20 Episode results for "Josiah"

Josiah

The Bible Binge

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

Josiah

"Is Very special episode of the Bible. Binge on we're host talks McCoy and me has always telling neck romances to go home his goal. Then you cannot stay here okay guys. Here's the deal. The avalanche show where we take stories from the Bible and we recap them as though they were a movie or TV. Show now. We say movie bicker. Tv show because that's what we usually do on our other show about pop culture. The podcast would not Jamie where we talk about. Popular Culture Sacrilege every Wednesday and before we begin. We just WANNA be clear that the Bible Bench has no agenda. The show is immense be evangelical zero. We just think the Bible has some super dope stories and we want to talk more about them and a voice says Moore every man or every woman. The conversation that will take place in this episode is meant to be more casual not disrespect but in an effort to better understand the story. This season of the Bible bench is all those in the Bible and Jason found themselves in a moment in time or they had to pivot the season of the Bible. Binge is presented by all things reconsidered the newest book from our own knots mcvay which releases on June second. If you're listening on Sunday when this upset releases its choose that you guys. Don't you stay? Knox writes about his own pits on things that matter and some things that dumb for this episode. We're going to talk about king. Asya and to make sure you get every episode of the season head straight to wherever you listen to podcasts. Him Subscribe to our show plus. Don't forget to fall along with us on instagram twitter at the Bible Binge finally here at the Bible Bench. We urge you to love others as you love yourself and share the show on social media and if you WanNa fall long ago the main biblical scripture. The Soil Cover is second kings chapter twenty. Two and twenty three are Jamie let's talk about King Sciatica the Old Testament name that birth thousand youth group teenage boy names I fifty eight juice is really everywhere. We went to a mission trip there. What the you passer. Someone's named Joe Fat. That feels that feels like a good. If you're going to go in the Bible in me like who are we going to name a kid after I was always we'll see I was interested in the people who name their kids like a and I'm like I don't think you read that correctly. You know we talked about earlier. This season people who name their kid. Jona might if it's for biblical reasons from veep. Yeah that's true also about hang. You don't want to do that. It's like you through basically donate your kid Jona. That's what we're saying guys. I don't know tell you. Yeah but you know you knew so. This is So we've got another Very interesting very interesting character Not a huge cast. But we'll go through those The people involved very quickly before it gets the context. Well speaking of idea. That is our person that kind of the star of the show He's eight years old when we meet in. He's the sixteenth. King of Judah Spoiler. His Dad's dead for being a jerk or maybe just for being king. It's we'll see And Joe Cya. The Name Means Jehovah has healed which fits for the story. Yeah I guess it does. It does it. Does it works so well. So for this Character I wanted to. Because Amb and we'll talk more about context of mix as we go a little bit but I wanted to ask someone who was trying to kind of escape their father's shadow a little bit and I want someone who conveyed innocence incompetence right so I need someone who has a famous father. Someone like yourself so you know I. I started and I was circling Jason Ritter. I was like a really Jason Ritter but I think I've landed on John David Washington son of Denzel Washington. Oh that's really good. Well when we can see pictures of him like when he was a little kid you it's just ideas onto rain for many many years right. He is an adult through some of the story. That were GONNA be talking about today but I like that. We can picture him as little but then also know that. You're you're fighting a legacy when you take charge. That's true for him to. Yeah so we have other in the story that are even going to be named. But there's a lot of like really like Mall Not Small. That's unfair You're in charge of the wardrobe. That's an important but like we have other characters that are in the story But it's mostly the servant people sure serve via. There's not really a lot of key. Characters in the sledding let a niche performances right. That's exactly right so I've Understand that I've cast them as the Supporting characters from beauty and the beast the candle man Dish Lady. The Candle Man. Small dish person the piece of furniture that acts like a dog. All down versus right graph. That's their canonical names. I believe I've memory serves no I I got here and I was like you'll remember it and I don't the beast supporting character. Yes okay. That's great all right. Well let's bring you up to speed of where we are. So we're in the book of Second Kings now when this was originally written by who knows who Aaron do you know who you tell us. it was just one book but some translators broken into two bucks. I am always curious why that happens. She's talked a little bit about like before Rebukes of of like that. We're chapter breakage comes from and stuff like that but like why j- just decide you know what we need to be two different kings not wanking. Yeah I am second king. I didn't need a break could read. The whole thing was like an author who's trying to like bulk up a buck by like. Oh this'll mean another page. We'll have a chapter break. He wanted other advanced another day guests. So I don't know I wanNA know so previously in our biblical timeline. David who is the subject of season three of the Bible Bench? He's become king and he has united the twelve tribes of Israel. Now it was the best of Times. There's a flourishing nation there's holiness there's glitter et Cetera. And then there are four hundred years of more kings and some were pretty good like Solomon and has a Kaya and some were less good I e all of the rest of them so these wicked kings lead. Israel Judah for away from Dillard but there were always God's prophets like saying hey stop touching that come over here sit next to God and most of the time. God's people stared at the prophet and kept touching it and today's episode. We find ourselves in the six hundred Specie and family lawn. That is complicated at best. You know in the one of the interesting things I realized about. This is When you're thinking about like Win this takes place in the Bible. I think the interesting thing is This story and the writing of the story it actually like it took place pretty closely together. Thought because you know a lot of the Ultimo was written during the accelerator or posts exotic time period. The the that's about to happen here at the Kings right like we're At the end of kings balanced surveys destroys. And exiles got people to Babylon. That's when all of this is really getting written. So this is recent memory stuff. This is me like millions of years ago. It's like I remember when that happened. I remember as like it was probably not until my college years when finally someone said to me you know the Bible's not chronological and I was like what do you mean right like. Oh No it wasn't written like it's not all in order of when it happened. I'm like I understand what you're saying. Why would they put together? Oh they liked grouping at a different way and I'm like No that's real. I probably some people listening in like us. Cosker what are you talking about? But doesn't actual thing. Yeah and you can like this whole Bible study plants where you can be like read the Bible chronologically like it's like watching the marvel movies like you can now watch them anyway so we recommend that the whole dynamic will come into play in a little detail. We'll talk about in the script yes okay. So who is Joe Cya so just size grandfather is Manasseh? And he's the King of Judah now a record breaking fifty five years but he was evil like sacrifice. Your kid in a fire. Evil Big butthead. Big Now this is how God speaks of him in. Chapter Twenty one. He says because Manasseh has done things more evil than all that the Amer- rights did behold Jerusalem Judah such disaster that the ears of everyone who hears of it will tingle. I will wipe Jerusalem as one wipes the dish wiping it and turning it upside down. God's not a fan not fan Manasseh puts the word Manasseh know what I mean not cool not cool so grandpa me is gone and just is dad. Amman becomes king and he turns the whole thing around and even really great King J. He's just like his father Manasseh and he gets assassinated by zone employees. So Joe Size family tree has some rotten limbs. So in Judah at this time as we've talked about in previous episode Israel and Judah have split and at this point in the story Israel has been so awful that God quote removed them from his presence inquired. They were exiled to Syria. So Judah is the only tribe left and they are hanging on by mere threat. Do you know why I just told you King Manasseh. He's the worst. So grandpa made. Many made Judah allegiant to Assyrian rulers. Their sworn enemy and God is not okay with that. Plus Manny is not a fan of the winter. God He prefers the idea of sixty one rides and the outlook now. For God's chosen people is very bleak but with the assassination of his dad. Amman just has a chance to turn it all around at eight years old. Okay go up to see an eight year old. I'm going to be great. I I like that. Manasseh he He's got the triple crown of worshiping other Gods Going after the prophetic community. God's people and we're sacrificing young kids like really going on us not just sacrificing anybody's kids yet. We're just here. Don't sacrifice anybody that's us that's are missing but specifically don't do like if you sacrifice kids that's bad that's Jane at Jamie Golden Nine. I'm just like people that's me saying. If you're doing hierarchies and evil again they'll do you please back me up when he goes to these if you will so that brings us to Chapter twenty two the scripture. We'll talk about That James Lead into so just. I was eight years old when he began to rain. Rain thirty one years in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Jeddah. The daughter of Dia of boss calf. I'm doing my best. Everyone going to have to with it and he did what was right now is the Lord and walked in all the way of David his father and he did not turn aside to the right or to the left are there. Is this like as an eight year old? That's what they're saying. Is this about his rain? You know I think it's probably a up full. I mean I think it's probably a full looking back on Even from eight. He was great all the way until he died. Yeah it feels like a prescription for a life not necessarily like man. That third graders awesome. It does feel almost like a preemptive T. L. DR. Like don't read this. Here's kind of the thing it's funny so in chronicles thirty four which I would like someone to explain to me. Why is chronicles? Just another telling of wets were reading. Yeah like a watered-down down the chronicles person. Sometimes do it. Much better than the Kings. I sure who's the chronicles person. Who's the King's person I need? Aaron answer all these things that's right but in I chronicles thirty four. It says that in his twelfth year he began to purge Judah injury slim of the high places the Ashram in the carved and metal images so it seems like he is great like all along the way so at twelve. He's like you know what the worshiping other Gods seems not. Great sure no for sure. I don't know for a fact I've read a book that says it but like it feels like not great and then even up until the point that like. He's like sixteen. He is really taking down whole cities that are just alters to like. He's just cutting down incense altars throughout Israel. And then just coming back like that's what he does in the summer. Sure a little hobby. He's picked up right and I like that and I think it's important to form the foundation of the character of Jessica who as we there will be a formative event here and it's less about like this thing happened and it changed him more as much as it's This is more Informative of who he already is right. so bursary. We continue in the Eighteenth Year of King Josiah the king and again these are names. I'm going to try my best. You guys The king sent shaft the son of as Alia son of Meshulam the secretary to the House of the Lord saying go up to Hill Kia the high priest. They account the money that has been brought to the House of Lords keepers the threshold at collected from the people and let him given to the hand of the workmen. Who have the so basically like there's money go gave to the guys and they're going to There at the House of the Lord. They're gonNA repair that house. That is to the carpenters. The builders the masons and let them use it for buying Timber Kordestan Stone to repair their house. But no accounting. She'll be asked for them from them for the money. That has learned their hand for the deal. Honestly what so? What is this about? What are they talking about giving the money? What IS THE MONEY. And what are they going to do with them? Well the temple is in disarray. Right because there's lots of pagan things going on. We'll see later that pagan things going on everywhere. Not just in places he killed as like a preteen and you know that he took down a preteen or as a teenager but in the temple there is prostitution. There are idols in there. So the how I just find that places where there is prostitution and child sacrifice. I just don't think they keep an eye on the drywall real now. I just don't think they pay attention to like worry soft. That's what these guys are doing is kind of fixing up and you're seeing the extension of the legacy of Manasseh right you've just like how How much into disrepair things have gone? That's right so in that money. They're taking the tax money that's been collected and just I was like let's let's renovate. Let's try something here. He's not really been prompted acceptance heart to like. I think something should be done here. Unique idea like people pay taxes and then you use it to make things in the community better. What a concept very Nov. Here's my favorite thing. So you mentioned Kaya which he just gets this brief mention in the story. Obviously but he's the high priest right. I did not know I didn't. I literally did not know until preppy. And I've read the Bible you guys but I did not connect the dots that he'll Kaya is the dad of Jeremiah. The Prophet I also did not realize that and told. Yeah it's pretty good and it's just the drive-by just drive by in Jeremiah. Is actually a profit during just is rain? Like he's hanging around probably runaround that he's like dodging prostitutes and stuff and he's like the hope we have a future. We have a hope. He's like practicing it so verse eight. He'll the high priest said the chef end the secretary. I found the book the Law in the House of the Lord and Health. Haya gave the book to Shafran and he read it. So this okay. Book of the law. So that they've gone to the Temple of actor talk talk guys'll to renovate solve Liga wallpapers and stuff and sees his book of the law and he brings it. Oh what is this book? What does this mean? What are we talking about? Is this the book when we're books created when we're books invented? This is why I'm asking. I feel like books have not maybe this is when they were invented. Like I read something that was like bookstore minute between six hundred nine hundred. Ad will that is not then. That's not true. I don't feel like that's true. In nine hundred eighty books were at what is. What's the idea of a book like the printed piece of paper Don Quixote like? We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA assemble something together about like we're like words on papyrus okay. Well now. We're talking now. We're talking about literature words printed on paper and like tied together with the ribbon. I don't know like book well and Book of the Torah a book of the law. Or whatever you WANNA call this this There's some nuance here like. He's like he says. Hey I found a book. Sure what's he holding? I was no one really knows right right. It's from what I saw and I'm sure you saw some things. Well what it kind of hinges around is is it. A copy of Deuteronomy is at a portion of it. Is it A page of it. Is it some kind of collection in reference to that? But that's what kind of people are circling. Is it the book that goes around with the Ark of the Covenant? Oh okay like I like that idea. Mainly just watched Indiana Jones raiders of the lost Ark. This week but also I in Deuteronomy. It says which could be in this book that they're holding. It says you know tell. Each every king has to a personal copy of the book of the law. So that's the first rule like that's one of the rules is that kings have to have a personal copy. So is your size copy right and it also tells us in Deuteronomy that you're supposed to read this book of the Law to an assembly every seven years at the Feast of Tabernacles It feels like someone lost the book. You will yeah and not just like once like this. It almost has like the feeling of it was. If you've seen Jumanji it's like if everything Java's Jumanji and then like you just when your basement your guys your Monje. Should we played you margie? Are we supposed to play Jumanji and you are and like no one knew that and I think I don't know to what extent this is I don't know exaggerated to the point that because when you look back at because a you know was a good kid. He was Just great grandfather. I think Manatt Manasseh was terrible. Aim on big fried Okra Leoni energy there but like they're not that far away to where or it doesn't seem to me that they're that far away to be like. Oh should we this book? You know so. I don't I don't know if that's a function of recency bias for me has just he was a blip right has a coyote a blip on the midst of other bad keys true. So it's like maybe has a didn't get enough of a shot to be like I'm going to imprint this on all my children and everyone in the family tree that this is really important. Yup that's a good point and just I just know Ya ya no. That's a good point. Hey guys it's me Aaron alone in the middle of this pop up in episode. Finally why am I here because we want to take a quick break to remind you about Knox's new book? All things reconsidered. 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They won't BE BETTER FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. What does He? Here's some papyrus with AIN'T GONNA. My man not complicate this has to say papyrus so he gives them a collection of scrolls words books or whatever so he'll try the priests give me a book. Shafie read it before the King. So verse eleven. When the king heard the words of the book of the law. He tore his clothes. Why did here's close? What's that mean? Well tearing in the close it was a traditional way that people would show either. Har Or astonishment shocked or like overwhelmed with like. Oh my gosh. 'cause I know I will sometime say like I like. It's so hot outside after tear my garbage. That feels like not using it correctly. Like maybe not in a holy way. Vote but it's often like people will put ashes on their forehead. Go Wear sackcloth. They'll tear their garments. This is a way of also showing grief and I think that's what he's doing here it. I've always thought about it In the sense of when you don't have the vocabulary to express something. Yeah this is how you express that you can express something you know what I mean. And he's feeling there's this sadness of like you've just read this law and you put you into together that like. Oh I live somewhere where we are not doing. Any of the things got told us to do it does feel like he just walked in and realize he was having a biology final was like what servers twelve in the king commanded? He'll the priest in how van a ham the son of Shaven and bore son of my Kaya Chiffon. The on me. This is like this giant Joel. I'm just going the ski. You're on the giant slalom and it's going bad and it's getting worse you're hitting air. Yeah you're like yeah it's Gonna I'm just going to keep going and a side of the king service saying Verse go inquire of the Lord for me and for the people and for all of Judah concerning the words of this book that has been found for great is the wrath of the Lord that is kindled against us because our fathers have not obeyed the words of this book to do according to all that is written concerning us so obviously has He's realizing the importance of this but Jane. What do you think about this thing where he's like? Hey Going like go talk to go talk to God because I don't know what I'm supposed to do here and I feel like I'm supposed to be doing like wet experienced as he have like. How much how much time has he spent? Because it's also like thinking about his grandfather who had the longest reign of any king like fifty five years like if all it's almost like now if you live in the time now you don't think about what was happening wet in the nineteen th like. If you didn't live you're not going. Oh I I'm really very aware of how things were done in the sixties like. I'm very aware that even though I was born until like eight years ago or in this point eighteen years ago I think about all the time of like how they ran the government and how they money an agriculture and all the things and I think for him he's just like he he does understand his responsibility. Because there's only sixteen of these kings but it's like this is telling him exactly how to do it and he knows because you understand like where your car. It's the ceremony of becoming king. There's probably some reference to God in it that you're supposed to you understand what judy is in the history class but maybe because now he is the hands and feet of that. It's like it's so families like somebody has helped me understand this right now. Yeah you know and I think to what you're saying about like the six or whatever I think we'd take for granted or Institutional Knowledge Understanding about how the world worked just because we have media and we can read and movies from the time. When you're talking about a generational multigenerational deficits. I think it's really kind of cords. Speaks to his heart of. He's already kind of deconstructing these pagan things. And he's any see in this thing he's like. I don't know what to do this but I know I need to do something with it kind of I think it's a nice little Some textual a reminder that he's got a good heart he's trying he's trying he's trying to understand the sixties because we listen to podcast and we committees by Ken Burns and like we do that. But this is a kid who's like. I only know the stories that my family tells me and no one talks about GRANDPA even though it seems like he was not great because of what he did to my uncle. Gary you know like he burned him in a fire. But then the other component is like you only have oral histories and maybe pictures on walls. Yeah and whatever this book is and you don't know whatever book as to why and or books right there even a real thing and you don't know to what extent the propaganda the administration's rule. What kind of Oral Histories? You're allowed to tell so verse fourteen. So he'll carry the priests and a lot of names. Not Even GonNa try went to hold. The Prophet is The wife of Shalam the son of the son of Horace. I don't know maybe I love. How many allied there are the the woman at the well gets literally no name but we know who this prophet every connection to a man in her life? Her husband is who his daddy is who his granddad advocate. It's great but you get a Reagan Horn which is wonderful so keeper of the Wardrobe. Now she lived in Jerusalem in the second quarter and they talked with us. All these guys can guys asking whether you're Jamie helped me out because It seems like no one here knows what to do. Despite the fact Mitchum notes. There's a literal priesthood. There there's a man whose job is to be a like prophets or like you got Elisa you have a legacy right Do you picture that when they like. Roll up on a camel by foot. I don't know maybe When they roll it to hold his house I picture it being kind of cobweb covered dusty storefront for profit. Who like? She's like what you need you. You need a word from guy. Oh Hang on. Let me put on my best address. I haven't gotten to do this in a way and a long time because I read that whole that you know there are seven provinces. I think you all know. We know that in a That our beloved in the mid rash in the Old Testament but the two that are considered like the top tier is hold and Debra what. I love now Deborah. A judge like a big deal. We'll eventually get to that bre like I'm very excited. But Debra what I love is that Deborah's name means Honeybee and hold a means weasel great. It feels like a providence. Who hadn't have ought to do. Yeah somebody like that they. Also here's the other thing about this whole encounter as now. We know that he'll Kaya Son. He's the priest. His son is a wet profit. Yeah I liked that. He skipped his son and was like we. Don't go to this lady. She it feels like when you apply for job. And you're like I'm proficient in Excel. Yeah of course I am spreadsheets. And then you get in that job and you're like I don't know how to do spreadsheets. I need to find Holda who knows spreadsheets. And that's why they're heater. His son is like Dad. I know how to do spreadsheets. No Trust Trust hold up and I wasn't acting profit this time like I like there. Is something really special? That's why we have the REGGAE Horn is. Because there's really something special about this group of guys who are advisors close advisors to the king they go to a lady verse fifteen and she said to them thus says the Lord the God of Israel till the man who sing you to me a love that not King James I just this guy just the Gironi that sent you here thus says the Lord behold I will bring disaster upon this place and upon its inhabitants all the words of the book that the King of Judah has read because they have forsaken me and have made offerings to other gods that they might provoke me to anger with all the work of their hands therefore my wrath will be kindled against this place and it will not be quenched but to the king of Judah who sent you to acquire the Lord thus shall we say to him thus says the Lord the God of Israel regarding the words that you've heard because your heart was penitence and you humble yourself before the Lord when you heard our spoke against this place against its inhabitants that they should become a desolation and a curse in you torn or closing wet before me. I also have heard you declares the Lord therefore behold I will gather you to your fathers and you shall we gather to your grave in peace and your I shall not see all the disaster that I will bring upon this place and they brought backward to the king so good news bad news yes right and wonder how he felt about this. Like hearing this to- back to him. After having we we don't know the time line riser if this quickly happened over a couple of days or weeks or whatever or the same day go get this. And then she's like okay here it is and I'm wondering like this rollercoaster of Ocean. That jess is on a bike. Who Am I gosh? We've been really bad and then like oh we have been really bad. But he's GonNa spare me. Yeah but wait but it's going to be a desolation and a curse that seems not great. Then there's something there of Almost I think a maybe the most paralyzing part is like so you're in the middle of this and there's nothing you can do change this you've been cattle and that's great and I'm like knockers. You because of that but I don't know I. It feels like almost like a not that God is robbing him of initiative but feels like this paralyzing place of just what do I do now? Yes yes so in Second Kings. Twenty-three just Cy. He was really not because he could have easily been good losers. I'm covered. I get to be fine but he doesn't do that. He doesn't do that because he's going to be spared. He thought you know what we're supposed to read that book and we haven't read that we're gonNA longtime and so. He decided to read that book. Out Loud. Not just. He doesn't get the priest to read it. He gathers up all the leaders the priests the prophets the elders and he reads the book in the Temple and he renewed the covenant with God and then just I had them clean house literally. He told them to get rid of the idols in the temple. Get rid of the Pagan priest. Get rid of the prostitutes. He also got rid of the horses who had been dedicated. The sign that seems accessible bad he just. I was so diligent like in his reforms that he took down. Alters located in Israel like Israel that's now owned by Syria. He goes and he's like no. We're not going to have this. Pagan Altar Bethel. That was set up hundreds of years earlier. I'M GONNA I'm literally GonNa Clean House and that's what he does. Yeah and I think there's I it's a really good example of leadership and like the character. He's trying to set because I think he is someone who has the product of a legacy of people who didn't set this foundation. And he's like even though. I'm not going to change anything maybe for the next generations. I'm going to set this thing in place to where they don't just find a book that Mary are real like there's going to be like no. No I know about this. I've heard the story. All right verse. Twenty one and the king commanded all the people keep the Passover to the Lord. Your God as it is written in this book of the Covenant for no such Passover had been kept since the days of the judges who judged Israel or during all of the days of the Kings of Israel or the kings of Judah but in the eighteenth year of Joe. Cya This Passover was kept to the Lord in Jerusalem. I did not realize that that even David didn't bring back the Passover. I'd I was stunned. I was I guess you know when we were talking before we actually like decide to do this As an episode. I just always thought the by like everyone knew in the Bible News but Bible News. Going on d these holidays like the guy was messed up and forgot soft and I think this is good Lesson about like Yeah No. Sometimes they did too. I know like In early parts of the testimony is like yeah they forgot who they were or forget God but it would at. I saw someone describe it as it would be like if modern Christians forgot about celebration of the Lord's Supper and I'm just like I just don't see reality where that I know coming in the little crackers on top of the little juice crackers and juice was that bit. I also. You're exactly right. There is a commentary on you know. We talked about this in the season on David. About how David is this man. After God's own heart and a great man but also flawed like as a leader lake. He could have in the in the sense of that you think about when he was raining. He had a lot of flourishing and his kingdom. Like why he didn't make the Passover literally like one of the most important things you're supposed to do and if it wasn't asking a lot of continuation now but you know we don't talk about that in season. Three the battlement. Because we didn't we just assumed oh they're just not talking about that. They did pass over every year. They're just not mentioning it in scripture and now we know they actually. They weren't doing it at all. They were spying on hot neighbor. Ladies Busy David Verse. Twenty Four Moreover Jessica. Put away the mediums and the neck. Rome answers net grow managers. You know what I WANNA and talk about MC romance answers picture. I'm thinking goth all black eyeliner. Nacro is usually like necrophilia. Right dead people decker. Danker Mansor you talk to dead. People actually think we've had romance or in a previous episode. I think we just work that out with the necker but do I feel like Aaron. We'll do it in a better way. Ca- at first. I thought I had something to do with and didn't like that now. Different thing can you walk me through? How other household Gods and idols all the abominations that we're seeing in the land of Judah and in Jerusalem that he might establish the words of the law that were written in the book that he'll by the priest founded the House of the Lord for twenty-five before him there was no king like him who turned to the Lord with all his heart and with all his soul with all his might according to all the law of Moses Norton any like him arise after him still the Lord did not turn from the burning of his great wrath by which his anger was kindled against Judah because of all the provocations with which Manasseh had revoked him. And the Lord said I will remove Judah also out of my sight as I have removed Israel will cast off the city that I have chosen Jerusalem and the House of which I said my name be there. So that's the end of the scripture. It's not A super great fun ending you know for this specific story and even you know. I like to end on a high note but even like the end of I. It's not he doesn't end. It's it's exactly what it hold the said like. It doesn't end like a souvenir I was reading about. Said he wants was about second kings and it was like loose. It was like an intense like verse by verse. And it's so funny. I was looking back at that study in. Prep for this and they end has a. Kaya can no kidding. That's probably the right move right just before Manasseh gets over monastic. It's on the things so does all these reforms they don't really save Judah Joe Cya now we already been promised right that you saw Joe I would be spared We didn't have the verse that said just I will be spared As long as he doesn't try to get killed yes and unfortunately he he does so after. Tosa had prepared the temple up House and did all that made it. Pretty Mad curtains Nico the King of Egypt up to fight on the Euphrates and just went out to beat him. And I like the NEKO's out Gaza for like what are you what are what are you doing here. Because he's trying to fight the Syrians and they just got to pass by right and he's like hey we don't have anything to do with each other. King of Judah. I'm not coming against you to stay but against the House with which I am at work and God has commanded me to hurry cease opposing. God who is with me lest he destroy which is really funny. Because he's not like a worshiper of God he's just a messenger. I've gotten it's a pretty fascinating and I would want ten more chapters about what's going on. I WanNa know all about this situation. So of course is like oh my Gosh God has sent a worden through this pharaoh. I need to turn away. No he disguises himself in order to fight with him and he gets air road like three times. Yeah and then and even to like say you guys. I'm hurt. I'm dying on dying. I'm dead and take me away. I'm badly wounded. And his servants took him and he died and he was buried in the teams. I'VE HIS FATHER'S. That's a real tough death. It's a real stupid death honestly. It's actually a stupid death for guy who liked it so much good in his life under ridiculously difficult circumstances. It's a stupid way to go. Yeah it really is so wish. There's a better way to end it. But that's literally just the dot like the thing is guide. God did send a word through fare was like no and he was like okay. But what if that's okay but I think I just want to find it so we're going to that. We're going to go now a lot of politically good staff. I really like to do some okay. So that reservoir on kindle let's get into some let's get into some superfluous Jamie. Please grade the pivot as exhibited by King. Oh I'm giving this an a like this to me is a pivot that it's especially because if you can look back in hindsight it's a short-lived pivot But it's a pivot that has really good roots In terms of what it does for some of the people who were able to turn away from this kind of legacy. That's within this is family. That's the other thing is just I is turning his back on. What has been taught to him and his family for sixty years and I like that. He's able to turn away from that just because literally just because he has the word of God read out loud to him and it transforms him. Yeah I think there's a there's something to be said I don't think I think I'm hovering around but I'm not going quite put the right words to it. There's like this thing in his heart that gets teased out in a variety. Different ways over the course of story. I think It takes someone with a pretty strong faith to put put that inaction without having anything like discovered yet like a book of the law or whatever so when that actually does it. There's a there's a verifiability there you know that puts it into into motion. I'm going to be a plus for similar reasons. I just I think you know in a Lotta ways. I think it's like the truth. Form of integrity here is doing something and pushing forward in a cause that you know is like it's nothing is going to undermine it but it's like it's it's going to be in vain so it's just in the pursuit of doing the right thing. I love that like you're not going to get credit for it. Not necessarily. I'M NOT GONNA SAVE ANYBODY. I mean you're not GonNa Save Your Kingdom Right. It's still going to suffer but it's right and it's like right and so we should do it. Yeah yeah it's really cool. Who who's the low key? Mvp of the store for well for me. It was the priest Hawkeye APP for reasons one because I found out he was like a dad to Jeremiah. Which is not too. Shabby germ is a fantastic profit. You can be all about them in the book named after him but the other thing is I like till Kaya. Because I'm not saying that when like when his keying is mourning and grieving and tearing his robes and he's like I need a word from God and he's like no problem. I know the lady And I'm just like that. He leads the cost to go. Find The lady to get the word. It is Kinda noble for him to be like well this. I don't know this is my job if I should do that and feel like wow know. Let's go to Holda that because that's my even the Holda it's I don't she's she's a prophetess and she's she's Kinda speaking the truth over. Where other guy like this guy literally his job. He should be doing that but she just steps in and Delivers the truth and she's kind of really compelling especially in the mid rash so I really liked her contribution to the story. All right. Why don't we wrap up with our application repertoire? So what who cares okay? So we hear about. We read a lot of commentaries commentaries. I like to think of her like Bible. Glasses that help us understand scripture better And they're written by scholars or theologians were people who are just obsessed with the Bible and understand culture and things like that. One of my favorites is Adam Clark he wrote just a mere six thousand pages on the Bible took them forty years to write in the late. Seventeen hundreds and in this episode of the Bible. We saw Joe Cya asking for help in understanding the Bible and the priest Kayak goes to hold on for that assistance. And this is what Adam Clarke has to say about that. He says quote we find from this and we have many facts and all ages to corroborate it that a pontiff pope a bishop or a priest may in some cases not possessed the true knowledge of God and that simple woman possessing the life of God in her soul may have more knowledge of the divine testimonies than many of those whose office it is to explain and enforce them. You know it used to be that you waited for somebody to read the word of God at a festival. Once every seven years and we don't have to wait anymore you can buy bobble it a bookstore or target or cracker barrel. You can read it on your computer at Baba Gateway Dot com or you can download the Bible App for free on your phone and you do not have to wait for a priest or a profit or even a podcast to explain it to you. When Joe Sira the book of the law he was immediately moved by it. Perhaps when you read it for yourself you'll be moved to. That's really good muscle. Who Cares about the necessary? Partnership of Morality and ethics with leadership so in the store we have to prince elements right a a King and a legacy of kings in established law for how the Kings God's people should act however one of these the law it's ignored and it's allowed to go dormant It wasn't that the law was in powerful at didn't represent God's Harper's people it's just that for it to be implemented a required the complement of leadership as well. This really resonated with me. Because I think a lot of us now equate knowledge of the law morality or ethics or whatever as a stand in for leadership or even more. We Equate weaponising this knowledge as leadership. Which really isn't leading. It's kind of impeding What I love about this is that he bounced finding God's law with his own sanding of being in leadership and because of this he was able to align a much-needed ethical standard with a platform to his people. So that's what? I'm taking away from this episode. It isn't enough to just virtue signal. And it isn't enough to prattle on and on about rowdy or goodness representation or wisdom our ethics. We also have to bring those things into authentic alignment with who we truly are and the opportunity. We have to broadcast messages in genuine and influential way ahead here the Bible bench. We're grateful for Modern Day. Bible translations. Could you imagine Knox and Jamie trying to read ancient Hebrew Aramaic or Greek? That would be a show for you. For centuries scholars have diligently worked to make those old words in context understandable to people whose native language is something else we've mentioned handful of translations during our episodes King James and IV ESPN and lt. So long and so on but sometimes it feels like things get lost in. Translation. I'm sure you've had a moment. Where new read a particular line of Scripture lifted your head and said to yourself It happens to all of us if you've ever gotten lost in translation or wondered why one Bible says a text one way and another has something else you need to know about this new Bible the net or Net Bible over twenty five years ago a group of Seminary bobble scholars got together to create a Free Bible translation and in the process. Did something no translator in history has done. They documented all of their translation decisions from the original languages. And over sixty thousand translator notes the result total transparency into the result total transparency into not only their translation but all of your favorite translations to with the Net Bible. You'll turn those Moments into deeper understanding of the beauty and shades of meaning in the Bible and discover a greater love for the Scriptures. Go Two net. Bible Dot Com to see this amazing Bible tool for yourself again. That's NET BIBLE DOT COM. And lastly before we go we're GONNA end with an accountability segment. We call eight gentle rebuke with our resonable scar. Aaron Moon as is our tradition we in this episode to Erin and she in turn replies with her issues which we will now. Face the music for full disclosure. Aaron is the CEO of our company. The pop yes media group but she's also a Professional Bible Studies writer and editor and she's been empowered and give them full immunity to check our biblical tones for inadvertent sacrilege or any biblical elements. We've misrepresented or misinterpreted along the way. And now here's gentleman okay. So you guys asked. What was the book that was brought to Asya? Yes while we really can't know what exactly it was the phrase that is used in Second Kings is the book of the Torah. And it's identical to the phrase used in Joshua one eight and eight thirty four to describe what Joshua had received from Moses. Okay okay so obviously. The Torah could not have been written in its entirety because it before it was chronologically created so lots of scholars have traditionally held the idea that it was sort of either the whole book of Deuteronomy. Or a scroll that became a part of Deuteronomy. Now I did read sort of a more modern theory that the quote Unquote Book of the Lot was an invention of the priests during Joseph Time Who were driven by a desire to see power consolidated and centralized in the temple under Joe size leadership and we'll dive into these reasons a little bit more later so some of these historical critical scholars even believed that not only was the book of the law created. Here is a tool for like positive manipulation. Basically Joshua's second kings something called due to Toronto monistic. History was written during his reign as a kind of official recordkeeping based on a source. We've since lost called the Deuteronomy St- okay. Can I ask a question? Yeah this is really you know. I like more modern theory. The book you know I like so sometimes when Our son was very young and we go to the beach. We would bring a treasure chest and then at night we would dig a hole in the sand and then he'd come out on the beach and dig for treasure. There's a treadmill. It's not lame. That's good parenting rate hearing that kind of what we're doing here hills very enabling in a way. It's Oh look how smart you are row. You found no sometimes the world's majestic and fun and not terrible as you will soon find out. I it is a if this theory is true. Then it is a little bit. It's sort of a so we're gonNA talk a little bit about how Manasseh and Ayman Basically reinstated PAGAN WORSHIP. Because it was good for the economy And so what the priests and the Prophets well unless the prophets more the priests and like people at the temple would like to have seen is that instead of. Hey I gotta go give my sacrifice to MOLLICA. I've gotTA give my sacrifice to bail and also Ya away. It's better for them. If you just go give your sacrifice to. Galway like they get more money or whatever manipulated it. Doesn't they couldn't manipulate Joe's reaction to it and his response to it acted after. Oh Yeah I'm more in a way of pushing someone in the right direction. We wanted to end up here. Here's a little product things like the priest like they didn't even know like when I mean it's the very thing was he. Why would he even cause in the source what we need to go as a lady like we don't even know well and we're going to talk a little bit more about the as far as the reform and how a lot of this did come from? Joe Size heart apparently. Yeah so it's not as if it was negative. It was just sort of like. Hey we're going to have a fifth quarter at the I'm like is going to be cool and fun. Also I'm going to tell you. The Gospel at the end of this is straight and I think probably like a another. Maybe one of the more important things for people to realize is this. This just represents there wasn't a lot of that consolidation of like let's go to the law was just like it was the wild west so to find. It's it's not weird that they didn't know where they didn't have like the whole Torah with them. Exactly and hold a interestingly and we'll talk about this a little bit more later but hold up was Also a teacher probably she probably taught at like a school or a sort of like a college okay and Her specialty was apparently oral tradition. So it makes a lot of sense that they would go to her and be like. Does this lineup with what you like. What in the name was her and ask her. Like what's Lord from God and then she was like this is the word from God. Yeah that that makes sense. Sad News Okay so Oh well and then also traditionally in the midst of this work. He'll kyw was really excited to find the scroll from which may have been from the time of Moses or a from that was directly copied from that It had been probably kept in the holy of holies because so it would've been hold on Joe Great Great Grandfather King. A has He liked to burn the scrolls. Sivas like no of any of this like this is not my because then it's not stored in the cloud and you can decide what it said there were like a scroll surviving copy. That's not cool. That's more Jewish tradition which it may that may get this rash. No not from the Midwest about Ben ICAL source. Okay Okay so. Let's talk about books? What kind of books we had so. I got clay tablets. Then so can we just underline. I think the question was what are books. When did books? I think everyone's waving when you say you found a book like was it was on a kindle on clay paperback hardcover questions audit so. I had clay tablets and the reason why they use clay. Tablets was because it was easily a raceable You could start over quickly. You could make a term easily raceable. I'm the clay within context. If you put something in stone you're not going to be able to write it in Stone. It's like forever. Yeah exactly So then we had papyrus scrolls. That's right I knelt that word of So Egypt was the main exporter of flu. I got too prideful. Egypt was the main exporter of papyrus and Senate off to Greece and Rome. Other parts of the world. More than likely at this point in time in this place and time just size book was probably a scroll on papyrus papyrus books were in the form of scrolls several sheets pasted together for a total length of ten meters or more. I'm some books that were Bigger bigger deal more important. They could been over forty meters long. They were rolled out horizontally. The text occupied one side divided into columns This is like the title was indicated by a label attached to the cylinder containing the book. If the book of the law was a fake. Like a sort of hobby lobby construct used to go into elevating as opposed to any of the other gods that most assuredly was a scroll if it was incredibly old and from the time of Moses it could have been a Clare Stone town okay. I like that that helps me understand. I don't think that's really interesting. You know we read these stories and we're trying to understand and we're trying to like strip away the the pretense or the whatever preconceived notions we have about them. I think that applies the books. Do like you just think it's a library of books. But it's like it's this long that's interesting to think about. I like to have the visual of like what am I like? When you're when the Bible says this what am I looking at like just like you would read a normal book in your mind's eye like a clay tablet with the authors picture on the back and like a bio instagram handle typewriter field in Labrador. Like great exactly so I want to talk about Holda. Hulda is really is really super cool. She probably had schoolhouse and may have had a gate in the second temple named for her it could also be interpreted as the cat gate. So we'll go withholding hold so. I never really considered the fact that there was more than one prophet like hanging out and doing prophet things alongside each other normally. This wasn't the case but Jeremiah and hold a were related. And so he was like really. You're chill yes and I and it turns out a lot of them are related on another which I thought was very interesting So normally they would have gone to Jeremiah right off the bat but he was not in Jerusalem at the time. I guess So y'all way had sent him to visit the Jewish exiles in Syria and so Jeremiah was bringing them like a message of hope And so the mid rash relates that hold was gifted with spirit of divine inspiration by mayor of this by merit of her again. Booted the bit mid wrath can't just have her own skill. I now got a husband. Give them to her but her husband was like massively beloved so he's the guy that's in charge of the wardrobe. He was an outstanding individual of his generation. And he was like very kind he would go so far as to like sit at the entrance of the cities and like anyone that anyone that was new that came along he was like. Do you need some water. I would like to help us as the Chamber of Commerce Super Sweet Deal Nice And so after his death according to the mid rash all Israel sought to repay him for his kindness and accompanied him to his grave when they got there they threw him into the tomb and when he came into contact with Elijah's bones he came back to life. How about that? I like it. I'm out I'm out from the beginning of the Mirage says like because I always it always means. There's going to be a reincarnation of some sort I would I would. I wanted to see like a Jamie verse. Rabbis theater after socially distance. Let's have it out. And then I mentioned earlier. That hold up was not only a prophetess but she talked publicly in the school. According to some teaching she was especially knowledgeable about doctrine which is also probably why they came to hers. Because if if the oral tradition lined up with scroll we're good to go. You're trying to do your diligence right exactly. I like. I like that. There were like all these profits. Did they have like province? Hangouts has told US anything new territories like if street. And you're like building from south. Okay Serum I was mainly out in the streets. Zephenia was in the temple and Holda was in the will the school. That's so interesting is I'm okay so let's talk about just is religious reform So he was not the first king to have to go back to making Judah great again as it were His great grandfather a Kaya was another upright king. Who had a bad dad? A has that we talked about earlier. Who would like T- like to burn scrolls has a kyler reinstated the Passover pilgrimage for his generation as well as the tradition of inviting the scattered tribes of Israel to come back to Jerusalem for Passover So I decided to over by executing pagan priests and having the bones of the dead pagan priests exhumed and burned on their altars. That's a hat on that. Wasn't there like a tradition. 'cause I remember reading something. Like the reason he was zooming the bones was because if you burn them been there really gone yes right because then otherwise they reincarnate right. Someone throws them somewhere. They could land us. Sure there's a whole new world so the timeline of events looked like this. When Joseph was sixteen he began to seek the God of David. We don't know why a prompting in his heart the Holy Spirit moving. Someone said something. We don't know when he was twenty. He decided that seeking the God of David also meant that he had to go on a spree of destruction. Eradicating Pagan cult worship Judah Jerusalem and other parts of the land of Israel. Then when he was twenty six the book of the law was discovered and he made Olive Judah Take Part in reestablishing the covenant so is the process. Don't we all have a version in our lives particularly if we grew up in some sort of evangelical perhaps Southern Baptist Church tradition a season of like executing pagan cult papers only militant Christianity? We're like I'M NOT GONNA listen. I'm not GonNa Watch TV. I'm only going to read them about when I was twenty two like I did that so I like feel like. That's it's almost like a right of passage like it. Yeah actually I rebuke it but but I like that. We can have that in common with me two zero exactly so kings and chronicles. And why are they separated into two books so together? With Samuel Kings was written around. They think five fifty five sixty BC during the Babylonian exile while chronicles was written after the exile was over around four fifty two four forty see so where whereas Samuel and kings addressed the hard-hearted Jews experiencing exile and captivity. Chronicles is like seeking to inspire hope and faith among the people who are hurting after they have been through this like spiritually devastating ordeal so it can be said that kings gives a religious history of the period and chronicles is a religious commentary on the period so in the Hebrew Bible first and second kings are a single book as our first and second books of Samuel. When this was translated into Greek in the last few centuries Samuel was joined with Kings GonNa four-part work called the Book Kingdoms Orthodox Christians continue to use the Greek translation. Which is up to a giant. We know but when a Latin translation called the Volga Bulgat Jerome. Our boy was made for the Western church. Kingdoms was first retitled into book of Kings Parts. One to four and eventually both female and kings were separated into two books each so the books now commonly known as first and second Samuel are known in the gate as first and second kings. What are now commonly known as I kings and second kings would be third kings and fourth kings in old bibles before the year fifteen sixteen and then the division we know today used by Protestant bibles and adopted by Catholics. Came to be used in fifteen seventeen. See I'm fascinated by that because I like. I know this seems like such an you know. Minor detail right but I like the idea that because I think sometimes we when we get our story but Bible and we read it. We're like well. This is exactly how God did it. No Man touched yet. But then it's like well no it was the of Kingdoms and then it was four other bugs and like who and what was the Mo like what was the motivation to give credit to Samuel. Yeah that's the real thing is like there are motivations behind the books being written. It's not just it just like got pooped out and there it is. It's like no. We're trying to soothe this or we're trying to warn here. I liked that perspective of this is why this book exists. Okay so that is it for general bucs for this free episode but as always there are many more general bucs included in the AD free episode our patrons supporters get in the Bible seminary in this version of the extended gentle rebuke. We'll talk about what Joe it has to do. With the apocalypse why MANASA killed his GRANDPA spiders and more if you like average episodes more generally weeks for me as well as tons of other premium content go to pitch dot com slash bobble binge to sign up. Today are Jamie going to do this? Sort of the Bible Binge. Okay guys before you go. Don't forget Knox's new but I'll reconsidered comes out this week on Tuesday June. Second if you order the book anytime before noon Central Time on June six you can get access to the best friends of the B word private group to become a member simply ordered the book in any format and then access six chapters of the audiobook read by Knox with additional commentary. You get an invitation to the PODCAST. Live in your home. Saturday night reconsidered on Saturday. June six and also includes a twenty four hour. Replay you get a mailbag episode opportunities where you can ask him about the writing process audio interviews of him talking with fellow podcasters and writers about their ideas of reconsideration and of course much more just visit knocks. Mccoy dot com slash B word to become a best friend today? Also before we go wherever you get your PODCAST WE WANNA make sure scratch your feet. You don't miss out on future episodes all right. I'm Jamie Golden. You can find me on twitter instagram facebook at Jamie Golden. I'm Aaron. You can find me on twitter and instagram. At Aaron. H Men and score. You can find me on the socialism next McCoy pure that new book. All these reconsider wherever books are sold guys. Listen next time.

