't matter. This is a unit measurement that gives us a baseline measurement. We got right cannot dislike fully make it religion. You know that's that's dangerous because again. It's gonna work for some people because some people listening there was like i've just measure my calories count my macro. I win you know but that doesn't happen for everybody. Everybody got to understand that because again we blame the other person so i just matter of fact. I'm gonna pull a study up right now. It's the points that you're bringing up a really interesting thing. I think you know a great place to try to get somebody to you. Know have them say they lost twenty pounds n._f._l. Easy to them. That's always the hope that's always the goal and i think that's why there's so much dispute going back and forth between carnivore diet <hes> if it's your map rose there's all these different diets and people getting excited but it's usually like a guy i like myself who who utilized a low carb diet. I used to weigh three hundred and thirty pounds and i've nowadays we in the thirties and i feel so darn good about. I wanna share with everybody and then sometimes you're thinking hey the only way i can share this. Get people excited about if a bash everybody else over the head with a baseball bat of why i'm doing it but it's i realized it's there's not a reason to do that because the people that are counting their calories. They got healthier year then. Let it be. It's they got in better shape. That's cool. That's why you're good what you do as well as just like. We go then phase of like wanting to bat but there's so many different paths to the goal so listen to it so this was a study is was published in the journal cell till peer-reviewed prestige journal they found that the presence of a certain type of gut bacteria actually blocked people's intestines from absorbing as many calories from the food aid the the bacteria in your gut determine airman how much is getting shuttled from your gut which are gut in a sense is kind of leg..

baseball two thousand calories thirty pounds twenty pounds
"journal cell" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"A new study from UCLA has identified new genes which increase the risk of autism it was published in the journal cell the study's co lead researcher Elizabeth Russo tells can access the sequence the entire genome of over twenty three hundred people from families it had at least two children with autism what was unique about this is that prior to this study that we need to add most of what was known about autism genetics was from studying family that had only a single child with autism and so what that meant is that they were identifying primarily not inherited mutation but what are called the noble mutation which are mutations that occur only in the sperm and the egg from the parents you really see them for the first time in a child the sound sixty nine genes associated with a risk of autism including sixteen that had never been seen before she says the more jeans they can identify the more they can understand the underlying biology of what causes autism some people in the Dana point community are fighting to save a nearly extinct butterfly it's the regal monarch in fact the monarch beach Amman or kills areas are named after the orange black butterfly can Tarbert president of the Mahler kills H. away tells connects part of the problem is the butterfly friendly vegetations been torn out reporter Sir we've lost our habitat of milk weed through agriculture through pesticides and and through just expansion and through drought when the people put in in southern California people put in lots of flowering gardens everywhere that the missing element is now we saw a monarch way station with lots of milk we'd been created in the area in hopes.

UCLA Elizabeth Russo Dana point community monarch beach Amman president Mahler researcher reporter California milk
What happens in the brain when we give up?

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

What happens in the brain when we give up?

"Have you ever participated in a sporting event where you feel you can't push on anymore he just give up what happens in the brain when we give up according to an article in the journal cell there is a part of the brain noted as the ventral tegmental area in this part of the brain there are cells called neurons that release of chemical called dopamine which is normally associated with pleasurable events researchers wondered about cells that work in the opposite way as dopamine essentially demotivational or frustration or us turns out they do exist and for people who suffer from depression the ability to turn off the cells may actually improve a person's mood we don't know a lot about the cells yet but there is hope that the more we know the more we might be able to help those with depression with your help I'm not your private data on ten

Dopamine Depression
"journal cell" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"journal cell" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Missed some actual news like the recent study in the Journal Cell Metabolism. I try to I try I to read the entire thing front to back and especially when the cell metabolism swimsuit edition comes out. I'd never missed your come on. It's just great stuff I read the little inserts has a postcard. You can tear out yeah. We'll get into a friend Yorkshire to share the the Awesomeness that is enough time you can get a free toaster-oven from cell metabolism's really good so yeah look for that <hes> anyway scientists have always suspected a correlation between growing rates of obesity obesity and processed foods but now they found that the process food also helps you overeat so the bottom line. is you need fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. I really tried last night. I tried to eat actual. My wife like made this actually my daughter whose home from college made this concoction this salad with some fruit in it and then a rubella and spinach and I thought well. Let's see if it was so nasty like three bites. I couldn't get like nope gone going back to field of Greens brickhouse nutrition no question maybe you can help me. <hes> Dr Pat Bitter Nasty stuff right. I had for dessert drumsticks. You know like ice cream cone so but also had a peach so totally negated everything so I started ballots right out that's right Yep. One Scoop of field of Greens has a full serving of.