Kings Bible Manatt Manasseh Judah Temple Aaron Moon Jerusalem David Verse Israel Second Kings Joe Cya Bible Bench Jamie Knox McCoy secretary Israel Judah Asya Joe Size
The Sessions at Midori House: Seu Jorge

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

16:45 min | 1 year ago

The Sessions at Midori House: Seu Jorge

"Sediba? Mike. Let's do it man. You're listening to the sessions at Midori house where this week we're joined by soldiers a hero of the Brazilian samba seen. He's in London for a special performance of his iconic David Bowie covers his work with bows. Material I found popularity and its most stripped back form sung by Georgia Buddha boat in his role as pellet or centers in Anderson's oddball. Classic the life aquatic with Steve Z sue he's been revisiting the track since his death in two thousand sixteen and later this week Josiah be gracing the stage at the Hammersmith inventive Apollo the very same stage on which David Bowie. Retired Ziggy stardust back in nineteen seventy three. Hello. I'm so's yours in this song as a cover from Bowie calls lady stardust. Evening. So fast. Fica? If I cone enough phone, gene. He soon Lucy. Start to. Official. By. Get off the stairs. UCLA? Now through this. Guidon by scared him routine. By phone. Ill. No, saying see. Auto to LA they'll see. No. Salk cattle out Z. Solic-? Start the soon sue. He said. Bye. Stairs. Bye. Veered? I not through this. Fica in pies gate, and we'll put g. Bye. Bye. Me five. Sim- fee. It is. Bye. Judas trish. He's. Veered are not to this juicy. Kaden pies skit in g. Soc. Welcome. And thank you so much for that, really peaceful. Perfomance? Thank you for having me have air was fantastic. Maybe you could start off by telling us a little bit about how you came to work with David Bowie songs in the first place. Yes, how it wasn't a home is refer study hours in my home. I got a day off for me, you know, day off a used to play PlayStation. You know, my PlayStation my phone serene. And my ex wife you bring the phone, and she read you that same seconds. She get the phone should remain the funny face and asking her what happens and she say nothing I'm asking again. And she said, oh have only guy. I think is American is. I us you about you play palace. But I don't play soccer PlayStation Goodwin. But suck. She knows. About pilot is about is above some, correct. I talked to him I'm bathing speaking. I think he's making us this time. And I got the phone. He say Georgia. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's a joy, you know, bullying they Bowie. Yeah. He's a blonde guy. I know him, you know, Somboon. Yeah. Have to song. A Notre song is not America. And that's nice because this real good one as you say love this chew. But I'm talking about the classics. You know, the class. I know I don't know. But I don't know if you know about I'm Brad guy. I'm boring Brazilian in Brazil, listen, so much rock and roll with don't know someone and he left a lot. And he say, okay, I can say for you because I really need you play from me version and Portuguese saying, okay? I see, you know, send us office send a lot of songs the first hoses changes. And that so that's blow my mind because it's so beautiful music. By the super problem because I don't know what this title putting signed this one, you know, just me and my guitar Brazilian guitar six nine sixteen. I'm putting some Brazilian inference inside. This team's more of more. Come and he'd love it. And inviting me to play the movie, I'm spend six month easily an Rome, and I should have moved hand with me. All this friends. Cape willing therefo- Murray old nice guy. Very humble guys trade me's, farewell. And you know, this is the first contact real contact to Bowie songs, but yeah, I have very nice moment right now after three years doing this shows meaning people around the world, he's fans fence off authorize Anderson fans of the more in my fence to all. Together and really had hats on the the audience. So many has. Remember the last time. I was when the Royal bed hall and so special for me. Okay, right now, I will play rebel rebel. Two. Two. Sanel sidon. Moving. Looming for. Getting. Sickie? Gonna stand on that. Baby. Mossy Monja Becky. I'm. Show. Me too. Rabble rabble. Said you more into. Rabble rabble. Moscow. Two two. No side, you see vile vein. Walpole Ming, Paul. Getting. Oh. Must be. You stand on that thing. Baby. Bossia peg. Monkey? Seal me. Rabble rabble. Deal. Molly. Rabble. I begi. Two two. Two two. Rabble rabble. Rabble rabble. Rattle rattle. Jason. Are you coming to London you to be paying the Hammersmith porno with the heritage orchestra, which is kind of really the other end of it is net, you know, from from one man who kind of who sings is our Hobie to singing on a stage with this enormous backing behind you how the songs changed for you. As you arranged them to be played with the orchestra. Well, first of all the Bill is backed daddy. He wrote this. He's road. All this this Raj man when I saw for the hardest things for the first time is in the Hollywood bowl and essentials, and I got a beautiful beautiful moment because it's twenty thousand people watching and come to the show for C. And that's after the I say, okay, I can do this. I got and now I'm still doing, but it's. Special because before Bo is say what he say believe I made a good we could work because the condition before done give me I make this. I may fourteen sons in one day and see, you know, we got guitars and put it on my phone only from and play in the guy recording straightening be the cut in anything them. And that. Wes have this opportunity to to to release the album and putting down in hunt. And now. He's he's right. You know, because you know, better than me. Have a lot of fans around the world, and the movie you affected this fence too. Because we have this song you'll have all this great act as all the Nys story that they started the life aquatic is so nice. I'm really happy and proud to do this and still doing that's home 'cause foam ours. Where is? Say. I saw you this and we. Shea Scott bothers moves. That seen. Fan movie visiting. The more. No, we stump sides. Human. That's bad. We need to say. G TV dying marchinko. The saw. Meaning male bang. I don't know mill case. Okay. Emmy mood. Lies ma. It is easy. So quotas. Walkout Manchin new system. Maintains cesspool. We saw news out this through we. Scott by his moves. Footnote I've seen payment. Nope. It down Vive it, Yvonne. No we stumbled saw. Human. That's bad noise. We need to do sell us. V dying marching tone. Lee-ing were dome Goeke out but outside. Dating saw. The male bang. I don't know millville. Can you? Oh, walk it in me. Bottle mile life. You'll see. You've been listening to the sessions Midori house. This week's guest were so sure who's playing with the heritage orchestra. This Friday, the eighth of February at the event Apollo in Hammersmith this show was produced by Holly Fischer and recorded and mixed by Alex put feelings if you'd like to hear more from Jewish students the monocle weekly this Sunday midday London time on multiple twenty four and don't forget to join us at the same time next week for music by the drums until then for me Gusta, much Lowry. Thanks for listening.

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Ep 46: Fitness Is A Metaphor For Life w/ Josiah Novak

The Super Human Life

1:11:05 hr | Last month

Ep 46: Fitness Is A Metaphor For Life w/ Josiah Novak

"You gotta get a mental. You have to get plugged in to someone who can help you get to the next step the next level. I didn't have the life experience and have a support team and these are all things that maybe aren't common but I just didn't have that. Anchor I had lost sight of what had helped me get to that point which was even being calm down enough to start my own business. Welcome since you're going to like, I'm your host Frank rich and this is the only podcast in the world dedicated to helping men break free from the shackles of addiction through the power of faith and fitness. It is our goal with every episode to help you take back control and rebuild your body Mind and Spirit and we do so by bringing real life conversations with people just like you aiming to find their place in this world while dealing with the everyday struggles and battles that we all fixed now, it is my belief that we were all created for a specific purpose and if he can harness that belief or faith then take control of our mind and body for Fitness, then we can ultimately create the life that we've always dreamed about our own super human life. I want to log How grateful and blessed I am to have you here with me today. Let's get on today's show. Right. We are recording intro episode 46. What is going on guys? Welcome back to another episode of the super human life. As always. I am your host Frank rich and just want to let you guys know man. I am incredibly blessed and excited to have you here and extremely grateful to have today's guests that way that I'm going to share with you and just this incredible conversation, you know, one of a true true transformation story and you know, it's it's it's always fun to have to have guys bought a car guests on today and just a parallels from from his story and in mind which you know, a lot of you guys know kind of the journey that led us to to where we are today and if you haven't yet done, so make sure to go check out episode one which really lays the foundation and ground work for what we're trying to do here with this podcast. And in the mission that we're continuing to grow on a dog. On a weekly basis. So after after listening to today's if you guys are new to the podcast here, make sure like I said you go check that out and I'm an intro Our Guest here in a minute. But if you haven't done so yet as well as checking out the first episode of the podcast, you know, make sure if if you're finding value in these episodes and then these conversations, you know, this is something that we are drugs by Omission. We are driven by impacting and making change in the world and if you want to participate and be a part of that and help us grow our message and help us grow this show you can do that in Hancock ways. First off if you haven't done so yet and you're finding value out of these episodes make sure to leave us a 5-star rating and written review right there on iTunes or whatever podcast platform you are listening to that did not help the outer Rhythm and let people know where it lets the algorithm know that people are enjoying the conversations that they're finding value in it, you know help spread it more organically to find other people and secondly if wage They story or any of the stories that we've shared on any of these podcasts have benefited you and you know, there's somebody in your life that it could benefit as well. We just ask that you share this podcast with them, but let's get into and throwing today's episode and guest my guest here. Today is a great friend of mine. We connected a few years back in a mastermind. So we share some mutual friends and some mutual mentors but it's none other than Josiah Novak Josiah is an American Fitness coach author and speaker his articles and workshops have been featured in publishing some some Publications such as fitnessrx magazine. He's been a guest on some incredible media outlets and podcasts just to name a few of mine pump the order of man podcast now his mission with his true transformation online coaching business and his true transformation podcast is to inspire educate and inform you with the wage. Health and fitness information on the planet his company. The true transformation is designed to help you transform your life through the power of health and fitness one thing I really like about about society and and we're going to get into this and today's conversation is you know Fitness was really a Gateway for him into his own radical transformation in as he's evolved and grown over time his work with his clients and really have is take on Fitness and what it really means to be fit or live a healthy life has evolved as well. So we talked a little bit about that. We talked about, you know, the first couple of steps if you are looking to perhaps maybe get involved in the fitness industry or or even if you're not looking for the fitness industry and you're maybe looking at possibly pursuing a dream or pursuing a passion of yours, he shares incredible Insight on some of the first steps to take we talked the importance of having mentorship in a strong Network around you and so much so much more but really if we had to suck. You know the theme of today's podcast is that Fitness is really a metaphor for life. There's so much that we can learn and take away from our physical Transformations are so much that we can learn and take away from the discipline and structure that we get through following a program or through following a diet. Now. It's important to follow that for the physical benefits, but when you can really unpack that and take that in to carry it over into other areas of her life, which is what we're about helping you do here living a full super human life mind body and spirit. So that's that's where we're going to go today guys. Make sure to stick around to the end because your Sia has bought some gifts for you if you like what he shared here. He's written a book called diet suck which you can find on Amazon a link down down there below but stick around till the end to find out how you can get a copy of that book for free. Okay. So without further Ado guys, here we go episode 46 with Josiah. Novak Fitness is a metaphor for Life. Enjoy. All right, so we are recording episode 46 Josiah, Novak. Josiah what's going on brother? Welcome to the Superman light now pump to be here dude. Yeah, man, I'm glad we finally got got a chance to make this happen. I know we connected early on when I first launched Thursday and that just kind of Pop things are I mean, you're you've been into space and for a really long time but super exciting it to kind of jump into your work your story because like so many guests here and really this is kind of been for me as well. It's like we started on this fitness journey at a very very young age, but this was really kind of the gateway to want to use your your words here to change transformation and it's it's so much deeper than the physical the physical part. So we really didn't get to that here and kind of unpack some of that but I think the best place to probably start it's it's kind of like your your journey Fitness way back when when Josiah was was just a little guy what was kind of that path and what were some of those first initial steps that you took to get yourself in, you know into fitness and what was kind of some of the the motive motivate them. I respect thing. Yeah been so my fitness journey kicked off with a strong desire to have an anchor in my life. Right? Because I kind of felt like that guy who I'm going to use an analogy. I watched this movie called The Lighthouse it was super weird, but it was it was super cool at the same time because it was kind of like watching someone go through this this this phase of like losing their mind basically, right? And that's kind of how I felt. I feel like someone at C kind of like got all this rock Enos this storm after storm. And this is what I was younger. This is when I was in my twelve thirteen years old parents were going through a divorce. My dad was an addict my mom comes from a long history of addiction have siblings who are addicts. So it's cool that I'm on the show now because that's really where everything's starting right? I needed something that I could pour energy into that. I would get something positive in return. Obviously I'm putting in too much better words than say like, I mean where you were you that like a we're at the time like, you know, what it was or had no idea. It was more an outlet kind of run from I was your classic kid who saw a picture of Arnold and said that's what I want to look like and I also want to be able to play baseball looking like that package which is impossible. Right the cat. The real game-changer was a couple of things were kind of at the same time. I I grew up in an abusive home. My dad was very physical. Like he basically took her when we were playing together. He was we were wrestling right and when we were punished we were getting beat right? So it was like a very physical environment and my dad was a very still is a very jacked guy wage and at the time I looked at my dad is like the ultimate adversary Someone who physically could basically dominate me in every part of my life. And so I knew and he and he would plant these seeds like he used to work it out. If you want to ever get tough enough to whatever blah blah blah. And so I had these seeds already planted and ended up watering. These seeds was getting into sports and starting to live for for sports and guys who I played sports with some of them were genetic freaks like some of these guys were so jacked so big and high school and middle school that I was like, I gotta do something to change my body both for my home environment and for my fun Sports environment. And so I started working out with a buddy who was like deep into fitness at the time. We were young guys, but freshman in high school, he had bought all the work out books. He was like to we're going to get jacked like this is going to be crazy. And so I started getting into it just for sports, right? So you go live for like ten minutes before practice the drill like you play. It's like you go lift and then you go play and then it's kind of a deal but over time. I started really fall in love with the process of seeing your body change getting stronger and feeling just more confident man, like be honest girl started notice right there like you starting to get bigger dude, like whatever wage going on and then guys, of course like start to notice. I remember from my sophomore year to my junior year in high school. I gained like twenty five pounds and they started calling me juice because I was on steroids, right? This is no joke true story. I wasn't on steroids. I I think I took some creepy like nitrotech her cell tech or whatever, but I just was starting to grow my body was changing and my palm Is going through the divorce was a huge moment in my life. It was very scary. It was also very relieving at the time because my dad was getting out of my life and that was an abuser that was gone. And now I had to really latch onto something and sports was great and it was highly competitive. I mean I played against some of the best athletes in in the world and different sports. It was fun. But I am in the back of my head like there was that subconscious voice like a subconscious a small conscious voice saying dude working out at your thing. Like I really was dedicated to it. Like I remember in high school. I would go work out every single day after practice. We already thinking career like Fitness career back then Noah career. Okay, let's look like I actually truth be told I had plans to become a lawyer. That was my goal. Because in my head I pictured this lawyer as someone who had money I came from very very poor up rings military family six kids. My mom. Did it work. We moved every 2 and 1/2 years like dog. The oldest so of course I was the guinea pig for everything like oh well, we didn't do things right with you. So now yeah brothers are going to get treated better that kind of stuff right? It's it's it's so funny you say that because we are our stories are dead. So many parallels here. I I wasn't in an abusive home, but I kind of look back now we were probably lower-middle to kind of middle, you know middle class like we didn't go without but I lived in a part of town and I am a sports with a lot of kids that were way better off. So I remember having a coach when I was like ten to twelve years old like in the majors Little League, he would he would have us over on Saturdays after after the games and and he just had a bath used like, I mean, there's no house in my neighborhood that even compared to you took four houses. You would equal one of his there and I knew from back then I was like, wow, okay, so there's like there's this divided between those that have and those that don't and I I remember thinking like what like what is his name was Bob Hall? I remember it like he's I mean, he's one of the coaches I just had so much, you know impact on me. Like what is Bob do like Bob was a lawyer so dead. When you asked me and I was twelve years old, like what I want to be. I want to be a lawyer cuz I want to have a house like like bomb has so so so funny. I want to ask you one thing before we before we move on here because I know that your relationship with that over the years. It's kind of fluctuate has been moments where you guys completely apart and that he's tried we tried to bring him back and and I know fatherhood is something that's extremely, you know, passionate about you with having two boys now, Back then when you first got started cuz you mentioned your dad was super into fitness and he was jacked and fit did you think at the time of when you were first getting started like this was maybe a way for you to bond with him was just kind of going on in in in the back of your mind. It's a great question. No one's ever asked me that before and the truth is yeah. It was I remember distinctively. There was a moment in my fitness journey like a moment that way we all have these moments where like you kind of fall in love with it a little bit right one for me was my first bicep pump for sure. I'll never forget that was like, oh my God, this is a best thing ever. It's like that that line from Arnold and pumping iron Arnold is the man Always Forever will be my one of my heroes but like he's not right here is not wrong like it's so awful. Right? Like it just feels so good. But anyway, there was another moment my dad. I remember we had a Thanksgiving 10K actually was it was a Turkey Trot they called it and where I grew up and I was I think thirteen at the It's on this is right before my parents like officially parted ways and my dad these occasional like I I do probably I probably talk poorly of my father more than anything but there were these occasional blimps that remember that there was some bonding over Fitness especially and one of it was this Turkey Trot. He said look we're going to go run. I'm going to go run if you want to run. Let's run if you beat me about your breakfast, right and now keep in mind buying me breakfast was a big deal because we were broke man like, you know ever go out to eat ever ever ever ever. So he was like I'm going to go by you I think was like IHOP or something, right? And I was like dude I set like I almost died in that race bro. And I want now here's the funniest part just a funny Side Story. I remember the running about cuz it's in case like six point Thursday. I believe six point three miles. I remember four or five miles in I I had lost him in the crowd to start the race. So I'm thinking I'm way ahead of it, right? I get to about mile five and I see like a hundred yards. Enemy. He's up there keeping my eye is pushing to do. Yeah, right and I was in shape at the time as I wrestled play ball and all that stuff. And so I was running a lot and so I just sprinted man. I caught up to him and just blaze by him and I didn't look back cuz I'm not looking back cuz I might get caught and I want I won the race they took me to breakfast. I remember that was like one of the month was as a kid. There's probably no better feeling than after getting your ass whooped for years by your dad being your dad the first time that something yeah. Absolutely. Oh my God. So anyways, man Chun. I mean Fitness was a common Bond and we actually had there was a moment where we had reconnected after they got divorced for just a very small period of time and I remember the only thing we did together the time that we reconnected we went to the gym and yeah, so Fitness was definitely an olive branch in a way between me and my dad I wouldn't say it has done a whole lot for our dog. relationship because of all the things that have taken place but Looking at it now from from me to my kids or sometimes as a dad. You're just like, how do I connect with my kids sometimes right? Cuz you're just like these are like creatures that have their own personalities. Like you're just like, I don't know what I'm doing wage, but Fitness is a great way to connect because kids love physical activity. Yeah. They love it. They want to do it. I've never asked my kid. Hey, do you want to go right outside? Like go run in the yard. They never know. It was like, yeah, let's go play Chase. Let's go do this like so for me, it's been like an anchor again in my relationship with my kids for sure. That's incredible. That's incredible. Yeah. No, I did not I as you're talking I get that that's something that kind of, you know popped in my head. I wanted to I wanted to ask you but yeah, so You're in high school, you you're getting your first kind of, you know, newbie gains the attention to come in. You're starting to excel at sports. I know the story isn't as simple as you go from there to design Novak transformation podcast is I know that there's some some ups and downs in in this story. So let's go ahead and pick up valleys for sure. I mean so high school was was cool. It was rough in terms of home life. A lot of things that had taken place during my high school years. So just you and your mom at this point or you have siblings. So I have five siblings. So it was it was six of us total right near Baptist. I'm the oldest. Yeah and when it up happening was most of us live with my mom and then a couple of them had like split time with my dad younger ones right off. So I was basically on my own at that point. My mom was so caught up in getting her career cuz she never had a career right? She was a stay-at-home mom. So she she needed to go she went to go start working. And she was so caught up in that life. She was so caught up in basically recovering from the marriage that I was on my own. I had no rules it went from men from the most hardcore military discipline household to no rules at all. Now fortunately, I had Fitness and sports right? Because otherwise I want to get in a ton of trouble right? I would have been and I and I did some dumb stuff but I never got in trouble. I was very lucky in that sense and went to college played a little Sports in college and then I got hurt and I started, you know, rehabilitating my shoulder specifically and I met some people in the gym some some pts some people that were in the therapy studying therapy in school and met a guy who was a personal trainer who is to this day one of my best friends and he was just thought it had like me right like another guy who was like, I'm studying to be a physical therapist, but I love the lift and let's lift Yeah. We actually we be we became friends at a bench press competition shockingly and wage. After I rehabbed and was contemplating whether I wanted to continue to play sports. I was burnt out man. I had literally play year-round baseball from the age of Thirteen till like not a break. I never took a break from like basically eighteen, right and it was awesome. Don't regret it at all. But I kind of burnt myself out and I was twenty at the time and at that point like if there's baseball's really not probably the future like you could yeah reality to understand you talked about playing with some Elite league players. Like when you when you see it, you see it like you there's there's there is a difference to those that have it and then yeah, I played against your teammates of mine not to be a name-dropper but like just so people know like Ryan Zimmerman was a teammate of mine for a while and not the VP of or at the AVP Brookie Brookie MVP for his team and we got drafted. He got drafted like third overall won the World Series recently, you know, you know hit a home run of the World Series like I mean, these are guys that I played a game. It's a with and and there was a a noticeable like I was good but there's like that that level where you're like. Yeah, I could probably get to like minor league baseball and be making ten Grand a year in a table which by the way a lot of my friends did who were similar level of talent and they're miserable now, I know guys who are working at random spots and they just never made it in. Anyway. I got burned out bottom line price, right? And I knew that to meet for me to make it there was a very small chance and it just wasn't worth the energy more and I wanted to focus on work and school and figure out what I want to do with my life, man. And so my plan was and wasn't the greatest plan of the time but I was going to move to Las Vegas go to law school at UNLV. That was my goal. Right so still still in the early twenties lost. So kind of the target exactly but I went full-force into working out cuz I had to fill that Gap right? We had these buckets in our life that if they don't get filled, sometimes we fill them with bad stuff off. Playing sports all of a sudden. I had like four hours of my day. That was like free, but I'm like what am I going to do? Well have fun I guess but I'm going to work and I'm going to lift and I'm going to eat and I'm going to do cardio and like I'm a start getting out fully into it was that instant for you like when it stopped you knew immediately. Like I got a diverter my focus and energy or was there. Where you kind of lost a little bit cuz you talked about both both Birth really struggling with addiction and and I do believe that there's a genetic component to maybe Call It The Addictive behaviors. I don't I don't think that you passed down alcoholism or passed down but drug addiction Bible can pass down the addictive behavior. So you had to struggle with that a little bit on your own before you realize I mean, I mean kind of refocus this energy or was it quick and instant I'll be honest. It was instant man. I look at it is like so here's the thing. I was addicted to working out and I still am like I still love different types now but back then yeah, I was addicted to the gym because it's cheaper. Is tangible it was measurable. I could literally measure my progress day by day and I was still young so I was making tons of like you said newbie gains were like dead one week. I'm benching 185 the next week. I'm benching 225 like crazy that wasn't doing things on naturally. I was literally just riding that wave that we can take as newbies right back. I was getting and I so the thing though on the flipside though was nutrition, right? So nutrition was never my strong point. I for a while I followed different methods different body building diets and and started to learn the basics. But I always had a addiction addictive nature towards food right food was an outlet for me ever since I was a kid. I remember in high school man. So like rough rough time at home. I'd go to school immediately go to the cafeteria and buy like two or three breakfast sandwiches. Okay, and we're talking High calories, right and it made me feel good because I had a rough month. Or a rough night at home and I'm like, this is amazing. I look forward to this. So food became emotional crutch and I never really went away until after I got out of college started. I was a personal trainer for a bit and I met successful people who hired me as a trainer and I was like well law school. I started to become less of a realistic wage because I realized I have severe attention deficit disorder, right? Like I'm just an active person the more I got into acting, you know activity working out I realized sitting still is hard for me. Right? Like I would have to do things with my with my hands in my body and like I gotta be moving and I got into training to kind of fill the gap before I decided do I want to go to law school or do I want to pursue another career and in my head, they're like I the reason I want to become a lawyer is because I like fairness. I'm a Libra. I like things to be equal balanced. Right and I had this idea my head that I was going to be like this song. Very by-the-book lawyer and and be fair and give people Justice right? Let's don't exist. They don't exist. There's some way to say you guys are douchebags home know if I have by the way, I have a great lawyer fit friend, if you ever listened to apologize to any lawyers out there. That's that's total stereotype, but I watched The Rainmaker that was like my Movie package. Damon it was it was a lawyer and I thought man he's doing some good in the world. That's what I want to do wasn't reality at the time. So being a personal trainer though. I started to realize I was making a difference in people's lives. It made me feel good to hear someone tell me. Hey, like I feel better you help me lose weight. Like this is awesome. Like you're really giving me some awesome knowledge. I'm thinking myself like I thought like common knowledge because I've been added now for a while. I mean, I became a personal trainer was like twenty two twenty one. So I've been at it for a bit almost ten years. So I thought this was before the internet obviously like there was a table But you know what? I mean there was before like you could just find everything in a second. Yeah, there's there weren't workouts being streamed on your Instagram or you can just literally pull one off of the internet today or YouTube full workout. Yes. There was nothing there was just one of those forums. I think we had bodybuilding forums and magazines magazines, right? I remember walking in with the pulled out work out from like the muscle and fitness and it's like and your pocket like what's next like dude. All right. So hilarious story gets home. So so meet his place is awesome. I walked into the gym many times with Arnold's encyclopedia and literally walked in with this big book and I like put it in my locker and I'd like go back and look and stuff off. We do the push pull legs like did it was awesome, right? But those were the good old days or whatever and I became this trainer who I felt like man, I'm really making a difference. I didn't know if I can do it forever cuz the money was a great right? I was making chump change working terrible hours 4:30 a.m. To 10 a.m. Come back at night. It was rough, but I met these guys that I trained who were like super successful business owners down. As you were financial planners, and so one of my clients was like Hey, dude, you're you're good with people you're you you care. What you could do to make more money and actually build a career is you could sell life insurance and Investments. You could go get your your licenses kind of like becoming a lawyer but just way faster. Yeah, and you just start helping people build security. And I was like wow, that's that's cool. Like that. Sounds like a good idea. And so I did I literally did I went took all the tests got all the licenses did it all over the course of like six months of my own financial planning practice. Like I was literally a solo preneur got licensed two different companies and sister like Transamerica primary, does westernization question on your Liberty Mutual. Yeah, all these choices that I can sell the people and start building a book of clients. And at first it was great man, like I had some initial success that kind of propelled me to keep going but then the timing of it off was just all off like I had zero Rolodex cuz I I was a young guy didn't know a lot of people but I was pretty resourceful I would call on attorneys cuz I wanted to be a lawyer so I would call a bunch of associate attorneys who had them listed online and I would just pitch him like, hey, man, you don't have enough life insurance. Let me come talk to you about it. Boom, right and then that would get in that way. But then 2008/2009 happened. Okay, and that was like a disaster dead. Everybody was like dude, you're not buying life insurance. You're freaking crazy. I'm taking all my money out of Investments and put it all in safety area safe areas. My 401k stanking. You're twenty-three years old. What do you know but I got really like bum man, like for about a year. I was making nothing and I had to actually give a lot of money back cuz people were canceling their stuff. So I went took a deep depression man in my early Twenties that was kind of like the the pivotal part of my life where I had nobody I was on my own no girlfriend was kind of just living this lifestyle where I thought I was just going to make it and everything's going to be cool. And then I fell straight on my butt and my eating caught up to me. I started gaining weight like crazy cuz I just didn't care as much about starting a business. I'm struggling. You're probably still somewhat emotional eating is as well. I think so many people can can relate to either for themselves or somebody that they know. It's like, yep. I've experienced this I mean multiple multiple times but it's like in order to kind of hide this pain that we're feeling emotionally like we can eat ourselves to feel so full at the pain almost goes away because we have a different type, you know type of feeling different type of pain come in coming from that. I think somebody how many times I'd have a rough day at work. And actually I've never I think I've ever told this part of the story but I used to go back I would crush food right? I would order everything and I would literally like force myself to puke afterwards man like all the time cuz I feel so guilty about it and it was so bad man. So many times I would just took my fingers down my throat and after eating a whole whole large pizza and I just be like what what am I doing like and and honestly, but it was just a cycle cuz I couldn't I couldn't see past the fight. I was in at that time. I was just a young guy. I didn't have the life experience and have a support team and these are all things that maybe aren't common but I just didn't have that that anchor right off. Lost sight of what had helped me get to that point which was even being confident enough to start my own business, right? So there was a period where I gained like basically sixty pounds plus it was dead. There was times I didn't step on the scale where I was very heavy. My estimate is I could have been like almost eighty pounds overweight cuz I was literally eating probably like five thousand calories a day of junk day after day after day after day off not exercising. That's the big thing. I wasn't exercising. I could you completely lost her to finish their. Wow. Okay. Yeah, and I would do a little bit like here sporadically and whatever but the way it was just piling I don't have like what you would call good genetics right? I'm not like the guy who you know was born with abs and looks like a tad Otis. I was a guy who was like average genetics who could easily go one way or the other wage with a little bit of push right? So there came a point man in my life where I lost everything. Basically. I lost my my place. I lost my job. I I gave up on the financial planning wage. Luckily, when got a sales job kind of started building a sales resume, but I was depressed. I was very very depressed and I look at depression. So I'll be clear on this. There are people who like my cell phone went through severe depression who contemplated suicide like I didn't like really needed professional help and looking back. I really wish I got professional help back. Then I probably would have turned the tide off a lot faster. Luckily. I had people in my life who cared about me, right? If I didn't have those things. I don't know where I would have ended up right but I had friends I had people who I knew who would check up on me and see how I'm doing. Like, hey, let's go out. Let's let's have fun like and some people who are listening maybe don't have that. I would strongly encourage professional help even if it means going to a church or whatever you got to do to plug yourself in. The other side of the depression coin that I think does get tossed around a little bit is where people say, I'm depressed but really what it is is they're just not doing anything. Yeah, like they're just literally like well, I'm just going to sit here and wait till things get better and I was doing some of that too for sure right? We're like, I'm so glad you went and I don't I don't want to cut you but I want to know you're good, but I want to really kind of phone it on on this point. I'm so glad you I'm so glad you're going here because I was asked I mean a few it's probably been a month or month plus now since I was on a podcast in my story like I've been very open with them if it's something that battled with quite quite significantly, I understand now that I've stepped out of the addiction of really had me captive for for twenty years. I I understand what the root of it was but while I was going through, I mean it was I had a friend that referred to it as like your Frank your sickly like you're a cyclical depression like it would be almost like every eighteen months like I'd fall into this this whole or this trap we're dead. Like the entire world was collapsing on me and there's no way out of it and on the podcast. She she asked me to describe depression. And cuz I know it is a word that a lot of people use when they're sad or they're not feeling okay or like you said, I'm not doing anything so they say I'm depressed and I'm like no like there is actually a point where you you can't even take action. You're Paralyzed by the thoughts in your own mind. You're Paralyzed by the on fear in your own mind that you feel like you're in this box and the box is slowly slowly closing in on you from all angles. Like you question every thought you question everything before you say it cuz you're like this this is done. This stupid doesn't make any sense. Why would I say this? Like you literally are like a trap or victim to your own mind. I mean, I don't know if that's a similar kind of way that you would you would describe it. But the scary part. Well, I say scary but looking back man. I actually think cuz I always talk about oh, I got it fell into depression my early twenties. I actually think I fell into it much thought. For that and I just didn't realize right. I think I fell into it with my parents split and looking back the signs were all there. Right? I would have very low energy all the time. I would question everything I did I second-guess myself constantly. I noticed my performance in sports like kind of peaked right before my parents got divorced and then it started slowly cuz I was like, I mean I was up there in a performance and then it went slowly down right slowly down. Well, you mentioned the add that you were through your teenage years like struggling with it like yeah when you're depressed it's impossible to focus on a single thing. Like you just can't cuz the minute you try to focus on one thing. It's like ninety seven other things are like swirling around in your mind you hit the nail on the head man, like so I look at it as like sometimes I think sometimes people think depression is like it's like a virus that hits out of nowhere, right? You're like, oh jeeze. I'm depressed right like it's not really it at least in my experience. It was it was a slow drain, right? It was like dead. Something catastrophic happened painful in my life as a child. You don't really know how to wrap your head around it have abuse leading up to that. So you're already damaged in a way and then this whole thing down to zero. Oh my gosh, like my family like this literally happened to my family like this is crazy. Right and then it's like everything you have ever believed in or question, you know, if you've ever thought of as now is now a question like I don't even know if this is accurate, I don't even know if my life is even what I thought it was and then you start to have these battles that you don't win right like our first of all the baseball thing. I always thought it would be pro baseball player. Didn't happen cool. All right. Going to be a lawyer didn't happen. Thought I was going to be the successful financial planner didn't happen. Right? I was going to be in a family that stayed together didn't happen. So these things start to suck just these dominoes and you're just like maybe it's me. Maybe it's me. Maybe I'm the problem. Maybe my parents fell out of love because of having me. I don't know. These are just questions as a kid you start to ask if obviously Looking Back Now wisdom and time are great healers, but looking in in being more of like a a higher view from compared to being in it back need it may be the depression really started much earlier. So maybe my early twenties was more of a a peek right of the depression. Maybe it was it was a Tipping Point if you will and I remember when I was there sitting there broke overweight depressed suicidal there was only one thing that I could even get interested in and that was dead. Still Fitness right? There was a guy I'm sure you've heard a great play. Yep, but I was online I was doing something online to might have been like playing poker cuz I was literally just sitting home all day like trying to find a job and then moving from one job to the next and then poker and like all this stuff and I stumbled upon Greg Plitt and he was one of the guys back then who had like a website and it was like, wow that guy's huge. This is awesome. And I think it was like a dollar or something to join his site. It was like super cheap and I don't know why I honestly don't know why I joined it was probably cuz I had this little flat fire still some wage earning in my brain that I could end up being someone like that. And I watch these videos like all of them and they were all mindset. There was no like hey this do that. It was like, hey, dude, you need to sack up. You need to like take control of your life. Like stop playing the song. I'm like, but you're depressed. Okay, go work out like and I was like, holy crap man, like no one's ever really talked to me like this. Yeah, and he looked like I mean anybody would want to look like that guy obviously something that doesn't know who Greg clue is I mean he I think of all the time most covers I think right up there with Mike O'Hearn. I mean just a credit chiseled. Yes, unbelievable. Right? So yours was like this guy's like not an idiot. He was an Army Ranger or something. So like he's he's a beast so I was like, wow, this is kind of a mentor from afar for now. Yeah. Well now you mentioned you may really true that there was there was like your network or your Circle of Death signs at this time. So was this around the same time where they were supporting you and then you you kind of stumbled upon she had your own like in person, you know mentors. Yep. I don't know if they were more mentors or just maybe friends at that time. I think but there's there's there's definitely a difference. So what that group kind of kind of do for you? I don't want to I don't want to go out but it's perfect. Yeah, I mean what ended up happening was when I was a trainer. I had this culture of working out right like cuz you got trainers and then you got your buddies who you work out with kind of like this Meathead group and we stayed in touch right and when I fell off of it, I saw that some of these guys were still in it and they were still doing their thing and I was like man, this is awesome and we start talking and then online forums there was a lot of people I I connected with online to coaches trainers back then guys were pretty accessible like you could just get on a form and start messaging with, you know, bodybuilders and stuff. You're like wow, this is awesome. So what ended up happening was I remember going and I'm trying to just get back to the gym. Like I was I don't even know what plan I had at the time. It was like, all right. I got a job. Okay, cool. That's step number one. Now. I'm going to start trying to get my life together, and I I was one page. I picked an extreme way to get my life together. I said I'm going to do a body building competition cuz it's going to drive me. Yeah do something right? Like if I don't do this show man, like I'm screwed like that was my my life back. Then I was like, this is just my last shot silly to look back on it, but I did it and I and I dyed it down. I did a keto diet for like twenty four weeks or something like it was awful. It was probably the worst and I was doing cardio at 5 in the morning doing keto it was just man it was it was rough, but I did it and then I gained all the way back right and then I did another show gained all the way back, right? So I did two shows and like a matter of three years and was cuz back then man bodybuilding was like the way you got in shape based. There was no like off like today you got the guys were like anti body building but there's still a shape like it's like there was no that lifestyle. It was like either in or you're out dude, you know, and when you when you're getting into bodybuilding back then you were doing it for for the Bob. I mean, I I have competed in two thousand eight 2009. So like you did in the same time do the competition's weren't so that you could document your journey through Instagram and gain, you know ten thousand thousand words. It's like no you actually started the prep just so that you could complete the process and stepped on stage and like that was the reward not the Selfies throughout the entire. My progress pictures were taken on a have not the camera I use but I had like this where I took progress pictures in uploaded them for like 30 minutes and then emailed them to my coats right or or the Forum. That was like helping me keep keep myself on track. Yeah. And so what was man was like once again, I I needed an anchor. I needed a low-hanging fruit to get my life on track and the good news is I I was told I was getting a career in sales going. And I was still involved with Fitness though. So I've been a trainer and I never lost touch with a lot of clients like you started you become a trainer. You become really good friends with people you helped and I remember communicating even through my depression of people that like for example had a young kid who I trained to get ready for the Army and dude like he went to Army got killed like like he got killed not understand shortly after I had worked with them and I see in touch with his family and his brother actually moved in with me for a period of time and it's like stuff like that. You just don't lose those relationships because you become very tight with people. Yeah. The floor is the gym floors an amazing amazing place like I would I mean I would tell any any kid twenty two twenty four years old that doesn't know what he wants to do with his life get a job working as a trainer in a gym cuz you're not develop so many things you're going to get over if you struggle with talking to people you're going to get over fear talking to people you have to learn lead generation and sales and closing you have to learn customer service because how you have to show up page. To treat your clients and service and you're going to get connected that more than anything. I think is the power of working in a gym because you're there like at all hours. So you get your people that are coming in first thing in the morning what you're going to be your early go-getters Highly Successful People. You're going to get that lunch crowd. I would tell any trainer like do not leave the gym during lunch because that's when the really successful people are in the back window. They speak about language. I remember sitting at the trainer desk in my gym and it was lunchtime. I remember sitting there eating my food multiple times at the trainer desk like a lot of money going outside or whatever and I would just I sat there and ate because I my workout time was from 10 to 11:30, right? And so I would eat afterwards and I would just sit at a desk and eat I can be how many times I would get a client who would just walk up and go. Hey, where do I sign up for training and I'm like cuz there's nobody else. They're they're like, yes trainer. I'm like, I'm available Thursday. Okay, cool. Here's my credit card. I'm like what right? So yeah, man, you're spot all of that that talk that taught me so much and once again sometimes lessons aren't revealed until way later. Right? Like I had no idea what I was learning back. Then I had no idea what's going to sales dude. I was like the sales Trend was god-awful. They basically were like, all right, you're going to you're going to tell them you're going to do their test. You're going to tell them I suck and then you're going to life present the options for them to buy. I'm like, okay and I'd like would sell training somehow now, you've got me back in the gym. Oh my gosh. I'm murdered right like it's over for everybody. It's done cuz you learn you learn so much and it taught me sales. It taught me people it taught me relationship building and taught me confidence. I didn't have any confidence. I was an introvert still an introvert by nature, but I taught me how to express things may explain things and just develop relationships man. Such a powerful skill. So anyway, long story short I got you know into the the corporate world was still doing Fitness advice on the side. I was coaching people. I was making a couple bucks here a couple of bucks. They're sending people diets and workouts and these things and I just stayed off on that that path even though I had no intention of ever becoming my my career. It wasn't until I got I would say somewhat past the depression stage where it was I did to bodybuilding shows and I I learned so much about nutrition like I couldn't believe that I didn't know all this stuff up until that point, right it was like, how was I missing this whole time and then I started to realize that there was this whole culture online of like Fitness and grade at the time was still the guy that I just like idolized and in this guy's like this website and he's got a story in like he's helping so many people I thought man and I remember I had this thought I'll never forget where I was I was in my room. I was watching a video of his and I said one day I don't know what it's going to take. I don't know how I'm going to do it but I'm going to do this. I'm going to have something that helps people with Fitness cuz I love it. I love how I look and feel when I work out. I loved my whole life gets better. I love that. I'm confident with my friends and my family and I I just this light bulb went off and keep in mind. I was still working corporate. I had no idea what I was going to do and I met my wife and mm. Well I should backtrack I met friends who were doing online fitness before I met my wife and they were doing a big they were selling supplements. They were doing and programs and all this is what year this is like 2011. Okay. Yeah. So this is like a couple of years after my big like hardcore depression stage and just took guys killing it and I said man, like what can I do to like get involved with this? Right and they started, you know, giving me a little tips and giving me advice and actually one of my friends was like hey, I'm working. I'm doing this whole like certification company. You should start a coaching company man. He was like, you've lost a lot of weight like but you you've really made like a story that you can help other people with it and it might not be a bad idea to start talking about it. I was like, okay dude. I had no idea what to do. I still I would never categorize myself as like a social media expert but this is back when Facebook page to get its legs underneath it. I don't think Instagram was out yet, but it was getting their YouTube was starting to make its way into things and I started posting my results on bodybuilding forums, right and people started to message me like, how'd you get so we found you diet down. How did you lose weight and sort of sharing my knowledge like, okay. Well, this is what I did he toes not for me this the next time I did it I didn't show and then I gained weight back but then I got it off and this is what I did just all of a sudden the power of information sharing started to open up doors for me now. I met my wife in 2013. Our first date she asked me what do you want to do? Like, what's your goal? I said, well, I want to I want to run it online fitness company. She was like what I was like, yeah, I'm sure she's like aren't you like I'm selling technology or something. That sounds like yeah, I'm selling this software right now. But this is just a it's just a career for me to get to the next the next phase which is start this company and I had a name of the time I was like, it's true information and she's like, well, that sounds cool and that's what you want to do. Awesome and two things that moment man like one someone not telling you like you're an idiot. You're crazy. Right? Like don't do that stupid. Which made me fall in love with her access, let's go. Right and the second thing was like wow, I gotta do this. Right but you tell someone publicly that you have to walk in like that someone who you're like dating and and you're getting serious with your like well, jeez. I better do this. So from that moment on I started pouring time like, I mean, I had been building towards this but I just went like full-on like I'm not looking back. Like I said, it's like seven almost eight years ago. Yeah, and that's where the the work started to be Thursday. We put in man like it was just nonstop from that point. And here we are today like looking back. It's been daily daily effort to get to where we are now, but it's been an incredible journey managing obviously many more ups and downs along the way over the past seven years, but every second of it's been worth it. Yeah. So what were some of the the first steps because somebody's going to hear this and and maybe for them it's not the dream is dead. Fitness I want to I want to go a little higher level but but somebody's got this dream like that's in place in their heart and they they they struggle finding finding the right career. They're they're kind of stuck. Maybe the salary good they're comfortable. They're making they're making a great living but but it it's like they the dream holds them up at night. It's like it's it's sitting there with the fear of like taking the step but taking the first few steps off. So what do you say, you know, what do you say to that person or or what are kind of some of the first steps that they could take not maybe not leaving the the full-time thing, but how can somebody kind of get something something off the ground cuz not everybody's going to be going to find a girl like yourself that when you open it up. She's just like I'm behind you 100% is supporting you from from day one people when they when they share their dream with somebody it's if they do get that initial that's stupid. Why would you suck Ur pussy being that you got so there's a lot of conflicting things kind of come and being thrown at us. So, how do you get past that kind of first initial fear step and what are some of the first things that somebody can do? Yeah, man, I am Say if I could go back in time one of the first things I would do and assuming we're in today's day and age right because now we have access right we have this like amazing opportunity to learn from others and it wasn't there. When I started we have access to people who've done it right whatever you want to do, but you can be a guy who wants to talk about whatever topic all day and help people with the topic or sort of business around a certain product. I would bet a lot that there's probably someone who's done it or something similar and a successful fashion. So you gotta get them into a man. You have to get logged in to someone who can help you get to the next step the next level. Even if you're working, right? There's no there's nothing holding you back now from getting plugged in to an environment or a person or a team that can start giving you the tools and the steps to get to where you want to be, you know, whether it's Fitness business whenever we live in an amazing time, so, my first step would be to to invest either time or money into someone who can help you like that is number one number two is you have to start with this whole idea that everything that happens good or bad is your responsibility, right? And the good news with that is like we live in a world where there's so much out of our control, right? So I tell people are our coaching program. Look the reason why I tell you to control certain factors in your day is because it gets it makes you better at dealing with things that are out of your control right you focus on what you can control which is showing up effort doing doing the daily steps as you can do because when life happens you're going to basically have that Foundation of strength that you've built up doing the things you can control and out but starts the personal responsibility saying like oh, okay. I am responsible for my results or lack thereof. And if I'm not happy doing what I'm doing right now that's on me. There's nobody least. I don't think and this is only took a gun to your head making you do a certain role or job or whatever you're doing in your life. So if you want to make a change or change you have to say this is this is on me. It's my job to do this. There's nobody is going to come save me like I remember moments during my life where I would just need like well, there's gotta be someone who's going to save me right like and I'm a religious guy and so you might say well what about you know, God and what about Jesus I say well look, I believe that what God gives us action, right? He gives us the opportunity to do one little thing or some little things to start getting the ball rolling in the right direction gives us free will to go out and do what we need to do to get what we want. Right and there's consequences to that good and bad and I think the one big thing that I lacked early on in my just life was personal responsibility on a blending my parents for a long time abuse. I blamed getting hit. Oh, well, I I was abused. That's why I'm out of shape. Well, maybe that's why you have some emotional issues, but there are things that can walk. Q and there's steps you can take right and so I always say like this is not me preaching or saying you suck and you gotta do better this me saying like I'm here to help you write like we've media, we've gotten through some tough times. So there are people like us out there who are more than happy to have a conversation to give you advice and it's just up to you to take that step. Right? So those are like the two big things off then you gotta seek out mentorship. Success leaves Clues go out and get that be be ultra curious go. Ask questions go hunt people that man people hunt me down all the time. Like I have people who have messaged me home a hundred times for they don't want to sign up for you. They just want to answer their question, right? There's like Hey, how do I do this? I don't isn't I finally like, you know, let me help you do right? Yeah. I mean get this out of the way. Let me help you cuz they're persistent. And then the other thing is though, like if you're not getting what you want don't start pointing fingers and being like, oh, well, it's just not for me. I'm just not lucky. It's not my my timer. It's someone else is better than me or whatever know just take that owner of a man like own it and then do what needs to be done to get what you want. Yes, what you just said there. That's like I mean that's that's like the underlying philosophy of of our entire, you know coaching program that we're that we're building here with rebuilt recovery. It's like yeah wage. So so you've fallen into this addiction great. It's nobody else's fault, but yourself own it and now let's start to build the plan to get you out of it. And I love you said have had some small victories on a daily basis. Tell all my God like we want to start the morning with a series of wins if it's something that's little and and there's there's a book written on this make your bed. I mean, but there's real power behind me. There's power behind just getting something done. But then when it's actually done you allege knowledge yourself forward and say good job. Okay. Now let's move on to the next one and then you could start your day first 30 30 to 60 minutes with like three or four small victories you put on this like armor before you step out into the world because you can't control the outside world. You can't control the person driving the person that cuts you off the person in your office that got in a fight with your wife last time you're going to bring that anger and frustration into the authors. But if you've taken care of yourself and you put Justin shakes said that one episode five you fill your cup up first and whatever is left over is there for everybody else? So I love that and in in the mentor PCS Odyssey, I mean, I've talked a lot about the role that mentors have had in my life. And I mean we met through through a future through a mutual Mentor both of ours. But so Greg Plitt was kind of the first guy for you and talked about kind of a virtual Mentor give you a cheque have there been big pivotal players in your information like who have been some of those guys for you? Yeah. Oh man I could so it's crazy. I have I've had mentors in different parts of my life, right? So there there was a pastor named Paul Gilmour huge mentor of mine when I was going through that rough patch, right? He was he was my pastor at my church and I just by chance stumbled upon his church was very small club that met in a movie theater and he was a massive impact on my life both from a mentorship standpoint, but also someone who had a skill set of connecting with people who either. I admire and to this day he's amazing friend guys who might know Jason Phillips good friend of mine really mentored me in the online business game George Bryant another online Powerhouse marketer. Just a great human being Garrett white another huge name who's been a huge mentor and here's the thing like, I believe so much easier to worship and coaching that I am constantly on the on the on the grind to find more mentors, right? Like I don't think I could ever get enough men to worship because God there's a saying and it's like the moment you think what all is the moment that you literally slike? No, nothing, right? It's like you you can never stop seeking out. More right because you'll never find it all that's the beauty of like where we are. And in this in life is that yeah, we're going to Information Age. Yeah, we got all this stuff that we can learn about and read about and watch off but there's still never going to be a time where you know everything and here's the thing to True transformation. I thought about this the other day as I was planning for next year. One thing about information is that we never really stop transforming right? Like we never really stopped. We we reach a new place and then we go. Hey, I want to work on something else like part of my journey hours. Yes. I've I've created a healthy lifestyle. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. I've created awesome business with amazing clients amazing team, but you know, I got kids and I have a a marriage I want those things to continue to get better right? I'm going to keep transforming those into better more powerful Godly things like our relationship with God like I want that to continue to transform wage. Is not to say like oh sorry, this this shocking spoiler is that you're never done? Right? But it's it should be exciting because you'll reach new levels and then you'll go you know what I need. I need to be better over here to-night. I need to do that. That's what makes it exciting though. Like if if you had it all figured out and you you were done growing and learning and transforming but you had another thirty years left. Like what do you what are you going to do? You just going to sit there and rot away and watch it watching Netflix. I mean, but I think that's that's we both have done a tremendous amount of work to get in that called called growth mine that I I guess so, I know nowadays. You're you're you're choosing information you're coaching. It's it's more of a lifestyle coaching anything. You know, people aren't coming to you for macros and training they're coming to you for for the principal count like that. Greg was teaching you back then was that right out of the gate that was kind of your focus. Like I'm going to be I'm going to get people all these principles that have helped me or when you started was it really just about the macros in and work out. I mean, it's definitely evolved over the years, right? I mean, you can't teach what you don't know, right? So as we as I progress as a man and as a husband as a father, I realized that my success that income from knowing how much protein need every day and like well my RPM like all these things like I I I gained success from my principles my values and how I structured my life the systems that I follow and I realized early on like this is something that I just couldn't really put into words until the past few years, but it was like Fitness was a metaphor for life. It was like all the things you do and fitness you can apply to life and you'll get results in life. Just like you do in Fitness where consistency and filling up your cup first page and tracking what you're doing and being strict with what you're doing and making sure that you allow yourself for some fun and some balance like all these things apply to all parts of your life. Right? And so what I tell people is like Fitness is the simple way to learn how to get better at other parts of your life. Right? So it's like you show up for yourself on the fitness song Health side the eating side and all of a sudden you start to gain a skill set that can be an applied to other things and I tell us the people to like who come to me who are like, hey, I'm just I'm crushing it at my job. Just making so much money, but I'm so out of shape. I had no idea what to do. I go now, you know what to do, right because you're successful, right? What did you do with your job? Well, let's see. I was very consistent did all my job. Calls every day. I did my to-do list. I'm like, yeah, it sounds like what you gotta do to get in shape and they're like, oh, yeah. It's like yeah, it's not that complicated but we think it is because there's so much information out there and everything is confused. But like I said when I started I kept it simple. It was like I'm going to teach people how to work out. I'm a teach people how to do cardio and these people how to track their food and that got us a lot of successful until I realized that those things only work if your entire life is set up for it to work, right? So like are you handling your morning routines? Are you spending time with people you love em doing reflection. Are you strict with your non-negotiable time? Like these things all allow you to follow those those principles that we know work. So our our our coaching model became much more of a lifestyle based mindset based with of course, all the details that go into training and nutrition, but helping people who liked also want to be better in their job or be better at business dead. Giving them the tools to go Crush those areas too while they're getting in shape right that became our whole Mantra of like hey Fitness is just one piece of the puzzle and it can be a powerful piece. It could be the finisher piece and a lot of cases but it will definitely leak into all parts of your life. And that's what true transformation is. All about is taking Fitness and using it as a tool to improve all areas of your life. And that's where we are today. That's awesome. And I and I love how you use your own growth and in your transformation as as really the Catalyst for for your business. I mean because here you are when you got started Maybe nearly married or you just met, you know, just met the wife, but you didn't have the kids you didn't have the house and all the other responsibilities that you that you had now, but as your life has grown and evolved so has your business which you know, which I can see which means you're going to be in this for like the long long run like this is not open July is not going to fall off the face of the earth and the twenty-twenty because you're going to keep evolving but at the same time because you understand how to take that and apply it to your coaching and into your student your your business will continue to evolve in. I mean, I'm excited to see where to transformation goes and the next couple of years. I'm definitely going to be be paying attention and I hope the audience does as well. So people are are interested in in getting plugged in learning more things here will give you a chance to kind of plug all of all your different places podcast book site social media. Just give them give them the big run down of where I connect with and then we'll wrap it up with we have one final question. We asked if you ever at the end of every podcast, but before we do that, yeah, just just tell people where they find you. Yeah, of course, I appreciate it. So we do have a podcast. It's the true transformation podcast. We drop episodes three days a week and you can find me on social media pretty much anywhere. If you search Josiah Fitness that'll pull up my profiles on Twitter or Instagram Facebook YouTube, but we always have a couple of things we give any show that has Beyond I wrote a book two years ago called diets suck. It was basically my boss love letter to diets and fad diets, but it'll it'll give you a rundown of how simple nutrition can actually be and how it can be enjoyable and how you can eat Foods you love and still get results and I share a lot of mindset things in there as well. So you can get my book for free the digital version. At least if you email me just Sia at the true transformation, or if you disconnect with me on social and say hey, I guess and I want your book my team and I'm on its Guardians all day. So we'll get you squared away. But if you're just like hey, I just need a place to get started. I'm not sure how to do this Fitness thing. I need to do it in a way that way. It's my busy schedule. I'm a busy person. I'm successful or I have a family and I have a lot going on go to look good naked. Yes. It's a very very clickbait friendly with website, but look good naked. C o and you can download a 20 plus page guide that's going to outline exactly how to get started. If you follow the guy you probably don't need to hire me, but you'll probably want to hire someone or someone to keep you on on point. But look at naked. Co that will give you everything you need to get started. So check those things out raising. Yep. Thank you guys and we'll get all these all these links plug down in the show notes. The book reach out to them for free will also will also linked up the DMS on copy if you guys are like me and and and like the physical tangible stuff. I know there's there's people that just love the old school feeling of having a book in hand. So sorry man. I appreciate you coming on here today and and sharing your story and just some packing a lot of that with us. I I think we got some stuff that maybe had a shared bath. In a few different places, so that's that's always kind of cool to to get that special with somebody that's been on as many top-level podcast which by the way, I mean you've been on you've been on some pretty pretty big big names out there. What's been a make your best experience or your favorite podcast. You've been a part of well the three that I I always shout out because they're good friends of mine and I love their podcasts and they're awesome. People mind pump Adam thielen Justin those guys are badass and Doug who's our producer just incredible people my good friend Ryan McClure who I'm going to shout out. He's my client too. So I'm gonna give him a bush but he runs order of man wage amazing amazing guy and great message and then my amazing friend Larry Hagler who runs the dads Edge podcast. He is probably one of my favorite people on the face of the Earth, but he's just an incredible human being so connect with him as well. Those are the three that I always tell people to listen to the neither my favorites. So yeah the Mind pump dead. They were they were huge for me. I I don't subscribe to as much of what they put out any any more just cuz I have so much stuff going on. But when I was coming up and I was looking at shows I was like, okay, I like what they're doing. They're like the way they keep the conversational flow. They're a little more edgy than than I like to go. But definitely some stuff that I pulled from them at I mean has I've tried to tried to make a part of of what we're doing here just with wage and the open dialogue and just really making it fun and and infotainment and and kind of style. Yeah, and and obviously the order man is it's all you guys out there need to get plugged in with Ryan and pretty dad's and now summer hoping to go with you desire maybe at some point in the future we can have you on again and we can do more of the the father conversation is definitely something I wanted to get with you. But yeah, we'll have you on my show man. And yeah, yeah, there you go man so much wrap it up here. We always have one, you know one final question you you you are familiar with with the mission of what we're trying to do here. I mean the the show is dedicated to helping men break free from the shackles of an addiction through the power of faith and fitness wage. It really the Genesis has been my own story my own transformation last somebody very similar to you that comes from a family of addiction and suicide as well and and had battled with addiction his entire life the feeling of Freedom when you were able to break those chains and and you know release that bondage that in my eyes is what living a super human life ultimately means it's more about your belief system more than anything but I like to get I like to get every guest take take on this. So how would you kind of Define living a super human life? Oh man. That's that's phenomenal question for me. It always starts with the people. I've been blessed to be a part of right like my family. I can I come from a very chaotic home healthy family environment and people ask me all the time. Like when you get the end of your life, like what what what would it would success look like right and honestly for me living a super human life is often the people have been entrusted with right the people I've been given to to help in to love and to look after and preside over and protect if those people are proud of what I've done and and they feel loved and they feel like I set them up for Success then I feel like I'm a superhuman all day but that starts with my faith right my faith in in in Jesus and God who when I'm wondering what to do right when I'm questioning like what choice do I make what moral stance should I take? What should I do in the wage? Equation. The answer is are there right? And and that advice is so practical like people have no idea I try to without being the past or I try to say look. Everything I do in decisions was based around the Bible cuz it's so applicable and that though is not the end of it. Right? Cuz my favorite one of my favorite quotes. I'm probably going to miss, but is faith without works is useless basically, right? So yeah, if your faith which I have but then you gotta go out there and you gotta work right? You gotta do your mission. What are you called to do? Right and if you can look yourself in the mirror every day and say hey I'm doing what I am called to do in my heart and I'm showing up for the people that I care about your superhuman home. There's so many people out there that need people like that in their life, right? Like they're people out there struggling right now who are like all I need is someone who gives a crap about me dude, like that's what I need. You could be that person. That's a super human and we need more of those people in today. I mean, oh my gosh and brother and that's but that's my answer. So I mean, that's what it's all about for me is I don't care. I mean, yeah. Yep. Want to make a ton of money, we all want to have all the cool stuff. And that's our natural human instincts. There's nothing wrong with that. I don't believe if you're doing good, but the end of the day though if I have nothing, but the love for my family mean the the pride that they take and what I've done and the feeling of being protected and provided and and just loved that. I'm good, man. I'm straight. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you for for your openness and vulnerability on that response. I I get chills every time every every time I I asked that question summer, so thank you. Thanks for having me man. It's been awesome. Yeah guys. Thank you so much for for tuning. I mean you heard it here. I mean just so much so much knowledge and and and actionable stuff that we could pack out of there and back if it's really the one thing the one underlying message here perhaps it's it's it's what besides said there at the at the end. It's Fitness is a metaphor for his life. But live your life in service about others in in protection of others and and just absolutely amazing. So we appreciate you guys for turning in here to another episode of Superman Life as we do at the end of every single episode. We always ask for your continued support to help us grow this network office grow this Mission. So this your first time listening make sure to subscribe right there on iTunes, whatever platform you're listening on and there's value if you found value in today's conversation or any of these conversations that we have had here wage. Just just give us a favor and leave us a 5-star rating and written review and most importantly if there's somebody in your life that could benefit from hearing Josiah story or this message just do us a favor and help us reach them by sharing this podcast with as many people as possible. But that's it guys. We really appreciate you tuning in for Josiah Frank, Rich. We love you guys.