Journal Cell Metabolism Greens rubella Dr Pat Yorkshire
Older Mice Experience Delayed Aging, Longer Lifespans When Given Blood Protein From Younger Mice - Study Finds

Dr. Daliah

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Older Mice Experience Delayed Aging, Longer Lifespans When Given Blood Protein From Younger Mice - Study Finds

"All right. Could an injection of young blood be the fountain of youth wasn't there a company in California who was selling for thousands of dollars a infusion of young person's blood. Well, there might be a little science behind it or being told that buddy is claiming that an enzyme from younger mice. Extended the life span by sixteen percent for older, mice proteins called. E. N. A. M. P. T. Received it. Lived longer. Scientists say the protein. We're getting older mice received injections of the protein from the blood of younger vice they saw their confident function, improve have better sleep quality and their lifespans extended by nearly twenty percent. In humans. This is the equivalent of life expectancy being extended from the age of seventy nine to the age of ninety one. Oh boy, I could just see the stocks go crazy. The team from the Washington University school of medicine in Saint Louis St Louis said that the findings indicate that this method could be the secrets awarding of age associated diseases and be an anti-aging method for humans. And the enzyme is known as E. N. A. M. P. T E napped. So they say he plays a role in how cells produce energy as a body ages, however cells become less efficient at making this energy. They say we think the body is somebody redundant systems, to maintain proper any D levels NASD is the energy that they're discussing and this senior author, Dr shin is hero in by says, since we know that NASD inevitably declines with age many researchers interested in finding anti aging interventions that might maintain an levels as we get older for the study published in the journal cell metabolism. The team gave one group of older, men older, mice concentrated eat and AM inapt taken from younger mice and the other group got a placebo sailing, not that you really need to do placebo with mice. It's not like they know and the mice in that got the saline solution all died in about two and a half years. But the mice that didn't live for two point eight years. So lifespan increased sixteen percent and it's better than better, cognitive function on memory tests. This is

Nasd Saint Louis St Louis California Washington University School O E. N. A. M. P. T E. N. A. M. P. T. Dr Shin Sixteen Percent Twenty Percent Eight Years
Obesity, Fourteen Days And Two Pounds discussed on CNN 10 (video)

CNN 10 (video)

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Obesity, Fourteen Days And Two Pounds discussed on CNN 10 (video)

"Most fires are common in ultra processed foods, and new study in the journal cell metabolism says those kinds of foods can cause people to gain more weight than unprocessed foods ultra processed refers to foods that have also high fructose corn syrup flavoring agents and hydrogenated oils. In the study, ten healthy adults eight an ultra process diet for fourteen days, it, including foods, like baked potato chips Turkey bacon, and bagels with cream cheese ten others, eight, an unprocessed diet, including oatmeal, bananas, meats and walnuts. Then the two groups switch diets for another fourteen days, the meals all had the same amount of calories fat and carbohydrates. But participants were allowed to eat as much or as little as they wanted. They also exercised about the same amount each day, the results on the ultra process diet, people, eight faster and took more helpings consuming about. Five hundred more calories per day than those on the unprocessed diet with the ultra processed foods. They tended to gain about two pounds with the unprocessed foods they tended to lose about two pounds. So one big conclusion was that limiting the ultra processed foods we eat can help prevent obesity, but that's not always easy. Researchers say it takes less time to prepare the tra- processed foods, and they cost less a week of process meals was estimated to be around one hundred and six dollars a week of more natural meals, one hundred fifty one dollars that may be why another study found that a majority of the foods that Americans Britons and

Obesity Fourteen Days Two Pounds One Hundred Fifty One Dollars Six Dollars
New study says processed foods make us crave more calories

Real Estate 101 with Mary Gill

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

New study says processed foods make us crave more calories

"Eating, processed foods leads to white gain Alesi has details. New research published in the. Journal cell metabolism reports that study, participants who ate a diet high in processed foods like breakfast, cereals, orange, juice, low-fat potato chips, and processed meats gained unwanted weight. This is because the processed foods cause a rise in hunger, hormones, this study found that people who ate a diet full of highly processed foods aided average of five hundred extra calories each day, that's the equivalent of two and a half. Crispy cream glazed

A new story from Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

A new story from Rush Limbaugh

"Well, this may not come as surprise eating processed foods, leads to weight gain new research published in the journal cell metabolism reports that study, participants who ate a diet high in processed foods, like breakfast, cereals are instincts, low-fat potato chips and processed meats, gained unwonted, wait. This is because the processed foods cause a rise in hunger hormones, the study found that people who ate a diet full of highly processed foods. Eight. An average of five hundred extra calories each day, that's the equivalent of two and a half. Crispy cream

When and Why Your Liver Grows and Shrinks Dramatically

Curiosity Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

When and Why Your Liver Grows and Shrinks Dramatically

"From Dayton night, your liver grows, and shrinks dramatically, and the reason why does this should give you a pretty compelling reason to get a full night of sleep. We've briefly mentioned this fun fact on the podcast before. But today, I'm going to dive into the details as a quick reminder, your liver keeps your sugar levels, constant it stores and releases vitamins and minerals into your body as needed indeed. Doc, suffice their blood, and it has a remarkable ability to regenerate the growing in shrinking part is pretty important to see scientists have known for awhile that animals follow a kind of body clock that triggers regular cycles of function in their brains and organs and even their cells your liver. Also follows this internal clock, but it's function may also depend on when you eat. And when you exercise in may two thousand seventeen researchers published a study in the journal cell that found that the livers of mice grew by nearly half during waking hours which for my says nighttime and their livers shrunk back down to normal size at mousy bedtime while the mice we're active. The researchers saw the mean kind of liver cell hepatitis sites growing that growth was linked with how many Ribe assumes they had Ribe assumes being the specialized structures inside living cells that produce the proteins needed for a bunch of different liver functions. Rep assumes also fluctuate with the size of the cells. And the more ripe assumes the better the liver can process food into protein and help your body get rid of toxins as you get closer to bedtime. The liver cells start tagging and begging those excess Ribe assumes and that helps deliver shrink down to its resting size. Again, the study found that the livers of mice that were active in feeding during their usual times. Meaning nighttime reached peak efficiency and size the bottom line. Here was that the liver seems to be sinked up with the body's circadian rhythm. And we have reason to believe that same liver size shifting happens in humans to not just mice and then take away from that is to remember that the longer your liver operates poorly. The more likely it is you'll experience unpleasant symptoms like fatigue, swelling, a tendency to bruise and even jaundice add this to the list of why regular full nights of sleep are. So very important.