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Day 218 (Zephaniah 1-3) - Year 2

The Bible Recap

00:00 sec | 3 months ago

Day 218 (Zephaniah 1-3) - Year 2

"Hey Bible readers I'm barely Kabul and I'm your host for the Bible. Recap. Today we finished our twenty four th book of the Bible. It's written by a minor prophets. who was the great great grandson of Judas King Hezekiah, and because he's a descendant of the king that actually makes him a distant relative King Josiah, who is the king during the time is as writing this book. You may remember King from yesterday. He's the king who sought God and his ways and turned the places of worship degrade yards. If, there's one thing we can say about Zephenia. It's that he does not hold back right out of the gate in chapter one verse two, he starts out with destruction. You Warns Judah about God's coming judgment in much. The same way Isaiah did. He calls them out for the ways. They've mangled their worship of y'all way with the worship false gods anytime. They felt God wasn't coming through for them. They didn't actually seek him or pray about things. They sought help from idols instead. Has, a Kaya. Warns that the day of God's judgment is coming. God promises to punish not only those who are blatantly wicked and idolaters, but according to one twelve, he promised his judgment on the complacent to those who are inattentive inactive. Interestingly, it seems like they're passivity stems from a belief that God is passive. They think God won't really do anything about their actions. So they carelessly live there lukewarm lives. If you know someone who is a depressed? This is a lot like what they believe. They believe it creator exists. But after he kind of set everything in motion, he just it alone and moved onto other stuff. They believe he's distant and doesn't interact with mankind. But here, the one true God who is speaking and interacting with mankind says he will judge the complacent. And for the few things, they do put their efforts into building houses and planting vineyards, they'll be laboring in vain. They won't get to live analysis or drink the wine. It doesn't matter how high their walls or how deep their pockets, they won't be able to stand against God and his wrath. In chapter two, he does provide a potential solution though any ideas what it might be. You guessed it repentance into three. He says, seek the Lord all you humble of the land who do his just commands seek righteousness seek humility. Perhaps, you may be hidden on the day of the anger of the Lord. Then, Zephenia begins warning all the nations around you too because they don't follow Ya either and their sin has to be judged to. And in the midst of all this destruction and judgment, the offers, a suite reminder that there will be a remnant of his people when it's all said and done. More on that in a minute. In chapter, three? Guide describes the rebellious people of Jerusalem as proud, stubborn, faithless, and autonomous. The description of the city in verse two says, she listens to no one. She accepts no correction. She does not trust in the Lord, she does not draw near to her God. The fact that your here today in the word listening to this podcast, it serves as evidence that your heart is not pointed in the direction verse describes you are seeking God. You're here to listen to his voice to receive his correction to grow interest of him to draw near to him. Humility teach ability faith and nearness to God. Go Hand in hand. The people of Jerusalem aren't doing any of that though, but God is still there and he's still acting righteously. I sport talks about Jerusalem's wicked leaders. But in verse five says the Lord Within her as righteous, he does no injustice. God continues to give them chance after chance to learn their lesson, but they refuse. So God promises judgment. He says, it will consume the whole earth. And you may wonder if this burning fire of his anger and jealousy in verse eight is literal or figurative or both, and I do too. But. There are a lot of references and other scriptures to Earth two point Oh being consumed with fire. So I tend to lean literal on this one, we'll see. Her. Usual seven AIA wraps up the book with the same to promises. We see in most profiting books. The I promise is that God will say people from among all nations. We see this here in three nine where he says, he will change the speech of the peoples to a pure speech. When I was a kid I thought this, I meant that people wouldn't cuss anymore, but now I know it's referring. Referring to the Tower of Babel where guy divided the tongues or the languages of people, he's going to reunite those languages again, someday, strong chance. It's not going to be English though my best guess is Hebrew and he says all these people from all these nations with all these languages will serve him together in peace, and despite all the sins of his people, God says, there will be no shame for them. They don't know this yet, but he's got a plan to pay for their sins once, and for all time the second promise an I point to that we find in most books of prophecy is that God has preserved and will restore a remnant from among Israel as well. Israel. Has Been through a lot and I love hearing how God speaks to the remnant. He says that King? Of Israel the Lord is in your midst, you shall never again evil. God loves to banish the fears of his people and he does it just by his presence with them. you rejoices over them with singing equites than with his love changes, shame into praise and renown. Guy Keeps, reiterating these promises through various prophets across centuries, you wants to make sure Israel gets the message about who he is. Where did you see more of who he is today? What was your God shot? Mine was in two seven through twelve where God is promising the destruction of the enemy nations. Do, you remember back when the Israelites I moved into the promised land after forty years in the Wilderness and God kept repeating over and over how they were supposed to drive out their enemies completely once they got there. And remember how they didn't do it. Their hearts wandered away from God and they just didn't view obedience as a priority. So. Now God is saying that he will do for them, but they couldn't or wouldn't do for themselves just like he always does. In the middle of all that seven ny references, the remnant of Judah and says, the Lord, their God will be mindful of them and restore their fortunes. All they've done is sin and rebel, and God. Says that someday they'll come back to build their houses in the lands that have been emptied of their enemies through this destruction. In. All of this God is clearing out the wicked who have oppressed his people and mocked his name to make a peaceful home for his people. Is. Patients you guys is grace? It blows me away. He's where the joy is. Tomorrow will be starting the book of Jeremiah. It's fifty two chapters long we've linked to short video overview in the show notes to help set you up for success. Check it out if you've got seven minutes to spare. Can. I give you some show notes, pro tips. Number One, not all pipe catcher APPS have show notes as an option. Unfortunately, you can do a web search to find out if your APP has them, and if so, how to find them number two? If you're pod catcher doesn't have the option for show notes, we've got you covered. You can find all three, hundred, sixty, five, five days of show notes at the Bible Recap Dot Com. com forward, slash links number three show notes aren't transcripts, we have those, but that's not what these are. These are usually links to pictures, videos or articles to help you dig into what we've covered that day. You can always look for that in the show notes or visit the Bible Recap, dot com forward slash links for a whole year's worth of show notes in one treasure chest. The Bible recap is brought to you by. discipleship and study groups that meet in homes and churches around the world each week.

Judas King Hezekiah Israel Jerusalem King Josiah Isaiah Zephenia Kabul Kaya Tower of Babel Zephenia Jeremiah seven minutes forty years five days
Joe Spaulding -165

On Mic Podcast

00:00 sec | Last month

Joe Spaulding -165

"Hello and welcome to on Mike with Jordan Rich, you know when it comes to theater and entertainment in the Boston area and quite frankly beyond the name Josiah Spaulding is very well known and certainly well respected since nineteen eighty-seven Josiah has served as president and chief executive officer of the bach Performing Arts Center in Boston formerly known as the Wang center of the city center. It's one of the nation's leading cultural institutions. Also under Jose per view as a classic the Shubert Theater in Boston Josiah Spaulding has led his team in launching major musicals and pretend Jaws done more for decades. Now, we are faced with the covid-19 has affecting everyone of course, but the Arts have taken a severe hit Joe and I are about to chat a liquid about that and other things including a cool concept making use of an empty theater with something called the Ghostlight performance Series. So without further Ado I welcome a great booster and Patron of the Arts Josiah Duggar. Balding to join us on Mike. Well Joe, as I said in the introduction you have been Mister theater in Boston for many many many years and you've done an amazing job. Is this the most challenging time for anybody in your position ever or what? It is totally the most challenging times ever and I really hope we never go through it again, you know, it's funny about five or six years ago when I had the pleasure of getting my friend Ernie Boch Jr. To agree to be the sponsor of the center. He said to me Jo so listen, you know, what could shut the theater down and I said the time well perhaps, you know, we have a fire and it burns down and you know, it's pretty hard to rebuild the Wang theater. It's a national story. Mark and so on and so on and the other is we could go bankrupt I guess or or competition changes or the entertainment stuff changes, but see I don't think there is anything and then I said, yes, ma'am. The only thing I can think of is a pandemic and we both laughed and here we are facing this incredible problem. We're we're off our industry was the first to close and going to be the last to reopen that's right. I was just talking on another podcast with a gal by the name of Jessica genic. She's a Broadway producer for many many years and the one that she told me to take away was of all people of all organizations of all groups to come up with creative ways to sort of get something done. It's the people in the theater and that's the case with used before we talk more about you and what you've been up to Let's jump right into this Ghostlight campaign the Ghostlight series, which is terrific concept Jordan. It's it's you know, when when the Panthers just happened and we were all forced to shut on March twelve the center not only had its entire performance schedules in both theaters completely come to birth. Fault, but right at that time, I was diagnosed with covid-19 myself and so was my wife and I hear you were extremely ill for about a month it took us to get over it and yet at the same time, I had to let go 275 family members and I consider them family members all the people that worked for us here in both of our theaters and at that time on both theaters were very active in sway. We let all people going and at that time we also had to shut down the hall of fame which was on a on a real roll at this moment and we were getting ready to open a Bob Dylan exhibit in a Bruce Springsteen exhibit and the tours were going well having it came to a complete halt but what we decided to do was to support a lot of our Brethren, so obviously there were dead. Live streaming going on at past scenes. They were live streaming going on and our friends at the Cabbage theater and Beverly and others around the United States like the folk Alliance or them are kind of music festival and we really didn't do anything for ourselves at that point except launch a campaign that said that Arts can heal. Well as time went on I finally decided that we really needed to do something and you know, we came up with this plan to do the Ghostlight series and if your audiences don't know what a ghost line is, it's been in theaters for centuries and at the end of every night before the last person goes home at all standing lamp is brought out to the edge of the stage is plugged in with an extension cord. It has no shade and a light bulb and it's called ghost light now it was, you know rumored that this would protect the actors and allow the ghosts and the phone number. After all these used to play around but the most important thing was that a theater never goes dark. So we decided to do the Ghostlight series and use the Ghostlight as the home as the you know, the symbol and major artists, like people saw on on September 25th with a mammals and others have come in they play on the stage with no one in the seats 3500 empty seats and they perform acoustically no production sound. No, no, no lighting no spotlights and they just perform acoustically and it's been really terrific and we've gotten a lot of attention across the country for it and it's to go off so that you know the Arts to heal and then we'll be back and you also have a connection with New England cable news a very popular in a very important news source in town. Tell us about that with and and that was the birth. One of the things that sort of made me want to go in this direction. There's you know, when you notice that the live streaming was sort of getting over saturated and the amount of wage ordinance members that were actually watching it on people's, you know, YouTube channels or FaceTime or Twitter or whatever. It was. I needed to see if we could find a lot of eyeballs. And since we were kids, you know, we're the largest non-profit Performing Arts Center in all of New England. We wanted to support all of our sisters and brothers of artists in New England. So Thursday the fact that we were able to convince NECN without much effort to be honest that this was a great idea. We are now broadcasting all of these in a half hour show off beginning last Friday or Friday the September 25th, and it's on every other week on Friday nights at 7:30 and it's a half hour show and Thursday. Broadcast in Maine is broadcast in Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut. That's outstanding. We're talking with Joe Spalding president CEO of the box center. And what's really interesting in reading the history in your history Jill is how much Boston since your rain has begun? How much Boston has been a player in terms of Broadway including shows that you've actually produced including shows that have started at the Wang or now the box enter talk a little bit about that growth in Boston's input world. You know, I'm I'm just starting Jordan in its most incredible. My 35th year is the CEO here and so obviously witnessed a lot of things over the last thirty-five years, but you know, we we did get into the Broadway business and we were able to back in the late eighties and nineties proved that Boston could be an incredible Broadway Town. It is subsequently changed a lot since then during this Thursday. No, but back in those days, you know, you could run Phantom of the Opera for four months. You could run, you know rent for a full year. You could run all these big shows that we did for long periods of time. And so that force is to say well listen. Well, let's get into producing some of these that we might be able to have worldwide rights to which we did informing elephant. I am and we developed The Addams Family and the biggest success one. We had was American in Paris, which was a gigantic success for us worldwide that said today just like wage thing else Broadway is shut down and the only thing that's changed now in Broadway is the expense of mounting these Productions have gone through the roof Jordan. It's very hard to capitalize nowadays. And I think that the the the style of Broadway audiences in my personal opinion are getting old. Yep. And not younger and certainly Hamilton which we were involved in very much help that but you know, it's going to be interesting to see how long way comes back when we finally all reopen sometime. We hope in Twenty-One. Well, it's funny. You mentioned shows like that. I was thinking of dear Evan Hansen. I was thinking of Jagged Little Pill these are very contemporary shows, but they still follow the same framework of dance and music and comedy and Pathos and I think the writing is so good with some of these Productions in the Productions themselves. Are you excited about when we reopen whenever that is people are just starving for live entertainment. I would agree and all the studies say that we are tremendously optimistic, but you have to remember Jordan we will have had Let's Pretend We're going to open in September of 21 and cuz that's what yep Modeling at the moment. Hopefully it'll be sooner but that's what we're looking at. And that means we will been shut from March of 2020 to September of 21 with not one dime of earned income and how are are my sisters and brother organizations going to survive that that period of time without any earned income now how long we're a not-for-profit. We had an endowment. We had operating reserves, you know, we have a line of credit. We got a p p p and we're able to raise money and people have been contributing to be maintaining that we will get back when we get back. We're seeing we have a whole range of shows that we have been just continually moving for the third or fourth time in to later time slots. And so we think we're going to have a lot of shows if we get a chance to get open that said, I think we all feel that there's going to be a period of time. When people will sort of still be worried about indoor Gatherings, but you know as Doctor fact, she said in the New York Times recently, you know, he sees a time where in September of 21 people are going back without mass and and really enjoying it and I think in order to help us get to them are working hard obviously at doing the things that we need to do to keep people safe in our buildings when we do open and number two, we're hopeful that they'll be a rapid testing at home. And obviously that we have a vaccine and with those all in our favor and that the public really wants to come back to live. We think we're going to do extremely well if we can last that long, let me Circle back to something we talked about at the beginning of this chat and that was I didn't even know that you and your wife had covet I'm glad you've recovered but the the sadness that you had to log Off at that point well over two hundred people of the family the theater family and I think for a lot of people we go to the theater see the ushers. We see the orchestra. We see the actors. We don't think about all the people that it takes just took example and the audience an example of what we're talking about who are the people behind the scenes? Well, you you know, you want to have the entire marketing staffs. You have the tire entire theater services staff. You have the entire catering staff. You have all of the actors you have all of the stagehands you have the teams whose unload the truck you mentioned the ushers. These people were here with us, you know, twenty-four-seven all of these years and and we've never been shot this long ever in our entire history in this building has been around to almost a hundred years as you know, so I thought it was extremely hard and a lot of those people made their living in this field and they are still unemployed and that's a very sad thing off. I've got to ask you before we wrap as well Joe about the work you've done and where we're going with government or public sector private sector cooperation. I mean that God we've had support in some areas for the Arts. But as we all know that one of the first things to get cut what what's going on currently in the city of Boston that you can report on well, I guess as you know on my second love of life besides the Arts as politics cuz they got play it everyday, right? And so I spend a great deal of my time lobbing both at the city level and certainly here in the state level with the governor and our legislature that the Arts are important and they are exposed to our soul and I believe the Arts keeps the civilized society. So we gotta fund it and we can't take it for granted and it's a huge wage. Streets and it generates a huge amount of economic impact for all of the cities that were involved in and you know, so right now I'm you know, cuz the state is working on an economic stimulus bill that we hope concludes some Arts funding in it, you know, I helped develop over the years which is come to it was a great thing. We did a casino mitigation bill which allowed not-for-profits to get money from the casino mitigation and Thursday. So that was going but now they're all shut, you know, we've continued to develop the the cultural facilities of which our governor continues to support which is generated millions of dollars in bombing issues for many of our buildings be able to do elevators sewage injection pumps everything that nobody fees that we need in order to keep keep functioning Soulja. We've also rallied obviously in Washington. So we rallied hard for the ppp's we're absolutely rallying very hard right now to get what is known as a save our stage or the restart program. We have one shot to do this by the end of the month of September maybe into the first couple of weeks of October and that's a $10,000 one and we're spearheading that with a group called Neva NIV a which is a national independent venues Association of over three thousand of us across the United States often has been a champion for the Arts as you have and I love talking with you Joe, but I really want to hear you when I go to the Wang. I'm sorry the box center and here you give the announcement about theater exits and all that, You still do that, right? I do it is a requirement and for our safety and I do and many times, you know, I might be in the theater and peacock. Will say I didn't know you were ventriloquist, but yes it is there and I redo those constantly, but with my team here sucks. It's it's part of what you're supposed to do. I give you an A-Plus affected our studies show Jordan that that people trust the box and Faith trust and when they go to the Wang theater in the Shubert Theater, you know, you're you're providing a safe environment for them and we are and so in order to reopen with Jordan we have to make a very substantial six-figure gift. I mean six-figure expenses for PPE equipment sanitizers off, you know, your air filters and filtration and social distancing and text a glass of your bars. It's not cheap and we're not we don't have any money. So we're trying to raise money. In order to keep the bill to provide what we know our audiences want and what's the best website to key in on shows that people can can watch progress and also make donations and help out. It's an easy one. It's called box center. Org l b o c h of course is the way you spell it P e n t e r one word.org. I've been in touch with learning on a lot of other issues related to his work as a charitable fellow. I want to thank you very much and we're all excited about the Ghostlight series and if people want to know more they can also go to that website Joe. Keep up the good work. Hang in there buddy. It's not going to be easy. But Georgia always an honor to have conversation with you. Thank you find out much more visit box center Center. Org Joe and his colleagues are working everyday need to keep the dream of theater alive, and they will get their good luck Joe. My thanks as always to Dan Thibeault a fast which media to my buddy and partner Ken Carberry of shark Productions and to you for subscribing and down. In this podcast and please tell your friends about us offer up a rating if you would that would be helpful as well until next time. This is Jordan rich as always saying be well so you can do good. Take care off.

Joe Spalding Jordan Rich Boston Arts Wang theater Shubert Theater Josiah Spaulding Mister theater Josiah Duggar United States Ghostlight Josiah bach Performing Arts Center president and chief executive Wang Wang center Ernie Boch Jr Cabbage theater Mike
S5E5: How to Come up with Coding Projects to Build

Learn to Code with Me

38:50 min | 2 years ago

S5E5: How to Come up with Coding Projects to Build

"Hello. And welcome to another episode of the learn to code with me podcast. I'm your host Laurent's Bradford. In today's episode. We talk about how to come up with coding projects to build. But first a quick word about this episode's sponsors. Show is a development tool you can use to build apps for desktop mobile and more with Josiah at building is easier and faster than ever even for beginners. Learn to cope with me listeners. Get twenty percent off with the coupon code. I can't code tries ozo- free at zone dot com. Ford slash learned to code. Full stack academy is a leading coating camp that helps great people become great developers at top companies like Google and Facebook learn to code listeners get access to their comprehensive Java. Script course for free. Visit full stack academy dot com. Ford slash learn to get started. In this show, a talk with Parker Finney, the founder of interview cake Parker is well versed on knowing how to rock technical interviews. That's what is company interview cake is all about. However, he also knows a ton about building coating projects and our conversation. We discuss why a person should build a coating project in the first place. How one can figure out what to build if they have no clue what direction to take. How coding projects can help in your job hunt and so much more. Also, make sure to stick around to the end of the episode where I share details about a limited time sale for the interview Kate program. Enjoy the episode. Hey parker. Thanks so much for coming on the show for having me. It's a pleasure to chat with you. This is of course, not your first time on the podcast you a guest in the past back in season one. So like, oh my goodness. Like, seventy episodes ago or something, and we spoke about technical interviewing, which of course, your courses your expertise because you run the say interview cake, but I'm really excited to have you on again today to talk about coding projects. Yes. So to kick things off 'cause you talk about how you just like define coding project. Like, what is it coding project will? So the I think especially interesting to talk about like side projects so stuff that you're doing if you have a day job that you kinda like do on your on time on on evenings weekends, or if you're a student or in your during your job search it's just kinda like. The thing you do to to kind of keep the act sharp. And yeah, I don't know. I mean, they're a number of reasons why you might want to have on which which I'm sure we'll get into. But that's the high level definition. All right. Awesome. And I think talked a little bit about this. But the side projects the coding projects for someone who's a beginner what's the benefit of spending time building your own project. I think there can be a few the first one is if you have a new tool chain that you're trying to learn say, you're like, you know, you've done some JavaScript stuff with J, Jerry. And you wanna try out one of these fancy new front end frameworks like like angular ember or something you can read guides or like go through a book or whatever. But there's nothing like actually building something. And so some sometimes people will come up with an idea for like a toy project to test out learning the framework. Yes, I feel like for a lot of people and this was death. The case for me when I first started out, it's almost like you don't know what you don't know in even the task of figuring out a coating project to build can be overwhelming so tattoo. You have any tips for people on ways, they can get ideas of what to build. Definitely. Yeah. Yeah. I would say of thought about this a bit. So I think the biggest thing is the best coding project is one that you actually work on. So the most important thing is that it seems really interesting in fun too. You can talk about some ideas for like kind of how to get your mind rolling. But I think that I would start with that. Because I think there are a lot of reasons why it's easy to like talk yourself out of a project data, right? Like, for example, you might say like, oh, this is actually not that technically complicated. But man, it's like something I really want. It's like something. I totally would. Us. I can't believe nobody else's built it yet. Right. I think like if you have that enthusiasm should go for it. Right. Similarly, you might have the other kind of situation where you're like, man. I like I really want to build a like an image board kind of thing like a place where you can go and and post images in share them with with your friends sort of like a fake Facebook or something right? And but you might say like Amand, but like there's so many existing things for that. So like, it's not original. But I think it's like kind of technically interesting right again, if like if that project kind of speaks to you, I think you should go for it. So that's kind of like the the first kind of framework, I would suggest is like there to kind of broad categories. One is like reinventing the wheel right like building something that, you know, exists and you'd like to kind of see if he can do it yourself and the other is something. That you really want to exist. And I think either of those can be great. It just comes down to what's actually Mark citing to you. Yes. So I totally agree with the idea of business that you're interested in because I know again back to when I first started out I would go through a bunch of projects. I never would finish the projects. I would maybe work on for a week or a little more a little less, and that I would just get super bored of it. So I think working on something that you're genuinely interested in is probably one of the most important things or are there other things that a person should consider besides just it being interesting to them? I would say that's the biggest thing because again, and I guess it depends on your working style a little bit. I know I'm one of those people that if I'm not excited about something. It's really hard for me to do meaningful work on it, which sucks I wish. It was not that way. I I've worked with people who are not that way. Who can just like say, okay. This is the most important thing to work on today. I'm gonna work on it and make real progress. I'm not like that. I'm one of those people that will sort of have on. No, what's most important and kind of not want to do it. And then I'll make progress on the second most important thing. Instead what I sometimes call like productive procrastination, right? And so one so I've come up with all these kind of little tricks for like tricking myself into being productive and one of them is for something like side projects having two things going at once. So you're always like kind of procrastinating on one. But the way that you're procrastinating is by like working on the other. So you're still kind of making progress overall I love that on. And I like that word productive procrastination because I feel like I do that all the time. I'll always prioritize things that I enjoy doing more than the things I enjoy doing. I think most people probably probably maybe as you mentioned air some people that they can just do the most important thing. Even if they don't find it enjoyable, but could you share like an example of two things you have going at the same time. Whether it's now, or whether it was years ago, or whatever. Yeah. I I haven't had like technical side projects. In a minute because I've been so focused on interview cake. I'm thinking about some projects I had going when I was as a little bit younger one was I built a pseudo coup puzzle solver, which was a lot of fun. And I did it. It was high school at the time. I wrote it in PHP, and I did it while I was on exchange program in Japan. And I was staying with a host family, and the the mom who I was staying with while everyone else at worker at school, she stayed home. And she did Sudoku puzzles. And so I thought it would be really a fun if I like showed her this program, and and I worked on it a bit while I was there, and then couldn't finish it until until after an, and I actually remember specifically that was a project that I got. Like ninety percent of the way through. And then I couldn't I hit one of those bugs where like I would press run. And it would just keep spinning. And I thought that what was happening was that it was like to computational intensive for something. But of course, I just had a bug somewhere where where a tight loop that that didn't have an exit condition, and but but I remember I put that project down for like, six months or something and worked on some other thing. I think actually the the next project. I had was a. In image board, this is sort of like a little while ago. But this is back in the days of like PHP, all these like, online, forums and stuff. And my idea was was to to see if I could make my own. So is another project I had going on. I remember bouncing between those two I had some other interesting ones in college. And like another thing too about side projects is, you know, for me, at least part of keeping things interesting sometimes is being a little subversive right doing something that feels a little bit like you're like breaking the rules or hacking system or something. And so in college, I started this this group called the hacker club. And we we made a couple of things one of them was a a little widget that would. Notify you if somebody unfriendly you on Facebook, which is something that Facebook doesn't have a future for, but you can the way it worked was it would you would log in and it would get your list of friends, and then it would check back in. And if anyone was gone from the list that meant that they hit on fronted you. We also built something that would text you. Or I think it emailed you. If if your favorite food was in the dining hall that day, so it would go to the dining hall website and scrape out the menu, and then figure out if you know, if like eggplant parmesan was on their whatever so bunch of a bunch of things like that that like felt a little bit like they're like goofy and dumb in like, the kind of thing that I think at first glance you might bring it back to like recruiting you might feel little bit embarrassed to talk about in recruiting context. But I actually think that most companies most engineers love to hear that kind of story they love when folks just sort of like bend the rules a tiny bit or like come up with creative. Ways to to kind of get get around things. In fact, I remember one of the companies I interviewed with they literally asked me the question. What is an example of a time that you did something really devious like something really kind of Nadi that you were surprised sort of worked. And so I had like all these stories from from. A college hacking days that I think kind of made a made impression is really awesome stories in. I have to ask did you charge for either those or any of the things you Bill in the past? No at that point. I was very as really kind of like an anarchist in like a nod an entrepreneur at all I thought was kind of a thirty word. So is is like very important to me that all this stuff was was free for everybody got it. So I'm thinking of like, then notifying you with someone unfriendly from Facebook. I could see people paying for that. And perhaps even the cafeteria one maybe 'cause I was going to add that for me, at least whenever I can make money from something that always motivates me a lot more. So in the context of a side project. I think like if I was able to have a way to monetize it and make some money, even if it was a little bit like a hundred bucks a month. It's still kind of extra motiva-. Action to finish it or to maintain it after able to make something. But anyway, thanks. Yeah. Extra sharing those those were great. And I think really creative for like a college student. No one I feel like I've heard of the notifying friend thing before like maybe other people built somewhat similar awhile ago or other little apps, but the cafeteria one that's definitely sounds really interesting. Yeah. I I was really I was really into what's called web scraping right in this idea of like writing scripts that either just pulled down information from websites, or in some cases, like actually make post requests, right? Like fill out forms for you or something on websites. They're all kinds of things you can do with this. And it's they all feel a little devious, which which I think is like really interesting. So for me, at least like really tickles me in his is really good fodder for for side project is so. Some examples are like, you know, if if you really like going to concerts, or whatever you can try to write a script that automatically tries to buy tickets to, you know, the next Radiohead show, the the second that they go online right because we've all had that experience trying to get tickets like having five browser windows, open or whatever. But you can automate that whole like five browser windows open thing with software. You could also you could like write a script that like downloads all of wicked pedia and like stores offline copy, you could write a script that takes all your photos off of Facebook and imports them into iphoto or something. So that you can you know, if you're one of those folks that like wants to get off Facebook than you can kind of do that without feeling like you have to leave your your your pictures behind. This is just kinda some ideas to get people thinking of again for me, at least, I think web scraping is like a really cool place to look for kind of devious side project ideas. Yeah. Thanks for sharing those examples. I'm sure the Lee really helpful for the listeners. I was also wondering you mentioned the question that you were asked about a talk about time, you did something devious werther any other ways that your side projects helped you? Get a quote unquote, real job at at tech company. Yeah, I'm trying to think. A couple of things. So there was one time that actually wasn't a side project who is a work study project. I had I got a job on campus when I was a student making a a web app where the the idea was that you could in real time while watching video kind of thumbs up thumbs down moments in the video. And I think the professor working on it had kind of this business idea around it. So we we were building that out. But at a high level, it was like a very simple one PHP script or something like really was not a very advanced tech. But I did have to like very lightly, touch like the YouTube API to so that I could get the player to talk to the cage p or I guess the Java script in the front end end annot like what position in the video? It was or something. Anyway, I I when I was interviewing after college. Dj? I spoke with a company that did video stuff, and they were like super impressed in super into that in like talking about like all the different product ideas for how to do it and stuff, and you know, and again like it wasn't at all technically complicated. But just the fact that it was like in the same realm as what they did was was really cool for them. I think that's kind of the biggest thing. And that's a hard thing to optimize for right? Like, I I wouldn't say that, you know, if if you know, you really wanna work for Instagram that like you should make an Instagram clone. I mean, unless that actually sounds fun to you. That's a lot of time to invest like just to maybe kind of get that that moment of peaking year, your interviewers interest. I think the bigger thing is just ideally, you know, again, I I would say like the most important thing is that it's actually exciting to you. But beyond that, it is helpful to have at least one of your side projects be something that's somewhat technically complicated right in in other words, the kind of thing where you could sit down with a a whiteboard. Stand up at a whiteboard or like sit down with a piece of paper and a pen and kind of walk someone through. Okay. Here's how the system worked in like make a little flow Ciardi thing of how data moved. Through and you know, like what the database model was in. You know, something that that kind of has some interesting technical designs, some sort of architecture to it because that is something that that will come up. In just about every coding interview, one of the first things that most companies like to to do is look at your resume and say, tell me about this, right? Or like, you know, just explain something technical to me or explain a project that you think is interesting or whatever. And in fact, even if they say if they point to something specific on your resume and say tell me about this. They would they'll be happy. If you say that actually wasn't that technically interesting. But here's this other thing that that I can talk about that. Like was really cool, you know? And so that's kind of like another side tip. I would offer is the thing that you have the most interesting story about the thing that you can kinda tell a neat story where you're again, like dry diagramming out like technical design. You should put that at the very top of your resume. So that so that it comes up in in that kind of beginning. Chap heard of the interview sit tight podcast listeners were taking a quick break to hear word from our sponsors. If you want to Bill apps that look great on every type of device Josiah makes it easy. Even if you are beginner the cross platform app development tool lets you code your up in just one language, then simply click a check box to generate versions for other platforms code an app for MAC OS. In have a windows version in one click. You can also use their drag drop tool to seamlessly create a user interface since oh, Joe uses native controls the apple automatically look in perform as it should not every platform. So show is perfect for anyone who wants to build an app, even if you are an expert build an apt to make your job easier, or as a hobby is show is also used by professional developers who want to build apps faster and even fortune five hundred companies want to give it a try. Learn to code me listeners. Get twenty percent off with the coupon code. 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Full stack academy making great people into great developers. The thing with building your own projects side projects is you can create your own story to tell. So even if you had work experience that maybe isn't as excited chat about what you just said, you can instead use another example of something that you built and take them through that and really paint the story of of what you of what you built. So I also like that tip to about putting it higher up at your resume like the things you wanna talk about more or the things that were more technically complex and positioning that way because I think and I'm kind of switching gears. I wasn't planning on talking about this. But I know a ton of people always are unsure of how to talk about side projects on their resume, or if they've a personal website or linked in or whatever do you have any thoughts on that? Like how they can include those in the best way. Yeah. It you're saying on the resume or Lincoln specifically. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's a good question. You know, I'm I can offer some tips from my perspective, I've never been a person who's greens resumes. So some of this is gonna be a a little bit outside my wheelhouse. But my guess is. Yeah, I think they're couple different on this is maybe a helpful kind of angle for the game on the couple of different audiences to to play to with that. The first person is someone who screens resumes. Right. So this phase where you're trying to get in interview at a company, and that person's screening resumes in a lot of cases is not going to be an engineer his or herself. And so the there are a few things that they may be looking for. But but in many cases there. Doing sort of advanced keyword matching. Right. So I'm kind of looking for words that matchup with with the job description. So that might be specific languages or frameworks? They may be looking for rails may be looking for Perot coup. They may be looking for, you know, post Gress, do whatever react with whatever's. Whatever kinda stack have. And then they they may be looking for. Yeah. Well, I guess everything else is coming to mind to just more examples of vocab words that are like tools or frameworks could even be things like agile development or or test driven development or something. Right. So whenever you describe either work experience or side projects. Put all those vocab words in there. And in fact, I'm just putting right on the top. Right. So just like give the name of the job or the name of the project, and then right under just say, you know, Django heroic coup whatever like what the stack was right? And then, you know, any other potentially relevant vocab words, like test driven development continues, deployment, whatever. Right. So that that's kind of the first person that you may wanna think about with with your resume, including side projects. The second person is a person who's running in. Review? And so she is gonna be technical almost all the time. And in in those cases, they're coming at things a little bit differently. So cases, she's going to have your resume in front of her. And a lot of cases like, you know, she's been working she's trying to ship some code. She's behind on something in like. All right. I have an interview scheduled for two o'clock. And so they she runs over to a conference room to meet you or like hops on the phone to to get in touch with you like either there's just like a copy of your resume sitting there on the table or they like pulled up from their Email real quick like during the call. And so they're looking at it for the first time, right? So they're not even probably gonna read all the way to the bottom. So you're gonna wanna put the most interesting stuff right there on the top. And that's why I suggested this idea of putting the thing that you're most excited to talk about right there on the top. Because a lot of. Cases. They'll just like point to that. And go, oh, that's interesting. Like, tell me more about that. Awesome. Thank you for sharing that. And yes, there's definitely different people that'll be that'll be reading the resume. Whether it's someone who's like, the the personal work for like, your manager other people that are gonna be conducting the interview that could be your colleagues one day or co workers are working on the same team. And then of course, as you mentioned the person who's the screener who could be someone that is like on the people ops team or someone else that you may not even be on the same team honor ever work with one day. But they're just the ones that are going through the the applicants? Yeah. One thing that I want wanna mention one thing that I found in. I wish I had an answer for this. And I think this is something I need to think about more in the future. Maybe put other content around this on. But I do think just having the side projects on the resume can be difficult because I know I used to do a lot of the twenty minute phone interview before the person comes into the office, and there's been times because you go through resumes, so fast that I didn't realize that something that was a side project accepting they built themselves the way they kind of framed it on their resume. I thought it was like an employer because it had like the company name it said what they did. But it wasn't clear to me that it was like something they built a course there are other. Yeah. There are other people who had sections side projects they made it very clear. It was something they built I would just say for anyone listening who's doing this. Definitely try to have it be clear that it's something you Bill in not a company worked for because you could throw the person off then. Right. If they didn't. Notice that resume or is a little vague out was worded in then you're trying to them on the phone in then that becomes clear. But anyway, that's the only thing I can I can add to that also loved what you talked about before. When you go into having, this example in mind that you could run through with the whiteboard and your story back when you are college when you're working with the YouTube API, I know back when you were working with that, you had no intentions of it, helping you later on during an interview or something, but I think for those that are listening that do have a more specific industry, they wanna work in or they have a clear sense to work with the different services and third party tools in API's available like four in that in that realm. Yeah. I think that's a good idea. If if you know that you want to be working in specific space like definitely get working with those tools. But if if you're more open than you know, again, like don't it's hard to predict what is gonna. Pop like what's going to resonate with with the companies you talk to? So again, my biggest thing is work on something that actually seems fun because then you're gonna make more progress. You're gonna be more excited to talk about it. All that stuff. Yeah. A hundred percent. So like, what are your thoughts on just like throwing in the towel giving up on a project? I know you mentioned a story earlier about the Sedova coup at that you Bill and how you gave up for a while. And then returned back to it finished it. But if a person just loses all interest, or they get really really stuck should they give up or like, what are some tips on them to push through. If you think that's what they should do. I think you know, finishing a project is definitely better than not. But I dunno. I also think that there shouldn't be too much. Shame in giving up. 'cause I think that the truth is. You know for recruiting specifically at least, you know, a company in individual engineer who's gonna interview or like a resume screener, whatever like if they actually go to the URL where the project is hosted that already is kind of a miracle. Right. Then if they really get in there and like kick the tires a whole bunch. That's like that hardly ever happens right for the most part, though, kind of look at the landing page, and then, you know, go like, oh, I have to log in. Okay, whatever. And then balance, you know, what I mean? So you can would say in a recruiting context. Don't be afraid to like fake it a little bit. If that makes sense of if you have hard, coats and stuff kind of throw in some fake data. You know, kind of mock out some features that they don't really work, but you kinda have like the flow built out for how it would work. You know, you don't have to be dishonest. Like an interview if it comes up, you can say, I didn't finish it. But here here's what the design was like. And here's how I was, you know, working on building it out, whatever. I I think that's going to be enough. Right. So so I guess put differently like. Think think about the demo right? If if that's what if that's what's important to you is having the side project do some lifting during our current process. Think about what the the demos going to be like an in fact, like it's less important that the project fully works doesn't have bugs and all that stuff than it is that it's very easy for someone to see the demo. So in fact, a better product for you to have like linked to on your resume or on your linked or whatever is like a screen cast of you using the thing, right? And when you record that screen cast, you could mock out features put in test data in like, you know, kind of smooth over some stuff that you never quite finished. Because otherwise again, if you like make this whole website, no one's gonna log in. No one's going to like, actually, you know, get to like the dashboard and. N B like, okay. Like now at your first book to your reading list, or whatever. Then they'll be like, I don't wanna do that, you know. And then they'll bounce. They won't even really get to see the product. Anyway. Yeah. Yeah. I think that was great advice. I've never heard anyone actually showed up before. So thank you so much for talking about that. And when you were chatting, I was just thinking about like kind of the plague perfectionism I succumb to this all the time in a range of ways. But sometimes it's like, you know, what it doesn't have to be perfect. If you wait for something to be perfect. It's never going to be done. And what's more important as you said is like kind of like faking it until you make it in showing the demo showing you use it having certain parts done, but not all of it has to be done. And exactly as you said, if you're an interviewer or potential teammate, who's gonna be talking to you like a phone, vetting, you they probably aren't going to go through the entire thing. Like, they just go through a small bit of it. I. Though, like the further he will belong in the interview process or could be a bigger chance that they may go back and check it out in more detail, but still like, especially when you're just getting the attention just getting the interview, there's no way they're going to spend that much time going through it because they don't have that much time to go through thing. Right. So all really awesome advice. So is there anything else before relieved that you could share with those who are just stuck on figuring out what kind of product build? I know you talked about like the interest the technologies. Thinking about you know, if they know what round they wanna work in taking that situation. Is there anything else you could leave people with that are just stuck on what to do? Yeah. I guess for kind of a few ideas that the first is about web scraping. You know, this is just just me. But like I love web scraping projects. It's like just just the right amount of like devious, and and a little subversive and fund technically interesting and kind of involves the web, but also kind of more programming in to learn how like a web browser works a little bit better and how web server works all that stuff. So. I love web scraping stuff. So I shared some examples about that another is. Yeah, you can start with a piece of technology wanna learn, and, you know, come up with something that would do well with that kind of technology. So if if it's like a front end web framework, for example, you know, something that's really front end e. Another thing is, you know, think of either like a product that you really want to use yourself, right? Like, maybe a web browser extension that you really want a web app that you really want or think about just just make yourself. A reminder put like put put a calendar reminder every hour tomorrow. So that your phone buzzes once in our to tell you like to remind you to think of a problem that you're having or like look out for if you're having a problem with something is something that frustrates you or whatever you can come up with some ideas for problems that you have that could be solved with with software. And then the last suggestion I would give is if you can't come up with a good problem to solve. Just reinvent the wheel. Right. So take a piece of software that you really like and seeking build it yourself. So yeah, for me like image board and an online forum was was a good example of that nowadays, people might be more excited about like, something that's more of a social network. But even you know, something as simple as like a to do list app, right or whatever you nerd out about if you're really into. If you're really into reading, you know, maybe a good good reads. I think is the name of the app that people like to use to track the books. They read stuff if you wanna make like a good reads clone just just kind of whatever you like to use seeking Bill to yourself how great stuff Parker. Thank you again for coming on where can people find you online? Best place to find me is on Twitter interview cake as in the handle is at interview cake. Facebook dot com slash interview cake perfect. Thanks again for coming on. Thanks. Healthy enjoyed my conversation with Parker. Remember, you can find the show notes for this episode back on the learn to code with me website in the podcast area. And as a hinted to in the beginning to go along with this episode Parker is giving learn to code with me listeners fifty percent off his interview cake program for this week only this special fifty percent discount is going to end on Friday, November eleventh at midnight eastern time. And to take advantage of this special offer go to this. You are out learn to code with dot MI Ford slash interview. Interview cake is amazing product that will help you ace technical interviews. People who have used Parker's product have landed jobs at companies like Amazon Facebook, Google, apple Snapchat, Hulu Lincoln Spotify in so many more. Again, the special your out is learn to code with dot MI Ford slash interview. Go there and get fifty percent off of interview cake. If you're listening to episode in the future after November eleventh, I'm sorry. But this deal will no longer be vailable. However, make sure to sign up for the learn to code me Email list. So you can learn about these deals when they happen. And not after the fact, and you won't miss another sway. Thanks so much again for tuning in. And we'll see you next week.