Ribe Dayton
"journal cell" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KOMO

"Last year, where brashly was one of the heroes who risked his life to save the boys. But to get out the two men still have to get through several hundred feet of narrow and winding underwater pathways with jagged rock and low visibility cave. Diving is notoriously deadly sport. Brackley cheated death and said he immediately planned to go diving again, the entrance to the cave here sits a little bit of ways from here and it's on private property. And last week check the gates to it. We're closed at some of these cave entrances across the country. They are close to cave divers for good because they are just that dangerous. That's ABC Steve Olson Saami researchers say they've developed a genetic test to help determine which infants are predisposed to obesity later in life. Scientists working to fight obesity say there's a to Nettie component to the problem, and they created a test to identify newborns who have a higher risk of becoming severely obese by middle age the test examines more than two million spots in a person's genetic code those with higher scores were twenty five times more likely to become severely obese than those with lower scores. The researchers writing in the journal cell say the genetic influence starts at around age. Three. So parents would have plenty of time to focus on healthy foods and exercise. I'm Jacky Quin. Go news time, ten fourteen.

obesity Brackley Jacky Quin Steve Olson Saami brashly ABC hundred feet
Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin all believe it or not mosquitoes don't bite out of spite female mosquitoes of the species agent tie. Need the nutrients present in your plasma to ensure the proper development of their eggs? Then though there I may seem on quench people. The ladies actually, take time to savor your blood once they've sip their fill after female bites she'll double her body weight. And then she'll actually completely lose interest in biting people for several days. Laura Duval postdoctoral researcher at the Rockefeller University in New York City, the insects post-prandial recovery phase may divall in her colleagues wonder, whether they could essentially trick mosquitoes into thinking already eaten divall works in the lab of Leslie Voss hall who studies genetics neuro science and behavior. Here's fossil our idea with that maybe the same drugs that would turn off human appetite might actually. Work to turn off mosquito. Appetite turns out that when the Rockefeller researchers fed mosquitoes a drug that's used to treat people for obesity. The insects were indeed less interested in hunting for their next human meal ticket. But the problem was that we needed to figure out how the human diet drugs were actually working in the mosquito. So the isolated the receptor protein with which these diet drugs interact, the receptor, which they dubbed NPR L are seven looks a lot like the receptors that regulate hunger and people the researchers knew they had the right receptor. Because when they knocked it out in some mosquitoes, the drugs, no longer dampen, the insects appetite a finding they describe in the journal cell. In fact, the mutant mosquitoes were all around insatiable said the are seven mutants behaviorally strangely. Even after they take a huge blood meal. They remained thirsty for human blood next divall says they'd like to explore exactly how these drugs act to curb. Females bloodlust does she become less sensitive to the clues teller that humanist nearby? Or is this more like smelling a hamburger app you've already eaten three either way the approach could provide a novel method to limit the spread of diseases that are transmitted by mosquito bite like Dunga and yellow fever and give us a new way to tell mosquitoes to buzz off. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Rockefeller University Leslie Voss Hall Obesity Postdoctoral Researcher Laura Duval New York City NPR Fever Sixty Seconds
Scientists gave diet pills to Mosquitos; the results are promising

Generation Bold

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists gave diet pills to Mosquitos; the results are promising

"Tests may be coming up with a way to put mosquitoes on a diet. Here's more from USA's. Rick, vincent. A new study published in the journal cell says by manipulating the hormones would make mosquitoes feel full the insects lose interest in human blood, thereby cutting back on mosquito bites by giving mosquitoes assailing solution containing drugs that act like a diet pill. They found the insects appetite and attraction to humans drop sharply. The study still in its early stages

Rick USA
"Hunger Hormone" Ghrelin Aids Overindulgence

60-Second Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"Hunger Hormone" Ghrelin Aids Overindulgence

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. All TIs the season for over eating, but it's not just your lack of willpower or the omnipresent holiday treats. No, you can lay some of the blame on guerrillan because new study shows that gremlin the hormone that makes you hungry also makes food and food smells irresistibly appealing. The finding appears in the journal cell reports grill in is produced in the stomach, and it's levels rise before your habitual mealtimes. And after you have an Eaton for an extended period. So the hormone reminds you to put something in your belly. Injecting rats with grilling encourages them to eat and people who receive a dose of Groen, grab extra helping the buffet. But how does the hormone induced overindulgence defined out researchers at McGill University trained volunteers to associate random images with the smell of food. For example, every time they saw a tree they might get a whiff of. Freshly baked bread at the same time, some of the subjects received gremlin others got only sailing the volunteers were then ushered into an FM Mariah machine where the researchers watched their brains to see which parts got turned on by different images. Seems that in subjects under the influence of Gretl in the brain region involved in pleasure and reward lit up only when the volunteers viewed the images they associated with food aromas, their brain pleasure centers were disinterested in images that had not been paired with food smells, also one. Participants were then asked to rate the pleasantness of the images, the ones who'd been exposed to grill in gave higher grades to the food associated pictures. Then did folks who got no grilling. So when visions of sugar plums or the smell of apple pie, get your stomach growl. And you can think or blame your grilling as you reach for a fork, thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Mcgill University Gretl Eaton Sixty Seconds
Bone Building Needs Bit of Breakdown First

60-Second Science

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Bone Building Needs Bit of Breakdown First

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. Exercise builds muscle, but it also strengthens bones. Exactly how exercise boosts bone strength is a matter of debate and a subject of scientific scrutiny. Now, a new study in mice shows how a hormone secreted by active muscle cells triggers, bone remodeling, physical activity stimulates the release of multiple molecules from skeletal muscle take Iran, for example, this hormone named after the Greek messenger. Goddess iris is produced by running rodents and by us humans when we do high intensity Arabic training once it's generated iris and improves bone density and strength to find out how Bruce Spiegelman and his colleagues at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School took cultured bone cells and located the receptor to which Iran binds, this receptor protein is particularly abundant on cells called osteo sites. These cells of the master regulator of. Bone remodeling and the most abundant cell type in bone. What we found interesting in. This paper is the magnitude of the effects, we get in terms of iris and acting to stimulate osteo sites and preventing their death in culture. Also their ability to make a key protein sclera Sten under the stimulation of iris scores. Ten is a protein that actually stimulates the breakdown of bone that Iran, which builds bone would promote the production of sclera Ston which destroys it may seem counterintuitive but Spielman says that this bit of bone breakdown that signals the body to engage in some skeletal renovation the results appear in the journal cell boning up on the actions of Irishman could help us work out. How we can derive the most from our workouts and possibly keep our bones dense enough to keep us dancing in our dotage. And the new work identifying the receptor. Also allows us to really a much more easily identify. What are other target cell types for IRA Sinn with particular reference to neural cell types, where there is suggestive evidence by us and others that iris in may play a neuro protective effect in disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and a LS? Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Iran Karen Hopkin Dana Farber Cancer Institute Bruce Spiegelman Sinn Alzheimer's Disease Harvard Medical School Spielman Parkinson's Disease Sixty Seconds
What Can Probiotics Really Do?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 2 years ago

What Can Probiotics Really Do?

"If you've ever wondered how the world might end, then my new podcast is right up. Your alley. It's called the end of the world with Josh Clark. And it's about the very real ways that humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two might it. Be artificial intelligence or a haphazard physics experiment or perhaps in altered virus that escapes from a lamp who knows the one thing that sure is ignoring the risks won't make them go away. So come listen to the end of the world with Josh Clark. You can find it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bond here. What if you could take a pill that would treat depression, constipation, diarrhea eczema, urinary tract, infections and allergies while also preventing cavities and strengthening your overall, immunity, and what if it promised to shield you from the impurities of the world and reestablish a right and correct balance in your body's ecology. First of all everybody settled down. There is no such thing as a pill that does all of that. But to hear some people talk, probiotics might just come close the popularity of products containing friendly live microorganisms has exploded over the past decade at this point. You can walk into almost any grocery store and find probiotics in capsules lozenges. Gum facial toner, and yes, even in pet products. In addition to the more traditional delivery systems, like culture, dairy products yogurt and fermented products, like sauerkraut and Khumbu. Some folks are making a lot of money on these little bacterial helpers. But what are they actually able to do for us? And are they safe? We spoke with Dr Chris Irwin, a dietitian and lecturer in nutrition and dietetic at Griffith university in Queensland Australia. He said that unless you have an extremely poor diet or drink alcohol to excess. There's not a lot of evidence that a probiotic dietary supplement will help your overall health. He said if you're taking probiotics you'll likely. You need to take them every day, and it's best to feed the healthy bacteria with prebiotics. The bottom line is that healthy people are likely to get more benefit from getting regular exercise of waiting smoking or consuming too much alcohol and having a diet rich in foods that increase fiber and natural prebiotics intake like vegetables, fruits and whole grains, rather than consuming a probiotic supplement. However, probiotics might be an effective treatment for specific cases or conditions while there's not a lot of evidence. Supporting the idea that probiotics could help with your ex allergies or dental woes. Sorry, they might actually help people looking to avoid veteran east infections or upper respiratory infections picked up from a cold virus. Other. Studies have found that probiotics can help with digestive issues like irritable bowel syndrome, and may improve the frequency and consistency of your poop. So as a consumer what should you look for in a probiotic? If you want to get the most bang for your buck. Basically, you've got some homework to do. Irwin said a different probiotics. Strains have different effects. So it's important to look for a probiotic supplement that contains the strains of bacteria most likely to match your condition, the dose of bacteria called colony forming units or CFU is also important and should be high enough to meet benefits observed in clinical trials, the short answer here is if someone is looking for probiotic to take gopher something that provides the greatest diversity in bacterial, strains and the highest CFU. Irwin also suggests getting advice from your doctor or dietician for those strains that might be right for you. And making sure you're buying probiotic strains that are refutable and have committed to transparency in scientific research. However that ladder is more easily said than done. A study published in JAMA internal medicine in two thousand eighteen pointed out that there is very little government oversight of factories that manufactured probiotics and the US food and Drug administration or FDA found that about half of the six hundred and fifty factories that manufacture probiotic supplements in the United States were cited for violations most having to do with the product not living up to what was promised on the label. The study also said the probiotics may lead to infections in people with immune deficiencies. Another study published this year in the journal cell suggests some people may be resistant to supplemented probiotic bacteria, and therefore we'll get no benefit from it at all the researchers also investigated whether probiotics can help the gut microbiome bounce back after a round of antibiotics, and they found that though probiotics might have hell. With diarrhea related to the anti-biotics. They seem to have delayed the reconstitution of gut bacteria. Of course, more research is needed to understand just how helpful probiotics are to our overall health, and it's important not to give them more credit than their do. Irwin said. It's unlikely probiotic supplements are dangerous, but I don't think that they're a magic bullet L D people are likely to get more benefit from having a diet rich in vegetables, fruits and whole grains on the other hand if someone has a poor diet and doesn't exercise regularly their digestive bacteria may benefit from probiotic supplements. But they'll likely need to keep taking them to get lasting effects. States episode was written by just windshields and produced by Tyler playing for more on this and lots of other gutsy topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hey, their brain Steph listeners, we need your help. So the ads that you listen to make this podcast possible. But we want you to listen to ones that are actually useful. We have listener survey up on our show website, brain stuff show dot com, where you can go, and let us know what you're most interested in it should take less than five minutes. Just head on over to brain stuff, show dot com. And let us know. And thank you so much for listening.