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Art special: digital disruption

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

Art special: digital disruption

"Hello and welcome to the bulletin with UBS or Monaco Twenty, four and the latest in a special season of programs, exploring art and collecting and shifts and trends in the art market. In the season we've been tackling some of the big questions confronting sector and hearing from key figures within it from Gal stiffer directors from auction house executives to leading fine arts economists. Now I art special. We reviewed how the COVID nineteen crisis has pushed the art world to innovate accelerating development of initiatives that transform the way we interact with art and the market. We've heard from many of the key figures navigate in crisis about how this is a moment to replace on the status quo for the arts industry, and about future opportunities and possibilities. Today's episode focuses on the longer term potential for digital disruption. Looking on this comes online viewing rooms and social media channels that have dominated our attention during the current pandemic. We'll be joined today by four experts who share their insights into a handful of examples of technological advancements. We'll look at how they have and will continue to disrupt the art world to make it more relevant to a wide audience to make it less pay and to make it pats critically more accessible. We start with the curator writer and technologists Ben Vickers Ben's chief technology officer at the Serpentine Galleries sometimes now launched the future art ecosystems report examining new digital innovations nap potential impact on the art world and its infrastructure. It's a strategic briefing aimed at practitioners and organizations across arts, science and Technology Ben thanks for being with us. We're going to zero in in particular on this briefing's report on on future, our ecosystems really really interesting looking at digital innovation, the potential impact of that on well all of the art world, really all of the infrastructures that are involved really interesting findings, and we'll sort of go through some of it. But I wanted to stop asking about something you said in the briefing about this idea of an industrial revolution for art. An Art Industrial Revolution Chose a bit about what that means really and what? That might look like right so. I think what we describe as the industrial revolution something that's already cut it beginning, and we're seeing the first wave south. What it points to is the way in which infrastructure that's being developed in the digital age is cut of reshaping. The distribution flows of artworks. The way that people connect with ought works, but I guess specifically the way that artists developing that practices and their art works. We are not going to ask you a little bit about how these changes benefit the artists moment, but I just wanted to vote in this. I guess it's quite a fundamental point about technology and its role here. I guess your point is the this can help to really enrich the way we all experience, not just the way it's created our sort of end user experience if you like, but a lot of people seem to see technology as a threat almost to the traditional values, the traditional aesthetics of all is there a paradox or a conflict here or you very confident? The these new technologies can be employed to really enhance everybody's experience what I think the one of the kind of key observations that we make is something that's been happening over a period of time to all types of media, which has this cut of removal of like gatekeepers said. Typically would play the role of deciding what is our? What is not all what is value? What should be paid attention to? And I think same in journalism, the same in many many different sectors, the WHO decides what is value, and what can potentially build an audience is shifting cly, and so I guess like that's the kind of first wave, and the first sight of looking at how technologies have sort. Sort of disrupted the way that we experience culture, but I think you know specifically. Our report focuses on advanced technologies so artificial intelligence augmented reality, new emerging biotechnology and I think for sure these things in some ways have terrifying dimensions to them but I think that's not because they're necessarily entirely new, but because they raised questions, the go back to things that we've been addressing for a long long time, so. If, it's in the instance of blockchain. It has the potential to completely rewrite systems of governance how financial systems work etc, and artists avoid played a fundamental role, not just in cut of locating those questions and cut reflecting back at us, but of also like shaped the development of those things I think one of the things that's not nearly recognized enough is the kind of narrative that exists around what technology is or can be is. Is Very much part of that technology and the way it can imagine to the world so the difference between thinking about Fisher intelligence as something that has the potential to be a kind of sky net the ultimate away orval jobs versus it becoming a kind of assistant, the represents a different form of intelligence, produces very different outcomes, society and artists over the last decade and longer have been working with these technologies and nuanced ways. Well, yeah, I guess. That's why I wanted to ask you next Ben, which is about how the processes in that process which has been ongoing as you say there, how does that benefit the autism? And can you give us an idea about how you estimate? The scope of that benefit can be by which I mean. It's not just presumably about the work the way they work, but them all care and the relationship with the audience of their work wherever that audience might be in however, the audiences consuming the work. How far-reaching can there's benefits? Be Well I. Think I work in a major gallery right and Before I started working for that Gallery I was appalled of various online communities that would developing an entirely new type of practice, and is inevitable that you see the integration of those practices into the museums and institutions, but imperil autism building, different infrastructures and different types of communities. And rethinking ways, in which the financial distribution can walk around outlets I saw a platform just the other day called snark art where artists selling their works online, a percentage of is redistributed to other artists that may not have the same scale of market so I think you know very obvious very tangible ways. There is a shift happening as a result of working with different types of technologies, different types of platforms. What are the areas that we identify poll? Is this idea of the off stock? So typically you refer to large technology, corporations and platforms as stacks, a niece alike fully integrated organizing structures that developed technology that helps them further develop their product, but was shapes the organizing structure. Of, that corporation or organization etcetera on one of the cut a key examples for this is team lap, so team lab is a collective six hundred artists who have opened their own museum bottlers and Japan and this museum is now the single most visited individual autism in the world like surpassing Vincent Vanco. Now? That presents a major shift. The idea the artists would not earn control and design. There are museums, but that they would have larger market share than existing institutions. Museums presents very disruptive and a very interesting trajectory where artists going directly to the audiences, and the same thing is happening online but this. Is a good example of a major move and in the re poll there are other artists that we've spoken to. That is obvious that the kind of imagined condition of their practice could also produce similar outcomes in the future Ben. What about the need for a long term strategic vision for art and the art world? What's missing at the moment? And how is the report helped to put in focus? What needs to be done I? Think they're kind of three coal issues. My background is very embedded in kind of open-source practices that are predicated cooperation and cut a sharing knowledge and improving. On that knowledge for longtime, whilst is cooperation in the art world, there is a high degree of competition and something. Candesartan learned from the technology sector and specific areas of it is the value in coming together in order to build new types of infrastructure and the Internet when it without this operating systems that we rely on wouldn't exist without this and so a kind of move to a more open source. Source approach to sharing between institutions, building common infrastructure is something that seems absolutely critical in this moment I think the other areas something that we really sought to address in producing the report self so over the last twenty two years a lot of the kind of strategic analysis about the future trajectory of the art, world has come from external industries so whether it's financial reports whether it's national governments in devising. Devising soft power strategies the has not been a kind of specific move on the part of artisans and artists in order to devise their own cut of strategies and analysis of what's unfolding, but rather die is often just produced by the creation of exhibitions, etc, so I think a kind of concerted effort for artists and institutions to work together in order to devise and think through long term strategy in the. The future ecosystems is just alle contribution towards that and then I think the kind of fundamental thing, the way observed towards the end of the report together and I think will most likely informed. The next iteration is the issue of metrics. The way in which is evaluated so for the most part right now, arts, institutions and commissions etc, evaluated simply on the number of people that come into contact with. The number of visitors that come free dog, and this is a very like blunt metric for value. Eighteen wall is inherent in the value of art and at some him. That's know indebted to the kind of men. Of the museum in terms of sharing knowledge, we become more aware, and therefore can make more informed decisions in the world, and I think that right now we need to go through a process of revision and begin to develop much more nuanced ideas about what art can do, and then developed new metrics that evaluate. In that way with particularly influenced by the work of Marianna Matt Takato at UC L.. In terms of the way that she's trying to think through new ways to evaluate what constitutes public good, you know. What are the new regulatory frameworks the needs to be put in place. How do we create new systems of accountability and I think that this is something that's really really crucial, if we all have a different type of off flourishing Ben, can you tell us about a few key ambitions for the future? You distill in an pithy where I guess some of the key learnings from myspace across all areas of society right now it's very evident that as a result of rising complexity that's been very much accelerated by technology. There is not a necessary place for people to be able to have these compensations in a non instrumentalist way an are has always served this purpose of bringing diverse fields together in order to produce unimaginable outcomes, and I think an ambition is to be able to create a space for that, but crucially space that doesn't just speak to itself, but a space the can actually have a direct influence on these developments and specifically in the area of technology. Over the course of the way it's accelerated in the last thirty years. As a result of a very small group of people devising these kinds of innovations, we've got something that's kind of monoculture that is globalized, and is an issue that we need to address quite urgently if we are to have kind of plurality of us if we ought to different kind of ethical frameworks, and if we're to frame a much more kind of nuanced and complex conversation about the way, in which these technologies are going to shape future. So I guess that I would say that that's. The core thing, and that's perhaps the most pithy I could be. I think the other thing that I would say on. That is the way to get there in order to break down the barriers between different disciplines. It's not going to help us going into the future if there are not conversations hiring directly between fields, a note, perhaps Ben Vickers on another aspect of the report. That was really interesting. Can we get a reflection for me? Maybe on this idea of the potential, a new kind of art, making here one of the things that we also I de Fide in the poll is that as a result of these projects requiring diverse range of actors? The notion of authorship is shifting so at the moment we very much think of off being made by the single genius artist, and I think as a result of the diverse range of skills required to develop these hugely ambitious technical projects that wish shifting from the individual artists to more like a team formation. That's more akin to say like a Hollywood production or video game production and I think that that has enormous potential for how? How we can see are being remade in the future, and that's something that we're very much like focused on future development and I would also specific point to video games as a entirely under recognized awful and the reason why video games are crucially important in this Merman is that the software is used to develop them video games engines is becoming the kind of face technology for many other areas of innovation, so whether it's blockchain. ETC and video game engines are increasingly being used in manufacturing television and most of the artists that we work with also used these platforms, so I think I would want to signal that as a very tight, a key area of innovation and Ben. Perhaps just finally. What about a thought on how all of what we've been discussing might reshape arts, organisations and the wider. Wider world, I suppose in the future. How might museums and Institutions Ben Need to change? The Silicon Valley Model of innovation is predicated on failure right, so you have like nine point. Nine nine nine percent of startups will fail, and it's as a result of that failure that the lessons off shad and learn by other actors. They're attempting to answer similar questions provide. Provide semi solutions, but the problem of museums and institutions is that they are always predicated on presenting this kind of picture. Perfect final product, so really limits the scope of what can be developed, and how hot can contribute innovation and so one of the areas that we're focused on. Is this idea of creative for such development as an area where you can create? Create a more reflective more inquiry based approach inside the institution, said he will not always presenting stuff to a public, but you'll producing new ideas and new research that can be shed within the industry more widely, and that's something that we're specifically focused on research and development as defined currently in different kind of governmental funding strategies only applies to the sciences and engineering. And doesn't include the humanities so a key stepping stone for changing that is to recognize the humanities as a force in research and development, and hopefully this will open up a whole new south possibilities. Ben. You. Sophie Percival and Olivier Burger our co-founders it one under which uses a data to demystify the dynamics of value, creation and biases in the art world. Sophie and it's great to speak with you before we talk about wonder. Can you give us some background on your journey here? And on this broader discussion around the the demystification of the market and the dynamics evaluations in all its sophie APPs first. What's Redeem put fires? Is that you know my background is social sciences and economics energy coming from the financial world and innovation and collectors, family and one of the things that is so important when you look at the art, world and something that has been studied for years is the intricacies. Intricacies and the interdependencies of the institutions and the Publicans and the market, and to be able to be honest. No one wants to talk about it. Usually the only ones really looking at it are suggests of art of the art market and the art world and have been similar books that published coalition the seventies, but no-one really looking at that massive subject, which is the interdependencies of different kinds of institutions and the result of that is that there are a lot of misconceptions in the world when you go deep into how not? Not is career grows how art comes to gain status as a cultural asset as cultural good as a shared can of treasure, and this is actually very complex constructs that is happening where the world is actually functioning as again take filter where many many many professionals of different backgrounds are activities selecting artists showing promoting artists and through that filter the cultural creation, the cultural value is recognized, and that misconception I think going after looking at the data is saying okay well. You know there are so many around you know. Mega galleries are making. Making the market, the Oswald is just like basically manipulated by a few a handful of people while this is not what the data says so looking at the data in a way, it's kind of a sobering exercise or can of a reality check of how the twelve really works, so how into setting up your business and the technology that you guys harness attempt to address those challenges Olivia actually was indeed a huge challenge because what we needed to do. I is really to reconstruct the art history from nineteen twenty up to two day. So by Odyssey we mean understanding who was the artist who have been active from the nineteen twenties to today. And where have they been shown? who had been collecting their work and we needed to do this exercise on a global basis, because the world is essentially a global ecosystem. And so we had to map out in a nutshell, the activity of about. A quarter of a million southeast, and understand how they went through twenty eight thousand museums and galleries, the world, and what was as a result of that, what's the impact of every one of those injuries museums on the cultural recognition of the soft on the acceleration of the southeast, and on the financial value of the artworks were producing, so he took us about a year, and a half a good year, and a half to we map out the world where define it, and then the technology that we leverage was not the classic I. of Technology We were at the frontier of a game. Theory and graph theory, which is really advance. To be able to crack the code and understand something that actually art historian have understood all the way through which is museums and galleries do impact cultural reputation in value, but no being had taken. If for two we'd try to measure swelled this mapping. What is the impact of every one of those marketing so to speak throughout the world? What about this idea of off as an emotional endeavor to people struggle to make sense of how it's possible to use cold hard data clinical approach? If you like to make sense of something that is by its nature very personal, it's emotional. It's subjective. Yeah, and you know what it's interesting because we both have very emotional relationship to art. You know some people in the I don't and it's interesting that we both come from kind of a position of loving art and artists, and that's the reason we do that. And in a lot of groups working in the I., R. Activity Coming from a completely different angle, which is more like, let's see what as Geeks we can say our produce as a producer machine, and these type of organizations usually don't really look up to artists right. So what's interested in the clinical approach to quit you and that is that it is in many ways reassuring to have the proof of something you believe in. And linked to give you an example here. We've had countless conversations with art. Experts with collectors that have made emotional purchases of art pc's that they really had very strong connection with the believed in the artists, the believed in the power of the work and they wanted to support it. They didn't make that decision based on clinical process, but the fact is when ten years later you tell them well. This artists actually has gone a long way since you supported him her. At this early stage in their career, and this expansion of their career is actually a testament to how right to wear to support this Ottesen voice in the article system. It's a very good feeling, and in that case you WANNA poof. You want to know that. No. It was not just like I can have a probably. Probably mistake or something that you did, but you. You know maybe didn't think through enough. No, when looking back, and you look at what has happened in the careers of these artists that you have supported, and you see the growth, and you see the reach that they have developed. It's a very important feeling, because ultimately when you care about art, you care about this art to be seen to be recognized to be celebrated. You want the artists that you know. You're every emotion in yourself you want them to. To actually trigger emotions in other people, so this idea that the development of an artist career matters to people who love art forces can have obvious the way we do it, which is different than others in the past is that we do it to numbers and Madrid through quantification of those very steps in a career, and through can ever very cold analyses of what's going on in a career, but the driver is really in understanding how an artist goes from not being in the spotlight to being a cultural. Cultural Force. That has the power to inspire others what has surprised you in the data, other things learnings that emerge from the analysis that do that actually Tom. We get surprised everyday, and that's why we had the chance to work. We scraped talents in research in because for them. It's like landing on Mars right? Everybody S in Mars for a long time, but nobody has exploited and with that I, we gathered own the world. This is an expiration. We surprised every day. One of the was. There's A. Market that few batteries we make makeup artist, and we creates artist nothing to something of a control giants. This is actually not the case. If you were to look at the artist who moved from known artists in two thousand and became start his in two thousand twenty. As of today, the contribution of those star galleries is minimal ease below the one percents, and actually you see. See a network of galleries and museums, and some of them a lot of them. You might not know who had been keeping temperature to enabling the scientist from not known to become the control stars that we know today, so this research was again a confirmation that you look at a network of twenty thousand market influencers who as Sophie, save very well is looking debt danettes. Danettes, but we're. If someone wants to make a statement stronger than the other, it would be compensated. It would be contradicted. It will be validated by other players on east. Who Macho validations who the importance of an artist and important of a voice of an artist you can reach us star status on bias. You know we've been researching by US for the last twelve months now. Now with research by US own gender, we search by US around cultural backgrounds, including African American and lose no surprise. Intense us. Yes, the bias exists in these strong I sing. The surprise is how the trajectory of the Saudis is different. If you're humanity, so may not ceased how longer it can take for Nazis to fund the ladder so to speak, and how much innovation? AUTISTS needs to being to her or his career building to move up the ladder. It's quite surprising you know today and more Gamal cannot ceased silhouetted ten years ago. It was not the case and twenty years ago, it was even less and to go to that level. They had to go through temendous amount of force and innovation to Camden. What about the cost of these vices can you tell us about the role of technology to fix those a narrative I guess often the art world is of the disruptive impact of tag of its threat to the established order or to creative process, but. Is that wrong headed in your view. Should we be focusing instead on how tech positively drives innovation how it drives creativity? Right and I think a lot of people haven't understood that in the art world and the world is often described as being very conservative and anti tech, which is in a way, but it's not for lack of innovation in the spirit what I mean by that just like looking at how the has reacted to the credit crisis, and how much innovation is at play. Play there how fast getaway and art fairs and players of all sorts of not for profits, organizations have reacted to produce meaning and forearms and platforms connections is very impressive and I think that's the paradox of the art. World is that it's very innovative by definition because you flopped via creative people, so there's no shortage of ideas in the art world in terms of. Of How to change the system or how to find solutions to new problems, the shortage see is actually in the comfort level with data, and that's kind of a culture shock when you bring data and numbers to people who used to dealing in language and words, and it's almost like can ever cultural divide where a lot of the people on the outside of the. The world are not very comfortable with manupulating that I in manipulating math and numbers, and there's a lot of education to be made there. What we see is that the minute an expert understands that deck is on their side, and the technology is able to give them the poof. They're looking for are helping them. Make making arguments that there were struggling to win. They don't think twice. They just embraced the technology and we've seen it with people that sometimes way into the seventies and eighties that have a reputation for being very takeovers, but the minute understand how they can use the technology. They just do it. They just go with it and they see the power of it, so I think for us. The way we see technology has an opportunity for the art. World is really. Really opening up this knowledge in making it easier for people on expert to share the knowledge in were. That's efficient. That's easier to understand from. Many people is much easier for a lot of us. Let of new collectors or even people who are interested in are not experts to understand a percentage to understand an impact measure of museum than to read a book about it, so it's time efficiency problem. It's also. Just to kind of commitment that is required today from someone who wants to understand the art world that most people on the trip to make because of just the cost of investing timing understanding how it works and tell me for me is there's one condition to make it. Work is one to technology needs to be an enabler in doesn't need to replace any kinds of expertise, and that's what he's positioning that we chose not replacing the experts refrigerating competition through that are between the experts and non expert. This condition is is needs to be actionable, so if I give you data in this on. On your portfolio. You know needs to be analysis that is actionable that helps you protect your wealth that helps you make a conscious decision about a purchase that you love because of the emotional attachment that you have to it, but it might not be an economical good decision that at least you're conscious about it. So making it an enabler of expertise on expertise, not a replacement is critical, and really happing to drive decision is critical for technology to move the needle in the case of bias. What's critical is the technology that we provide to. Some players is helping them changed. Behavior is not about. About, doing something bad, it's about having changed behavior so that you conscious about bias and you can adjust it so the seminar financial sector when you're conscious about how you prefer with performing, whereas the risks involved you, how the gross on the based on medium and gender is evolving in hats. You make decisions, so the semi's bias needs to help you drive decision, so many of the narratives here are around joy, change and harnessing technology to make the sector better I just wanted from both of you. How much more is there still to discover in terms of the potential here? But you know there's one thing that's. That's does a beauty with we are exploring right now. which is the fact that the twelve is a living organism? It's really like gigantic buddy where every part is needed. Everybody's doing their job as supporting other parts and I think the more we progress in that direction, understanding that there is activity new antagonism that you know museums could not exist without galleries commercial galleries that commercial could not exist without not for profits that is kind of bringing a bigger understanding of. How did you support art when you really love? Aren't you know we knew some collectors who don't like to buy from galleries because they think? They don't understand the game and it rather buy from auction, but once you understand that guarantees are an essential part of building careers and giving a platform and building an audience for voice, the Voice of the artist to care about then you want to support them as well and some people will buy from galleries, and they will be held private museums, but they won't support their local, not for profits, and the look on not for profits are actually essential, especially if you have diversity because this is where a lot of artists that are struggling to find their way into the artois, they have their first shoes, and I approach to actually build. Something so i. think that this more holistic understanding of what's at play in art, and how we collectively look at art, and how we collectively build those channels for our to gain an audience, and to get a reach is probably a you know the next big step in what the art market and. Of itself. And going back to your point rolling motion. Actually we would argue that that I can help you enjoy even more emotional aspects of art. I give you an example when you see network to gallery. And interested about this at work, a lot of those conversation would be wrong the value. And because you to understand, why is it worth fifty thousand dollars? You need proof you know. Why is not worth stencils dollars? She need proof fund so once you've access to. Either to center to the buyer, then you can remove this part of the cassation really focused on the work. And the story. And the message and intellectual value of the work, and it's one example we could give you talk. were the lack of data is preventing enjoyment of art. The would give easing a museum. You go in a museum. You see a work. And you don't understand it. It's because the value of this work he didn't to you. Is it's in the data? Is the message that the artists wants to say Easter trajectory in the hurdle that is had to go through. It's all of this value that he season to your eyes. So once you bring value through data to you. Then you can appreciate the value, even more so enjoyment his higher, so that ease of source of enjoyment. He's a so soft enabling enjoyment of arts. So that's when you division that we have, and he can really impact every stakeholder democracy from West Management Insurance to election years to galleries to artiste and even more. Olivier Burger and Sophie, percival. Joseph is digital strategist and the founder of the First Digital Agency for Art Josiah was formally the first director of digital at the Jewish Museum in New York from where she joins us now to take silk of recent digital innovations and potential to make the art world more accessible. Josiah thanks for your time now as well as being a digital strategist as I mentioned having launched. What back at the start of this year the world's first Digital Agency for? You have a wealth of experience within the. Space such your eminently well qualified to give us a sense of the nature and scale of the major challenges, the art world already needed to overcome at indeed how the last few months and the pandemic have added to them having worked in museums for over a decade, always found it so interesting that unlike any other creative industry be art, world is the only industry in which nonprofit is shockingly ahead of for profit when it comes to technology so when you talk about challenges in the art world I mean the short answer at this point is survival. We're at a point now. Where many galleries and even museums may never reopen, not just because. Because the crisis, but because the pan-demic has really been an accelerate for many existing challenges in the art world that have been deferred so looking at this global ev unsustainability of the art, fair system, economically and environmentally the fact that the art world still relies on a very traditional business model, relying on brick and mortar in these in person exchanges, so the refusal to adapt into a digital world with something that was already becoming a huge issue, but the pandemic absolutely solidified this, so I decided to start my business just because it was something I'd been interested in, but there is certainly this urgency that I think no one could have predicted. You. That's really interesting and that tops into a couple of areas that I want to ask you about one of which was about how the art world needed or need still to learn from other industries I mean if we look at whether it might be fashioned musical entertainment or other areas the commercial areas. Do you think they're all learnings for the art world to get over that challenge that you've described there about maybe a little bit of inertia around the adoption of new technologies, or at least an understanding of how liberating and how freeing. Freeing technology can be to business. You're absolutely right. I think every other industry whether it's publishing music cinema has already adopted into this world of technology to me the key difference between the old and all these other creative industries is this idea of accessibility and inclusion all intertwined so the art world. If you think about it, it's completely built on this idea of exclusion hierarchy, so objects enter museum in value, because many others are not and me have professionals who are highly trained to determine the trajectory of art history through the practices exclusion. I think the future of whether or not the art world survives is going to be based on whether into braces, technology, and by default also embraces the idea of accessibility so that the tech world can even become interested in. Art I think up. Until now there was the symbiotic relationship between art and commerce, but if you look at the people who are making the fortunes of our time, it's really the people in technology and so corporations like Apple. Google facebook are going to be the future philanthropy in the future patrons of the art world, the commercial at large the world desperately needs to change and become more inclusive and serve a value proposition that really communicates the value of art to continue Joe what about the democratizing impact of tech and technologies power to? demystify dynamics and Boise's in the world, the creation of value is it perhaps too early to buy into that narrative wholesale like the state of whether or not technology survive will kind of sort itself out i. think because of need. There's going to be a natural solution that's going to be built, and I think another very important fallacy that we unravel is this idea of museums in technologies not being technology companies so I think were innovation would eventually evolve is perhaps not from within the art world with partnerships and working with these large tech companies that have the resources to build solutions to problems in the art world I think we should be spending our time to invent new products. Products perhaps with exception of artists who are tasked to be about new ways of looking at the world, but you know we have to think about worthy audiences are we have to think about where the need is where we can define a solution that comes with technology where you have Netflix as the direct translation of film and spotify is the direct translation of music as technology product art takes on so many different forms. You could be looking at a painting. You could be looking at in immersive installation or or channel video installation, and so there isn't a direct way of translating all those experiences, but there may be some potential in thinking about especially the outcome of Oliver Experiences. Experiences right now being deduced screen and leading into the limitations of the screen I think there could be really exciting art that's produced during this period where you think about the history of art, and why do Painting Exist? They exist because they're all. And if we're completely looking at visual experiences on our screen spy's days than we've only begun to explore the possibility as the screen as the new interface for culture, and then also going back to decide the virtual reality and digital experiences, I've seen countless attempts at trying to replicate museums and galleries faces at. You know they're never successful again. Because of this feeling of being alone, but surprisingly I haven't played this game myself but the. The nintendo game animal crossing has been wildly successful when it comes to even several museums partnering with Nintendo in allowing their images to be displayed online from the mets to the getty. This is virtual. That's created in a gaming space, and of course they're solving the problem of social interaction and being able to have social exchanges with people on a digital screen, but then being able to explore environments and really having the volume to make an impact so I think there's probably potential there you know the gaming world has definitely led a lot of innovations and other areas, but I think there's definitely just going to be the test of time that will tell what's GonNa Happen Josiah ferry. Finally on the program, we meeting Jacob Gear. The founder of cute art acute taught has created a marketplace for augmented reality art works. They have an APP that allows you to buy and trade a are art. Jacobson, he has a keen understanding of this facet of the business in the market and knows about the disruptive aspects involved during lockdown Utah launched a new development to the APP that offers us as a new way to discover experience and collect a art by leading artists like 'cause and Oliver Leeson. Jacob de thanks for being with us. We'll come to those artists. Perhaps in a moment Jacob I up. The pandemics affected seemingly almost everything in the past few month. It's disrupted the art well to certainly, but can I start by asking you a bit about the origin story of Qatar and maybe. Why the code was so primed to be disrupted even before the pandemic when we started thinking about forming acute heart and The purpose of acute heart, while no defense not sprang to mind the early, and was sort of driving force behind this is that. If one thinks about music or even film, it's been of completely changed in particular in regards to distribution. And, art has remained a bastion where. Things have pretty much been the same for a very long time. It's driven by museums striven by galleries, and it's also driven by art fairs and so on. And one of the things that makes it very interesting and stat now you wouldn't buy record. You would listen to spotify. You wouldn't really. By a VHS anymore, you would sort of go on net flex. And we have the strong firm belief that art is. An experience and experience is should be shared. They are not necessarily just you know if you will an asset class where you have to. Have some sort of way to get to dumb as going to museum more, you know buying a piece of art. So we started thinking about. You know what is actually possible to change here. And we started out with virtual reality and the reason we did. This is because it's a form of art that is. Made by an artist, and it's something that is impossible to make an any other sort of medium, so I think if. You can sit or if you can make a sculpture. If you can perform, it doesn't really work. It has to be something that is completely immersive, and it's also something that is. In a way user generated so note to people in an art piece half the exact same experience at something where. You know you participate with, and would you know the meaning of art and a completely new way now? Jacob on another aspect of novelty here. You mentioned before the acute arts involved in a new way of collecting art. Can you explain that a bit more to us? Does it change what it is to collect? I think it's not GonNa Change what it is to collect. People are always going to want to collect. Dot Savarese sort of primal. Human thing and a very good thing in terms of virtual reality there. Are you know a lot of sort of obvious problems? One as the equipment keeps changing technology keeps. Evolving which means that people are hesitant in? Future, proof is, it not future-proof. I also believe that the model off. You know the very classic moment if you take a photograph, so you do a number of additions and they you sell the editions. People have tried this with virtual reality. I think people are gonNA. Keep trying it what I think the future of this particular medium. If we only limit ourselves to virtual reality is that. In time I, think and quite near future, it will be completely possible to stream these things online. And then begs the question. Is that an experience to be owned, or is it an experience to be shared an I think? There will be a number of models coming up on this I think people will collect them in addition spot I also think it will be moving quite quickly towards a more pay per view experience where. You pay quite alot figure, and then you can watch an experienced VR and not necessarily maybe own dvr I think would five G. and everything that's happening in the sort of telecommunications industry. This is going to be the next. Disruptive thing would an at least virtual reality art. When it comes to a are, it is quite difference. When we launched a project that we did with cools. We tried a very different model there so augmented reality as Instantly accessible because pretty much everyone has a phone, whereas most things that are augmented or even digital have always been free for all. If they're out on the web, they're available and you can't really monetize on them. So, we created a limited edition of course sculptures stat. You can buy, so you buy them online, and then you can place them any way you won't T. And then basically anyone can see them, so you have them upside your house or outside your museum, and then they function very much as you know any artwork would so I think combining the technology of today, and then adding the scarcity of the normal art market is also something that seems to be incredibly attractive, and it's not. I think such sort of far fetched fought because again. You know young people. They live with phones. Take pictures today. Instantly understand that you know this is something unique. It's something that they can own an insult something that they can pulse on. Adding to that I think what's really interesting about a are as the environmental aspect that if you think about art today, people traveled to art fairs. You have to ship artworks. You have to insure them. It's not really. An incredibly sustainable model whereas ar instant. It's just starters no need to travel. There's no need to tax the environment too much. It's. Know something that seems very much in tune with the times we're living in. Do you think that they'll be a almost a twin track where the way this market develops? Does that sort of then sit alongside traditional mall, kids and I wonder. You mentioned maybe doesn't change. The notion of collecting is, but they must surely reshape the understanding of what value is in market terms right if you're looking at different price, points or more sharing economy driven model. Do you think that it will necessarily reshape the way that the rest of the market considers value is in art. I think it's going to take time, so it's not gonNA replace anything I think a painting is always of painting. Sculpture wasted sculpture. So this is not gonNa Affect it, but what I think is, it's something else you know. Some people love film. Some people love painting. Some people love performance. You know some people are fascinated by a are so i. think it's going to be something. That sits alongside everything else and I. From my understanding, what I think is in a couple of years. This will just be another art form, so it will be. You know I collect paintings I collect a R. I enjoy virtual reality, so I. Don't think it's replacing throughout. Adding something that is not ready and it's also. Bringing live lot of possibilities that you know otherwise are impossible because I mean think about it, so you have. An Ar sculpture and you can pretty much place it anywhere. You can have it on the Millennium Bridge. You can have it in your garden. You can have it in your apartments. It's an incredibly sort of instant art form, and that it's. And it's up to you how to use it, and it's also completely up to you allowing people to see it, you could keep it as a private thing. You could say you know. I want everyone does you can move it around in a matter of seconds, so it is. It's a very free form in that sense I would say. Tell us a little bit more than about some specific innovations. If we look at your work and I, guess I probably had time like everyone's. Had Jerry lockdown to push experiment with other things. What are some ambitions in some new innovations that your playing around with one imagines scenario that can develop very quickly as tech advances, and if you have the time to dedicate been happening recently. Yeah, also what's been happening I think we've been on this track for a number of years now, but I think as I. Said initially. I think this has sped everything up. What if we've. Learnt and found during lockdown as that people really take to the so what we've done as we've created a system where? You know anyone can place in art artwork anywhere anytime and I think we did a project with Ola Liason. He calls it wounded comer, which was quite a beautiful project where he started thinking about. You know what are people really lacking in lockdown and it's very simple. Things like you know. You can't see the sun because you're inside. You can't feel the rain because you're inside. You can't see animals because you're inside. And he brought his art body. If you will from the outside to inside, so he created a son that you can have inside. He created a puff and that you can interact with. He creates it a lucky rock, so things that. You know are not possible to experience during lockdown situation that suddenly you had inside. And I can see a lot of the artists we are working with are. Sort of really thinking about what is you know the thing that really allows people to experience that you know otherwise they content I think a lot of it has been around natured spinning around sustainability. The Technology Is Interesting but I think what's even more interesting is the way. That artists are now thinking about. How can I? You know do things that I just couldn't do before. Because a lot of these things are you know very clearly already in the artist's mind. There were thinking you know. How can this be done? But now suddenly we have a technology that allows for it so I. Think it's been very much up to. Trying to find new ways to communicate trying to find new ways to. Interact I. Mean Really Interact with arts to be your own curator. Have Your own collection of pieces in your lockdown apartment to those there are obviously some sort of says who say well you know look. I bought loads of video art in the eighties. Now I don't even have a video player anymore or I bought a piece that was made out TV sets, and you Combine Cathode Ray Tube TV. Do you have a rejoinder to those people who say your room is necessarily going to be a victim of your own success? Success because that's the technology racist forwards. Leave you behind. Is that a concern or do you just have to go with the flow? Almost you know what? It's something that we think about a lot. I think if you have a technology. That's localized, so it's an a box. I think you need to considered almost like a time capsule where you know, this is something that was made at a particular time. And then you need to take care that you have the equipment you know I, think it's going to be a challenge. But you know films are still around when it comes to late technology like a are, we're not as concerned because here were cloud based, so we can keep updating, so it's not really some technology that you know you would need someone to fix you know each iteration we make of the APP it improves all the art pieces at the same time so this. We can't keep doing forever. Things like the capability to place something very stably. That you know keeps improving and whatever art piece you've bought or rented, or you know have without paying. That's just gonNA keep improving improving and this we do in collaboration with the artists. A piece could also. You know suddenly start doing things that it could not do before you could have. I, Dunno like pulsa bar that could only sit and walk before some can fly, so we can keep coming up with. New Innovations and new ways to keep the technology contemporary and also quite interesting, because I mean that really means that the art pieces are not dead art pieces. They're not something that you know. Here's the beginning. Here's the end they can keep all the time improving and changing and growing as you grow yourself. Artworks never finished, but sadly this edition the program almost is thanks to Jacob Gear, and to all our brilliant panelists today on this very special edition of the bulletin with UBS here on one twenty four. Listen out in the weeks ahead. Ahead for the final installment special art focused mini series. You can listen back to the previous art specials, and indeed search default archive and find out more at. Monaco dot, com, or wherever you get your podcasts will also be coming back to an aspect that we mentioned briefly today, blockchain and its potential impact on the art world in future episodes of this show. Of course in the meantime you can always visit ubs dot com anytime to discover more about UBS own passion for art and collecting the bulletin with ubs all monocle twenty four.