Dr Chris Irwin Josh Clark United States Lauren Bogle Diarrhea Apple Depression Steph Griffith University Bowel Syndrome Lecturer Jama Queensland Australia FDA Tyler Five Minutes
U.S. Immigrants Leave Country--and Microbes--Behind

60-Second Science

02:15 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Immigrants Leave Country--and Microbes--Behind

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata immigrants to the US might lose touch with certain customs and traditions back home. But here's something else. They lose their microbes when they came to the US almost immediately. They began losing their native microbes, Dan nights, a computational biologist at the university of Minnesota. And over time the balance shifted to the point where they were dominated by the US associated microbes. He's referring to first in second generation immigrant women from the mung and Karen ethnic minorities in south East Asia. His team sequence the DNA found in their feces, and they saw that there was an immediate decline in the number and diversity of gut microbes among the emigrants compared to their counterparts still living back home and the decline continued over time. Now, if you're thinking, well, maybe the women just switched up. Their diets started eating more hamburgers, more, bacon, and eggs dietary serve. Vase don't bear. That out. The women weren't changing their diets nearly fast enough to explain the drop in diversity. So it seems as though there's something else going on the has to do with the US lifestyle. Antibiotics could be playing a role the water supply could be playing a role. It could be other aspects of lifestyle. No stress exercise hygiene. But we don't have enough information yet to be able to pin it down. The results are in the journal cell. Some of the missing microbes help digest traditional foods like tamarind palm and coconut, but the consequences could be more severe than indigestion. We have evidence from many studies now, especially even causal evidence in the number of animal studies that having the wrong set of microbes or missing the right set of microbes can cause many of the diseases that are rising in industrialized nations. Things like. Obesity metabolic disease, which we might be able to fix. He says if we're able to solve this microbial mystery. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

United States Christopher Dodd East Asia Christopher Don Metabolic Disease Dan Nights University Of Minnesota Sixty Seconds
Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

All Things Considered

02:41 min | 2 years ago

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

"Reports that involves distinct pattern of communication between brain areas involved in emotion and memory, there's lots of evidence linking sadness and other emotions to part of the brain called the amid della. But a team of researchers wanted to know precisely what the amid della and other brain areas are doing when someone's mood is shifting because so Jose psychiatrist at the university of California, San Francisco who was part of the team we really wanted to get at you know, when you're feeling down or when you're feeling happy. What exactly is happening in the brain those moments? You can't get that from brain scans there too slow. So the team studied twenty one people who were in the hospital to get brain surgery for severe epilepsy before the surgery doctors insert tiny wires into the brain and monitor its electrical activity for up to a week. So how says the team hoped those? Recordings would help answer a basic question. When patients are sitting there watching TV or talking with their family or just waiting or being anxious, which regions of the brain are talking to each other the patients agreed to keep a running. Log of their moods. Then the team looked to see whether certain moods were linked to communication within specific networks in the brain. And so hall says some of them were what was really surprising to us was that it was the same network in most of the subjects. So in about two thirds of the subjects there was one network which over and over again would tell us whether they were feeling happier side that network involved communication between the amid delight which plays a role in emotion and the hippocampus which is critical to memory the signals between these areas became much more intense at times when people reported feeling sad. So how says the finding published in the journal cell may bring comfort to people with depression as a psychiatrist it's incredibly powerful just to I think status patients. We actually know there's something happening in your brain. When you're feeling more down. Josh, Gordon who directs the National Institute of mental health says in one sense, the study merely confirms earlier research on animals, it's finding a circuit a piece of the brain that we kind of already knew was involved in mood. That's the less than well part. The wild part is that it's human beings. Anti says, it provides a detailed map of what's going on in the human brain, Gordon, says discoveries like this should eventually help patients with mood disorders drilling important that we find the circuits underlying mood. So that we can learn more about them and treat them with the tools that we're developing that are aimed at circuits tools like transplantion magnetic stimulation, which might someday be used to alter the specific brain circuit,