Sophie Percival Ben Vickers Ben Jacob Gear Olivier Burger founder US chief technology officer Fisher myspace Josiah spotify UBS writer
#TSP095 - Jill Halfpenny

The Two Shot Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

#TSP095 - Jill Halfpenny

"How are you doing. I'm craig parkinson. You listen to the to shop podcasts at yourself down public. How we're gonna marry sold shot this week. I'm going to tell you right now. Take the devil oria. Are you well good. It's thursday episode ninety five of the podcast and you hear thank you so much for download and subscribe and join us because this week we have a fantastic conversation with a brilliant actor jail half penny now go a few bits of admin rights. Is it just just bear with don't fast forward josiah because these things are important while two really important ones just slightly annoyed annoying things i this episode so it was a blazing hot peaks on a day when i met jail in in london and what we ought as we'd walk up the road to sicelo square in the sunshine. Get them is on record which we did now so mcclay is not the best it can be quite quite noisy at times book your as will tune in after a while. Now i understand why griffin wanna stop the recording all why didn't because we were very the <hes> mid flow in the conversation we didn't want to pick it up and relocate or the is without the danger of replicate in any so conversation which is something that we don't want to do obviously so that is the slot annoying thing as i say you're as will tune in it and it's a fantastic conversation <hes> about bounced conversation. We took on various subjects that the people could find difficult so we we talk about loss. We talk about grief which are a whole host of things that life throws and these are the things that joe hasn't spoken oaken about before and it gets will we both get upset at times <hes> on one you to get too upset so i suppose i'm prefacing this by saying if you're not in the best place to to be here in a conversation that goes to these places <hes> then don't listen for now just put it aside and go back to when <hes> you feel roy moore quipped to to deal with the subjects that come up <hes> is very role at times and so <hes> just wanted to let you know i would never throw a conversation that dealt with stuff like this without telling you because ryan isn't van so if you're in any place. Just don't listen and it's fun. You'll come back to it later. If you all gonna listen yeah look about las words already and this has been one of the only times of all five episodes where there is times where i was lost for words because of what joe was talking about is very heavy as very date and look. It's very sad because no two ways of getting around that so <hes> yeah i just wanted to bring up so by saying that i think we should just go straight into it but she's a wonderful wonderful him bain and i'd met jail very very briefly for all ah few minutes at screening unav- always been a massive fan of outlaw friends that were with her and they've always said incredible things and they went wrong. She's very very lovely and i'm so thrilled that she came on and she was able to be honest and feel that she could share washy does share with us so without further ado let's get down to it. This is episode ninety five at the two podcast with the wonderful jill happening opening. I'll see you at the end of your even save. I've got more bad than face. He's terrified about gonna self. What do you have to get achieved off after this job. No do i still down to jobs that require clean-shaven. She was so attached to it and it's well. Is it about it that you love though like the the camouflage yeah a like kind of looking exactly like myself have low self esteem masseuse. Oh you've got some mortar yeah no. I've read a report on the radio about sugary drinks including fruit juice today cancer more than certain amount of sugary drinks anyone including fruit juices cancer. Everything's everything's gins. Concentrated is getting we'll. We'll stop moaning. It's fine. I was thinking your i think ungrateful after telling me if i'm wrong about this the only the third person enact says the i've spoken to who started out when there were quite young. I thought it'd be more than that and then it was only when i i mean i knew that cab bishop 'cause the mopeds and institutions. I don't care about them and i didn't know much about jemima. Rupert pitching jemima robot realized that once we start digging around then then obviously mobbing big memory of you is a certain show that i say to people people listen to this won't even remember. Some of the young vote remember now for an institution was background. The bay is just kind of weird. The we'd nothing had been made. They're certainly not like kids stuff for years and then for some reason as nerva andrea one for decided that they needed to be a program of a new castle and there i mean honestly it was like you can watch him as a kid being on a show like that as well and because there's not it's not exactly known as industry town so you're on this show. You think it's like yeah absolutely buzzing but then you're walking through threes you fucking bitch. They were supposed to be lately the club honestly it really really was i mean it was really happy years but like say it actually like caused quite a lot of negative attention that i found actually to be honest with you quite difficult to deal with secure an hour when i started and seventeen when i left oh oh my god a lot of growing up as a as old up loop on tally it was it was it was really difficult. Was i my body. Literally he was changed and i was literally becoming a woman and in that just in itself is quite difficult. Let alone being on the teddy and having everybody watching common on you so it was hard mom yeah but it was. I wouldn't change it for like a minute but it was. The attention was difficult because it's twenty. I think about this a lot. I don't know if you think about like if you choose to be an actor. The has to be a part of you that wants to be seen wherever part of you that as we have chosen a career where we are looked at yeah and also for yourself out to be judged completely right so there's there's gonna be a populist. That's up for that and yet you know especially as a kid i. I just don't know whether you realize quite what that will feel like like. I remember i was about maybe three years into it. Maybe two years and i was. I was on the bus komo home from a school disco and they were always quite tricky kind of things for me to do because i wanted to do normal kid things but obviously i turn up at the school. Disco is gonna be a lot of pointing whispering and actually it's not the school disco. It was just like a a local tastes calm so it was like people from different schools and i remember getting on the bus home afterwards and and you know it just started like people a champion on the bus and people start throwing stuff at me and just like the paper and stuff like that and i just remember getting off the bus now is really humiliated gated and i remember going home and just cry my eyes and said we. I made a stupid and i just did what to do and she's like you. Don't have to be in if you don't. I want to be an age. It was a really good thing to say because actually my reaction was not do one a pianist. Don't i'm not having not taken away from so actually it just made me. It realized really really early on look there. Are there are things that you have to accept will happen. If you choose this kind of job and do the positives ah the negatives and for me like the always did but i think it's important to say that the negatives are always on the go in some respects the guy even the me but thank thank god. Thank god that there's an insane visit you get recognized in this dot thrown based paper sociopath. Kids kids are kids whatever they don't know how to the deal with their emotions and you know they're a bit jealous and what probably what kids really want to do is come up d._n._c. I'll watch it like that. Looks really cool to do it. It instead the c. footing better meals on something that you i wanted to do so. It wasn't something that you were pushed into now. I was already doing it. I always like damn doing theater stuff before that's our star. It may be a roundabout a ten or eleven. I was doing some like m. Shows in the theater and <hes> i just loved it i really did i just loved it i was i always felt like a sort of a of an underdog. You know like i would go up. I would audition for a lot stuff and like my mates would get it right. 'em down to the last eighteen o four or five inches for like i just didn't go your way or you know. That's not told to there so you to start really early. You're just wrong basically and nam <hes> for some reason can't come back like a dog with a boom pick me. Do you think it was easier dating with rejection than it is when you start to become an adult now. I don't think it was used to really used to really like got to to me is to really hurt me but what it made me do is. I learned from like a really young age like my best friend we both i went up for a role in his show and she got it and i didn't and it came to the west end. Avenue is quite as really quite a big deal but actually you know. I came down to say a state of that for a couple weeks. I saw you know i really champion. So as much as i was m._b._a. That she was doing i was like but she's my main. She's doing well and i'm pleased for a so from a really young age. I learned that you know it's just not always going to be your turn but it's always vialed super supportive t._m._a. By and you will need support exact well. That's the thing goes both ways down in the dome teeny someone that's going pay openly tell you try talking before and you were saying oh wants to go to the other tonight and i saw my mate and that's what was going to do and she was brilliant is great to tell them yeah but what you do when you go and see a mate and it's not very good nowadays i tell them you didn't amazing job well done because i've come to really believe that there is no the reason to go and see someone in his show and and tell them after the just walked off the stage after just given how many months of their life to something that you didn't like it or you thought it was a crop production say who cares right there. Hey your may and what you say is if at least if at least then you can say as well done just say well done and but you know especially when i leave drama school. This is kind of tendency that everyone's like a real critic and everybody knows when you're like twenty one initial people come and say you didn't like this. We'll call you don't know anything af to learn and i'm just so like aware as does like you brought up a forward just judged on every level so i'm not i don't no one church my mates and the thing is i'm not it's not about being false because actually older of golf the more i i actually believe just well done for getting up there and doing it because actually it's quite terrifying more terrifying again get to horrifying on stage for quite a while and then i did like a few years ago and i was yeah it was fine for failing was really really scary but i got through it. Regardless if you've been very good but i'll go through it. That's the thing thanks chris mortars and yeah no. I've been on like stage uh-huh last on stage when we now last year. I just remember the night thinking. I'd like run away. Run away and never come back. I think everybody has some points the really honest with themselves it's proper. The fight or flight isn't a more of these days. I wanna find wanted to stephen fry and just like eh quite. Do it probably leaving no telling someone where i'd actually go up on asclepius all right but it's fine. It's a lovely hot sunny day and we're in the middle of soa square in london so i'll try off. Jill tell me about growing it was he. You got mr. i've got two sisters and grew up in on a council estate in gateshead which is side newcastle so from your custom up just literally just over the river mile or very close am and yeah had a very kind well. I was going to say at a very normal childhood but it didn't actually my dad died when i was four so you know it was <hes> we're in the late seventies. We're in the northeast. My mom is left with a four seven and a ten year old and <hes> and i think this all of the the the the idea was let's just let's just get on with things and you know what i personally. Let's get on with things when someone trauma hats. Oh i don't know what she was lake before. Obviously i arrived and i only had four years with our before. This happened so whether that incident meter become like that or whether she was already like that. I don't know but i'm supposed to. It's quite hazy feel around that time anyway. I mean i remember being told he was dead. Icon remember being told he wasn't coming home. All i know is that when you're that age you you world revolves around you because that's what kids. Are you know compatibly narcissistic birth. I must have just thought i did something wrong. I must have i just thought right. I've i've done something wrong and that's why must be my fault. I think essentially that's what kids bring goes to and i'm not sure with a and this is no one's fault all allow you know my family are gorgeous and lover. I don't know whether anybody ever said to me. It's not your fault. This might have said to me. It was an accident basically basically was playing football. He went to play sunday league football and he just had a heart attack on the pitch and died instantly home. It was literally a case of somebody leaves the house and i just don't just don't come back and it's it's a brutal brutal felim and i'll get very annoyed when i hear people in general talk about <hes> <hes> kids being resilient is if is if is if that's an excuse to not engage with them about some difficult things that parents are going through people go through breakup all debts and all that just resilient. It's like well. They have to buy like we're all survivors. Do talk to them. Talk to them answer their questions and if they're not asking questions that's a problem see. I think we should talk about some things you know. Open the door for him so they've got can ask those questions because i remember when i spoke to my little boy about something that was pretty heavy and he could see him really compute old then over the few weeks. There was anger would come out all right well. Let's talk about this and then we will discuss that and then and then he was upset so there was going through all those emotions but that's really healthy and that's what i and that's what i didn't get in bless my my mom because you know she didn't really know didn't really know much about therapy in those days or how to so she just wasn't experienced was plunged into a world. She didn't know about so breath. I think i made like of come to realize from my years of therapy that i think i made like an unconscious packed with my mom when i was about four which was to say you are sad so i will be happy. Writing esau spent a lot of my childhood. They innovate yeah you know jumping around in car wheels and generally really just kind of a moscow definitely and then i would go into my bedroom on my own and i would just honestly like just fling myself around the room crying a. and stuff but i would sort of do in the guys in my head of like i was in performance in some grand opera or something. I now realize that i was literally. Just grieving is as a full of grief and everybody's different. Everybody's different and everybody does it differently book so i i think i think it just lead to sort of feelings of love like very very low self worth and i sort of felt a lot like an outsider when i was a kid and a maybe attracted to the industry because was for like a belong a little bit more and you could escape. I could've skipped certainly could escape <hes>. I was very happy to be someone else very happy and in in my adult life of hot to like have a really good think about that about my still happy to be someone else. Is that still okay with me like am. I all right to do that and do ask those questions at all yeah a lot <hes> specific times. We'll just think i'm just like constantly explorer on like the wise of some bang and why i'm doing something what i'm actually getting from it because i sort of realized that i'm attached to outcomes a law. We even know i'll be doing job and i love the process and i will love the people i'm working with an. I'll say to all my major. I such a time as brilliant ultimately currently what are really one is a positive outcome which means people to say that they think it was really good and then to get another job permits like you know that's like. I think that's a bit of a road to unhappiness. You know that's a that's a dangerous trials positively in an industry which is pretty negative negative all the time. Now ultimately has to come back to me and it's like what is it that's in me. That's still wants somebody to tell me what i am. Why can i not tell myself cell phone i am. Why can i tell myself that i'm not enough. Nobody see. It's not like every day but i will. I will i do struggle with that and not again like like. Maybe there's a notion that people who are sort of like mainly successful as does kind of walk round. Just feel really good about themselves. It's take on this. I wonder whether the world outside of the industry thinks we do though i don't believe we do because we're all human beings. I don't believe anybody walks yeah. I'm just feeling really good about themselves all the time if somebody says the do i think the lion they are. I think what they're presenting isn't what's going on internally maybe they they are really unhappy but they wouldn't let any lennon anybody say that now because i think that we made like my unhappiness on my melancholy for me it that that part of me feels unlovable bats why i've struggled to show it because i think well if you've got if you've got low self worth and you have to present the best of yourself all the time because come on you gotta work twice as hard to be loved talking infected like deep soul tells the point join. The point is so really show you who i am. I'm why i'm jeez. You'll run a mile being like a lot of stuff for me to work out all of the he is about who i am and what i'm presented an whether that's ridi authentic or not think it's authentic but i think it's quite brave to be honest honest yeah. Because what else can you be. I just to me like i've always when i grow up. I always really struggle with small talk. I i still struggle talk. I find it really really difficult honestly like if i go to a party and in our company even told you the day yeah probably very very busy busy revisit but like i will come home. I know about you but i will be exhausted. Properly wiped out and i thought about this law and i've spoken to my therapist and stuff but it's like it's because i'm acton a mocked him the whole time in it's uncomfortable and the may like sitting here with you now and just talking base ace. This is like quite relaxing for me because it's true and it's real but i cannot do small talk. I find it on bearable like this. Obviously you into an audition. How did you get here. You know what is your name colin and i'm thinking please get to the place out but that thing about which is kind of ironic considering like i do this now but meeting new people i find really odd because the thing is i'm meeting new people on this all the time but light is complete the other end of the spectrum too small talk. We're just getting down to it which i find fascinating because then i know who that person is but it's a surface cia. He's only difficult and i'm really yeah. I would be ready nervous that i'm going to. I'm not going to be me. I'm going to say something that upset you or fangio or i'll say something stupid then. I'll go home and get cot nine tells our guinness twenty lashes on a career in india. I ended up feeling like right bolic's into who was i. It was that's why he was saying those things that you think those things but then as i've got older really found like my people like like who i just can say hello and then the next sentence of says got. I'm sure they feel really lonely today and i found my people who can do that that way and not to. I'm comfy a nor have to build myself up a bit if i'm not going to be with people like that because yeah it's hard. That's the main thing if you fine nine those people you stay with the ones that the ones that are going to really go our way because they're really asking. You're not going i so anyway away was doing the just surf just go sky over and he just got time for that because you don't really ask anita that's when people when people say to me. How all you like. I will always have that moment where i'll go. What kind of person is they've then. I'll decide what my answer is. Invested the everything's fine whatever kind this horrible but did you have to use your older sisters. You know when you were younger about that set that certain time feet up past two you know weirdly. We talk about it a lot now. You've really talked about it a lot but no i don't think we did. I think maybe this is very very typical. I don't know but it felt very much like it was put in a box and it was put away and my mom married <hes> within two years. She was remarried to my dad's brother. So my uncle bovine became my dad so again like i was considering your so your law it just was it seemed like at the time my little child brain was like aw that's nice like my my uncle. He loved my dad. Now loves my mom all we we see now when i think about it nope buchan as that's that's interesting. I wonder what was going on in both of their brain so you know my my stepdad that is is is gorgeous and our love him very very much but it isn't the same as having a dad. He looked after us any protected us but i wonder a lot about how much they navigated their relationship with slightly shrouded and shame. Perhaps i'm not sure you ever. I can't imagine you would you would be married you know and and not feel a sense of guilt no even though your intentions of very very good and i think that how to read effect on on my i think there was there was a heavy own said but the onside stuff i don't you know certainly a very northern thing for my i'm from. We'll put what those emotions in about soon. We'll deal with them another day because there is there is shame so admitting that maybe in the the northeast as well till you know this guy if you've heard of him called <hes> gobble mati he's like he's a he's a doctor and author and he writes a lot about addiction and about trauma and you know he says that you know no matter what you do with your children it doesn't matter the intention is what matters the intention behind it so i think that when i look back on my childhood like we did a lot of lovely things and my my family very loving and caring but behinds means that was an enormous amount of grief and sorrel leads that wasn't done so that's a huge amount of trauma debbie brought up around and it has it has them it is manifested in different ways through my different sisters and we've all struggled with obviously i i can't speak for them. That will be unfair but it has come well. I then experienced something something which actually have never ever spoken about so bear with me sure some off to sign an untalented new. It's not it's not you know what's funny i i will. I'll tell you why i'm going to talk about it because something happened. A couple of years ago that never ever spoken about and it's weird it feels like part of my life ace is missing. It feels like anyway. Let me just say so tune. In january two thousand seventeen my partner very in very similar circumstances my dad he went to appellate on class to jim and take had heart attack me died so excuse me to my grief brief allusion matt my partner was so brutal and so shocking but what happened open doors it actually brought out all of my grief from from my dad as well so it was like dealing with this like double like loss loss that actually never ever ever dealt with and then just found myself thinking. Oh my god like he's his own bearable. What am i gonna do like. I cannot cannot cope with. These feelings like i just wanted the cessation of feeling to stop. It was too much. It was overbearing and i'm a fairly sort of <hes>. What's that word industrious. I'm quite industrious so i thought to myself. I've i've got like child. I've gotta get through this but what i'm not going to do a made. I promise to myself. I'm not going to put this in a box going to put it away. I'm gonna feel every single feeling that comes my way whether it's brutal and like a volcano mccain or whatever it is and i'm gonna feel it goes for all going to go through all jesus i i need to. I mean so three weird. Take what life gives you in. The universe has planned for your book. Icon aecom possibly say that losing my dad will lose. A map was good and positive in any way but what comes was is by face in it. It has somehow somehow freed me up somehow unlocked something in me webuye and it's not like i'm like a different person now. I'm i'm becoming a ah different person. I'm i'm on my way. Nobody was probably always there by going through at laney sulfate everything you look the other part of you probably think i've read all the pod i started to feel like i need to take like my rightful. Fool place started to be like i can't. I can't keep so feeling less land or apologizing for who i am or or make myself off smaller or diminishing myself anyway. I think i spent so much time so of people pleasing even with directors you know like a director director would ask me to do something and i'm fairly quick like i'll pick things up. Quick and i'll go in. I'll do it and sometimes especially if i'm doing a role where like i'm not the leader or anything yet. That was great. She would just move on instead of saying no. I mean i did it the way you want me to do it but actually let me try something else some the okay of of of policemen a now mike gentleman like you're allowed to just take your moment. Take your time. I watch actors. You know take as much time as they want to do whatever they wanna do why do you why do you struggle to take up. The space ace that is yours comes confidence. Sometimes those what you're saying before self belief and weirdly grieving it has given me meet more confidence because to survive that level of brutality you think the nothing you can throw at me that isn't going to be u._k. Qena a swear to god on bulletproof. I'm that's what i've got one fear now which i don't. I'm not going to say but it's obvious anyway but that's it like anything else. I'm good. I'm good honestly. I know what it's like to like. Literally feel like every minute of every day is torture because that's what it feels like when you're going through grief that you're like. How can it only be five nine. How can i looked at the clock. What seemed like six hours ago and it was nine o'clock. That's take your time just goes so slow and then suddenly to not to and a bit years later you're like hey you know i'm i'm actually doing all right like is this thing i've been reading about cold like m. post traumatic growth and about how anything doesn't have to be bereavement when you go through something really challenging engine and really painful in your life it does if you if you allow yourself to go through it to feel it as they say you will. Thri phrma ma 'cause you've you've seen part of yourself that hadn't been seen you know and cling onto that because sometimes the doctors octaves. I've got so yeah it's been. It's been a rough few years but <hes> feel like. I'm here talking to you. You're stronger yeah kind of ever loss words folks. I don't really know what to go at the moment for them. You don't have to be sorry. I didn't know why i said that was so english apologizing however we always do that though somebody bomb tend tomato the dine immediately one sorry they went awry and then afterwards on that it wasn't my fault survey but it's just not nature reaction and also we revert back into the sewer yeah very sorry yeah. I went through a phase. When i was a kid and again this must have been like as a result of <hes> of trauma like not being actually john brennan brown she has she has a brilliant am phrase and she said if trauma is not transformed it will be transmitted so wherever you don't deal with you will transmit to your children your friends your your partner. Whoever ebba so deal with your share 'cause you will give it to someone else. It down says brilliant thing as well where like you often like meet and connect with people who along the same level of trauma as you you don't know it and it can manifest itself in many different ways but you sort of feel that unconsciously you'll feel <hes> and you will connect with the new thing. This feels really familiar person. I'm really drawn to them and it's usually because they saw software and on the same level as you but it's an unspoken park yeah well again talk about finding people. Sometimes you connect through that and do you ever get based. Do you ever get like massively triggered by someone. You hardly even know them. You meet them like gothi. Annoy me in waimea up so much. It's like i've realized that every single person that i've ever met in my life was like that when i've looked into it or when i found out a little bit more about them they have experienced something similar to me but they're dealing with it in a different way. I'm somehow somehow they've got something that i want basically interesting and i'm like god in jail. It's gotta be you. The person hasn't done anything to have a think about shit. I've met low to those very same before you're saying about still from you. Dad's passing all passengers didn't really learn from any. I think you already really did learn something from from that moment with your dad passing about how everybody else dealt with it now unfortunately when the the best life not away you're dating with the something so honest an assay braven don't mean nothing. That's really really brave that stuff pair aloe. We're all i'm john coffee walter sir. Oh that's fine suspend <hes> sort of a a man peripheral and when i was looking in jails is no no outsiders this does that turn around the of nail mascow news now. Go and get yourself a coffee over the super while i was gonna ask you was right like without point you've just made. Do you think that life is predestined. Do you like spitzer. Corinthians <unk> example. You said so i learned from my dad died in the way people dealt with how to deal with diane. Do you think i had to to learn that lesson with dad because my life was going to give me something else and i was like. Do you think it's all mapped out. Things and i think we always have the power to change aw that book. I'm reading reading. This book called the courage to be disliked about it quite like the coach so it's it's some it's first time it's been translated from japanese and when he got freddie japanese slot philosophies philosophies. Everybody has the power to to change what who they are packages. I totally holy. Believe people can change you. Yes entrepreneur i in fact i know it's like i i. I absolutely that's another thing that's sort of slightly depresses me when people say well. It's just who i am. I fixing fail really sad for you. You're saying that 'cause that's like goren oren. Well just gonna make do davis will now. Don't you don't have to make but also it's sometimes it's sad because it's like people are resigning resigned themselves to something back then happy with sometimes i get angry because they're lame excuse in their bad behavior just to i am but it's like no no like let's look at why we do and think the way we do. I'm like obsessed with like people's intentions and the human and condition obsolete the obsessed with a life. I'm like literally a psychotherapist. You should do i to tell you this about which we is in in this scenario. You know yourself the amount of people that just opened up <hes> when we're talking but i think he's really healthy now. Just about those people that go. I'll just who i am an- go no because i see so much more near the so much more potential and you behaving like they're all resign yourself to who you are allowed us so much of this but i think it takes bravery or certainly honesty did takes all of those things. It's it's. It's very courageous to look inside yourself into say hands up. That was me you know. I will always look at a situation. I mean i've like messed up so many times in my life and i've don't things i'm not proud of but there are others but there's other things where i absolutely think it's the other person's now no absolutely not not. I didn't do anything wrong then. I just have to go after go home when after sit down and have a really good thing about it and be like right more often than not is to to people in this situation you power jill so like a find it sometimes getting much better at it now but when i was younger especially especially on set which sometimes find hard to express myself i'll give my opinion again going back to like the low self worth it would be a data speakeasy fast or i couldn't find the words to see what i wanted to say and i just then i would get quite aggressive quite quickly and then i would and it would just be in that order go into the trailer and so we really for like assad that just set my opinion whereas now i'm much more luck. You've got an opinion and it deserves to listen to your sometimes. It's sometimes it's how you say it as well. It's always made in the past. You know done things up sixty out of an and i was thinking about something today. When i was talking to somebody else going on. I thought about it for many years. Go would change what i did know. What a change how i went about doing it hundred percent yeah yeah yeah but what was style wasn't wasn't who i am now so i wasn't <hes>. I probably didn't know exactly who i was certainly musk's mature as i am now so i i would have dealt with it differently but even a week ago i did something i wasn't proud of confessional this it even relatives. I was particularly awful diet. Yeah and i was at work. I thought i've just got to knuckle down and and just to get through this day and then everything will be fine and tomorrow's new down. We'll deal with that in homes with my head was kind of when you all over the washing machine a washing washing machine add mustard is historical and i just want a date to focus and it was drained right and and i was getting something wrong work on getting something wrong and i couldn't get it right and the scripts had a cap coming up to me and go yeah i i. I didn't even know the fella and after about four times. This is my fault remember and i just went. Can you can you you. Just stop telling me every time i'm doing it wrong because so i was just projected onto him. My folks and i sat back down on. What did you do that for and i got straight by. Coping overton won. I i'm so sorry i apologize. I'm semi pose is not not may and ends up. He said that's really good of you to say that. It's no problem thanks so much. Apologizing fine sawed out overstay told me about two days to get over close sobel fight with myself but you know for me like the power of an apology like what you've just described. If you really mean if you look into someone is and you mean you say. I am sorry for what i've just said or done. I really and truly sorry then and a human beings like we have to give each other that and that's something that i've i've learned like in the past six years. It's like just apologize to remember the big. The big person to apologize also takes a big person to accept that apology and i think if you originally sincerely apologize and then you shouldn't need the other person to accept as well because what you're part of that exchange is i am sorry it's not knock it's not supposed to be rectified because the other person says no worries me and thank you for if you've said you'll par up to the person how they want to take it but if you've looked into someone's is is and just said i'm really sorry then. I think for the most part that is to me. That's a really healing thing to do and i've gone back into my life into pass. Do things and made contact with people and said. Can i speak to you talk to you and i just said i just i'm really sorry for how that was handled or what i said. I am and i think i think it can only be a good thing. It can only be a good thing and i completely agree with your weather. That is reciprocated. 'cause i think trying to think of a situation but i know there is something accomplished a finger on it where i have apologize and it wasn't accepted but it was fine. It was because there was a lot of past not ready not ready and that's fine but i think i remember betrayed wallace because i've done my part of an i'm kind of pace without law literally donnie an apology. Is something about the past ask today today. There's a strong possibility complaining about the refreshing. Okay ready for okay yeah i do. I think i think i am you know. The woman who wrote china monologues eve ensler. She's got new luke. Don't talk about it. I big raid in the moment and for some the reason i've never done this before. I've always gone rodney to focus on this book unless mccown late and i'll get to the end of that and then i can start at the moment i'm so oh spinning three plates and i can never do i used to think like that but i now have about three or four and the goal is different mood fly not completely different books yeah so it's not one of them. No i was in stone in an are listened to a very very heavy interview with a view listen to what i watched and being interviewed live and is lincoln town hall but just anyone that's listening. I'm just would just because it's an apology alleged that she writes from her dad to her who sexually abused there but again like she talks about the power of an apology even if it's not common and from the person that it needs to come from the fact that she she said she sat down and she wrote that book and at the end she literally felt like something had left her wow all time the old time and she said something we'd be beautiful and i'm not gonna call too right but it was something like if you are prepared to walk through the portal of grief you will be amazed at what was on the other side and it's like if you just prepared to go this uncomfortable disgusting horrible feelings that i'm having if if i'm prepared to sit with them or walk through it like there's a there's a world on the other side that you could never know existed and it's just a wall just frightened ayton don where nobody wants to be in discomfort but she has like she said it is freed up so much not just thought that was fascinating the an apology written by. I herbert all the things that she needed him to say he said yes. It was through her pen. She felt like she said she felt like it was almost tame right in that channel him or yeah for amazing foot on stephanos just be in the right minds don't book stock and so a spin spin plays with him after i do it in a bag yeah <hes> from even go l. Feel free yeah. Do i feel free. I feel you like i feel like say like a few years ago. I was doing this interview with you like that might be part of me like worried that he didn't like me or what we're going to have to say or is that interested enough in now in the really nicest possible way. It's like massana. Just i just i'm who i am and like except except if if you don't like me i will have to accept that of course it would be nice if you did but if you didn't. It's the walker way in access. They're all you did was sit down on a bench and talk to someone what is the big deal about the art with me and but if you'll notice fine walking blocking that it ruined my day as an actor like it so challenging when because i believe that everyone pretty much feels like that about themselves at some point at least yeah but as an act day after i have pretty big ball sometimes when you walk in on a set with lots of people who you might be slightly intimidated by more you might be on a timeframe for something so you really have to like those those voices in my head i've i'm really good at shooting them up when when the need to be immune to be quieted goods go but then i'll go home milk. Oh marie laugh like well. You should do exactly yeah yeah and i wonder whether like that was part of my attraction to the job in the first place which was a need to do something that cannot allow those voices wasabi price then i need to do something that takes all my focus but takes every bit of concentration in my brain so those voices on nowhere to be seen or heard and you know when you're on stage when you're doing something you know for the first few times you're in that zone on regardless of whether you think what you're doing is great or not. You're in his zone. You're just like i can only concentrate on this thing that i'm doing right now. If my brain goes to anything else i am doing that the voice i think it's just a constant work in progress that one but i think if you if you do commit work that go with that discovery results think so you know what the timeframe is still. I don't know whether the is one at a really a thing if you if you go on a journey of of of personal discovery wherever however you want to phrase it you know it. It never stops. There's no end to you do in it until the day you die has debated hey. This is never going to be a point where you go. I know exactly who i am now. Because tomorrow the next moment will present you with a new bit of information or a new incidental circumstance in your life and you'll go whoa who didn't react like that we can have a really no. It's part of the the sort of joy for me is the is the search and seeing how i react to each thing that comes along sometimes unlikely be choked with myself and i'm really proud and then other times i'm right wall the whole discipline back at least you're honest with and most of the time these days sermon will come out like leaky anger like you know on like a books on you like you trying to get through like the chew gum barriers is and it's not working and it's because i'm trying to use my phone and then someone behind him he's like why don't you just use it credit card and i'm like why don't you and it's like whoa wool like that was not for that person that was not meant for them but it's exactly the same weapons mate what the frame now it's only my ad in the pool and you feel terrible and all those moments and i think especially a city like london. There is so much leaky owns everyone everyone wouldn't it be great. If we all just sort of like sat down with each other some just went. You know all this is a this is a good example right is to go out with this guy my niece to ride a motorbike and i don't you write a motorbike or did i actually have a license for a minute but anyway when annual rate in a motorbike there are lots of other people more bikes that are a bit like testosterone dope and like trying cut you up an awful lot so he's a bike and this guy like just cut some really eighty dangerously actually gets a fright but they stop right at the traffic lights and these guys like this wow so this this goes when he says he just flips his helmet uh-huh and he turns to this guy and the guy looks at him right buddy for a fine an- and my ex boyfriends has to you came eight and the guy goes walk and he says are you okay in the guy goes no. I'm not an thank you for asking. I'm really not and it was such a a good example of like of course he's not okay. He's just ninety killed someone. He doesn't know you didn't wanna try and killing of beat strange disarmed and budgets disarmed so that's the thing that we will ask like talking about just before when when you say to someone how you doing but you've really already for the answer because it might be a one hour unser like be ready for it. If you ask it like don't ask if you don't mail ask if you don't mean it but there was something that just disarmed him and just oh. I wonder how many people walk through life never the really being asked like or never really knowing how to say it like well lookie in our industry where will always find people to sit down with another really good a crash on the lowest be someone to open up all that you really want to talk to or the fail that you can let bill gates open and go often. You'll learn how to deal with and i'm not asking for an outcome. I just kind of this nato. Child just need someone like to be listened to and then i also love the fact that you can then you know like the type of people that i al- always attracted to the people who you can have really deep conversations with like that and then you can just talk about just some something stupid and just have a laugh and you can go from one. It doesn't mean like oh we're having a really deep. Conversation will have joel gora laugh. It just feels like take you know somebody wants. Describe like emotions to me like an artist's pallet right yeah in this said that most of the time families will only live within certain britain kolesov appellate make complete sense right but it's like i wanna live in all of zones of the palate like i wanna be able to be angry inside aside and happy and joyous. I want to be able to be all of those things with people and it's like learning that the whole of yourself is acceptable volt like as loveable that you don't have to hide sit and call us from people. I just like the l. l. of visual kind of examples of things. Do you like visual things things i do but i'm aware i i am kind of. That's how that's kind of. What computers with me that's kind of what i i understand now iraq and learn from that bomb considering it from other people but what would you say if you if if you if someone said to what colors did your family so of thin totally mom dad listen to this this all right repress. Everything would stay in that yeah. Yeah i'm with you. I'll kind of you wanna be all the in the love and the from being judged for it then that's fine but as long as i i know it's coming hopefully from in the right place but are we all like when we're born. We're all everything absolute gets knocked out if you're not tomase like it found that really sad but you see all the time i get sad sometimes if i say from restaurants understate and bama south quite quite likes to do quite a lot of a fast either. Serena put my foot down looking a lot. We're constantly looking at people looking kind of people now when figuring out what that relationship is and then i just say something on this guy. That's made me really sad because i know that there's something there whatever story that is a now create a i'm saying something that's helped me created so something must be true in that. Are you one of those people again. This is a bit of a party thing the i'm like massively sensitive to people's energy how walk into a room our like nor the person who's angry the person who's really saad without even talking to them. Thank you really uncomfortable. Because what i wanna do is save. Give them some a bit of a codependence. I wanna be like it'll be all right. Don't worry but it's none of my business strange or just just a general and i i think it was like obviously growing up and having a lot of feeling suppressed in my house probably meant that i was supersensitive outside of that and i was picking up on a lot of things because i saw of needed to a needed to connect somehow but now sometimes it's like god. I wish you could just switch off and just be really unsensitive tiv- insensitive know desensitize. Just do what i do and just turn inhales. Remove yourself from the situation. Just don't go the bug boy from from the party but would you find that. Are you. The person that if if there's a if there's a problem going on somewhere like let's say if it was on set to people were like really not get an on on would you be the person to try and so it out <hes> i used to bay and it probably sometimes would use to get me into trouble because i would yeah yeah. I will be in there and fight for any of justices but i would only do that now. If it directly affected me or my work or otherwise it's n- it's none of my business really so well is behind you fighting for other people's injustice what what part of you feels like you've not. It's not been justified. Oh you know what if we start this why. I don't do the podcast beer for about four hours if i don't do it but thank you for that question and i'll tell you think thank you thank you very much. Thank schools <music>. Another episode is done. I really really i really wanna thank jail. <hes> for coming on and being able to share a story and pain and thank you for listening. I don't know if that was an easy lesson. I'm sure it wasn't i certainly wasn't an easy conversation for us to have by thinking something that needed to be spoken about because the end of the day i think we all need to talk more and jill show me did so massive massive massive. Thank you to jail and <hes> yeah again. I hope your ears tuned in after a while griff. The perfectionist is wasn't particularly happy with all the construction that was going on around us but as you heard it would have i've been wrong to obstetrics and move location jared date conversation right so the next week. There's no episode next week why craig wha what was going on. I'll tell you why it says the end of the some holidays and i'm finally free to take my little boy away so that's what we are off to greece for a week so <hes> keeps busy style trouble and we'll say even awakes. Thank you so much for joining us until then. I'd been craig parkinson. He's been produced a graph and this has been the to show podcast. Take care of yourself right to shop. Podcast is presented by me. Craig parkinson recorded and produced by thomas griffin for splicing blocks on music. Music is courtesy often. That'd that goes his <music>.

london craig parkinson partner joe jemima football josiah bain stephen fry gateshead aecom esau director Rupert roy moore ryan Dad Jill john brennan brown
Small Seal, Big Deal

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Small Seal, Big Deal

"Biblical archaeology can be about famous stories in the popular characters of scripture. Sometimes, however, it's just those little discoveries that remind us this grand story is true. For the Colson center, I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point no-one names. Their son Jehovah has it's too tough to pronounce on the other hand most of us Noah, Joe cya, or to not only is it a much more pronounced name. But as we read and second kings chapter twenty two Joe cya was eight years old when he became king. He reigned in Jerusalem thirty one years he did what was right in the eyes of the Lord and followed completely the ways of his father, David not turning aside to the writer to the left seeking Joe cya stands out among Judas final monarchs. Not only did he refuse to take part in idol worship. He tore down high places and the Ashra polls, and he reinstated the worship and feast of the true God, according to the bible, Joe cya did all this. Because of a discovery in the temple of scroll of the law, which had long been the elected and forgotten. He wept over Judas disobedience, he recommitted his kingdom and people to the covenant recorded in that scroll as a result. God promise that the judgment. He would eventually sent would not occur during Joseph his lifetime will a much more. Recent discovery brought this particular section of second kings to light even more the times of Israel recently described two very tiny objects unearthed at a dig in the city of David an agate stone and a lump of burnt clay. Both with Hebrew inscriptions. The names of two individuals it Carson of mutton yahu and Nathan Melik servant of the king. Now, whoever can tell me, which of those two names appears in scripture deserves this week's bible trivia ward. These were seals you see the kind once pressed into wax or dipped in ink to sign letters. According to you have to Shalev of the Israeli antiquities authority. Where those seals were found sets the twenty six hundred year year-old cygnets apart for archaeologist. She they were discovered in the remains of what was likely in administrative building that dates back. Back to the eighth century BC, many such artifacts hit the entities market. But no one's really sure often where they come from. These however were found in their true archaeological context the name that astute students of scripture might have recognized by the way, Nathan Malik an official who gets a passing mention and second kings Twenty-three eleven Justice. Joe cya is purging Jerusalem of the trappings of idolatry outside the bible this tiny clay CO is the very first confirmation of this man's existence. And to be clear, it's the obscurity of that name both in recorded history and in scripture that should amazes in biblical archaeology. We often look for the big players Moses, David the apostle Paul, for example, last year's announcement of a ring bearing Pontious pilots name was huge. And rightly so we say his name every time we recite the apostles creed proclaiming that Jesus. Redeeming work happened in real history. Still small names like Nathan Malik serving of the king may offer an even stronger confirmation that the events recorded in the bible, actually happen. The seemingly insignificant. Name from second kings reminds us that king Josiah who rediscovered the law in the temple and cleanse, the nation of idols isn't just a character from a mythical story he actually existed he was a man in history with court officials and administrative headquarters. He was part of the lineage that led to another king that Lyon who sits on the throne of Judah, who's ushering in a kingdom one that unlike ancient Jerusalem will never ever be conquered. Now, of course, we don't believe this big story because someone on earth a piece of clay with obscure name on it. But it is exciting to see how even the smallest details in scripture can hold up under the digging and all the scrutiny come to breakpoint dot org and will link it to more about this incredible story about this very exciting discovery. For breakpoint, I'm John Stonestreet.

Joe cya Jerusalem John Stonestreet Nathan Malik David Josiah Colson center Nathan Melik Judas Israel Judah Noah Shalev Moses writer Lyon Pontious official Paul twenty six hundred year
How to find a financial adviser, general election planning for your finances and the rise of the 40 year mortgage

FT Money Show

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

How to find a financial adviser, general election planning for your finances and the rise of the 40 year mortgage

"Brought to you by capital one where you can open a savings account in about five minutes and earned five times. The national average. Just imagine five times more savings toward that overdue home addition and maybe even in addition on that addition this is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Capital one a member. FDIC how to find a financial adviser a relationship with an adviser you can trust and crucially afford is something that young. FT readers often tell us is hard to come by could the solution to the problem rest in our pockets with less than a month to go until the general election financial advisers Tennessee. They are getting calls from a lot of worry clients we look at. What's troubling the wealthy and crucially what steps they're advisers suggesting them to consider and the rise of if the forty year mortgage pool Lewis? AFC money columnist and presenter of BBC Moneybox is here to share his own worries about extra long loans. Welcome to the money I shea the FTC's weekly podcast about personal finance and investing enclave Barrett FD money at a SIP bringing. This week's money needs would you. I like to talk to a financial adviser. Goodness knows there are enough things to discuss the moment the election stock markets were an all time high devising a long things have investment plan. I could go them but rather than meet face to face. Would you be happy chatting to an adviser new joining me today to discuss Damien fantastic the deputy editor of Eddie Advisor. Welcome Damian Alachua. When you think of a financial advisor most people probably think of a of a middle age man in a suit but the person on the other end of your small fame will be one of those yes so only go to my vast show industry conferences and the audiences can often be Mail fat sometimes style I'm not who is And I think the There's been Longstanding attempting industry to address that I think they have Josiah if a financial advisor was about fifty five. It's new in the mid fifty s and the one of the ways that some companies are looking to address this is through technology through a chat bots and other of bird vice solutions. We'd actually have no human being involved in them at all and and this is actually regulated advice. Because there's no rules the FDA has set out that say advice has to be provided by a human being just has has to her be suitable. You have to get a fact. Find you have to have a suitability assessment and capacity for loss the UH assessment. But there's no actually. There's no rules that say it has to be going to human being say the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence but tell us about your Own Brush with. It's interesting advice or a couple of APPS available when you downloaded on tested out. Yes so it's not actually an avid so website this particular on the a couple of APPs on used my ego. which is the solution offered by Wealth Wizards which is part-owned by the ensure. Lv and it was interesting expense. Actually I sort of got involved with it by accident because I was scoping it out for for An article the hood thirty money over lunch. Just Oh let's have a look at this and see see what it's like and it was so simple all to sign up to it that I actually signed up to it and got going accidentally of my lunch break and it was interesting. Actually it was relatively. It was the literally simple lots of emojis. Either in the definitely yes leedle. leedle is a human well. Evo Is Is a character sort of talks and interacts with you through this Chat Bot function she asks you how you on encourages you to continue. She's still encouraging me to continue. Actually still occasionally email from either telling me why haven't my will And yeah she uses lots of emojis It slightly undercut when suddenly she artsy provides you with all the terms and conditions and all the various. FCA number. But she's ask you a few questions and this is the fact finder elements you ask you a few questions about. Are you married. Do you own your own home. How uh-huh chess you have in savings and then do you have debt? CRTV you have that as well And then she'll provide you with a list of things that you should do. And some of these are restrict forwards for people who might be involved in moines building that personal finances like building a cash buffer paying debt that you might have but some of them are maybe not so obvious the people so there's lighting a will as I mentioned than this finding out who gets your death and service benefits and Various other bits and pieces which I have to admit I wasn't entirely on top of. Yeah well I had another APP called multiply which hasn't been Lewisville. android is on apple and I mean again seems seems very simple to use. I didn't I didn't sign up completely but it basically starts with a long questionnaire about you your goals your financial position. It's quite easy ready to fill it. On in villain via your phone for younger people perhaps would prefer to interact and it was something like that. Rodman going to go and see an advisor in their office could be preferable. These things have taken an awful long time to be developed even in the early stages that are now all right. Yes so these companies take this sort of stuff quite seriously because providing regulated financial. Advice is a big deal If you provide violated financial advice than your clients get the benefits of being covered by the financial ombudsman service by the financial services. Compensation Scheme It's quite a big stamp of approval that the FCA is giving you if you will provider of regulating financial advice and a lot of these companies. Companies have put years into development of the services Certainly multiply the one that you use that you've executive said that was the case. And they've actually employed financial advisers to check that the financial advice that they're giving is up to scratch these financial advisers. I don't actually give financial advice but they just check. The financial advice is suitable. And just going back to to to Lever Lever They do have advance. Who who were there who you can be referred to if if if either herself com work out? What's the right thing to do? Yes and to a certain extent and this goes towards the limits of this technology at this particular moment in time because my decides if there are certain things that it it can't do for you without the intervention of human being then it will direct you towards the financial advisers that either employers And an example all of this is defined benefit transfers for example. We contentious The moment and if you want to do one of those then they will say please this way Sir and you'll talk to humans but realistically the people this product is aimed at they're not going to have a final sound. Region is aimed at young working professionals employed by companies who are looking to maybe boost pension savings a bit and find out more about that stocks stocks and shares. Eissa potentially can recommend range of low cost Tracker phones but in terms of how it's paid for at the moment with my favorite's the employers who are picking up the bill. Yes so the two who is of Paying for my Asia. Either your in the position where your company his decides to pay for it or you can pay it yourself which is through a two pound a month subscription and also other fees involved if you want to do as something more complicated so if you do actually want to speak to a human being then you have to pay for the privilege of doing so and I've gone to trump? I was geeking out. This morning fencing. I printed out some of the some of the menu a menu options. So if you want a a retirement advice report that will cost you. Five hundred pounds That's personalized report recommending for those within six months of Thailand On and there's an ongoing seasons charges for certain other things so for example if you want investment advice you have to pay zero point. Two five percent of the total market value of the Fund's management. It gives people options where they can see easily and transparently What they're paying for multiply? It's a little bit different at saying it's free advice but you yes well. That's is strictly speaking accurate. I suppose because of the actual advice is provided for food. But if you want to them to actually implement the advice then you have to pay so they will advise you to invest but in a Vanguards Stephen and they say would you like us to do this for you. Here's how much cost. And this is a commonly known as contingent charging in the industry And it's relatively popular for certain aspects of Financial advice unless phase if he didn't have very much money money absolutely turned to the to the more common charging structure. I advise and making a annual percentage fee from failure Damian. We've we love having you Royce about these issues for FT money but of course the audience who normally consume your journalism all the financial advisers themselves. What do they it make of either and Co they threatened by her Ping emojis? I don't necessarily think many of them are because a a lot of them. I think that as you said earlier this is aimed. People who find the law Jr have very simple needs the same people who are not saving anything at the moment or saving entirely in cash and they could probably benefit for me the setting up an ISO- or maybe putting some of their savings to work in the market in some sort of low-cost Traffic and these are people. Starting from absolutely Taylor was a financial advisor would see that role as being more involved in people who have more money to to to play around with. In fact I I would imagine that most financial advisers will not be remotely interested in serving the clients that naive and multiply interested in. Because it's just not canonical for them to do so financial vices much more interested in people who have got Slightly complicated tax issues. People who might might be worried about passing on that launch amount of assets to their children people who have got you know a lot more money to play with well. Thanks very much. That's Damian fantasy deputy editor of the FT specialist publication financial adviser. You can wreaked Damian's big feature pushing the AI into financial advice online now dot com slash money and as part of this feature. We've also published empty advises this annual list of the top one hundred human financial advisers which is worth consulting if you're ready to upgrade from Chat Bot to a more expensive old-fashioned form of of the service what my next guest is a financial adviser and he isn't a chat board or could even as part of F. T. money special issue on financial advice we wanted to find out what kind of conversations the wealthy clients are having with their advisers. Right now. A my word. There's a lot of chatting going on Alliston. Alliston is the CO founder of Lay's and Co wealth adviser based in the city of London conveniently stains rate from the office and he has come in. Join me in the studio. Welcome Alastair Analyst. Thanks for having me say I should say. We've talked a lot about advisors being men in suits. But you're wearing a very fetching jumper have say Damian and we were just speaking to wearing a Cardigan I mean. Is this the new era I think. So yeah it's it's more comfortable than the traditional seat Plus they're expensive but we would expect the national vises Vance off of the cost but thank you for breaking away from your busy phone lines coming through to us today but more to your clients wanting to talk to you about and your colleagues and the Mavens to be honest with you is more of the same that you'd probably will have guest. is brexit. It's the election And I think actually if you take a bit of a step back of of why people are still talking about that is. It's PABST over. The last few years has been a bit of a gradual gradual buildup of anticipation that people are waiting for a market crash or correction. And this has been lots of false peaks on that Jenny certainly with Brexit. Lots of deadlines and in which case each one of those peaks people have expected. Is this time for some clarity or it's time for market crash And at the moment there's another sort of deadline mockery the sandwich with the election in December. And I think people are just looking looking at that and saying is that the moment we will get some clarity or is that the moment web I will and pull off a cliff and there'll be a big market correction so we're having to answer a lot of questions like at the moment the unfortunately we on the wiser. We're in the same boat as everybody else who is difficult to give any clear. Answers for clients now at the time of recording of her. 'cause none none of the major parties have released four manifestos but they have all outlined very ambitious spending plans. The People Fair could spell tax rises in the near future now in advance of any policies being released. What kind of things your clients fearing could change? Yeah I think people instantly worried about an extreme Labor government and completely sort of ripping up the rules with income-tax with any pension legislation things things that are typically attacked when it comes to looking for public spending because it's no surprise that whereas no secret that the NHS The police force these these of public services need a boost in that money is going to come from somewhere. I think people are somewhat off. Lines are somewhat shell-shocked in many respects by the amount of attack on that pensions and surrounding pension legislation has been under the conservative gum. Yeah Yeah I think that's left them with a bit of a bit of an opinion. Anything goes from any government when it comes to their own personal savings so I think more so than ever. We're noticing people just feel vulnerable about their existing savings and what could happen to them in the future. And what kind of actions do your clients perhaps wants to take. And what are you trying to advise him. Entity meaning extreme sense people might be thinking well put money offshore in less extreme since they might be thinking in case only changes to inheritance tax rules. I should give give money away if I'm intending to sooner or later yeah exactly. It's it's our job to in that respect to try and really give a bit of perspective to everything So instead of worrying about things that are outside of their control where we try and turn clients had store things that they can control so now more than ever is a a really good sign if you've got a financial planner whether it be an adviser or with yourself to really go back and revisit. What your exposures? Also things that you're at issue to risk Your asset allocation the objectives of the financial plan and sometimes simple exercise Looking at revisiting the assumptions that your plan has been inbuilt on can be enough to give a bit of peace of mind in a short term volatility area so I think people Bouli speaking since about two thousand thousand and twelve should if they've got money invested has seen some fairly healthy returns so for instance if they revisit this options of a plan and they may be built on on full percentage growth. And that will that plan will see them through to their retirement goals and actually they looked back since two thousand and twelve. It's not beyond the realms of possibility they might may have been now fishing seven percents growth In which case the plans got some inbuilt pragmatism around it. What my times like this? When there's volatility when returns might be harder to come by? They're already ahead of the curve in some respects because of the previous performance now a separate investor survey from UBS best this week revealed that many wealthy investors upping the cash levels Even though most of the people eight hundred averaged of coulter if that put failure alien cash is this kind of a cash. Grab something that your clients are hitching. We we always tried to stress of the investment within a financial plan as a means to an end rather than the bill that end So we're long-term plan as as opposed to short term traders looking at opportunities We generally. I'm really advice to not make any short-term alterations to your financial plan in terms of converting your funds into cash because then you enter the realm of trying to time the market comes to reinvestment which is notoriously hard to For those thinking about adding to their saving pulse for instance maybe this year is allowance. The you've got the grace period of of having a until April the six to be able to make your your contribution And that will buy a bit of time. But also the specific techniques e can use when investing from cash into the market so something like phased investments is quite a good strategy at the moment whereby you feed did you set investment over the course of anywhere from six to twelve months typically to gain a little bit of pound cost averaging so you're you're less reliance on what might happen in the news tomorrow now as well as defensive actions taken to protect wealth many TV goes eager to trade on the uncertainty Sterling is one way or colleagues on the LEX team verson about the Boris Johnson trade which is buying unloved UK stocks in the hope of Tory majority Brexit deal which would cause markets to bounce allegedly addict Corbin trade where you would short shares in the large eternity. Companies that Labor's indicated it would nationalize or going long on footsie companies. That don't have much business in the UK because they could potentially go off enlist on a foreign exchange Labour's plans to give away ten percent of shack ups oil to to to work as come come into force me. And this is all pretty speculative stuff but nevertheless people are interested in having pumps. Yeah absolutely I think like I said. Our general approach to the of investment is long-term planning as a means to an end. But that's not to say that people they liked the idea of some short term gains short-term trading I guess the advice advice from us. If a client came to an asked about a specific short-term trade would be to ring-fence and amounts of money that would be happy to lease two percents of remortgage your house in order to fund it and once you've decided on the correct amount go ahead and place you trades and and keep an eye on how it pans out. We'll finally you've been here listening to our last about advice. Boy a Chat Bot do you. Fear Alastair being replaced by an emoji caught. Oh my Alastair in future. I think we've all got to looking over our shoulders in some respects because I think there is a lot of power within those technology tools I think in our industry as far as I can see at the moment. I think they'll was always big going to be a need for some form of human advice just because of the amount Nov you've complication The amount of inferences and judgements that sometimes a human advisor can make when looking at a case I as opposed to sort of simplistic implicit smaller. Smaller client for instance I think in our industry specifically with the human advice there's room for innovation so so there's room for both I think so there's room to for human devices to be able to use technology to help perhaps though the operational costs and pass those cost savings back onto onto clients to make advice more affordable as a whole. Well thanks very much. There's Mr Phyllis in the CO founder of lead and Co you can read the F. T. money feature about all of these issues now now on. FDA Dot com slash money and. Do you know young person who good with money or curious about how the financial world works. Then please tell them about out the FTC's competition to find the young personal finance journalist of the year. We've teamed up the London Institute of Banking and finance to run the contest and we're accepting entries from young people aged between fourteen and nineteen. All they need to do is write a short hospital on topics including what the Bank of the future be like. They'd say shot or line. What are the financial issues facing young people or personal data is the new gold? Discuss the winds will receive one hundred and fifty pounds in cold hard cash cash and we are hoping to publish the winning entries in. FT money next year if he wants a winter and view all of the terms and conditions go to f t dot com slash young young journalist that's empty dot com slash young journalist. lasko is in front of the FTP Walser. Anybody can read it and the competition itself is part of the F. T. schools goals program are squeeze in a quick plug for that. If you haven't heard of it is well worth knowing about all secondary schools around the world not just in the UK can get free access to the F. T. dot com website for people's a sixteen over and their teachers. So it's really worth telling your old school about this. All of the details are accessible from that. same aim link dot com slash young journalist. Those of us who've bought property dream of the day that we can pay off the mortgage and rid ourselves of what is usually the most significant monthly outgoing but the new generation of mortgage free wannabes hippie drawing a pension before that day arrives and is of grave concern to pull Louis this the anti money columnist and presented radio four's moneybox programme. Who joins me from the line? Now won't comport Hella as you wrote in your column this week. There's something something about the word mortgage. Listeners may not be aware of well yes I mean. It's about seven hundred years old this world. It comes from the French and of course the first half mort gives gives you the clue it means. Death and gauge means a debt basically obligation on the idea is that if you pay it off then then the debt is is dead if you don't pay it off. The property is dead. That's the use of dead but my concern is that the way the industry's going now. It could be used as dead before you pay off your mortgage because they are stretching mortgages used to be twenty five years them. I'll say in our day. It's say my data now mine now sixty percent nearly of mortgage offers can be up to forty years so the product sixty percent of products can lost up to forty years. Now forty years is just about the whole of your working life at least and if you consider as you say. The rising age of the average average first time is thirty three than the average buyer is going to be seventy three votes on Pale. Yes possibly at well into a pension and that's assuming that that is their only mortgage and one of the Lenders Yorkshire Building Society that's introduced forty mortgage recently. Says they hope it would encourage people not to treat their first home as a stepping stone but as a kind of a chair if you were they'll sit out the rest of their lives so they'll buy their first home and it it'll be the revenue home until they're tied. I'm not sure if that's practicable of course they'll never need to move. Have Children get divorced. No because if you look at the statistics Statistics or one thing human lives or another. But you know forty two percent of marriages end in divorce nearly two and a half more over a two and a half million people in the middle. I expect to leave their job to care for either older relatives all indeed grandchildren and the calculation. Done by the insurer. LV equals that after forty years. You Start Your mortgage. It's thirty ended. Seventy one in ten of couples will experience the death of of one partner or and others that we have the more in mortgage because and of course They will normally get it. Paid off by insurance. But you know I it's one in three or you'll be severely ill one in ten will actually die over forty years. Things really do change now. We should say mortgage lenders are stretching the life colognes like this law because of rising prices. Yes and this has happened a lot in the past as you will recall. Fte readers will recall the whenever they talk about having to boost affordability. They come up with a scheme. Well now it's forty mortgages in the past you'll remember it was interest only mortgages. You didn't even have to worry for a long time. How you're going to pay the loan off? Just paid the interest so it was almost like renting renting renting the money to buy it they were endowment mortgages. They were the first interest only Huntsville. They didn't do too well did they. And then of course there was self certificates. Sean which meant you say to the mortgage lender one hundred and twenty thousand year and they say okay. We'll work it out on that basis. That was not a good idea. And it's all to boost affordability when rising prices are cutting mortgage lenders business to keep their business going. They come up with these tweezers and in the past they have all led to catastrophes. I don't know what catastrophe they'll be for these forty year mortgages and I probably won't be doing your podcast at that time anyway. Clear to be honest but some people will she'll be around and they will experience themselves. I'm very worried. What about it and I think people should think very carefully about forty year mortgages twenty-five years I may be an old funny? Seems a much more sensible time in date. Eight ten or twenty years seems more sensible time to borrow the money over from the gives you more flexibility. Thanks very much support. Lewis freelance journalist and BBC money. Any books presents it. You can read pools call them. It will take a long time for forty year old mortgages to die online now eddie dot com slash money. And you never know I could still be presenting this podcast when eighty me. We'll still need to work. We pension doesn't work out but that is it from the money. Show this week. If you want to get in touch with US team of experts you can email us our address money at dot com or follow us on twitter for the latest news. UPDATES or handle is at F. T. money and you can also join Sunni group on linked in to search for T- personal finance. We'll be back next week at the usual time. Thanks very much goodbye. The capital one has a fresh take on banking. Now you can open a new savings account in about five minutes and earned five times. The national average the banking with capital one means five times the savings toward your dream honeymoon or five times the savings towards your family's ultimate vacation even five times the savings towards just feeling good about saving. It's time to make your savings goals come true. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Capital one and a member F._d._I._C..