Gordon San Francisco Jose University Of California National Institute Of Mental H Depression Josh
"journal cell" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Probiotics may not be as helpful as you think. And may even be harmful to a pair of new studies in the journal cell, which says people take the live bacteria in hopes of boosting their digestive health. CBS news medical contributor. Dr David ages says the research shows probiotics have questionable benefits when you took. Just probiotics. Most of the time they just went through you. Sometimes they stay but a couple of bacteria dominate then they did the amazing studies. They gave to botox and the probiotics, and what happened is is that these couple of bacteria Kefir where the pill. They took actually started to dominate the GI track delayed, the normal activities from the study found that nearly four million Americans take probiotics gear up. This is Dave Ross on CBS News Radio network, presented by theraworx relief. If this week's news is found you going through the last of your profile. Let me take you to the one oasis of calm in Washington. The one place where the reporters of polite and all the news is above average. The weekly briefing. King of house speaker Paul Ryan, I don't know how many of you were around back the end of the nineteen sixties. That's the last time the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits was this low at the speakers briefing. There's no talk of what Brett Cavanaugh said the other judges were saying about Roe versus Wade fifteen years ago no-one shouting about impeachment. We will impeach listening to one of those anti-stress recordings of surf and seagull forms working. Families are better off businesses are hiring. This expanding manufacturing is booming Nova stay there are still big problems. The biggest being that. There are now too many jobs. We still have millions of jobs that are unfilled that story's playing out across the country. Businesses are trying to find workers with the right skills. This is why we just recently overhauled our career technical education system. So that it's easier to match people training that they need which means if you don't like what you're doing your dream job is out there right now..

Dave Ross CBS botox Brett Cavanaugh Dr David Washington Paul Ryan Roe Wade fifteen years
Older adults can still grow new brain cells, study finds

News, Traffic and Weather

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Older adults can still grow new brain cells, study finds

"The q younger hip her follow kids the q question has yet to be fully answered but the company appears to be looking at a name change charlie harder the k they better check with star trek fans officials from the communicator student newspaper at spokane falls community college say four hundred copies of their paper were stolen right from the racks this week they tell the spokesman review they believe the theft is an attempt to hide coverage of the allegations of workplace sexual harassment against an administrator that communicators faculty adviser said in a campus email this week that he would be working with campus security attorneys from the student press law center and local law enforcement to find out who is involved in that and to make sure they're held accountable frank lenzi komo news scientists think they might be learning why our brains perform less well when we ate for many years it was thought the brain didn't produce new cells leading to declines everything from memory to reasoning and language now researchers at columbia university have found older people have just as many new brain cells for memory as younger people but there's less blood flowing to those new cells in other words newer cells artists active in older brains the researchers say that older people can stimulate those newer sells through exercise and being intellectually engaged the study is published in the journal cell stem cell mark mayfield reporting officials say washington state's three national parks have received a one million dollar donation from an estate of a woman who loved the outdoors washington's national park officials say they recently announced the gift which comes from the estate of betty wallis who grew up in washington later lived in california it's thirty four past the hour komo aaa traffic every ten minutes on the fours or main situation right now is still in pierce county where we have a collision eastbound state route five twelve on the exit portland avenue state patrol is on the scene along with some medical aid on that one can floating bridge some periodic closures between now and seven o'clock this morning and in thurston county road work on i five southbound near marvin road that's near carpenter looking good over both the lake washington evergreen point floating bridges no problems on the narrows in puyallup if you're headed eastern washington it's good going over both snoqaulmie and stevens we have no restrictions.

California Stevens Thurston County Washington Cell Stem Cell Frank Lenzi Spokane Falls Community Colleg Puyallup Lake Washington Pierce County Charlie Betty Wallis Mark Mayfield Columbia University Administrator Harassment
"journal cell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Of life great guests today as always colin ross the wisconsin institute for liberty good morning sir and eugene cain raising cain longtime columnist from milwaukee journal cell good to see you as well hey thanks for writing me how's life after right in that column all those years three times a week for twenty years i've been writing a column in the milwaukee market and it has been an adjustment but to tell you the truth i'm so active on social media at is almost like i'm still writing a column every day although it's obviously not the same kind of melton research needed to do that kind of stuff but i'm having fun i'm working on some independent projects hoping hoping to get my brand can be like you see well good to see you going to jump right in the big story this week was the student walkouts they're protesting about guns gun violence they're asking congress to step up and do something on gun violence how i'm gonna start with you what are you thinking of protests what do you think congress will actually do about this this yeah i think student activism isn't necessarily a new thing and i don't begrudge anyone for getting involved in i wouldn't i think i commend the students having their voices heard that said i don't think because their students they have the policy positions they're advocating necessarily are anymore valid or worthy but i think what we're talking about in terms of what can actually get passing congress i think you're likely to see some some sort of i think it's been floated as gun violence restraining orders the ability to have due process.

melton research congress colin ross wisconsin institute for libert eugene cain milwaukee journal milwaukee twenty years
"journal cell" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KGO 810

"Inter species with the hundred dollars a lot well apparently we also have dna from another group a humanlike primate called the denisovans and there's a new study in the journal cell shows that ancient hankypanky didn't stop in siberia humans who traveled across south asia mated with a different group of denisovans as well apparently we were not picky in the old days we are a melting pot no that is one nice way of saying it that's the g rated version that is the it's like tinder on steroids in the old days was happening if we spotted somebody was kinda humanlike and we were like yeah let's get together speaking of dna that so somebody took this story from nasa and tried to jump to their own conclusion and that's how kraft gets out at nasa found a shift in the way that his genes were expressed which is different from the dna dna itself changing so you know dna can be expressed you might have the genes for brown eyes but you still have blue eyes you know that kind of thing the expression it's how the particular piece of dna is observed it produces lineal the r m r n a we're getting into the detail the weeds of this but it basically ninety three percent of his expression levels went back to normal when he got home however seven percent of his jeans related the immune system dna repair born bone formation and more we're still a little out of whack when he returned but the dna itself did not change that there's an important distinction there the story also talked about his response being slow his reaction so it is that still accurate yes no that part was accurate it's just that it wasn't his dna itself.

asia nasa kraft siberia ninety three percent hundred dollars seven percent
"journal cell" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KOIL

"And the order this to apply ended up much of free gifts of was go the journal cell dot com grade carpeting great product off all forward journal cell dot com to grow look your best bergdolmo an catch great university blue jays basketball all season long on 1620 his own i'm john bishop we are your home and away voice of the jays and catch all the buzzer abuzar action all season long exclusively on 1620 of his own and 1620 of his own dot com catch you in a women's basketball all season long on your lebaneseowned to the deuce where your home and away voice a mavericks women's basketball and you can hear all the buzzer to buzzer action all season long exclusively on your levin 80s own to reduce commando miracles digital doc here how she spanish the 21st annual dri giveaway is on and you can win an apple vacation three nights day at the real palace in cancun assisi theory darth dance producer mike and sorry buddy if you're not eligible snl plato and you can enter to win every single day at giveaway dot commando dot com and listen to win right here this weekend gm commando we all play a role in keeping our community safe everyday we move in and out of each other's busy lives it's easy to take for granted all the little moments that make up our everyday some are good others not so much but that's life it's when something doesn't seem quite right that's it's time to pay attention because only you know what's not supposed to be in your everyday so protect your everyday if you see something suspicious say something to local authorities traffic center to actually answering worked on what coach radio highway a fifty second it's causing stopandgo traffic also report of an accident blondeau at about eighty eight expect slow speeds of the dodge expressway eastbound between two hundred fifty six and the ice six if you split close speeds on el both directions at i eighty this traffic report is brought to you by chi help i met price i knew.

john bishop jays mike levin apple producer snl gm fifty second
"journal cell" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Order to digest food we need to bring it in enzymes that break down if molecules and those molecular fragments then pass through the gut wall and are absorbed in our intestines but we make a limited range of enzymes so we don't break down many of the toughest compounds in plants and the dietary fiber that's what we're talking about is these tough in digestible compounds that are in the plant foods that we eat but there indigestible only to us our gut is coated with a layer of mucus on top of that sits a carpet of hundreds of species of bacteria so that is what we're talking about when we talk about the microbiome and some of those microbes carry the enzymes needed to break down what is for us an indigestible thing this dietary fiber so um the big this this study that i'm talking doubt there were two of them they were published in the journal cell host and micro did you even know there was a journal cell host and micro but they looked at um bacterial dna in this sequel material from mice in the study and that was the way that they were able to estimate the size of the population of gut bacteria in them in the mouth and win the mouth went on a low fiber diet the population of gut bacteria crashed is shrinking ten fold um so uh and and the example that they used in the study they actually named mcdonald's so that um the difference between a fiber rich food based diet and a low fiber diet was basically what you'd get at mcdonald's said the researcher a lot of lard a lot of sugar and twenty percent protein so there's an indictment for your diet what what they did was um a day shifted this diet toward a mcdonald's diet and what happened was many common species of gut bacteria became rare and they're rare species became common so there were changes to the micro by on embiid but there were changes to the mice themselves the intestines got smaller than mucus layer in the intestine got much thinner as a result of that bacteria wound up much closer to the intestinal wall and that inquiry which meant triggered an immune reaction so very had chronic inflammation after just a few days on the low fiber diet this is quite the.