advisor Damian Alachua UK F. T. Alastair Analyst FCA FTC deputy editor FDIC AFC Josiah CO founder Asia FDA Tennessee
A Anchor tem um srio problema de falsificao de podcasts

RSS News I O Podcast de Not�cias para Podcasters

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

A Anchor tem um srio problema de falsificao de podcasts

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S01 - This Kid Life #9 - Kids Talk Accessibility

Arty Farty

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

S01 - This Kid Life #9 - Kids Talk Accessibility

"I do wheelies through sixties coping. EIGER DUNLAP's and I'll tell you scrape which I and Nala all all his e mud Venus. Hello and welcome to this kid. This kid by I'm Jennifer macy. This kid life is a podcast for kids brought to you by the Sydney Opera House where kids talked about big ideas. But I I want to introduce you to our panel. You'll hear them pop up during the episode. So let's make them. Hello my name is Suzanne and dine ten years old. My name is Charlotte and I'm seven seven years old. My name is Richard and I'm ten years old was near and I'm eleven years old. My Name's Kevin. I'm twelve years old. I'm sophy and I'm ten years old. My name is Lily and I'm eleven eleven. Hello my name is Travis continues old. I am Chandler and I'm eleven. Hi My name's Isabel and I'm eleven years old. My name is Joe. Lean and I'm ten years old old tonight. We're talking about a lot of kids. Josh is really into sports. The trains before and after school several times a week. That is when he's not down at the skate park personal training swimming. Aw I believe and this here he even got compete in the Commonwealth guy by the way Josiah's living with a disability. He uses a wheelchair to get around and compete Peyton all of these different sporting events. He's been using a wheelchair since he was three. Josh was born with a rare disease that affected his legs which means he can't walk doc. Disability Sake rely genesis that means I caught them my knees or move my legs and I have club fee and and and I'm missing a tale burn on a missing some burns on my back and I have learning gaps so that basically means I can't bend my knees. He's all like moves my needs so I can't like walk like Josh has three different types of wheelchairs one to get around and to that he uses for different sporting events. And they'll vote chair. I A skateboard. I got a hand cycle and I got tractor. The Hen Circle is a wheelchair that you pedal with your hands. He uses this wheelchair for the suckling leg of the triathlons oen competing trading in wins. Article has one big wheel at the front and Mantra big decide and you just basically just like Roy hands up now. OCTA MACHINE SL peddling hand. And what's the difference between that and a track will too well was track `Chez They have one small wheel unto big wheels and hand cycles can change gear like you can change it to one. Two seven seven fosters one the easiest so basically once easiest seven hottest so the tracks Arco is especially really designed wheelchair to compete in track and field events such as one hundred two hundred made a sprints in marathons while the hand Sokoll is rice against other Rod. What is in triathlons and cycling competitions that Rod? Yeah Okay Great I think of God. That Joshua's competed in full triathlons on the gold. Coast and recently competed competed in a special event in the Commonwealth Games. Thanks to a bit of help from two time. Gold Paralympian could Fernley and he takes his training pretty seriously. Obviously triathlons will Close it normally sought to fiszman than the than the running under the pink triathlon. athlon and the swimming was in the pool. And I really good at that. I didn't come loss Just before the last person and then full all the vice a hand cycle then ended. The running which was in my wheelchair now came in the middle. So what's it like competing being in a trust long. Well it is what he joke. And it's hard but when you get at the middle of the end so worth it what does it feel like when you cross the finish line. AAC feel good for myself. Yeah I think that's just amazing. Not many people can do that. have any of you. Donna triathlon. As long look at my parents have competed in a triathlon. Dislike Fun is a very difficult thing to do and especially if you're in a wheelchair that's like incredible. I could be hod. That's just amazing. Because I can't even do that and I'm eleven and I can nor even finish cross country and he's in the wheelchair doing a triathlon. Like I'm kind of jealous. I can barely ride a bike like thinking about me. He doing a triathlon. Yeah I can't do it. He's one in my million like back to Josh. Josiah's fitter and more athletic than many boys is his age and embiid fearless. He's not bothered if he takes a stack on the skate. Ramp sixties. Because I'm a dead devil and how Addison Big Ryan ups feel randy skin. They always feel going to tip or low but I always scare them. I am a little dead dead and what happens if you do. Oh I normally save myself but spending my hands down joe shoes like any other kid his age and he doesn't doesn't marketing adults tried to wrap him up in cotton wool just because he uses a wheelchair and I'm saying my head if I all I can see what I'm doing raw. Aw Yeah I know my limited sometimes I go over my limit or you've evolved over. He's done it before he's GonNa be fine. I think that it gives him. I almost like black freedom because if the parents are all all flat. Are you a K. K.. Every time like he might fall out of the wheelchair then. He's kind of learning learning so if he's in the world is allowed to like maybe heard and stuff and good and stuff like that in full out then he kind of feels like a normal normal kid. It's good that he has some of that freedom and you want some of that freedom that he can being a kid like every should have that. If you're always just stuck stuck inside of the Tom and Nikon do anything then you barely can do anything. And it's just four and just being stuck inside star. He is just a normal kid so so why can't I do stuff like other kids. Let's make some other kids who aren't worried about falling out of the we'll I'm Sebastian. McIntosh I'm fourteen an actual room. I've been doing bus twenty of us. How often often of About once every two weeks Irish going to the ball game and stock near Knoxville lava flows. What was that like? These kids do wheelchair basketball training after school every Tuesday afternoon but they do have one pit pave other lexus. There are lots of says that my school I get it under by like a lift and severe they ornery so all stays at the skype rat may be fun today. Tricks on stays at the train station or at the shops or at school can be super frustrating frustrating for wheelchair users. Stead are just had I get out of my wheelchair I woke up and my mom carries wheelchair. Does that happen. A lot happens because one time I went to his head wrestle and they'll stay I had a Hammer Cup and then at the end they asked if I would like a free not every every wheelchair users can easily in kroll up the stays so accessibility the ability to go wherever you want. Whenever you want becomes an issue she? Let's look at an example of this because of his disability Josh's smaller than other kids his age that means he's not allowed on some of the rides at the theme theme parks on the Gold Coast near his house. You know when you go to the same pocket you really want to go on a ride your your your number one most favorite ride and and the light and like the people there days and they say nope sorry Condo at because he's in a wheelchair and how does that make you feel Makes me feel sad because I know I can do it. But it's just they they weren't let me and it doesn't seem fair does it. Yes it does not seem fair. Basically do more than able body kids can do like three hundred push ups in fifteen minutes hundred push ups and ten to one hundred breakup environment account data. So do you think it's fair that asked cities and towns sometimes darned have lifts or ramps which means Bucci uses or other. The people living with a disability. Can't get around easily from place to place. I think it's kind of disappointing that you don't have transportation. Because what about all the people that have disabilities lose and they can't get upstairs and they can't use that because well. How am I supposed to get these days without help? So it's just sad that you wouldn't think of other people when you're building that qualify. Pull someone and he has a disability so he struggles like walking up stairs blue areas that he lives in. He can't go to this school because they have so many steps. I think when you building a school you should take into perspective. That dog and me people with disabilities or maybe that broken leg and are in a wheelchair and they're gonNA have difficulties. He's like walking up stairs or like steep hills and stuff Kev. You've been to a train station where there's lifts it's crazy. I think it's really unfed adjusts to have stairs and like no ramps or elevators because if someone has a disability and they can't walk upstairs or they're in a wheelchair Chad don't think he would be very fair. You need to make it fair for everyone you need to make it so that everyone can music or something like that you can't just be Solely focused on people that don't have disabilities. It needs to be fair for everyone as as well. I don't think the world has adapted yet to all the people with disabilities. I feel like this still is changed. That can be done to make it even easier for people with disabilities to get around like they should have. Every school should have a ramp for people with disabilities unease or if someone breaks lakes. I don't really think the whole world like the whole world has adapted and like is as accessible as it should be for all these people like they're so many people and I think as he said one in five people have a disability. That's just like so many one in like a million or anything. We need more accessibility. Thirty for the world and people with disabilities. Yeah I definitely think it's improved. Didn't think it's quite there yet every accessible but I definitely think it's improving Jean. What about people with other disabilities such as vision impairment or autism? What about simple? Oh things like knowing if you have a five or ten dollars in your hand. When you're at the shops have everybody saying the Yes What is special about this ten dollar Knight Phil Blind People? It has a little can recognize. What like typing noticed it is? It's like those dots on the notes that you can feel so you know which one is rich difference between the nights while ah five dollars a ten dollar not. How do you know that this person isn't just GonNa rip you off like? Oh Yeah. This is ten dollars and you give him a fifty fifty or whatever. What are we going to do? I think is slowly adapting to the fact that people need this like this is a part of their everyday life. So what if I told you that the person who campaigned argued to the Reserve Bank of Australia to change this to put the Bri violon was a thirteen year old. Kid I re- so amazed like I'm so I would be so inspired. It's so amazing. To see how young people to make a difference so you have to be own pal like Donald trump or something. You can do anything even if you're thirteen like that's amazing. Thirteen year old blind boys started asking asking the Reserve Bank to print tactile banknotes more than a year ago as seen his campaign Pale. Connor Macleod's idea was sparked when he was given money for Christmas but couldn't tell how much he had conner started a petition to allow vision impaired people to tell the difference between denominations nations fifty seven thousand people signed it and the Human Rights Commission and mccloud was just thirteen when he started lobbying the government and the Reserve Bank to change. Just try is banknotes. Now if you know closely at the new ten and five dollar note you'll notice to bombs in office security reasons. That's Braille while the writing that blind people can read by feeling fingers thanks to Connor Macleod. Who was nominated for the New South Wales young person of the year those dots now now every ten and five dollars in Australia? That's truly inspiring. It's really cool and intriguing. How a young teenage boy who is not that much older than me can convince the The the people who make the notes in Australia to change them. I think that's really really smart. I think helpful than they can like you. You know how much change they get and like how much they have to give. I think it's impressive. That he did and I mean it's helped all the people he's taking another step and now it's so much easier for him to save. Money has not get ripped off by anyone saying Oh yeah this is totally early off when it's maybe a five dollar night so I think that's really good. I think it's a great idea that boy to change it because that's is just amazing. It's incredible if if you're still a kid you can do anything back to Josh. Josh is an ambassador effort anti-bullying organization called I can I will and even I. Some kids might steer at him in his wheelchair. He's got a cool trick to help. Break the ICE S. They Jewish there. I just like Poparelli. We all say hi basically particular on the MERV if they don't be nice tea and Josiah's some big dreams for the future. 'cause I WANNA be a Paralympic tennis player when I grow up I the gold medal at everything will it. Sounds like he's on the right track. Get it track and field athlete. He's on the right track. That is flagging in an clarice. And before before we go. He's clarice. How with the official rules? Who Will Chair basketball? The basic rules of wheelchair basketball very similar to running boss couple. A player May wheelchair and bounce the bull similar tenuously however if the bull is picked up and end all placed on the players slap. Hey or she is our in the allowed to push twice before they obliterated to shoot pause or dribble the ball again there is no double dribble ruling. Wheelchair bus. Traveling violation occurs is if the player takes more than two pushes while imposition of the boom with that in the event that play fools Out of his or her ch- a referee my stop the play if in his or her opinion to play is at risk of being injured otherwise play. We'll continue. Thanks clarice. That's all for this kid. Line A podcast for kids produced by the Sydney Opera House for more information mation about shows and activities for kids at the Sydney Opera House. Go to our website. The executive producer is bridget. Van Leuven the brilliant audio engineer. Mary's Dumb Evans and payday sent composed out opening and closing music a special. Thank you to both that. Show the programs coordinator at kids wish and and Sebastian and all the kids at basketball training a big shoutout to all the kids from Landfill Public School in Bulawayo Public School who took part in this episode and thanks suspiciously to Josh and Abby Brass Checkout Joshua's facebook page that's at Joshi brass with a why for more videos of him. Doing man tricks on the skateboard ramp. Thank you for listening. I'm Jennifer macy. CENEX time at least uh-huh.

Josh Josiah Sydney Opera House Jennifer macy basketball Australia Reserve Bank EIGER DUNLAP Suzanne Joe Isabel Lily Travis Charlotte Chandler Richard Commonwealth Donna triathlon gold medal skate park
Flint Public Art Project, Murals, Goodbye Graffiti

Radio Free Flint

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

Flint Public Art Project, Murals, Goodbye Graffiti

"I there were taking a break for our sponsor. ANCHOR DOT FM. Let me tell you a bit about anchor They have a creation tools that are free like you can create your own podcast using an edit that podcast using your phone or your computer? They'll distributes your podcast for you on spotify Apple. Or many other podcasts hope host, and you may even make money off your podcasts. With no minimum listenership. Is Everything. You need to make a podcast in one place. Download anchor for free. By getting their APP IN INKER DOT FM to get started, and we're using it, and hopefully you will too thank you very much, and will resume our our program. Hey, how are you? This is Radio Free Flip. You're listening to Arthur. Bush and we have great. Guests for us today interesting as heck. And her name is Sandra Branch, she is with the Flint public art project. As well as a gallery on the goal or galleries on the go. Welcome Sarah Anne. Thank you for taking the time to explain a such a wonderful in interesting project undertaken. Thank you Sandra Anti. That's okay, are we? See a drop until next. Okay they called me Miss Sandra around town. I shouldn't have any trouble with your name. So in any event, you are involved in the public art project. Tell us all about that what? What is it? Public Art Project is a nonprofit. That was started in flint by Stephen Sachs. We took over in two thousand sixteen Josiah. Ponti. Was Our. Director and I was on the board of directors. In we changed it to pretty much shop, a public art in mural to beautify slit. And we brought a hundred murals last year with artists that were local as well as artists international artists this year since the Kobe is here. We're having a problem trying to. Negotiate around these circumstances, but we have euros going on, it'll be much less this year, and if you see any of our bureau out there painting, just blow the horn. Take a picture, but. The code we don't want you interact with them, but you'll also see our little murals on the ground we also did something for the pride project and we put Little Rainbow Hearts all around on the on businesses that wanted to support the Lbj t movement, so he did that also, but you will still see our murals and gallery on the go is still doing euros with the. Aerosol artists that were graffiti being up the town. We're trying to change them into Muir list and have them beautify city. They also do the boarding project with the city of Flint where we paint the boards, the decorate some of the houses in the more depressed areas where we have. Seven out of ten of homes are boarded up so. Skills is people neighborhood up adjusted incision of unique to blight. So. Interesting is heck. So your project of it. Runs through the the Flynn art project. That, how is that funded? Where did they get their money? Well we take private donations as well as we apply for several different brands throughout. The area. We are now beginning to apply for international brand, so we can get more money to pay the artist because they've done some beautiful work. Mostly, they've done it for free out of out of the dinosaur, their arts. We pay for their Travel Year and we house them ourselves, and then they think these beautiful murals on in the pretty much donated time because we don't have the money to fund. Somebody somebody in this. Stratosphere here. It's listening to this podcast or who happens to stumble onto my. Many facebook postings. Where would I? Tell direct them to give you money. Actually we have donation stood up through our facebook and instagram pages. You can go to flint public art project and at Slim. Our project that Um, so you can, you can reach us through Instagram at at Flint. Public art project or you can go to our website. And just look up on facebook. Or, right, so you know I've had long interest in graffiti. You probably. Yes and one of my previous assignments actually. For a long time, actually I'd like graffiti very much I still don't particularly. But you know years ago. We had a guy name Robert Katrina Nick. Robert Katrina sometimes was known as the Leatherman's actually was awesome whether man on. And he got the notion that he was sick graffiti to. And so he started painting over of these tags which is. St Language for Fiji. Yet as their issues regarding. The town I mean. It was an amazing thing what he did to South Saginaw Street. Yeah we kind of Jefferson that slot in two thousand fourteen and we began to do that. I was sitting at a train track, and I saw the beautiful. Tags that they had time to do, and I said well. That's not like what I see in our city. You know I see a bunch of scribbling. And then I saw awesome, the same names that must mean they have time to do that and I didn't really get mad about the train weight so I said well, if we can do this to some of the houses on the north side, because I was working at Christ enrichment, center off a Hamilton at the time, and in that neighborhood, everything was blighted, left open. They weren't even boarding the houses up, and the kids were going in there and playing, and it was getting hurt, and it was just ridiculous, so. Can I do being an artist and I said I could get these artists that are tagging up town and try to give them some tips and skills and connections so where they could get paid for doing murals, and now that's what they're doing. Most of them are coming to me getting assignments and going out in the city in doing work for people in actually getting paid so. It is warmed a quite a few of the older ones. Now we've got a new crew. That I've got to go under bridges and fetch. Or wait till the court spit them out to me and get them for some community service work. That's another thing. If you all want something painted, and I have community service artists. We can probably work out a deal, so you would also want to kind of. On the division through Flint Public Art. Project to do something like that and if your. Son or daughter got in trouble tagging. You might want to hook them up with me, so we can transform them into murless. You. Offer this idea I. I'm fascinated by it. You know I have a friend in Seattle Laurie speed back. Who is in is is She's in the in the anti graffiti business. Basically, she does contracts with the governments in companies. That pay her to get rid of the graffiti, so they go out and tackle the project and. They're not doing murals. They're just getting rid of it. So When. I was fascinated distinct. Because when you get rid of it, they see that as a blink. Tampa's to come back and do more damage. Sellers battle no question about it. There is a battle The one thing. To do, but never had time for a goose. Maybe my next life I'll have time for it every time now actually. Is these graffiti I should talk to the judges about this because the Graffiti Artists Essentially Telegraph. What's going on in the community? And we. Started getting interested in. It was I had a friend. Who I won't cholera snitch because that's not really what she was, but she had an interesting graffiti started documenting it throughout the city. And, then started to understand what all that scribbling as you call, it does mean something it. Sends messages and at one point. In my career. Longtime time ago we used that and gang prosecutions where there were murders or serious violent crimes. and. We occasionally, we introduced it as evidence. So, these things that you think or scruples, don't make any sense, they're actually. Got There. To their ear people and it's a a voice for the disenfranchise. It's definitely a language in the definitely speak. Times of turmoil, so they're kind of like unsung artists. Boy Subdued district. But A lot of damage and. Educate them on the the possibility. You're preventing jobs from coming here because they're making places uninhabitable for businesses, and it runs their insurance up high. Note job so the great him and. He becomes the problem. Yeah, and then they also they also telegraph to people in law enforcement although i. don't know dating got anybody round today. That understands this stuff. talk to people. They probably don't want to telegraph to what exactly the too so. But what were full idea that you're doing a great great idea to turn a negative to a positive? And I've heard people talk about this. And they were saying that the took a tour or something was down without. Yes, we have. A virtual tour it's you can take a map on our face website, so you can go and interact with murals and go and see them in this time of social distancing and take a picture by them and send it to our page, also the run contests like that where you can win art, some of the artists that come here leave prints, and and we sell them for fundraisers, and you could win t shirts and prints and stuff like that. Through the council urged council, we sell them usually at totem books in our events, but you can always pick up something that we've done some of our artwork. It totem books over there on Phnom. Believe is six ten grand travers across from the White Horse Tavern. Is a partner with us, and he supports everything we do. We really appreciate being and his efforts to change the environment downtown, as we wanted to change the narrative of flint with art euros, and now we have for adding pixel sticks where you can go up and take the. The Bar Code or the you are C. Code off of the. Euro and a link you to the artists, and the that did the mirrow and give you kind of like an art gallery experience outside because they'll tell you about the artists, tell you about mural, the interpretation of art and will also link you to the website of the artist, so you can purchase art from the artist's directly. Try. A happening. For sure well, know alarm cities of around the country. Do I know down in Florida where I live with part of the year in Saint Pete they have a murals. Trying to get people to take tours. Where linking with the shine of festival in Saint T, so you will be seeing us down there in your other home, because I do have a snow bird. From Lake Wales that we're going to. Visiting down there and bring the artist down there up ear, and we're going to be participating down there with this year. October for going down for the shine festival to see if we can get a partnership billing a sister city. What a wonderful thing! If you need me help! Run interference there, myself. Now fact, how do you pick a building? You know I keep thinking. Poor kid in Detroit. Who was really quite accomplished as an artist nationally and internationally, he paints a building in. They arrested him. Well see we get permission. Used to be law enforcement art in I was a sheriff in new. Orleans, so that's why intervene with the Program the in the courts do community service work, and also I understand that we need permission, so we actually put out applications for people to get walls or give donate a wall, and then we put that on our list. We always have permission so and we have so many people we. We run out of artists to do the walls, because so many people want their buildings painted for free it out. Few a few of the buildings that people might familiar landmarks if people might well. Up Fresh Alley downtown. You could see several murals up Russia alley and go all start down. Add I. Street will go all the way up to the end of brush alley and you'll see one two. Three four that about six neural over there. Then on Garland street we have. About four five, so and then when you go down university, you'll have about six and grand travers from downtown. Up through we're. School of of the International Academy is. We have several going that way then up the street to the International Academy, and then that takes you down. Where a winslow had done art, winslow had done the murals. So that puts you down to Saginaw Street next series the murals out. We did a few on the Economic Street we did one Mazda Foods. Factory to has mural. Hurley hospital over by the Eastern Michigan Food Bank there's Murals and Oh, there's so many there's hundred of them so Andrew hundred and seventy-five that we didn't last two years, are there. What do they use as a medium? We is exterior house saints. Do you. You get donations. For for this Sir now we take the money from the grant and we spend it on paint. That's the majority of the money goes to ward things. We just recently acquired a sponsor would aerosol paint. We all go over it with aerosol paints of the details and we with Cobra with a K. Cobra. We'll be a distributor and that's a specific special aerosol or Rafidi artists or Aerosol Aerosol artists. A so they so. For Graffiti. Yes that's it's a specialty at at a low pressure you can make fine lines and with a high pressure you can, you can make large ig lines. It depends on the air flow from the can going out the cats. The caps are used like brushes for the breaststroke so they they have quite an interesting array of tools to make those murals it's. It's not as easy as just take a canvas of Russell, Liam and going out there called while. I've seen some of that. Our work is not so. A painted up. Flushing Park with a bunch of. Offensive racially offensive. Tags all over the park in eventually turns out to be a bunch of. Stuff what it was. It was done and it was intimidating to. To a family that was out there. The the family reunion out there in the painting the pavilions. Eventually judge. Netti could have their Kieschnick jail. was. That's that is the outcome it depends on. If they're able to transfer, be transformed or or be. Reformed if they are not that that's their fate and partner. Telling this is this is what happens when you criminally damaged someone's property so when they get with me. I kinda give him an education as well as. Teach them. A skill set that they can use to make money with so you're doing mentoring as well. Right I've been mentoring I'm kind of on the mom of graffiti artists. They know me and I don't know a lot of them, but they find me when I do find then I. Tell Them Book. It's not fun and Games. It's you're gonNA work with me. Can't spray up town? And I learned their tags. It I. Tell Them I'll stand up form in court. If is something that they had done, but if something that they're doing currently, no, I'm not gonNA stand up for them. Oh! You're my hero. Hero. Were you the last decade. Well could've used season falls. Oh, my gosh and so these artists. Era Saw. Aerosol earns. Vastly different graffiti this China. It gives an or of respect. To this activity now? The Hell is going to say that the. When these guys are going out no one of the things. I learned from being the prosecuting attorney in Flint Michigan for so many years. Is that you can? You can cover it up. But letterman got respect for those on the street. They didn't come up in stuff they. They decided leases stuff alone for the most part. But each other's rivals say tag on top of each other God knows how much paint us. That's lights, so yeah, it is a war. But right with your people that are going out and doing this work in some of it's absolutely gorgeous and. Creative and Magnificent. They come out and record I mean. Do they come out and take care? Though not often do they come out and go over the other artists work with? We introduced him to the artists, and their becomes mutual respect, and they learn and get techniques from these artists, so it's a matter of actually communication and respect and. We lost her. No we have lost our our guest. So, in that case, we've lost the connection. That's modern technology will have to take a break here and we'll be right back. Sorry his out that. Okay we're back. We have her back. I've learned not to get excited about this. Because I've had power outages. Living out here in the middle of the state forest. and. So keenly have that. I forgot Oh. Yeah, we're talking about respects artists coming back and not tagging over your beautiful work. and. So. Because we actually. have taken the time to get to know them to see what they're talking about what they're doing and we give them. An outlet to to actually express. There are end to actually think it out and put something out there. That's it's a well thought out piece so. So. What's the subject of these various murals? Is there any common themes involved in any of this or do you tell them a? This is what we want. Pack Flowers, or we WANNA, have A. It also kind of. Justice message or something Actually it was to change the narrative of Flint and to include. in certain areas we went like the Hispanic Tech Center Latte, Nets. We went over there and we handed Things that were culturally relevant in that area, and so we give each area there due respect. We asked them what they want to see in their neighborhood. And we do that, so it's A. It's a matter of community involvement. They're all community are project so? The community you're asking the community or neighbors businesses what they'd like to see as they kinda. They kinda reach. Agreement was the artis. Yes yes, and there are all about slim, even some of the individuals that they pay our flint residents. Like the two girls love sisters. The. Buck camale those are flint residents, and they love the festivals down there it downtown, and so he made them part of the scene. But. It's all about inclusion family. Community togetherness harmony peace. That's usually what the messages. Europe here you're you're a saint. To Our town and I think people if they step back and see what doing, follow you around for a couple of weeks. We might be able to get. We might get to be able to take this rambling and other places. You don't just stay in the city. You know we get requests all over, so that's why we're reaching out to other sister cities, so we could help them and show them how to conduct a community art project is also we did it in depressed areas that were little, micro business areas and paint just actually. Revives the areas one way to do like a a remodel. Without. Investing much money. It's just pain and it brings people to their stores and their business. And makes it a lot more accommodating friendly. So have you taken it to the out county and genesee? I'm talking about places like Grand Blanc or flushing or Davidson Mount Morris. Have you been working in any of those areas. Now mostly concentrated on genesee county because it is flint of the art project, so we won't WanNa fix our own backyard before we venture out. So you know, you might have misunderstood. My questions were asking is. Do you just do the city of Flint or do you have murals outside the city? itself. As flip up the guard project. We don't have too many that have gone outside of Flint yet. Are Artists. Do Artists get jobs? Lapierre? A lot of the work is done in in holly by scraps Kevin Burdett, so he's got a lot of jobs just from working with us, and that's another way that the artists can get employment is they see that the work that they've done for us? And they get commissioned work all over the place. Named on up as far as traverse city with Some of his work, so he's quite melted into state now. Good for you, you know the most unusual public guard which I think we lack in and. At least my time when I was a county commissioner way back to eighties, I was really I really wanted to see more public art. Downtown's especially Where there was some of the development was going on. And but my son lives Seattle's. and. They have this. You know in the old partisan. Seattle stay have this one alley reminded me a little bit about of Brush Alley. The Gum Wall. Yes, and the gun wall. there. That's kind of gross, but it's very interesting. It is interesting and occasionally they clean it. Clean it and they start all over, but everybody takes their golf and. Put. Brick wall they had to seal the wall. But it's all it's it's. It's maybe I'll post a picture with your podcast of his on wall Seattle Spit. It has all these different colors. Right it's rainbow of gum. And they know my son. Has a lot of guests from out of town. Come visit him, and and they all want to see the gum lawsuits well-known, so so do you have? You have a favorite of all the murals. My guess the twenty. Your children be like best, but. There's so many, but I happen to love Emily Dings Niro on Garland street where the birds are flying in the girl is sitting there looking serene, and that's rainbow colored in the background. I love that once I just love. It brings me joy, but that's. That's what we WANNA. Do we want to bring people joy? And change the narrative of Flint. Negative. Let's make it something positive richer and we all. Love to use the. Art is coming out of in Flint. We fit featured a few of those Like Isaiah. Baltimore I can I see a messing up his name? But he came out of Flint, and he did a girl lady with the earrings that was one of my favorites, but it was gone over by another artist with a tribute to a Memoriam immemorial for someone that had died, but he's an awesome artist and he just graduated last year, and so we're making A. Kind of a place for those artists to grow from. So they can come from Flint in actually get international press. We had write ups in Paris magazines. Were in Brazil obligations and in Acapulco. Peru we've had artists from all over the world so. The press comes from all over the world. And apparently made it. You made it to Radio Free flips. Man. I just proud. Well we, we have history now now you. You also paint up basketball courts told. Yes, that's a gallery on the go project. We are working with heat genesee arts beautiful. And we've done murals and cook are. Do we park and we have some other parts on our list. WE'RE GOING TO DO A. Human Chessboard in one of the parts in we're also going to do some hopscotch for the kids and the gangs that we can paint on the asphalt on the tennis courts that aren't being used to tennis courts right now, so we could do stuff like that on the edges, and and the kids love it, and they love playing on that type of court. It. I'll give you a tip over to lakeside their thread lake in only got some courts stuff there they could use it, and it might discourage people from bussing up bottles on courts. That's what I said. They have a lot of problems within the vandalism over there. Maybe that might soften 'em up. It's an old story So, Well! I'm speechless. Confuse you have. have taken me to a new level here. Now! Do you have projects that are group's projects or they? Just all done by single artist to know a lot of them are group projects and gallery on the go always used his. Local. Artists in conjunction with international artists on our project, so we were kind of getting the best that they have to offer, and we keep them busy too busy to go speak up the loss. I'm sure the police police appreciate that now. Are Helping us the police actually guard them when they're painting and and talk to them and bring them water they. They have a new relationship with the police that they never had before. Beautiful thing there! Is that has the mayor in the City Council of they've been supportive view. Yes, we've gotten awards gala. Has Gotten awards from City Council back in two thousand fifteen for the Obama little misled mural. And we have been recognized by the Chamber of Commerce. We got arts achievement nomination last year, so we. We are getting recognition in our hometown. And I have another one of my favorite murals is the tallest one inflict done by scraps. One of my favorite artists Kevin Verdict and Story Charlotte is train in the sunset on. A beautiful. River, saying, it's really gorgeous. She got to see that when art. You have quite an ECLECTIC background you, you've been in law. Enforcement ear artists that. Too many too many different things. I didn't write them all down, but tell us a little bit about yourself. Before we sign off, here would be neglectful of me now. I'm proud graduate of Bentley High School. And from there I went to you them flint, when it was just the crowd building, and a few Ma buildings, downtown and I majored in Criminal Justice I went down to New Orleans and became A. Deputy Sheriff and then went through the academy and became indigent release counselor. And Sin tap was the name of it and I worked under major hunter that was liaison to the Magistrate Court da's office, and the sheriff's department and I went to every session of magistrate. Court might twelve hours shifted. For low, or free bail. If. They qualified for the program, and then I would set them up with community service. And I noticed. The frequency of the Black Youth and their recidivism, instead of the matter, arrest record as long as they were tall. By the time they were seventeen from juvenile offenses all the way up through adult instance when they started charging as an adult at the age of sixteen and I said this is crazy. They didn't even qualify for the program, and they weren't even old enough to go vote or the war and I thought. Will this got to be something? We can do to stop these kids before they get to this point. And I decided to. Go back to school in major in art. And try to reach these kids through art. At a different level and that's. Kind of my story. Stories. Are you. Are you a flint native? Yes, I was born in Flint. and. Offered the Church Street church in Grand. Travers is a matter of fact I lived in that area. Building is. A beautiful houses in that neighborhood went down for the count, but they still have. High School Yourself Western. To southwestern, but we moved out to Earth. And I live one one st from Home Depot. So. We were close to it. But we were still in Burton so I ended up going to Bentley school system and graduated from there, but I love my bulldogs. Yeah, well I can see people plant. Love you because you're doing mazing things for this town. I appreciate the time here's. If I love for I really support everything. You're doing art I appreciate, you Even giving back now after you've served us for so long in the county and the city. Now you're giving back to the community I appreciate you. Thank you very much It's it's been a lot of fun to do this. project of Radio Free Flint I. Hope to get more involved, but I do WanNa pass along. If you need some house, with grants or whatever I'm happy to give you a little bit of advice here and there. and. I know a few people out there. I could shame into healthy you. Keep up the good work. One of them would be Stephen Heady I. Get him involved as soon as they could. right had he did pay down, remember. We had paint the town and he led that effort for many years and. He knows how to turn pain into. The good paint. This technique is anyway. Stephen Hetty hats off to you. Start Painting my nephew works era. My cousins of Works for Stephen in does all the historic stories If, it's the same one that was down the. Job or he is alleged. He is a legend in the enjoy Katrina. Who is a relation to? The leatherman was his uncle. He is taken up the tradition in a different way. If you walk in Genesee County, you'll see all the restoration of all the gold leaf, and all that and throughout. The murals as of. The team in Fixed all that back up how it used to be when they built the courthouse. Anyway I've got to run and thank you. For joining us and keeping talk show. Thank you. Already right. Okay very good now. One thing I want to say to you guys. I'm going to put in his plug for this group is he's got a couple extra quarters to send the laws sending this Andrew Branch. At Flint public art projects or gallery on the goal, and look that up on facebook or on the Internet just Google it. And if you have any trouble, finding their gives me call your at radio. Free Flint will be to help you, and if you like our show programming, you can like US wherever you may rate us because that have too many people rate us yet. And we appreciate all your supports. Thank you God bless. Thank you. Bye.

Flint flint Seattle facebook genesee county Flint Public Art Leatherman Josiah partner Brush Alley Stephen Sachs spotify Andrew Branch Sandra Branch cholera Director Ponti Sarah Anne Bush
The MMA Reporters: Episode 20

Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

The MMA Reporters: Episode 20

"Everyone. It's your old friend area Awani on this Wednesday may twenty nine two thousand and nineteen. Welcome back to brand new episode of the MA reporters my whole schedule my whole universe feels like it's out of whack because the Monday show yesterday choose day because we were off Monday. And so usually there's a day in between, but here we are talking again. And this is very exciting. And I'm excited about today's show, and I will tell you about today's show in a matter of moments. But I just wanna say because I mentioned this on Tuesday show, but since we last spoke, I was telling you that we just had a few more tickets left for our live show, our Heleni roadshow, if you will June seventh in Chicago while I am very proud to share with all of you that the show is sold out our first ever wanna road show sold out, June seven Lincoln hall in shy town, the night before you have C two thirty eight I will tell you more about what you can expect if you bought tickets and I can't, thank you enough for buying tickets. A lot of you reached out. Are you coming to Vegas? Are you coming to Edmonton? Are you coming to Anaheim more on that in the future wanted to get the first one out of the way give you the lineup in the future as well? But I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who bought tickets for the support. It means the world to me. I truly can't. Thank you enough. I'm really excited about this. So wanted to get that out of the house, want to tell you that. If you aren't going to be in Chicago, if you aren't going to be attending, if you are sad that you didn't get tickets. We will actually be posting the full show on the same feat that you get this show. The Monday show us, you will be able to enjoy and catch the entire road show. Maybe just hours later, I'm told like literally hours later, you know, it'll be closer to thirty eight but it will be evergreen as well. So you will enjoy that and get a feel for what it's all about and get excited for the next one. So thank you very much to everyone, who supported. Thank you to everyone who continues to download this podcast. The fastest growing podcast. I saw the numbers recently. It's just absolutely amazing. Astronomical numbers, the fastest growing at ESPN. That's what I'm told. At least, you know, I it's incredible it right. I mean, I'm just I try to humble about these things. But then, you know, you're, you're told the numbers in your sort of, like whoa. This is amazing. When the numbers of that big, it's hard to be humble. You know, I agree Daniel, I agree. We'll set while said, so one of our signature shows over the past few months, you know, we've been doing. We've been trying different formats, we've been having different voices. But, but the, the response to the time that we had the Warlock in studio face to face Mino mono nose to nose. Response was great. And so I have called upon my old friend, the kung FU panda himself, the godfather of British mixed, martial arts and boxing media, the godfather of combat sports media in Europe, the godfather of Special Olympics media coverage, back in England in the UK overseas Daily Telegraph fighters only talk sport. William Hill, all those places in more the one and only Gareth Davies back in studio. How are you, sir? I'm really good aerial. Thank you. It's great to be here again, it's always great severe and seaport looking out in the Hudson river, across Brooklyn, where we used to go and have males with you and your wife and you children, you live the. Yeah. I'll make Johm bay coast town negotia Trie now, listen, it takes me back. Always coming here. It was lovely to come lost time on delighted few that you is a theater. You've sold out in Chicago, like a hall. Was it? What three hundred five hundred two hundred Berlin. Berlin, no wants to do the. Same myself people like iron show-me is because I think people love live stuff. They can come to unimagined. You'll have fighters on stage and people telling stories and I think it's lovely to do those kind of because we often find ourselves in, in rooms like this is a beautiful little recording studio. Will we find ourselves in front of a poster speaking to people one on one or in a media room or in the fight event, but it's quite nice to disseminates and have the nerves in front of a live audience? And it'll be great fun few, I'm sure go very very. Well, it will buy just to correct you one thing. Yes, I have covered Special Olympics Paralympics to a lot of. Okay. I'm going to my eighth Paralympic game some games in Tokyo in twenty twenty but but Special Olympics is tends to be more down syndrome. Okay. But, but Paralympics course is five different. Disability groups with blind over cited or partially sighted, Lezo Tra we'll. Chair amputee, okay. Remember the other one right now. All right. What if we can think of what it is cerebral palsy? Okay. Well, I apologize nothing. I'm an amazing introduction. Thank you. Great to be here. Look. Well, you and I are all pals, and we, we rattled, forty five minutes away. Even started this nothing. That would have made a decent. You save for the show. Because I don't wanna waste to good stuff, but you are made for a medium like this, like your voice. Your demeanor, your delivery Johnson poetry. You got something out brief candle. We don't check today. Let's have a bit of. What about the Jabba Wilkie at Brigham the sly the toes did guy at gambling the wave all the snow Loza, and they found boys will be getting bored by mile my poetry voice by now. But no. But the thing is I it's lovely listen. Podcasting as you say ferry false growing. Everyone's got their phones. Stuck in the is. When the traveling now, people like to use that time to travel people to read a newspaper or novel didn't they on their way to work to the gym while they're in their own private worlds, and a lot of spend time now when the back of a cab forty minutes on an airplane, people love things that they can connect with wired for connection as human beings, as why we love fighters because they're extraordinarily wired, and we like to see that wiring, and we get to see in public. Nick. And that's why I think, you know, the, the old audio the hour will medium is so vast, and so growing listen, the first noise that noise that was ever made by man was the scream. I am an you know, who doesn't love sung in the morning, you know, that podcasting think will be a normal vote casting podcast will be enormous as we go on what brings you back to New York, I'm here for a big fight at Madison Square Garden on Saturday night, Antony Joshua, they British heavyweight who is undefeated in twenty two fights defending the IBF WBAI WBO heavyweight titles against Mexican American from embarrassed New Mexico and the Mexican border and release junior junior is, is a late replacement for guy called Jarrell Miller, who's from just over the river here last time you're on the knee was just broke. That's right. He tested postive separate tests for some really heinous drugs. He PEO and stuff like that. You know which. Really, really bad drugs that you how long JiJi away for while. No, he wasn't. He wasn't licensed at the time which he's got away with a lot there. But if so just foolish, you know, to do that until CNC Josiah's headlining his American debut. They want to know if he can come to the, the US of the cigar members sold eighteen thousand eight hundred ninety four times in a row stadiums in Cardiff, and London is a huge star in the UK. But Kenny break into this very crowded US market with sports entertainment, film, ole the all the music here. It's very crowded environment. You know, some Volks pulsa William Hill, lost couple of days around Madison Square, go, no one to great neighborhoods in, in queens. A Mexican Columbia neighborhood last night. A few Margaritas spoke to people on the street at some guacamole, and it was fantastic. And also can people about what it means to have a first Mexican American heavyweight champion of the w-? Because it hasn't made a Mexican heavyweight champion the world's. But some this it's a great time because they're all loads of British fighters coming over to America, so many more boxes than mixed. Martial artists to be honest to mention mixed most lots on this on this podcast of us because lost totes a lotta boxing. No, no. Well, the there's, there's a lot of connections. Howard ticket sales. Well, I think when Joshua fights tends to be the Joshua show, but when Conor McGregor fools economy, Gregor show. And when he was fighting that's hope he comes back soon. I know we're gonna talk about that a little today. But the thing is with with Antony Joshua is he's such a crossover star in the UK. They believe ten thousand Brits will come to the garden on Saturday, noise. But he's just go to make a statement against. I no I eighty thousand tickets and come here to come because the other side, the rivals to SPN that the digital rivals to SPN. I've seen him as one of the tent pole figures, along people soul canal Alvis, Kennedy can ballot or for example, that trying to grow their that their fan base in terms of their subscriptions, they see him as a potential, stall from Erica. Some people say he's going to be, I'm not sure he does. I think America Alexa badboy when it comes to, to fight leader two to one of those guys who's who's come upon finder Floyd Mayweather, Mike Tyson. They, they love the guy that compla- the bad boy. And I do think that become big stalls as a result. He'll say while on the cusp of doing McGregor. Every time he did something, you know, that, that, that ruffled feathers, that was illegal criminal. He becomes more famous. And I think that speaks to what you were just saying they say, no old publicist. Good publicity in that realm. It works. You know what drives me nuts? We may have talked about this last about think, so on air, it drives me nuts when people tell me like and boxing, his dead boxing. Boxing, is interesting anymore. I remember the days of boxing, you cover both sports very closely, which sport, is healthier right now, boxing, or mixed martial arts. Well, I think in, in Britain boxing, is enormous at the moment, you know, we have we have double figures, well champions. We have a lot of rising stowe's as a lot of interest in it, every single major broadcast channel does fight sports, particularly boxing mixed Moshe with seven ten years, beholding ju in Europe and in the UK in the UK apart from Poland with chaos w is. Domus apart from Poland amaze still very long way behind boxing. How reaches news editors radio editors the, the platforms that the influences so people in influence really follow. So I think you have to look at it regionally the moments and nothing Emma is growing battles trying to put it all in, in the UK and a really big way they've got we spoke about this time that got skysports steel, which is equivalent of SPN over. There Sky Sports has its rolling news channel ESPN sportscenter Severi influential, you know, it captures the cost doesn't ESPN sportscenter on every ball, we see everywhere when you're on there and, you know, you're breaking news. It's that kind of nerve moment is that your heart rate goes up a little bit doesn't know? I gotta deliver here. My seventy two seconds. Another said forty three just now. So go to deliver my newspapers and forty three seconds, because the whole world or the world of America, the continent is watching. It and it's like that in the UK, and I think. Boxing, is big because eventually Joshua is big because of Tyson fury. It's big because of Delhi in white speak, because I'll heavyweights big at the moment, we've got six the top ten heavyweights in the world from the UK. We've got rising stalls in that division, coming up an everyone else, besides conham Gregor's got the brakes on at the moment. He he was being a great star at the time in the UK as well, because he was loved by the UK audience. But I think when you come to America, my straw poll, my vox population of America is that mixed martial people will know names mixed Moshe laws much more than they will in from UFC stalls than they will books his right now, may people know, may whether people know Mike Tyson that kinda Manny Pacquiao but beyond that they don't really know Deontay wilder, I is my experience. I think it starts change a little bit. I think the ratings have been very good as of late. I mean has knockout was was viral everyone was was was talking about it, but it's the crossing into the. In stream sure that that, you know, the Jimmy Kimmel show. It's starting to happen. The thing is feels like boxing, always goes away the heavyweight division goes when the heavyweight division is is awkward. And right now it's pretty damn high. There's a saying, though, that this boxing in this heavyweight. Yeah. Remember, none seventy-one just down the road medicine Square Garden Hamad, Ali, and Joe Frazier multi seventy-one. Both unbeaten the time two point five million dollars. They ruining each and it was called the richest prize in sports at the time every man, and his dog every granny every grandchild knew that Muhammad Ali, and Joe Frazier. Farting. We had another air with Mike Tyson and Holyfield. Lennox Lewis Riddick Bowe George Foreman coming back as well. The an and since then the hasn't been this period till now but the best thing to fight the best. So that was my question things. So the thing about boxing is the best can fight the best if they all get on the same page and the egos, and the splits and all that in MMA, if you're fighting for the, there's pretty much no chance that you're gonna fight against belt fed. And now we. We have seen as of late in a couple of weeks. We'll have a cure Gucci coming to Madison Square Garden to fight on Caldwell even this weekend on, on a smaller scale. But you've got Jinyu fray, who's the Invicta champion, fighting ACA Hamasaki in rises, you have in victories, you have smaller level, but you'll never see Ramin chocolate del went to pride and fought a rampage Jackson doubts over him. They awaited them but never did it ever again. You'll never see that and so-. Boxing, has the cannot in my opinion, go back to the days where the best warned find the best, because it felt like they were trying to gain the audience back over the last few years. And I think they're slowly doing that. But if Joshua and wilder and fury don't fight each other this, this will be bad for boxing, right? It's really bad for boxing with this. I saw wilder announced yesterday funding looser cheese. No one wants to see that was there. The fort lost year in Brooklyn. It was a great time. Louis OT's is an older guy. Tricky south pole. He gave on say well to problems for seven rounds banjo him with brilliant uppercuts in the tenth round with think it was two to finish him his to finish Ortiz, his thing that the reason why this has happened right now is that, you know, the company, you work for and the, the rivals that both in digital marketing war for subscribers. And what's happened is Tyson furious being signed. You had him on your show in yariel hawalas Emma may show and as Tyson colts me, Russell Crowe by the ways always called me. Russell crowe. He's an amazing character. Was he in the studio? No, no. Do you have anyone the screen? Yeah. Well, he's an amazing character. Is he he's a he just one of those incredible? When you meet impulsivity such big Manny belly fitness room. Yeah. ESPN saw something in him. Taught rank source something in Bob Arum. He's come to this platform. Josiah's being upset said at the top of the show is being taken to the other platform that rivals. I don't know if SPN and DA's at end would come together and to show at the moment, because they're such big rivals in the early stages of rivalry digital did did you fasting time? But the bottom line with those heavyweights on on just finished, 'cause I'm blathering that the, the bottom line with those heavyweights his that being paid Voss sums, which wouldn't happen in MA. Right. Regardless of the pay-per-view figures will the subscription figures. They all running tens of millions of dollars for fighting quarterfinals semifinals the final, and that's the problem while that monies available. They won't come together and they will build and build this guy Andy REEs. Right. How much do you make they think he's making three million from this six weeks ago? Airily didn't know he was even having the fight. He was beating the Russian Kolyma trying Koya knock him out in five rounds at eleven months ago, he was fighting a journeyman in his loss. Fight. Oh, Baram thirty thousand US stores while because like Danta Cormie is just sniffing three million at this stage of his career notice different. Why? Because there's a bigger reach for boxing. It's the fight league doesn't promote it as that doesn't control as, as much the pay scale is completely different. I mean, I think an EMMY fighters Vossler, underpaid you think we'll ever see today that they rival boxers in terms of their purses. While the dual ready. Some of them do the top one percent. Yeah. And you releases of the world in MMA are not making three million. Well, if Well, I, I mean, I think if you get Andy, we remember has Hoffa million before, is two hundred thousand yeah, but I'm saying a quivalent to him in MMA is not getting anywhere near that the equivalence him in Emma may, is like Derek Lewis getting the fight with Daniel comb. Getting that now cozy isn't. But, but the thing is and Josiah's is a big. Star. It's different whole, the whole algorithm of boxing, the whole model of books is different because what what's, what's the broadcast is trying to do boxing, his reach that older older audience? Again, that was there that is now really an MA audience. I've gotta say, I think, you know, the Modin fight audit. I don't understand why fight audiences. When you get a big fight when you get wilder against the Josiah when you get a wild against a fury. How brilliant was that loss? Talia the lost our in his dressing room Tyson fury before we fought while to it was extranet of unbelievable as the access. It was breathtaking. Yeah. No, you know, me, I can't be quiet and I'm no, I'm no, sir. A shrinking lily, you know, but I was quiet in the corner. Frank Warren, Freddie. Roach, Ricky Hatton. Ben Davidson Tysoe fewer getting wrapped up his family there and him coming over one point, some who who's the country and western style. Chris stapleton. That was playing. You know what? You're listening to the radios, the that all these emotional songs in Tarsem Feerick over any, you know, he's like a giraffe in size came your head down. He went at Reuss what you think of this music on them before the fight. Unlike some mazing love a love the emotion, I predict a riot was on. We don't sing around we'll Danzig around to it was an extraordinary atmosphere and on just San by the way that to mean nachos. Why I love combat sport so much like that picture that you just painted? I don't care if it's, it's all the same. It is the same as all the same. I love that, like the moments before the fight, and how you see these men and women stripped away of everything they, they walk in there wearing armor, wearing shows, but they really have none. Right. They have nothing. They are at their most simplest form there. And they're so vulnerable in those moments. Right. And you see this in there is like their frayed there. And we'll talk about a little more on that. In the second freight. And then you got to get that access. I've never experienced that I'm envious, well, I know friend of mine Thome house of the biographer of Muhammad Ali had it many times. He's requested that mutiple other fighters. I hope to be able to do it more because off to woods, the nice thing as a writer broadcasters to be able to disseminate that information to other people in, in a in a sensitive and accurate and maybe beautiful at times poetic way because they all very poetic moments that very intimate moments. And I do remember my, my recollection. Roach column in the telegraph the next. I don't say price my of that it was like the best pace on the money and all the Monday papers because no one else had the access. How you say, but what I remember is everyone's eyes on Tyson fury for the hour that all watching to see if that person's gonna change gonna crack that moods. And, and I think it's what's beautiful. It's like it's almost like the family cry. Adding around see a newborn baby born or a, you know, it's, it's, it's a moment. It's a moment where all the focus of everyone in the team, everyone that loves them ever in that cares, for them is watching them emotionally physically psychologically, as they just prepare for that moment in which they are embracing war, you know, you, we know all the great lines films like three hundred you know you know, darn wealth, you know, eat wealth for tomorrow we dine in hell. And is that moment where they are going to that wits physically psychologically, mentally, and putting that lives on the line to fight? And, and the funny thing is watching that I just felt so I, I was doing the same thing in the a my is never left Tyson fury. They never left him when he came over and spoke smell just amaze because he was so present. That's what found amazing about him. He enjoyed the music he was so present the J D S the train from the other team came into the gloves are allowed to do the wraps and all those things. The commission came in. In the it was just wonderful doctoral mile. These people are built for this. I didn't say nerves from him, by the way, I saw him tense a little bit are so him Austin questions. I didn't see knows very, very relaxed member. He's from gypsy culture, missing fighting since he was little. He's from ten generations of, and uncle fights, Genova now, two hundred years of fighters in his family. No, he really is a genuine warrior, but he's not a bruising fighter. He is a brilliant bucks, who six foot nine eighteen and a half stone. So it's extrordinary, but they're all really nervous fighters and spoken to people recently said that cannot believe in their access to some of the very biggest names. How nervous fighters got before they go out. Yeah. And we, you know, we view these fighters, we put them on a pedestal. But it's in those moments like I love talking to fires two days before the fight because they're cutting weight they're vulnerable. They're thinking about their own mortality and I'm reminded actually so this weekend. Anthony Smith is fighting Alexander Gustafsson. Have you ever had the chance to speak, Anthony Smith? You'd really like him. No. Conversation. Yeah. I like his psyche. I like the way he, he is not didn't give him any tone against no Jone. Jones is one of my favorite interviews sport. Right now, he is so sincere. He is so thoughtful, he is. So honest is one of those presence is so yesterday spoke to him. And it it really like so I spoke to him. Right. When the fight against Alex was announced, and it was just days after the Jones fight. Correct told me like I don't really wanna take this fight, but I feel like I have to I'm not over the John Jones fight, and they're kind of telling me schooled in that. Yeah. And you could tell he was not happy. He was down on himself. He was lacking confidence. And I was like, whoa. Someone needs to see this interview and take the fight away from this man. He's going into a fight in Sweden against Alexander. So I spoke to him. Yesterday two and a half months later, I wanted to know, like, how are you feeling and to interesting things came from that interview? I he said, like, look, this is why athletes, don't like to tell you guys you guys being the media the truth. Because I tell you the truth. And then everyone ran with this and was creating amounted out of a molehill here. Like I was just being honest with you in the moment, but I was going to take the fight was okay. But this is why sometimes we lie to you guys a get your thoughts on that in a second. But be he'll said like, I'm embarrassed. I need. I know I'm not getting a title shot if I went on Saturday, I know I'm not getting one contenders, but I got schooled by the champ. But I need to remind myself that I belong here. I'm embarrassed. It's there's a fire burning inside of me. And I just love like at the end of the day. All these fights are we tell people about title shots number? That's great. But for a man to just be fighting for his pride. I love that story. That's an amazing story. And so I, I was sort of taken aback yesterday driving home, after speaking to Anthony and hearing his story and just hearing on it's like he's not trying to sell me on the fight. He's not trying to sell. Me on the stakes. He just needs to do this firm, self. And I love that you could also say the the there's a certain. You could draw a relaxed focus from that. He's a natural Pfizer. I tell you what was coming to mind in your telling me about that was when. Where was I was at Chicago, San Jose? My mind is discussing now. No. I think it will San Jose recently ballots Rovan when, when ROY McDonnell, full John Fitch, and there was an extraordinary interview with Rory MacDonald off to. It's it was a beautiful open. I mean, I've tried to get deep interviews Aurora enough at twenty minutes half an hour before an Rury Rory is on the spectrum in terms of talking really doesn't wanna communicate. He's very closed up. I mean done get me wrong. A feel as close as anyone in the media to him because I've interviewed him so many times, really like seen him grow up a speech, affair asus coach Lauren being around Rory in the UFC an ballot or a lot of access to him. And I think we have to celebrate moments when someone wants to be utterly honest about what's going on in their soul. And that was the moment that will remove Donald changed as a communicative human being. It was a moment of honesty in which the truth is it's not good to hurt another human being. And he had a yet an epiphany in many ways, whether he had. In training camp on I don't know. But you had during that fights where he didn't have the wriggling him to get away. When Fitch put him on the grounds and thus what made it a close fight in the stand up. I don't buy the fact he didn't wanna hit Fitch because he hit me enough times. Yeah. You know, he did really well in the it was all Ghibli tool, but fit was brilliant. Senate frankly, for forty two year old I think he is. But when I heard Rory talking like that I genuinely thought that that was the end of him. I now, now you'll friend and mine. The bad guy aerial, you'll friend Chelsea Onen fights some on June. The full team that Madison Square Garden nosy Rory with six weeks. Notice six weeks. He knows fighting sixty announce to fight Neiman Gracie, Madison Square Garden that noise in the semi final of the Balasore, welterweight sonum, having said, two months earlier six weeks earlier. I'm not sure I wanna hurt anyone anymore and you feel about that. I'm I'm, I'm slow. Lately concerns if he loses over the end of his career. I think if he wins the tournaments hill at the end of his career because I do feel the what and this is what we do. Also, see with fighters. I'm old enough to been doing this nearly three decades Bing around fighters. The you see people grow up, I mean, I remember token to Randy couture about how he loved him MA when it came around, because he'd been the alternates for three Olympic Games for he'd been tough guy in the military could do anything that anyone else could take physically great wrestler, ultimate three times the Olympics, and by the time, Emma may came around. He was going to fulfill himself, as a man, because he was so frustrated, what life brought him he got that in the end, and he, and he people change. They mature I love the maturing of fighters. Something leaves them in the end, you know, I'm a grandfather, I'm in my fifties, and, you know, even though people might not look at me when I play. School. I played spore and are really committed an but leaves you Venturi. You go back and try and play it sometimes think my God, I am pasta and that's the only time you find out, and I think, psychologically, sometimes spiritually fighters get pulse, too. And I think that's why Rory MacDonald, his lesson is getting worse. He probably getting seven hundred fifty thousand fights, so his wife, and he or his wife who's small children is gonna sites him a couple more fights. You're being paid brilliantly. You're still good at what you do. But you're not Metairie. You were once look at the fights Robbie all those fights would have done him. Look, the fight with Masasi would have done to him the spirit gets diminished. And we say we witness it the spirits of fighters gets diminished, and it does happen. And that comes an end and it's there's nothing worse than seeing fighters. Go on. I love BJ. Penn, I love your IRA Faber, you know. Yeah, but why comeback, why are these guys fighting on? You know why? Well, we know why 'cause I got a good payday. Right. You know, although I don't like this year I favor, fine. I'll tell you why fitting guy named Ricky Simone who's a youngster, a guy that shell sudden once told me is the best guy in his Jim of smoke. Good news. Yeah. This guy is like fifteen years younger than your favor and you have your favor coming back in Sacramento. Threes away. No. Yeah. Yeah. King sacramento. Right. Give him a tune always one of my favorite guys of all time, and you're trying to build Ricky Simone off your I love that favor. I have no problem favorite back. He's in great shape. He stays, always in crochet, and lucky. You know, sure he wasn't one of the best when he walked away, but it wasn't like he was getting embarrassed. Right. And so you're putting him in there against Ricky Simone. This guy who let's be honest. No one really knows who he is. You know, the hard core using a name to build a guy, that's not the kind of fight that you put your favor and right off the no and forces him to sign the contract. He's doing it because he getting a decent payday, whether it be new last in gym or probably down. On another rental pro-putin. Jay your Reagan. No. That was terrible. Yeah. Antero games. Jay is in favor right now is and BJ and Simone is in your ear back then. But still, I feel like as opposed to box. Sometimes it's nice to get to fight. Sometimes it's nice to get a guy's confidence back. You know, you've had three year left get him. Get him a is adjusted. Haven't a cub Swanson guy who's lost four. So in a row, a name everyone knows cups Watson, but he's clearly on the downside of his career and just have him, do legend fight like coke or does that I think a lot more than than UC. UC says look, you're in the you're gonna fight the best. It's not true anymore. We had c- punk fighting. You see, we had Greg hardy fight in the U of C. We've had James Toney of I wish that they would I was against render. Yeah. You've seen terrible. I pulled up an article here because I James Toney had been doing jujitsu training for that fly. But he looked like a beached while he was moaning MO told me that he submitted him, and it was such, it was a great story. His difference between just on that point. Like if a box is past his best on these being pop against a young fighter. I think depending on the style of this guy, the euros fighting and I don't know. He's on rich. I don't really know anything about him. I'll be honest with you does. But what were if a really horrible, dangerous strike, oh, with great wrestling? That's what worries me because, you know, you're is not the best striker in the world is great on the ground, and his, you know, he's going to be slowed from the years away as long as it's not a guy that's going to beat him up in the up it here, be here. He'll be yard fresher. I'd be much bigger because they are they get, you know, as they developed with generation changing. So I always loved the media perspective on all this, and I pulled up an article from the New York Times the date is December six nineteen eighty two I was five months old. And. There's a quote in here that the headline is co sell says, I've had it there's a quote in here from the great Howard Cosell. He says, quote, I was always deeply troubled by boxing nothing ever changes. I've done all I can we've seen the thump list gloves we've seen earn shavers. Ray Leonard hurt their eyes of seen Benny parade and Willie Klassen and Cleveland. Denny and Duke Kim die yet. We still have this less affair, you've got to championships networks. Must take responsibility for that. You've got sleazy promoters. You've got reporters where freight to look boxing. I've had it no more. No. Why saying why? Because he's just finished interviewing all e because all these finished and slowing these covered his loss. Howard Cosell was the face of boxing, while he was interviewed standard is the guy interviewed Mohammad-Ali more than anyone else. You know he's guy that we aspire to spotted him, but everyone. He's a name. It'd be our Cosell. Famously turned on boxing into. I was just curious when you were talking about all this. Are you ever frayed that you will become somewhat numb tall this and say much like what Rory said, maybe maybe watching people get punched isn't the best thing in the world. Are you freight to ever experienced what Howard experience? No. Because I think. 'fraid to know. We the beauty of today, you know, there were a few radio stations and probably three channels the time on savy known else. Got to express themselves in those days like thousands of Stu now. And I do think, you know, we have to play the game in some ways, like you know, I'm a journalist, I write stuff are right for newspapers. I write online. I write my own stuff on my own websites. I do podcast site to national radio. Live radio. I do things like this with you like podcast all of very free form. But they have a certain standard about the my two batting stuff I do all kinds of things, and they will TV and they're all different platforms, and you act in a different way. But the bottom line is only try and be as almost authentic as I can about what I'm saying. I really care about people fighting, I hate mismatches. I'm a pot of my seat screaming. The referee it's you gotta finish his. Now. Stop it now because I don't I I've been around people being very badly hurts. And you know, more in boxing MMA, and sometimes you there's always concerned when someone's being administered off. Been knocked out when they're not moving for a while. Because that is a critical moment as a reason. They're a niece, the ringside while they're ambulances ringside while are safety procedures weights white checking. It's an we cover inherently dangerous sports. They all natural things only two percent of the population. If that is really interested in it in the main in the main stay, but obviously people come to the big fights. It's a very unusual thing talking about. It's not normal to fight people for living. So I never forget that. That's why I'm never critical of anti release looks like what Cole. Billy Buntar like a fat pudgy guy, you know, or fat slogans is X promoter Byrom cold him because he has the courage. He has the spirit. He's got next. Warrior in him. And he fears no one as he told me was fighting men at the age of twelve all the people, the men and women, and that they are quite beautiful human beings calling, and, you know, we talked about the privilege of close to people unite both been around a law fighters, just after they wanted to stop they lost with a microphone, or even just all our alms on the shoulders. What people don't realize we get slagged off on social media things with very close to fighters. They enjoy us because we're disseminating lives. Many of them can't speak for themselves in the way that we do fashions speaking about people about bringing people outs of themselves, and you do grow close. You grow close to people you work with on television. You grow close to people who do radio shows with you get to know them as human beings. And you get to see the vulnerabilities and it's actually a difficult job, sometimes because you don't want to expose them as you saying in that way, as he was saying earlier on. We are in a very rugged of this. Sorrel unusual complicated world. And that's why you could always expect the unexpected Feis votes. Yeah, I, I am an off these men and women. I really like like I'll go home on a Sunday morning and think back, you know, talking to max hallway about this this week to look with. He's wonderful man. I was just in all of the way he handled himself after that fight against this is one of the most natural fighters. I'm gonna went to Hawaii recently with ballots to back to back Friday and Saturday. And I didn't really get out in the hoods 'cause I love to go into the hood, Sherry law for that. But the truth is you go into the hoods and you go meet people on the, on the ground, and they love and Holloway is just so cool. So netra listening. Yeah. Is all about his kid. He's all about his family, his, you know, he's just wonderfully as just wonderful man to be around talk about fights. You can say the same about the Diaz brothers. I understand you have an update. So the last time you were on the show. You told us about this story where you went to Scott. Stockton. And you tried to find they d- as all over California trying to find him. So since then what has happened funny, you know, because through the power of your show as well overseas ital- at the moment that Nate Diaz cover story on fighters only magazine is out the moments do by the magazine I it is out. There is a great interest, really good magazine. Actually, there's interviews this brilliant, annual Strauss interview in the call it. I wrote it. But Strauss had a motorcycle trash could barely walk. Yeah. Came about recent against Shane krypton, who's another incredible story. So of the two most incredible stories in MMA fighting each other croutons guy that balloon PTSD from being a Royal Marine was blown up in, in Afghanistan. Tried to kill himself to know this story Shane krypton. You must get him on your show. Shane crooks before tenure Straus recently got beaten by Strauss. He got PTSD serving in the US in the marines in Afghanistan, and then or Iraq. But it was a way. Back like ten years ago. Came back was really depressed into drinking. Balloons had an MA fight heavyweight. He's a featherweight now in his early thirties lovely man, tried to kill himself. Seven hundred dollars worth of drugs from an undercover cop went back to take the drugs could himself got busted by the undercover comfort sold in the drugs, who saved his life, and he just kind of had an epiphany lost one hundred pounds and way fighting ballot. Oh now it's never going to be the world champion, but he leaves his numbers on his social media as a Samaritan anyone can call him anytime who's going through issues and he'll counseling and mazing story. And he was fighting this guy nearly killed himself in a motorcycle again, who could barely walk in days and training county, couldn't the doctors told me never walk again. And he was like no and Strauss's motivated so heavily by daughter. I felt so inspired. When I spoke him recently, he told me about his days in prison, that would just extrordinary where he's five, eight guy. But he could wrestle. He went to a really good school, but he was, you know, and he was from the hood, but he went to a really good school because he could wrestle, and he was able to get through the violent and people can about him, and these all-sports is replete with these stories. They all everywhere, you know, some of the women, we interviewed most beautiful women looking as well, I will say that, that, you know, because they are physically so fits, but the, the soles of them, you know other times token to Jessica I about the issue she had with a father and she's a beautiful human being, you know, the so much giving in fights foods, you know. And that's why that it's a very harsh environment. Sometimes when things go wrong, people, an I'm not into Sean for the you can be. It's I'm you can be very what kind of cruel. No. No. I mean, I know I think I can be cruel. No, I think some. Sometimes say Joe. No, I don't want to go the wrong way. Let's go. Let's go set it. No. I can be cruel. Well, I think I don't like you know, the world chart and Freud. Yeah, I do not like it. When something goes wrong for fighter Nevins piling on them off to do that. I. No, I hope you tone. What we need you either think I do or I don't I think sometimes in the post I thought, wow, kill arial is really cold air over that, you know, which, which probably rising, you've changed. Okay. I think I think you're backtracking. I feel you didn't expect me to react this way and you don't wanna tell like it is. Tell you what it is. I think I'm more emotional than you are really. I would actually beg to differ. Well, that's cool. Well, I'm really pleased to. No. I'm I'm pleased to hear that. Okay. No. Because I didn't think years ago, I didn't know if you can about the fights as much as you do. Now, I didn't know that actually I go back to the Anthony Smith interview. I just change you being around sure the. Yeah. But the old fighters more than any, you know what I mean care critical, and I appreciate you. Bring that up. I, I find that maybe I care about them too much, like at the end of the day, you mustn't get too close to any of the key. That's what I mean. I bring up the Howard Cosell thing. I don't wanna see. I don't wanna see Anthony Smith walk in there Saturday. If he's not truly into it. I don't wanna see him get. I don't wanna see ROY McDonald, get hurt you know. You know you start to care for these people as individuals. And I think that sometimes especially with the internet, especially social media filings, knockout, we celebrate these things. For example, there is a great great, knockout last week at PF L where Daymond Jackson right Damon Jackson. This guy former fighter got nailed the nail the with jumping knee and they were really promoting it a lot on social media, and I was like there's almost like a line is a line guy. Just got brulee knocked out. He got sent to the hospital. It's sometimes it's a little too much while I was alive when, when Douglas Lima CTO, Michael page recently, and it was so brutal and page really badly. Damaged the way he went down. He was lot uses expression quite slow when it happens. He did let you dropping show into a suitcase. Oh my hit crumbling into. Yeah. He looked very known someone that maim. They to the four Hamid. They news. I love. No. That's what I mean. Like. I love to hear that about you. Because I know I've known you before you were father. And I think all these things as we mature, we as we grow up, we, you know, I, I worked very closely with the brain damage books. Michael Wilson in his fifties. My age and he fought Chris Eubank, and he was horribly it six lifesaving, brain operations. I won't London marathon with him in six and a half days. It took us actually Kosei all the lights in his brain in his house runs. Get moving as so to speak, and we had to do over six days. The only one that we, we raised a few hundred thousand pounds through his way back in two thousand three and I was his ghostwriter for the for the journey was amazing. You know, Frank mill of famous people wreckage of as came on the walk with us. Couple of hours, loads of people, join, it was amazing. And, you know, I've with friends was spiritual friends as well. You know, we he's a very spiritual man. Now. But he, he really struggles with life, even though physically he was he was such specimen, Michael Watson. And I think as time goes on, we will see an EMMY fighters affected by the careers. They've had one's gone on too long an to worry about them. And, you know, I, I love to hear the fact that you don't lose yourself Omay, I never lose the fact of what I'm watching is inherently dangerous, you know, even to the point where I'm not gonna scream at Terry Lewis and Francis and Gannon because they can't pull the trigger and Kanani throw eighteen or nineteen strikes in fifteen minutes because they all suffer fair, a nerve because I like me and you that flesh and blood and bone and spirits, you know, and they, they all human, you know, now, we'll have human weaknesses and frailties. That's while the Paralympics because they are the full front of their own physicality because they. All saying you can cut things off for me a may not have this, but you will not don't my spirit and that, and that's what was saying in front of us. And the thing is we must never lose that. And in this mode nature where people don't spend as much time around the fighters. You don't get to know that 'cause they look like superheroes, your robots rock them sock. Robots fighting. There they are human beings like you. And I they bleed they cry. They love they lose their heartbroken. They grieve that, that they that's why we've got to really celebrate the coaling there in speaking of humans. How about Patty LAN? Here's a guy who had to retire right out of out of nowhere. He had a rare blood disorder, and he is so passionate about his people. I, I will be honest. I mean I don't know intimately what's going on in Ireland. But a mutual friend of ours, PT, Carol tells me a little bit about it. Patio, certainly educated me. And he said, you know what I need to try to fix the situation, the homelessness. Situation. The, the fact that you have people who are, you know, living can't afford rent. I it appears as though to real crisis in Ireland. So he was just elected to these south Dublin county council on Saturday. And I think this is a wonderful story. I don't know a lot about his party. I dunno lot about, you know, but just the fact that guy had his career taken away from him. And you know, try to go the gym with his coach John, cabinet appears as though they've had a falling out as a result of it, and has really especially in Ireland has really broken through because in Ireland, as you know, Emma, fighters are kind of looked down upon and now with kinda McGregor, you know, it seems like people are starting to turn on him the media starting to turn him. And so for him to, to break through and to speak with the passion and the eloquence that he does is a really inspiring story. I'm impressed by this maturing help two years ago. The, the best thing to do is create hooligan t-. Yep. He's because he loves his cO to nothing the brands. You know, was the thing to do like about Patty again about being around fighters. I'm pretty sure had a brain peration at one point as well. I think remember brain scar on his heads for your c. Yeah. Maybe pre you're surfing had. I'm pretty sure something like that. I may be wrong on that. But Patty's, what Patti is someone who's Uttley true to his own community. He is one of those people that will change thousands and thousands of lives by people being around him. He already does it in the gym. The reason he got voted in. I think it was the shin Fain party who, who were of the political wing of what people call the IRA now that isn't the situation anymore. But regardless at the politics doesn't matter in this. What does matter is that he's been voted into politics into the role of a counselor based on the on by popular by? Populace supports by by the people on the grounds who may be done even vote sometimes. Yeah. Well, maybe haven't even voted before voting in a guy who they believe will represent than needs, and their community, and that is what being apoliticial is all about. It's not about furthering your own needs. You are that to serve you are there, too. It's not about self. It's about service. You know it's not about finding yourself. It's about losing yourself. Do you know what I mean? You know, for anyone it wants to grow as a person exponentially through the life, you can find yourself, but, you know about losing yourself losing yourself in others losing. And that's what he's done. And he is an extraordinary man. And I think he'll be very successful what he does. He's man of the people. Exactly. He is a man of the people. I mean, he's got such charisma. He's, you know how. How he made flyway on never know 'cause he's five eleven you there that night in Cosi will, what went when, when Kona footprint, Dow down. So, I was I was working BT sport remaining. The remains in the studio remains one of the most magical nights that I've ever covered in person. Right. I mean it's been many, but it's just that was special. But what is the, the such bath pit? Remember that, that three arena, terrain a three it's been cold different things in Dublin the shape of it is designed to it was the turning stone. It was the turning station for, for the trains, at the end of the line. So Scott unusual shape. Really? So when the when the octagon was in that were ten rows on one side, and then huge Bank. So the noise reverberates all the way down the giant Bank of light nine thousand fans and then bounces off the wall, doesn't it? So at least when, when the Irish protecting taking Paul there and competing, it did sound like a jumbo jet was taking off the big under Jumba jazz. It was amazing and it wasn't just about Connor was about Patty, there was no that was that was the Patty night. Yeah. Qatar console pod. All those guys. Yeah. Park and gun exactly. Neil serey. Yeah. It was it was just one after the next winning the kept winning. Well, that was that was the moment the, the. I think Emma and Ireland really took of course. But look, look what's happened now that when James Gallagher in in ballots goes and fights. And now they sell out every wants to him. So it's like he's got the belts already brilliant. Now, I, I remember at the open workouts. It was in some sort of like museum or something, I don't know if you was in the Irish parliament was Irish parliament. Yes. And I remember being in the courtyard, it was on their bikes and they came up in the what's going on in there. And I said, o'conner mcgregor's having an open work on all his Connor there. And this is before Connor was Connor. Right. I think at this time, he had only two fights in the C max Holloway and Marcus bridge. And they like we Conor McGregor. We like HANA McGregor. He gives us hope he gives us hope. I can't believe that he's doing this, and that's when it really hit me, I think, for the first time my career that, you know, these aren't just UFC fighters are cultural icons by the back to the culture, icons Univer finish your story about the brothers. Yes. Of course. Yes or. Yeah. So uncovering the venison. Yes, it was Rory MacDonald was fighting Jones show, K. And I'm just tapping out the quit reports, you know atop as we call it for, for the report on the night and suddenly, invalid by these big homes that come around me in an a bad hugging. Look up and send you the picture because someone took a picture of it was Nate dares, and he'd come on the news, he said, listen, man, he said it shouldn't happen like this. We don't like the because he'd hoods about code cost. And I told a story and it was like my hunter Thompson like trickles, California. Trying to find said, we don't roll that way. Man. I'm sorry. I didn't get to see you, you got to come and train come and do a training day with us in, in the Nick das- academy in Stockton, an AJ zome was, like you, call common, and it's wiz the, you know, because you had that homey moment with those guys didn't, you'll never love that, you know, one of your seminal moments in a way in your career where everyone all Ireland with the boys and they all realize conic figures now. Has indeed you? And they know it was just sweet that he came over, and did that because they all sweet tears brothers, and I think he heard the whole story of people posted onto him identify listens to listened to the podcast, but he clearly knew I'd be not been driving around trying to find him while he was texting me back, and he was genuinely sorry. You know, I don't roll like that. We gotta come up, say us, and I'll text him again in L of going somewhere. I'm show. I think maybe this time, I'll get the invite to Nick's house, and we sit around and who knows maybe even a little smoke. I let, wow that's deep. I like the fact that there's a happy ending to this story. There's always had a result of this show. Thank you. Yes, true. That but it it's listen. It's a very small community the fight worlds. And those of us in it know who's who wants waltz, and who's put the odds in the hard work in. And you know, we know those guys Falungong for long enough to know the and he is back now look coming back his knee. And that's what the whole story is about, right? He's coming by every was telling me, I told you at the time when it's story AJ is all you know. His ballot or career who's, you know, who's supposed to be really, really good fighter. We haven't seen enough with saying that something in the air, Nick Knight's, definitely on the way back and Meave Knicks thinking about it. You know. So I don't know about that one. But it's exactly. But the point being. There's that certain guys you wanna see share share his one of them. I wanna see NATO against Corrigan. I'd love to say that it's one of the biggest bags. But yes, I agree with you agree with you hundred percent but he trained so much already. Is there most evenings he still training? He's shape. He's in great shape. He misses it and it took a while. He made a lot of money off those to Connor fights. I don't blame them for wanting to take a break. But I I understand. He really misses it. He's itching to come back and he really wanted this fight. This means something to him the poor. You fight didn't really mean anything to him. This fight actually means something he doesn't, like PETA's Pettus doesn't like him. I like much. I know that you have salon your tummy about that piece. You have another piece that is about to come out or has come out come out on one of the more. Influential people in the sport till ski slot. You always something every year nominated journalist of the year in the world, Amir woods, when it seven times of eight okay? But he said that you load your voice. Said that. So modestly that may eight. It's, it's on a vote. Of course you your you'll awards went on the now on a panel. It might be slightly. I should've wanted at least one can I feel like the fighters only awards should just be for fighters? How about that? No, no. It's, it's good knows funders help. It's helped you develop. It's healthy industries about. No. It's brilliant, that brilliant have those awards and integrate the sport is built for. You've wanted every year part from one something new. I don't know. But the thing is should it just be about the fighters. It's called fighters only well is about farces them. But, you know, I know it's brilliant. There's like twenty five different awards share twenty. No, it's brilliant, unwrap here. The owner funny brilliant, Joe putting all that together the industry needed it question about that is, why is it happening in July arm gonna clue if it's? I I'm not a part of the well, I'm the panel who votes, who on those on the say or no, no done all to disclose that old prominent people in of my world, fighters and journalists, and yes, good panel. I'll panel people, you know, well, or any people about seven okay? Yeah. So you have a feature coming out on Jeff Novitsky. He's nominated for leading man. Okay. I go and touch Jeff and Jeff Novitsky for people that don't know who is the drug. Saw employed by the of used to work for the US one of the cold, the food. What they called FDA, the FDA, the golden drudge the gulling. Nope. I'm being golden snitch, but he wears a t shirt with that on. It does himself. Well, how do you feel about Jeff sqi? All I think is tremendous. Why I think he? He was brought into the sports to bring a new Aaron Severi tough job. You know, let's not lie about this. Mix most laws was maligned with banned substances for a long time. You know, everybody knows the by background, so he was brought in trying erotic eight that from the sport is very brave move by the sea, because in some ways, they were shooting themselves in the foot trying to clean up sport. Make it into a sports. Make it safer. Make it more of a level playing field. Obviously people will always cheese as always be cheating in sports. But when it comes to duping it out with someone hissing with knees and elbows to the head and face and kicking people. And you cannot use your body as a weapon if you've altered it by chemical means he come to. It's just it's heinous. I think it's criminal and nothing down the. Join at some point we will end up with death from someone of someone who has full somebody's taking the wrong substances, and it probably will end up in courts and it could have an even end up as a manslaughter case couldn't you know, homeside say in a culpable homicide. So it's very, it's very, very difficult area with a lot of movements on the moral compass, for me the and he's doing a great job. I think he's been in the school for years. I, I listen to his tycoon things and he said, member, he was influential, Barry bones. The, the baseball player and who was caught as cheats, and launch home strong. The cyclists to very well, documented Novitsky was was instrumental in those of Paul the team, you know, working with the FBI in different people and investigating bringing those people to, to Justice in those terms. And what he said he found fascinating. Woes. He was very he was very fulsome in his price for Dana way, on the team, the UFC in how pioneering, they are in all areas because it's still very, very young sport in its infancy in many ways. But he also said he was so impressed by, by the fighters as people, we've been talking about today, very similar in a way that we've been talking about how it's a privilege to be close to these people. Because you do it mile what they're doing. And he's he spoke to me, and I mentioned, kind of lewd to this earlier, I didn't mention his name, but he was saying he could not believe how many, very big names. I can't name names, how many vary very big names. He's being in the locker room within the USA just before they walk out, so that music and so on that they turned to him. And they say him so terrified rhino. I'm so terrified. And he said it makes you wonder what extrordinary PayPal? You're dealing with what kind of pressures, they face they're under why they're putting themselves through this and another thing. He mentioned, which I think this is out in this month's fighters only magazine essentials two or three thousand one interview and he did really opened up and I really enjoyed speaking to him. He was also saying that this is interesting for everyone conham Grega, who was only full was see for once in MMA in tune Hof years. Is that right? Yes. Since the Alvarez. Yes. Owes once in two years in that entire time. All the fighters of Kohl's certainly the prominent ones identifies, every single Pfizer all the fighters who are very prominent in sports have to label whether they are twenty four seven three six five, and he has a one hundred percent record of warious. They know areas all time and he has his completely cleaning at every test they've ever done him. That's what Novitsky told me completely clean. And I think very good sign the he is coming back, and he said, you know, they're all people who terrible said, as a as a large number of fighters who completely Adair adhere to the system, and he said, we always critique those who test positive, but we don't give credits for those who really do keep to the system. I it was very interesting to hear about quantum McGregor. Yeah. No. I mean he is polarizing figures. Fair to say that not to me not, you know, not really. No. Because it's you cannot if you're a drug saw if you're the golden snitch you. You can have member sport would jailing with. The meet the difficult. I told him about the John Jones case. Okay. The picket grants the one on the front lines and kind of gets thrown on him. Even though it's he's not he's not he's not a drug scientist. I get that. But he's the one that kind of has to take the, you know, the bullets as the fizz Dana. I kind of throws it to him when I speak to Jeff about it. Well so, so he gets that. That's why I think he might be viewed as polarizing for some reason I feel he doesn't like me. He never response. When we said he said, the trouble is, you don't have feelings. I'm callous next calluses cynical. No. All them. You didn't talk about his clarify. But I think it is committed like when they hired him. I thought it was commendable move some, too. I have my questions about the relationship with Sada because how could it be truly independent if they're paying for it, right? There have been some times where you kind of think yourself like, wait a second. Sometimes we're, we're doing what's best for you can have this relationship with you Sada. You can pay you Sada internally, it has burned them. And I think that they got embed with you, Saturday, sign you sat at to come do their anti-doping, only to create this nice little package that Lorenzo could sell the company and other kind of stuff elements of, of that, of course, they signed up with revolt. They were corporatising yes company. They brought in one hundred fifty executives solos kind of things to do that. Yes. Of with view to selling, you know, it's unite totes about this many times, over many years, you could say the pats Nova it wouldn't surprise me. One died c, Lorenzo by back for half a billion that kind of businessmen if they go if they down on the heels again I could same coming back an anon- welcome him back. He was brilliant for the sport without Lorenzo tater, Dana white, maybe even Jeff Novitsky down the line, we so easy to criticize pay. People that doing they created it with benefiting from your career, my career, the, the great night, some of the great night's who've had an all in all sports careers have been as resulted what these people have done without them we wouldn't have. So I have to think sometimes we, you know, we have to disseminate news and we have to be critical in some ways, but I don't wanna be heavily critical of Jeff Novitsky because I found I've spoken, Tim several times workouts next him of Chansa Jeff, he takes serious journalist. Seriously? An he you know, I suppose him for phenomenal. Our about all of this. He told me the things he really wants in place, which is a swap that can take in the future that just takes blood sample from every single person, the everson's up in the whole of mixed martial arts. So you have a blood possible of everyone. That's the only way, we'll move forwards the beginning of someone's career when they signed you sign a blood possible. Say there are different ways that people could still cheat. You sign you sign up. You've got blood possible. It's tested on a template from that first test. And that's the only way listen in twenty thirty years time when you and I enjoy, our great grand children, or your grandchildren. They will have so many sophisticated ways of testing who knows hundred years, fight sports might be completely banned. Because people realize that to blows to the head can completely kind of adult senses forever. You know, you'll never be aegis Dono once, you know, the, the critical science of things people change views, change American football CT now, you know, look, the things change so quickly. We don't know about all off. Al-baz was so much tougher than us because I didn't know the things that were bad for them. Do you know what I mean? You know that we see in the Lucien of man in the Lucien and women in society. So. Nothing wrong with Jeff Novitsky. I think he I think he's doing the rarely job. He really, you know, listen, he's working for the USA, so he's always gonna pointed at him. The fact that he that, that could be a bias that he's not gonna bite the hand that feeds him. So he is in a difficult position in that sense. He was highly criticized over the John Jones situation, but you know what is fascinating? The story that he managed to Lorenzo's jet, and take Jonet Christmas to test in California, the same labs that you saw to vodka all these. They use the same scientists the same labs. So, you know, you can always those Lorenzo's jet. The other use Lorenzo's yet to cause Andy foster of California, when they switched the event from Nevada to California within we Hof and I felt sorry for the fans Anka's tickets. Without the when they shift to the Jones Gustafson headliner from Nevada to, to California, they had to think it was the twenty four twenty fifth twenty sixth of it was something Boxing, Day on what we call books in twenty six or something that they had to get the test on those alab open in Los Angeles. I think it was. But they took Lorenzo's jet. They picked John up and Albuquerque. I think Novitsky jumped in Lorenzo's, Jack he'd all stain, it could do. They and they told about the possibility of using Lorenzo's jet Novitsky jumped into jet went to Albuquerque and the jet picks up picks up, John Jones, they flew to LA. They took the blood sample that left it with the lab, they flew Jones back while because he backs Vegas and. The same old same individually told me by the time he got back to, to Vegas. They had the tests. The he was fine to go the result. Yeah. Amazing. It is amazing. But it makes me wonder why sometimes you have situations where the test results, come out after the fight right? If they can get it that quickly. And also aren't the test supposed to be anonymous? They are anonymous. Oh, they know they know who their oh, we have to get this rushed. It's John Jones tests. No one being a cynic air. But the thing is you're right. No. The someone someone takes the the bloods. Yeah. Then it goes into the lab, the lab, scientists had to get so fast labeled numbers than they're not using someone on straightway. They opened the lab for them. No one, no one asks, why are we doing this on Christmas Eve? Well, you can you can sommes whatever you want to surmise you can say, the whole of fight sports, his early corrupt while heavyweights fighting each other in boxing, the because it's all about why all of age thirty five day to make the timing right for the event because he wouldn't do it fairness, they were on the same car to him. And that's why he lets all in negotiation. It is. But the fight sports has always been the wild west of sports has, you know, there's no statutory bodies, you know, there's no the commissions for me should to have really find. I mean, it's, it's interesting for me is like. I think the Commission's probably have more power. But then when you're around, it's the commissions have relationships with promoters with fight league's. Yes. They all start. She government bodies. But, you know, every everyone loves the fight industry that will pulse of it. You know, when you around people friendships, develop it's no always as clear, cutters Papp's. We would like it to be. But his never going to be perfect areas. Never ever going to be perfect. Let us leave it at that. It has been a pleasure. So is really. Yeah. It's been it has been lovely, and I think we love the imperfection. We love the imperfection that is the fight game. This has been a lot of fun. My man may say mate, because you're my mate, 'cause you're British. Enjoy the coverage. His big weekend for the both of us. You're covering Anthony Joshua. I'm covering game one of the NBA finals. So I know you love your yes. Basketball in Toronto hoop. Maybe make it sink. Thank you. He is Gareth Davies of the daily. Telegraph William Hill. Talksport fighters only ring magazine. Ring magazine earth, still comb only, unbelievable, true renaissance man, a pleasure as always. Thank you for doing this coming studio. It really is so much fun to talk to you face to face. And, and hope that we get to do it more often. I appreciate everyone who has tuned in this week and every other week, please continue to download rate by comment. All those things and more. We are back Monday for a regular show, regular time and place. There's an episode of the bad guy on ESPN plus dropping and probably just a matter of hours. If you're listening to this right away, but it will be Wednesday night, and then the regular schedule resumes next week. Like I said, you have see in stock home this Saturday on his pin. Plus, n ESPN two, there's a whole bunch of events. There's rising there's cage word. Offers ella. There's a lot going on as always. So people have a lot to discuss next week for now. We're out of time for Daniel back in Bristol for Gareth here. New York for myself again. Thank you so much for listening as always. Enjoy the fights talk to next week.