mcdonald researcher twenty percent
"journal cell" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of so much what makes those trees the the leaves change colored it's will actually what's happening is all the different colour the pigments are already in there they're just masked by the chlorophyll so it's the loss of chlorophyll in the fall the causes all those causes start being expressed so well that happen regardless of of losing its dependent on son and brain and it will islands right right to a degree right but we're experiencing major climate change when you say oh yeah yes but if if during the fall during these new season when they should be colouring if we have the warm sunny days and then really cool nights the sugars get trapped in the leaves and that's what makes for really really good fall color a plus if you have to have a lotta soil moisture and that's why these leaves dropping early they were kind of muddy and the fall carl was not very good so we still have a chance for some good falcao now that we've had the rain if we have the warm sunny days the cool nights i got a kick s blower like a law awesome we floored that i enjoy doing that you enjoy doing my son does it with me and he really likes it was bushy when you compare that the alternative getting the breakout yeah we got a little bit of them i feel like i to exercise i get the rica let him do the blower but this blower gas good i recommend a territory the walt blower that powerful i put in his face and i've blowers is a key spla a lot of the conflict i think the thing we sell yes how am i wrong a writer so going back to our email you are wrong i'm sorry no i'm glad i didn't say right so now a wild back and i guess people were getting there is like a high amount of level and people's yaron timely weeks okay so i'm not quite slow you're not quite wrong but you're also not quite right okay sure guluma right there well i mean here that never lies and this is from the notion ever does okay okay sal i'm gonna go with aircraft but when this report cannot it was an app from a scientific journal cell the tell me what it say in the same no rigs again so basically an the send the.

climate change carl writer yaron
"journal cell" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on BrainStuff

"According to a 2016 assessment published in the journal cell every person hosts at least tens of trillions of microorganisms gnat amounts to about five pounds or two point three kilograms of bacteria and other microorganisms the trillions of microbes in each person's microbiome work in concert with the human body defend off disease promote digestion facilitate fuelburning aden recovery and even sharpen mental health and acuity now some believe that feeding the right mix of microbes to our guts could offer a new approach to enhancing athletic performance rather than using sophisticated genetic sequencing technology to zero in on disease causing microbes why not hunt for microbes that helps support elite athletes instead now fit by aum biometrics aren't the only scientists interested in athletes poop lauren peterson a professional mountain bike racer and a postdoctoral associate at the jackson laboratory for geno mick medicine in farmington connecticut as sampled cyclists feces to determine what makes the top athletes microbiomes unique in a paper recently published in the journal microbiome peterson and jacks professor george weinstock noted an abundance of two microbes in the top cyclists micro biomass one is thought to play a role in breaking down carbohydrates for fuel and the other could play a role in recovery researchers at university college cork in ireland meanwhile isolated what they believe is a critical microbe from fecal samples of irish rugby players the bacterium has been linked with a lowered risk for obesity and systemic inflammation another group associated with the university of california at san diego is looking at how the microbiomes of surfers may be unique and perhaps encompass microbiomes associated with their local ocean environments.

postdoctoral associate geno mick medicine farmington connecticut microbiome peterson george weinstock ireland obesity aden lauren peterson professor rugby university of california san diego three kilograms five pounds
"journal cell" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Here's the lead author of that study published in the journal cell metabolism dr matt robinson is an assistant professor of kinney's yala g at oregon state university but he conducted the study during his post talk at the mayo clinic well one of the theories of aging as that as a person gets older their muscle protein start to accumulate pieces of damage a much like a car would accumulate rust over time the proteins he's talking about or the ones used inside muscle cells to make and maintain the might of qendra might of kandari is where our cells get their energy and as we age the motto khandruyev estar generating free radicals one damaging aspect of those free radicals that they can go and have some negative effects on on cellular components such as the proteins once those proteins become damaged it's very important that we remove that damage protein and then synthesizing new one in its place so if you don't baath out doubt rust it will spread to study the effects of different types of exercise dr roberson device four groups made up of older and younger people one group did the high intensity interval training on an exercise bike three times a week that included a warm up then four minute intervals separated by three minutes of rest another did resistance training so that using free weights or machines to lift weights and yet another combined both moderate cardio exercises like body an exercise bike and resistance training the final group was a sedentary control group or the hit training comes in his we we measured the protein damage that would be the rust in your cells and we compared in a group that was sedentary so they didn't exercise during the study duration and we saw it they had an accumulation of these damaged proteins.

matt robinson assistant professor kinney oregon state university mayo clinic qendra kandari yala three minutes four minute
"journal cell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"journal cell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Wanted so i think that's just an example in why why was this on the cover of the journal cell was there because i think it really kind of is a harping are of what's coming where it's going to be possible for you know even sort of not that will we have to be big in oh the big sort of industrial agricultural companies doing this kind of work now it's accessible to anybody mom and pop businesses cetera to be clear we're not just talking about plants this could be for livestock lilic any almost anything that a sort of ronen consumed yet and i thought one of the most interesting dimples in the book that made me really think was was the woorld example of of farms potentially a using this to make a female only chicks because right now on blow when issue it's way a male chicks are essentially cold on the phone yeah that's right so what if you didn't have to do that you didn't have to kill these animals you could just simply do this genetically and i think it's it's a it's a really interesting thing to think about a tecnology that really avoids a lot of animal suffering very unpleasant task certainly for farmers and creates an opportunity to really transform or change at least the way that that type of farming is done and you know we also there's other examples to like we talk about the idea of creating an suddenly just an idea it's been done you know to create horn lists cattle that are genetically horn lewis rather than having cattle that have to be de horned physically which is a very painful process.

ronen