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NPR News: 10-30-2020 12PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 3 weeks ago

NPR News: 10-30-2020 12PM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Lakshmi Singh another sharp decline in the US markets. This hour capping a tough week for Wall Street. The Dow has fallen three hundred, twenty one points or one point two percent on fears the surge in new corona virus cases in the US and Europe and the ongoing standoff between the White House and Congressional Democrats over. A relief to millions of out of work Americans, the Nasdaq has fallen two point, six percent and the S&P is down one and a half percent number one issue for many voters this election year the US economy especially in hard hit states of the Midwest President Trump and former vice president, Biden or campaigning in the region today with stops plan in Wisconsin and Minnesota here's NPR's Aisha Roscoe. President trump and former vice president. Joe Biden each have jam packed schedule on the campaign trail in addition to Wisconsin and Minnesota trump will also be spending some time in Michigan Trump one Wisconsin in Michigan in two thousand sixteen. Now, trump's fighting hard to keep those states in his column though polls show him behind he's been trying to make the case that Biden would be bad for the economy at the same time Biden his. Work in the Flip Iowa were poses a showing a tight race corona virus cases are surging in the State Biden. His argued that trump is mishandled. The pandemic does not deserve to be reelected Aisha roscoe NPR news. It's the last day of early voting in Georgia which has emerged as a battleground state from member station W. ABC Susannah Kapalua, reports Democrats who haven't won a presidential contests there since nineteen ninety-two hope to flip the state. Over half of register Josiah voters already cast their ballots record early, voter turnout experts say that may buoyed well for Democrats who have not seen polling data this tight in a generation Republicans say they are also seeing strong turnout but find themselves on the defensive even in down ballot. State House races, Susannah Kapela reporting in France thousands of soldiers are guarding places of worship and other sites after another suspected Islamist, terrorist attack on a church in niece killed three people this week meanwhile, large anti-france protests are being. Held across a Muslim world over published images deemed deeply insulting to Islam Turkey being France's most outspoken critics but today that countries dealing with a different emergency us. Geological Survey says a magnitude seven point zero earthquake struck off the coast. NPR's Peter. Kenyon has details rescue crews converged on collapsed buildings searching for survivors amid the rubble is mayor as mayor said, some twenty buildings came down in the earthquake is MIRA's Turkey's third largest city damage was also reported on the Greek island of Samos off the Turkish coast. SONAM warning was issued and videos from the state news agency showed flooding in at least one district of Izmir aerial footage broadcast on Turkish news channels showed at least three plumes of smoke rising from the city. This is NPR. Roughly fifty migrants have died attempting to cross from Senegal to Spain's Canary Islands the boat with twenty four survivors was found floating at sea yesterday by authorities in local area Lucienne. Reports. This is just one of various shipwrecks in the region, the migrants both took off from Senegal two weeks ago but their engine was soon damaged leaving them at the mercy of the Atlantic. Oceans weather. After a harrowing journey, the survivors will be sent back to their countries of origin. Last week, another shipwreck and Senegalese waters cost the lives of one hundred and forty migrants. The UN migration agency called it the deadliest shipwreck of the year. This comes amid a sharp increase of migrant crossings from west. Africa. To Spain's Canary Islands with roughly eleven thousand arrivals so far this year more than four hundred people have died attempting the journey double the amount of data and all of two thousand and nineteen. For NPR news. I'm Lucia Bananas in Barcelona students at a Massachusetts University are under orders today to Remain in their dorm rooms for a week because of Corona virus outbreak on campus exceptions are being made for food pickup or medical emergencies. Eight more people at university reportedly have tested positive for corona virus in recent days where the one hundred students are reported to be in quarantine under the new restrictions, students will be required to get tested twice a week. This is NPR news.

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The Many Lives of Doja Cat

Popcast

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

The Many Lives of Doja Cat

"Between two or cancellations lost creative gigs and shrinking ad revenue. The covert nineteen crisis is making it clear that the system supporting creative people is broken. Patriotic offers a better way. We help creators make lost revenue and build a more sustainable income source by offering a monthly membership to their fans intern fans get access to exclusive community premium contents and the chance to become active participants in the work. They love Checkout Patriotic Dot com now and helped change the way art is valued it. Just keep welcome to the New York Times podcast anti-static white amusing music criticism. I'm your host. John Monica why do you not say so? I often think to myself the number one song in the country is does your cat and Nicki Menaj will. Maybe by the time you're hearing this. Maybe it won't be the number one but at this moment is is is the remix of say-so the All star team up. That took that record from big tick tock it too big pop radio hit too over the top smash. Barb proved Josiah. Cata someone who has had a pretty fascinating. Let's say six or seven year run with a lot of unusual twists and turns and I was thinking about other pop stars of that generation and most pop popstars have fairly linear paths or very legible. Arc's dirge cat has had a lot of ups and downs. This hit is happening six months after her last record came out. Does your cat has had one or two very big viral hits. She's had a couple of kind of messy viral moments. She had a a moment where some old tweets were off the had offensive language and she was kind of forced to apologize. Although not without some resistance she has been messy on Instagram. Live and then embraced the mess. It is not the path that we have historically come to understand is a pop star path but it may be how pop stars are made now. So we're GONNA talk on this week's podcast. Many lives of DOJ cat and the many turns that she has taken to arrive at this moment. So we're going to go all the way back to the earliest phases of her career and joining me on. This journey is going to be Laken starling. Laken was good Karl. Thank you for being here to talk DOJ cat with me. I'm very happy to be here. Thank you for having me. Laden writes about music and culture of variety of places should that Lana Zak teen vogue. Story rights were pitchfork. That's why she's here. She reviewed the does record for Pittsburgh rights for the Kat used to work at fader back in the day so his out here covering all the ground. So I'm excited. That's you know who who among us? Really? We chatted a little bit yesterday right and we were talking about the unlikely. Pachinko path of dosier cat to end up at number one and how she has had kind of all these unlikely twists and turns extremely odd angle path. Very very non linear as we were saying and you mentioned not conversation. The you've been paying attention to her from way back. Twenty fourteen. Twenty fifteen era soundcloud era. We already kind of set the table that here's a person as the number one song in the country will arrive at the kind of the path in the mechanism by which that has happened but DOJ has like seven different backstories so maybe starts off with the early to mid twenty tens. When does she I end up on your radar and in what contexts were you paying attention tour? So I'm pretty sure found. Does your cat on soundcloud. I think I really like I remember. Washy sounds doesn't sound like anybody else at the time. I was like really into her in the way that she was able to sing. Rathburne like both very well and on pershing not like. She's not wrapping as much as she wraps now which is cool because I was introduced to those cat as singer who could kinda flex in between between you know that Kinda like hated melody thing and she has voiced camelback instrument anyway so it sounds she makes Sam in sort of an interesting time on soundcloud right. 'cause that twenty twelve twenty thirteen twenty fourteen period when we talk about. Mike soundcloud robbery and it's been happening twenty sixteen onwards. It's not that it's a very different energy and some of that stuff from that time. It's that weird. I WAVE OF POST TORONTO. Kind of post drake like everybody being like okay. I'M GONNA tackle this problem from like a slightly different perspective and it reminded me like I had not listen to per. This is the EP. We're talking which came out in thousand fourteen. I had not listened to per prior to today and I was really struck by the one point. Oh soundcloud -ness of at all although weird because like that. Epa It'd be put out today and people were like it now. But I think it struck me one repair voice but also because of her competence which I this she continues to dislike evolve and make it really weird and like those very in your face slightly likely. Don't your wait out or you're not. You're intrigued probably and I guess you don't really get the weird part of power the porcupine of her from her music It's more so her on line or imprisoning but not in that in that they were not it was just totally is while like sexy for very confident voice that I just wanted to hear more. I think what five song but then part it was like. Where's where's that girl? That really lessons out. We should actually play so high which is kind of the first record that really got attention. So let's hear a little bit of so high which came out earlier than the EP but then got put on the and this is Josiah cats or go twelve two thousand thirteen mean a dress yourself do ruin and trump Los Ohi. Another one is actually the first track on our EP. Beautiful gives me the same feels as tracks like as track better than me. Which is on Hopping her knew her latest. I won't issues like was very gender Doj Dosier gives you a pink. Plus you think of life is like pink always since like his bedroom. That's like a moonlight like that's what I think. Probably says like that where she's been like many times but the way. That song gives me by really delicate airy but competent feels at the song. Beverly the same like Bob of light on beautiful confident. It doesn't really get much better than me. And so beautiful is like probably like a understated gem on that really think is really cool because she still messing pocket. Now she's involved. Yeah it's interesting. You mentioned like at this. Ep was dropped today. People really gravitate towards him. I think that's right because there is so much of the texture of our NBA was kind of like coagulating on soundcloud at that. Time has ended up becoming the breakthrough R. and B. Sound of the last two years especially Josiah herself. I don't think post say-so could do this. Exact record like hypothetical anonymous person putting this out. Maybe all of a sudden we'd get signed to a real record that gets that it's that precise that early. Does your cat stuff like you. Say It's it's part of what she brings now but it's only one component of what she brings now after this. Ep comes out or maybe just before the EP comes out. She signed a real deal. She signed with Chemo. Sabi art which is an RCA imprint. That's the doctor Luke. Imprint we will get back to the doctor Luke Washington. We will ris arrive at although I should say I did. I did fact I did day check. I did some day Jax. The EP came out. I believe in August of twenty fourteen. The first cash lawsuit is believe in October of two thousand fourteen now. That's not to say that people didn't know things or were aware that things were in the cooker. However I believe the DOJ signed with Luke. Late twenty thirteen early twenty fourteen. So it's possible that at the time of signing she was unaware that that was like on the horizon that it was kind of happening by the seeds. That's possible we don't know we shall come back to it because it's been an interesting day or two on twitter because of this okay so then drops that. Ep has a perspective and I will say as I was going through her spotify page. There is something very very interesting that I have often thought about when I try to assess or try to imagine like how the musicians of the future the popstars. The future are going to release music and I realized what they're GONNA do. Is it's going to be like here's album. Here's a two song thing. Oh here's a single. Oh here's a random remix. Oh here's like a odd. Like withdrew did like an odds and ends collection that kind of gathers up a bunch of nonsense. Oh and here's a four song thing. There's some of that energy in the Longitudinal look at does your cat and I was like Oh. This is actually very modern in as far as release approach although maybe as a kind of way to concentrate energy around. Her may be a little challenging. Because you're kind of just drip drip dripping out over a couple of years. Yeah and it's been quite a while like I mean what's that like. Six years was fourteen in-between then and I think she was on a feature track gardening. Seventy there really wasn't like a cat legal until two thousand eighteen so that was on streaming. At least we should touch on something. We talked about yesterday briefly. Which is and you mentioned in just a second ago. The kind of extra musical stuff. 'cause she has this very how can we put it robust personality? She's extremely present and engaged in the Internet space. Tell us about the DOJ cat. That's not the musical dosier GATT. Tell us about the Internet personality. Does your cat I remember. I guess it would have been on twitter. Yeah twitter and it would just be random times of light late nights where we look all like. Doj Cats on periscope and. I really never watched anyone else's periscopes but for some reason like she would always be like Inner Room Pink Moonlight Jeff. I just like chatting away. P Fans are Paris open kind of being like her very authentic self. That can be a little bit like snarky and like dried dry humor sarcasm but and I be like well. What is she doing she making beats and I think sometimes she would be like making music but she really has been learnt like she really has always known the value. I think of tapping in like but not always being about the music. It's about like hey if you if you rock with me new rock me while I'm like in my room being idle just how now she's like if you rock with me. Rock with my crazy grow of humorous time right where my pet might Tanya messy nece like all of this so I think I've always remembered bat and I think that's part of what made her sticking my head all the time because I just wanted to know more about her is she. We should probably step back. Slaley to understand with the mid twenty tens were like for everybody who doesn't remember what the Mid Twenties and not as Evil Nada thing not a thing right now. We're not not a thing but not certainly like one tenth of what is happening with their thirties. You remember exactly like there's really no way on instagram. In the past issue have there wasn't any lives you have parents the thing that was interesting about that time. It's really liked the first era. Where your post twitter you're early? Instagram's your image friendly but video is starting to become more of a thing. It's twenty twenty. It's corn team. Every time I open instagram's like fifteen people on live doing something lake just one man on just one man. I can't watch. Fifteen is at the same time I I see of friend familiar base or less generous. That's more generous than me. I'll tell you that I just can't the time. It was still kind of like haw. There is going to be a young generation of artists that is going to put themselves out there in these new formats and start to form identities around this presentation. They're not gonNA wait to put a youtube video out. I G video is not really a thing level it now. So they're gonNA use these live broadcast formats to kind of invent their personalities on the fly. And from what? You're telling me dozer your was like one of those people who was like. Oh I could do this. And she was really young at this time. I think she's twenty four and ninety five so she was probably still a teenagers. So that's even more interesting. Sometimes we forget that these people are young. I try be more generous with young people. Always figure okay. So she's inventing herself she's a loose. She's kind of a little a little wacky. A little eccentric. She's playful. She's maybe a little bit body a little bit rain-d bearing this day. I still like where in the world is your cat and you know and so like you say from a musical Brazil. She's cultivating this personality online. But for the musical perspective twenty fifteen sixteen seventeen is relatively dry and this is another interesting like we talked about the kind of Iraq irregular path that she takes from anonymity to the number one spot on the hot one hundred. It's weird that she had a moment got sign and then basically disappears while still being on one of the biggest labels in the country that strange in and of itself. I don't think anyone even knew like I didn't even know that she was signed under. Rca implant period. So I think the eighth album. I think when I was a while she just went off the long projects. I of course folks bottom okay. So that was when I I thought meeting. She got inside on the hunch. See everybody wants talk about industry plants which is like not a real thing but what is a real thing is secret signed. That's a real thing. Everybody out here writing about industry plants. Nope secret sign though. Ooh right and I think we find out about it more and more now because the ideas being signs of major league who has changed change again and being in the insole was like now. It's kept secret for different reasons but I wonder like you know. I don't know the facts about the interim time between two thousand fourteen and seeing and her first full album but interesting and the interesting thing about that album and it's true the second the two but the interesting thing is they're actually weirdly is a long rollout. There's like four singles on this record which is not something that ordinarily happens with non superstar. You know like you would think drake gets four singles. Reality gets four singles like that make sense but like cat gets forcing release of that album. Toni nineteen that has like roll with us. Juicy Nasty Mayor Mussa like I think once new hit it was like okay to amp up reintroduce year in another way to move which is vital vital American record of the late. Two thousand. Ten's let's just play a little bit of role with us. Which I believe was the first. Maybe the Second. I was like an actual single from that first album which was a malla. I believe so. Here's roll with us Bye Bye no. Let's get into mu which is of course the turning point. It's the breakout moment. I remember this day on twitter pretty intensely right and it's interesting because it's a very visual images record but I also love how it functions as just word play. I remember twitter being very very like loud and rowdy and like lower the that day one of the reasons that moves interesting is a kind of like sandpapers out some of the production stuff. That's happening on other cat records and really dials in on her unusual eccentricities as vocalist and as a kind of songwriter as a lyricist feels like a weird concept record. Although if you play it from front to back you get to the end. And you're like Nah it's basically just a regular song with like a kind of deadpan. Funny Hooks but when you can start. Distilling songs down to their funniest tenor twenty seconds. Which is things something that's happening in this era because of instagram? If you're still down it's really really like it's very funny at twenty seconds at two minutes. It's like pretty funny. But a twenty seconds it's hull Larry's yeah. I think that I was really excited. When move came out the because I just was like Albert. That's like that's the girl I remember like older now. And like see you know? Things have changed but it was just that like her level of creativity which instill refreshing unruly remember. What was happening in the world at the time but I I do remember moving like the net like everyone felt like we needed an away like our members doing radio show and putting it into my set in like everyone was like a live radio show. Everyone likes went crazy and even if they didn't know the words like it's just a really contagious on with the energy that it's so fun and like you said it's hilarious and like really. When do we get likes funny music like that really happened anymore? Especially when it comes alike rat gave there used to be a time where like you have. Artists like bust rhymes or like missy. Give something really weird and kind of in this kind of funny or just by. What did she? What did he say you know? What apple like that? Lou is like that like it's you're like it's just a metaphor is the outset in the video. Just our lots of too much you can like take out and be like I like that line. I like. I love that. I'll say the visual shorthand was incredibly effective. And the song. You say it's funny. It's dead deadpan. There's a certain level of like insouciance that we associate. I think with people who are on the Internet just in general. There's a little bit of an eye roll. There's a little bit of a you know and it had this song has some of that baked into it. It's not like straight like slapstick. Funny it's a little bit like deep size slapstick funny and that feels very internet to me very up of that moment. Well we've talked about it enough. Everybody get your cowboy pants out because this is mu which is m with three an exclamation point. Let's get into it cow. I'm not mad cow cow. I'm a cow more. So that's a hard pivot and then the next hard pivot is like twelve hours around the corner which is of course in the immediate wake of her intensify reality some old tweets or maybe one old tweet. I don't remember if it was one or more emerge in which she said. Unkind thing using language at you know none of us should use and when pressed on it as she a classic one point Internet mistake. Which is she doubled down and redid the thing that she critiqued for that all happen. I feel like within twenty four or forty eight hours of the viral break as someone who was watching at time like it was like the milkshake duck phenomenon. Milkshake duck is amazing. We regret to inform you. Milkshake racist like all within you know too so this is like a real good emblematic thing of that. One or your recollections of VAT moment in in her career at your member or Kinda just like not being apologetic at all and I remember the Internet being abused after like what I saw. People were disappointed but also decide. Confused THE BACK. Kind of reaction is is to do something wrong. It's also just are is like what does he really mean that like? Is that really? Hashi bills because it sells. That's crazy also disappointed because everybody was just ruining her days before so I remember it. Being like a shocker. Also her reaction was just like woody. You even do with somebody who badly nope bike said what I said. I'm generally in favour of like people doing their own spin control. You know like people kind of being like I'm GonNa Talk to you about this as opposed to like my representative says you know. Or like some publicist writing a statement that she just like notes APPs and puts on her in on her twitter. You know what I mean like. I'm generally in favor of the direct engagement approach. But that was just like a startling thing where you're like. Oh yeah no no. Don't do that now. It was like Oh no. What is you pay? Ooh Yeah just like real windy like I know. She did eventually apologize. I remember is one of the other who is one of the first first but it was a pretty high profile moment where you're like. Oh you just like accumulated a thousand goodwill points yesterday and now you're five thousand goodwill point in the whole tomorrow. I remember thinking like that's how fast and how intense the reaction was at that time and then that sort of begs the next question which is well is that A. I didn't feel that that was going to happy hour interesting. Why not I think because I saw people in conflicted like I saw a lot of people just like Dang like you know we really liked her like maybe show come around are like I think it was just on a high that people just. They just didn't work abuse. They usually are with my dozen or just more like waiting to see if she would actually come back around in. Fix It like you know. I didn't feel like it was like the end per se for her but I did feel like she was GonNa have to answer to it later again. This is where you have a weirdly like a long digital footprint as you point out before like she does have kind of a long digital footprint in a perverse way just for the record. I am not endorsing this approach however I do want to say if you have a long digital footprint and you could say I've always been a little messy like I was a little messy in twenty fourteen. I was a little messy in two thousand fifteen. Look like if you can point that out you can. Maybe plausibly are again a do not endorse this. Being maybe plausibly argue. Okay this thing that I'm getting five for is maybe like two clicks worse than what I did last year. But you have to understand. I've been loose for a long time. I overstepped boundaries. Yale I take some accountability even if our loose cannon like and especially because I feel like she artists with such a diverse fan base of people who are all different kinds of identities. And that's one of the things that's really special bar so it's like you can't just let people down like that like you have to answer you. Want to be taken seriously like allowed back in. Of course I mean and all and again just to tie up the previous saying just. Don't be messy online like broadly speaking. Don't be messy online than you won't have to deal with the problem like does your cat did in the moment and felt like a major mountain but in the rear view. It feels like more like a microbe blip right. Within a few months she was sorta like back to putting out songs and I remember I felt like there was kind of like a slow sort of a okay like A. Are we listening right now? We we do enough or we off this like I can't like and then like by the you know six to twelve months later so like no. No we're good. Everything's I would literally seed suites like she'll cancel like Kinda like like you know people who are of communities where that absolutely you know what I mean. The Was like it's kind of a dilemma. That no I think a lot of US especially people of Marginalized Communities Face Women Black Women Queer people. It's like we are often the targets of somebody's problematic comment Iran. So it's like you have sometimes make this stupid decision to just be like. Oh really liked the song and it's just like you know of course there's boundaries in different thresholds but like I feel like there has been this space for grace is like okay like don't do that again. You know what I mean like because I don't know the whole cancel. Culture thing really isn't good. I think it's counterproductive. But they're into way to hold somebody accountable but also some time is being like okay. I like you but I didn't forget that she did this thing. And how are you going to answer to that? Obviously it's within everyone's power to both acknowledge that people are fallible and also to say I will not allow that level of mistake like you know each individual's got to draw a line somewhere in that Sam. She did come out and apologized and deleted. Not just those tweets. I think to all treats right. Screengrabs live forever. Of course do you think that? Do you feel like she's been fully restored. Not say that people have forgotten either but I think that yet she apologized. She hasn't said anything like that ever again or done. Anything similar in that way like or she like sarcastic in a little messy but like you know offensive and that way I think also maybe something as you know. She works very hard when she's proven herself as an artist to light since move because that was really an introduction to for a lot of people so I think that she's buckled down on being herself and working on music and it seems like everyone really like loves what she bringing to the space the music space and rapid specially. So I mean you know. I'm sure there are some people in rightfully so who were like. Nope LIKE NOT GOING ENGAGE. But for what is things like the larger audience seems to be like okay girl that was. I think she's very likable. Like even though she's not like a likable in the sense of being perfect or harmless per se but her personality is very contagious. Kinda don't have you don't have you either like her. Or you're like you know Kinda interesting thing that happens. Post Mu is she gets really popping so basically almost every record that comes out after Mu Kinda goes. I think it was Tamara. After Moore Wait. Actually we play tomorrow which also has Rico Nasty on it. Big Idea like might ideal around my twins. Big Might Ninety Eight. Mera their juicy. Then there's like a juicy remix with Tiga it's the rule that if you are at this stage in your career you have cats on a remix and it's time to feature of always make the song slap. I'm always confused. I'm just like this is so rear. Got over whatever like residual anxiety. I had about like early tiny Ziouani about it. I'm always like tagger. Your Lord Twenty Twenty. I accept tiger. I really do and so all these songs. Kinda go and then they do a deluxe version which is like this thing that labels do to make it seem like albums really were hits and Successful. But they do it. Six months later the ad the heads on the end so that they can capture all the streaming numbers and apply them to an album. That is not pumping so even though there's good stuff on Tamala as an album it was not hitting but if you look at the amount regina the end you're like That's weird all. The bankers are right. There at the end sled up right here at the enemy should be number one and three. What are you talking about it? Anyway South our friends at RCA and so she's moving at this point and then there's another out. Lem that comes out. That album is called pink. Talk to me about this record. How does it differ from the first album? And obviously the first EP. I really was just really proud of her. Because I remember when the two thousand eighteen album came out and I was okay like she's you know she's still fine being her down even though. I thought that she had sound. You know that was already pretty cool but obviously the artists that can do a lot so like maybe to trying to find her. You know find a group but I really feel like even though pink is like a million different groups. There are really cohesive in. It's like I really. I don't know it was just refreshing. Because it's like a lot of times you know have a new artists. They put out there. Not The surfers Oleg. It was the first one which achieved this level of fame. Someone's like you get the mayor disappointed. 'cause you're like oh it sounds really overproduced. It sounds like this was like Berry package and I think her down. She was able to keep their highly produced sound and still have her own individuality. Just bursts often feel so pop that I was like who is it was it was like everything so that was also refreshing because athletes. That doesn't really happen a lot. Like you can kinda count on. Your favorite artists is first big island kind of sound. Not all the way as maybe raw or authentic. Maybe in some ways as you would have liked so yeah I think she like a really good job blending ally and making it sound like it belonged the record that that ends up really blowing and obviously we'll get to say so in a second but that record is not like the records that I think are great on Malla. And they're not like the records. I think are great on per so she has this very natural flexibility. And it's very effective. I think you know paired with a producer who has a crisp vision of what to do with that all the sudden. You're kind of arrive at a very robust song by people who understand at a you know work in tandem now. Say So. It's Dr Luke Record. It's kind of unmistakably of Dr Luke Record and Dr Luke. Obviously cash had accused him of sexual improprieties and there have been back and forth legal challenges and and lawsuits. And it's been we're not going to get into the depths of it. What this does though is. It creates the cloak of a problem for DOJ cat and also for other artists has happened with Patrick's where I wrote about last year similar issue. Where does your cat has? This breakthrough moment has a number one song. Thanks Nicki Menagerie next. And then the day to story is Dr Lucas. Back on top watching that happen. Obviously there are things that we can't know about the doctor looking situation. We know that it still is. There are still open questions and unresolved legal situations. So we can't speculate on those things but we do know what the public energy is around Dr Luke. To what degree do you think that casts a shadow over what does is doing and to what degree do you think? She's obliged to talk about it. I think for people who are aware of Dr Luke and all what cash. It went through like really where present that time. Definitely your weird about it. But then it's also like say like we don't really know the situation of like when she was signed or you know how these songs came to be so it was like you don't want to take anything away from DOJ because we haven't heard her say anything about that partnership or him Co writing or having credit but I do think that it is something that she should address like not even to necessarily defend herself. But I think it's. It's a complicated thing that's worth talking about. Even if she was unapologetic about it not saying that she would be less us an important troop to talk about because she is at this point where she's a big pop star now and Mike we know evicting also women it really does suck that a lot of times like the option for your success may be that you have to navigate or work with men can be really terrible being in a very male dominated industry but it doesn't feel good to me to see him back at a number one so say so it goes. It's a big record. It sort of undeniable. It was sort of an effective tick tock record and then it became a standalone kind of radio record. What do you think about the Nikki version? Because obviously the Nikki version is what takes it to number one. All the barbs came out. They missed making anyway. Yeah exactly just a quick sidebar. Nikki did a record with Meghan right and it. Kinda didn't do what I think people thought that that peering was GONNA do yes. It didn't have that power. I like what they linked up because I think this is where the conversation has been like an was was around Nikki for so long like you know we wanna see embrace these younger girls young woman rap and we want to see just have fun them and like being big this you know and so I think it was a really good parrying because both of them do pop really well and they both. They both have these very massive presence. Show on any record is like I thought it was a perfect parent. I read that. Does you know her fans are like obviously like we want Nikki on you know on the song and so she really excited when she found out that he got on it like I think it was it was nice like especially for Nikki fans at it. It was like a nice like you know all moment. 'cause I think we've been wanting that like we want to see. There's this new this new generation of women. There stole many of them versus time. When Mickey with like fighting inches so be a pioneer to pave the way for a lot of people whether they to give her a credit or not so. It was nice to see them. And you also you point out some I think is very right. Nikki's relationship to pop is obviously if it's a problematic through line but it's been a conversation point at various stages of her career right dating back to the Rosenberg Summer. Jam thing like it's always kind of been there what that conversation or that kind of narrative obscures is. That Nikki is a great pop rapper. She's a great rapper. Rapper Great Technical Rapper. But she's also a great pop rapper. She's great character. She's great at using space and melody like those are things that she's incredibly gifted. And even when you hear dosier cat wrapping you hear some of Nicki in Doda clearly. That's there so when you hear them doing it. Side by side you're like. Oh this makes all the sense in the World Eric. `wise is like not even not take anything away from Dozo but just like this meeting. The is is very much so insane. Like it's very cohesive in the ways that they present themselves sometimes in Mike. I think it's the rules. Video are now. It's cyber sex. I'm like Oh this is Margaret Nikki. But not in a way of like she thala this. I mean that and Mike Complement. Your be careful. Be careful yeah reminded me of Mickey Berry Nice Wistful. Way Yes at lake. Not Harass me saying that. I'm not denying stole something from somebody else. That's not advocate as my request for. This said this please do not. This is possible to practice responsible criticism and not get added so we appreciate the support of everybody listening to not add like okay as we go out point us to a great dosier record that were not up on and maybe it's from you know like something that is not part of the narrative that we are told which is already a very strange and Iraq narrative that has a lot of stops. Let's do beautiful okay. Would you touched on previously? But we didn't listen to beautiful. Does your cat laken. Thank you do not lake. That's our dosier cat conversation. Which means a you know what time it is it's JC cribs time. Let me get a smoking jacket on me. Pivot Aron Chair. You spin around and see what we're going to get into today to be honest. The first thing I'm laying my eyes on which for not going to get into the lamb is on this Sam hunt seven inch urban outfitters occlusive. I'll not know about that but I promise you don't know enough about that. So let's just leave that. Go check that out and also check out the my truck remix with Sam. My boys for loading on that. But here's where we're GONNA go. Today I worked at Vibe from two thousand six two thousand eight. I WANNA shout out. Danielle Smith the editor in chief. At that time who hired me to be the music editor the Mitchell. Thousands as you may remember you know we've just spent an hour talking about the various viral paths of the two thousand ten's but vitality did not get invented in the twenty tens. Let's talk about the mid-2000s. Let's talk about early Internet friendly rob which is to say. Let's talk about soldier boy. Aw Yes let's talk about soldier boy so you may remember. There was a time before soldier boy was reality television star before he was a drag mean creator before he was it. A phone entrepreneur or a headphone entrepreneur or a earbud entrepreneur. There were time before all of that. When soldiers boy I came out the sound of crank that soldier boy was so sharp and so radical and so kind of infectiously punishing or punishingly infectious. Maybe both and one of the things that soldier boy had at that time. I'm pretty sure it's in the video for that song is he. Has the white sunglasses with soldier boy. Pink ON THEM. I guess in Whiteout. Maybe it's white marker or maybe it's white out and I was working at vibe and we were trying to figure out how to cover soldier boy. I don't think we were interviewing him but I think we realized like the path that he had taken to his level of success at that point was not a path we had seen at all at any other junk. And so we did this sort of like a timeline slash flow chart of all the steps. That soldier boy had taken that kind of unconventional. And I remember we would talk to his publicize when you're trying to get some details and maybe that was for one issue and perhaps in a later issue. Maybe it was the year end issue with trying to wrap up the year in music. And I'm embarrassed to say I don't remember if this was. Oh six zero seven so just bear with me. We're trying to wrap up the year. Newsweek and I remember that was the year that Conway Really Spas with the the Venetian blind. Sunglasses and as Kindlier sunglasses soldier voice on losses. That's hip hop right now. Old Guard New Guard old fashioned new fashion high fashion up from the ground fashion. And I was like you know what I WANNA do. A photo shoot. Just those two sunglasses. No people just the sunglasses. This is the thing you to do it magazines. I don't know if anybody out here on the Internet. Doing photo shoots of competing sunglasses but anyway. That's where I was at. We had a hard time. I remember at the time calling in the Connie Glasses. Because obviously we couldn't get his actual glasses and they had not really started mass producing them as promo items so I think our fashion director at the time I remember. I was rise. Me Ella Rajini called a version of them in from some vintage sunglass dealer so we had a version of the Gandhi glasses and I called soldier. Boys pulses and I was like we want two classes these classes and I was like yeah. Here's the thing I got to be. They have to say soldier boy on them and the old boy on them exactly as he has them and he was like okay and maybe a few days later I get a package and open the package and they are sunglasses with soldier boy written on them presumably in white out and I called him and I was like I was in my peak fact checking energy and I was like I need to know. Did soldier boy himself right soldier boy on these glasses and the guy said yes that is soldier boys handwriting and so did the photo shoot. The fire spread somewhere on the vibe. Google books it's in there somewhere. The KHANIA glasses went back to the vintage sunglass dealer and the soldier boy glasses rest in my office. That is our show. Thank you to Laken for coming through. Listen every podcast ever at ny times dot com slash podcast. Email me email me. Your favorite soldier boy viral moments. There are plenty good logistical in their. If anybody's let's go these days drop me a line getting the facebook group talk about soldier boy and they are talking about dosier. Canton their subscribe pop gas anywhere. You get your audio spotify apple podcasts stitcher etc etc. Our producer is plagiarism from separate media and as we take you out like that boy. Shallow may crank that soldier boy. Oh boy noah.

DOJ twitter Instagram EP Margaret Nikki Mike soundcloud Sam hunt Josiah Dr Luke spotify Iraq New York Times us Pittsburgh producer Laken starling Nicki Menaj intern John Monica
Interview w/ Joey West of Disciple

We Are The Body Radio Podcast

44:19 min | 5 months ago

Interview w/ Joey West of Disciple

"Hey everybody. This is Nick with we're the body Radio podcast. And tonight. We have Joey West from disciple. Hey, Joey, how are you? I am doing absolutely fantastic. Awesome. Just just here at my home where I've been for the last four hundred eighty days. So yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I've pretty much been doing it too. So that's cool man. So I was just telling you and then I I figured I'd yeah record with that one of the things that inspired my podcast was listening to all of the bus banters that disciple did And and I remember telling Josiah that yeah, one of the things that influenced my corny dad jokes were also those bus boss boss banters dude, the puns is what got me started now, like nobody wants to hear them. But but those are the funniest ones. Yeah, you can you can 100% black Josiah. I always I always tell people like, you know, my girlfriend she she laughed at some of my my super corny jokes and I'm always like I have Josiah to think because like I don't feel like I was funny before I became friends with Josiah and by by way of being around him, you just become funny and he has he has a has walk or like I guess uh spread his uh his humor and his comedic ability to the entire band. And so now we just feed off of each other. Yeah, and yep. Pretty much what the the bus advancers were and any time you guys would release one. That's how I was on it. I was listening to it anytime cool anytime. I see like a live feed on Facebook. I'm like, I'm like cuz I'm I'm feeding off of those man. And I think between disciple and my friend Tony I had just met him around around the same time that you guys were doing the bus and he's the same way pawns, but between here and all of his puns and jokes and listening to disciple it just like I just started coming out with them. And now with my wife gets mad at me and I have you guys to thank for the yeah did did Josiah tell you about his no pun day Monday thing that his wife had as a rule for a while. Okay, so I don't know if it's still a thing but for a while they're just basically told so many puns that his wife declared a no pun day Monday where he was not allowed to vote. Say any puns on Mondays around the house at all. I always thought that was super hilarious. Gosh, remind me to not let my wife listen to this episode is it's going to be like no pun dog every day. Yeah, pretty much pretty much. Yeah. I don't I don't feel like I'm as good at them when I'm not around Josiah. So when I'm flying solo I hit I hit like I had some good ones every now and then but like when I get around your side, they exponentially increase in number. Yeah same way like off air when I'm around other people, you know, they can just have a regular conversation and boom bap just have something you know, yeah, but on air I'm like like I just looked up I just had to look up dude. I found the funniest dad joke website. It's got like 75 dad jokes wage was so hard to pick the ones for this episode. But if you're not familiar with this game, I switch it up every now and then okay started it with Josiah soak a dead. So we'll do it will return to that method which is when we get to it will talk a little more. But yeah, you'll have an opportunity to look up puns or dad jokes and we have to try not to laugh at each other's jokes. Yeah. Oh man, dude. I lose every time yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. I mean you might get me on this cuz I'm I'm a I'm a pretty I laugh I laugh a lot. I like to laugh. So yeah, if it's a good joke man I can but if I get in the zone and I'm telling myself not to laugh like sometimes sometimes I can keep a straight face. So we'll see I can't I'm just telling you now I'm going to probably be laughing at my jokes before I even finish them nice. But all right, let's talk a little bit about the seipel and upcoming. Events like this weekend. I believe you guys are playing. Yeah. We are we are heading up to I think it's Greentown Indiana. We're playing at the Kingdom Come Festival going to be it's going to be interesting. You know, I don't I don't really know what to expect now obviously with the situation that our entire world has pretty much been in and with all the the social wage in seeing, you know protocols how a concert is going to look with all that. I'm very interested to see it. I don't plan on being anywhere but the bus the stage that day, so I'm not going to do a lot of hanging out. I've actually as times progressed, you know, I've had more close friends and actually family member get covid-19. So I'm I'm definitely going to be practiced in a lot of social distancing and and you know protecting myself. But yeah, we are we're heading up there to play this weekend off. And then next weekend we are doing the People's Choice live stream show from Nashville, and we'll have an acoustic show on Friday night and then a full rack show on Saturday and the cool thing about the People's Choice shows that the whole setlist we did not decide at all the fans voted and decided decided the 15 songs that were going to play so having to go back. Well, actually I probably shouldn't say that I don't need to I don't need to give too much away. But I've had I've had to relearn a lot of songs. So I'll say that much. Okay, Mom. I'm pumped when you guys announced it. I was like who I'm going to go over my dad's house and watch this. I actually it was so excited that I bought two tickets off for me and my dad and then I I was like wait. Yeah, we're going to be on the same TV, but I was like, you know, what who cares. You know what we got the tickets. We're also planning on seeing you guys in October 3rd. In Jacksonville, Florida. Okay, sweet. Yeah, my dad and I hate fully hopefully. Yeah glaring it cuz I know I already rescheduled from I think it was in May that it was supposed to be there. Yeah. Yeah. I bought the tickets like as soon as it was announced and then everything happened. I was so bummed out right the last time we saw you was in Odessa, Florida. Okay, and that's more that's more area. That's more to Springhill Pasco area wage, but actually I have a picture. I took a picture with I think all of you guys but I wanted to show you that because I don't know if you could see it, but I only junk dude. I don't even look. I'm not even ready and I'm the one that's taking the pictures. We switched we switched hair. You had short hair that picture now you have long hair. I had long hair and now I have short hair. Yeah, that was that was four years ago months or years. Yeah. That was for what venue did we play in Odessa? I'm not sure what church it was. But I I do know and you might remember the landmark it had three huge crosses right by the road. Okay, huge crosses. It is faintly it's there but I don't all the way remember it all all these all these towns have been used they run together after a while. It was a nice outside. Okay. Oh wait, I was children 18:3 at that show. They were and that was yeah and we saw them. Yeah, it was brutally hot and I played a joke on them at that show. They have a song where they cut out completely and I had a massive air horn and when it went silent, I was on the side of the stage in a bigger airport. Yeah, I am. Yeah. I totally remember that place now totally that one. I remember going up to you and say could you guys Play Disciple disciple? Well, can you guys play your songs off? Did you guys play Big Bad Wolf and you were like if you scream really loud. Yeah for The Encore and and dude that was like that was awesome. It was funny because song Instead of the growl Josiah me out. Yep, and I have recorded I got to find it. But yeah Josiah switches it up. He he's always trying to make Kevin laugh on stage and off ninety 99% of the time he succeeds. Yeah, he got good that time. But yeah. Yeah, I'm still I'm stoked for the Florida shows cuz it's kind of funny how it always falls. We're in Fort Pierce, Florida the next night all my birthday, which I hear is like a pretty nice place, but we're at Murray Hill the night before my birthday in Jacksonville, and I've had several birthdays at Murray Hill cuz we're normally always on tour in the fall and my parents have actually driven from South Carolina to Jacksonville and they've brought birthday cake and we've we've there used to be like a little cafe next to the theater. I think it's a coffee shop now, but we had dinner and birthday cake there before the show to like celebrate my birthday. So Murray Hill is like a special place cuz I'm like every time I come here I turn another year older. I was like, I have like a love-hate relationship with it cuz it reminds me that I'm getting old. But also it's one of my favorite places to play. So yeah it is. I remember it very well and actually it's it's a cool memory that I have because it is the the first place that I ever saw disciple. Oh cool. And yeah and like we're going way back. Kevin was playing bass. That's that's way back. Yeah, and I'm a member specifically him during the growl part of big big bad wolf. He like just spun around really quick with the base and remember watch like I was amazed like I thought I was amazed at her without seeing them, but that was my first show and my dad took me now. This will be The same place that we're going to and and I'm taking him. That's awesome. Well, what's funny is even though you saw Kevin do that a long time ago. He's still able to do that after all these years of touring of like, you know, I've only been in the band for almost seven years and my body is destroyed like my neck hurts all the time my back hurts all the time and I like man before I joined disciple my body was all right. Now it's off now. It's just destroyed from head-banging all night every night and you know sleeping on the tour bus and all that but somehow Kevin man, he he he just keeps doing all these acrobatic and athletic things and he's a he's a beast. Yeah. Yeah. I remember seeing disciple maybe a couple of years after that took a small like probably the size of the room that you're in right now coffee house. Yeah, and and it was the original line-up log. I was coming out of the I was coming out of the bathroom was coming down the hallway and Kevin walked in front of me. And I was like, I was a little kid. So I was of course like Starstruck. Yeah having any issues account. He's like patting me on the head. He's like, hey, yeah man, dude, I can totally relate. You know, when I when I first met the guys, I was actually in another band and we open for disciple which was kind of what got me the job in disciple was that the the chance that I had to tour with them as an opening band home and What about the time that Trent the second drummer of disciple was leaving and that that whole thing like when I found out we were going to be opening for disciple. I was like, oh wow, this is incredible cuz I've been I've been a huge fan of the band for a long time. And so I can relate to you. Like when I first met Kevin, I was just kind of like don't say anything stupid don't like dumb, you know like but at the same time I was like, wow, I like this is the person that I've been listening to on record since I was in Middle School and you know, it's the mighty disciple, you know, so yeah, no cool. There's always the band that I would just like be on an airplane or in a car ride. Just close my eyes and pretend like I was in the band, you know, yeah. Oh man. God did that from the time that I knew what music was, you know, and never did. I think that my daydreaming of what it would be like to be in disciple would actually, you know, eventually come true. But I'm sure glad glad it did. You know, it's been a it's been a fun ride and and pretty wild so far. So, yeah, and and I was just showing my daughter a video you had the camera set up red on the drums. Yeah, big bad wolf man. And dude, if you can't tell that's one of my favorite Disciple songs, but it's one of my favorite ones too. I could tell when you're playing cuz you're just like, oh Ma'am, like we can't even hear the rest of the band, but I know exactly where you're at in the song and I'm like just taking it but I was showing my daughter cuz she's 8 she's now at the age where she's starting to like my music and not just her mom's music and she was just like Wow, you know, yeah, he's fast. I'm like, yeah, he's good. Is that was that the video from creation Festival think so I think so. I had long hair from the from the side. Yeah. Yeah. That was that was definitely Big Bad Wolf on a like a morphine shot of adrenaline cuz that she was like that was one of the biggest shows ever of my career. Like we were all just hyped cuz you know, we've never played main stage at creation at least not that late. You know, we were we were actually pretty headlining right before Jeremy Camp that night so we had never played main stage creation when all the people were at the main stage and we were hyped. So like when we busted a song that was towards the end of our set and I was tired, but as soon as my adrenaline took over it was like we could have spent the song up to double time and I think I could have kept up. It was a log. Journaling. Yeah now in the video and for a few others that we watched. So what's your favorite disciple song to play? Oh man, one of your favorites, so it's always so hard you're going to have to forgive me the the feed kind of made you do like a slo-mo thing. And you sounded like you were from the movie Transformer. That's pretty cool. Say all that one more time. My favorite song to play Live. Yeah. Oh man. It's it's really hard to narrow down mainly because like there's so many fun songs to play but I would have to say Scars remain is definitely a really fun when the play Ballad of Saint Augustine. Love playing that one regime changed love playing that song Big Bad Wolf secret weapon is a whole lot of fun cuz that song is is fast and off of our new album Panic Room and wake up or two of my favorites to play for sure. Wake up is one of those songs that I have to just take a deep breath and just kind of hold on for the ride until it's over. Yeah, cuz that that that song never thought moving. I remember recording that in the studio and any time I'd get ready to do it take the producer Travis weirich would just like hit the TalkBack button and just be like, all right, breathe take a deep breath. Here we go, you know and then he would that he would press play like he would always make me like do a deep breath before I before I did it take so that's Thursday. Yeah, I have a I have a funny story and this will be something that's that the listeners will have to disappear again cuz I gotta tell you about regime change. I used to think and I remember an episode of Boss banter. So you can't really laugh at me too hard. You guys were talking about song lyrics and misunderstandings and okay. So regime change I used to think it was like a fancy word. Like I used to think it was resume. Yes, yes. So I and even though he's saying regimes are chewed. I never worries. It was up until about about three or four years ago that I realized what he was actually saying. Yeah, it's it's really funny. Like we had this we had this whole thing on actually since big bad wolf is your favorite song. We had this thing on the bus one night. We're off somebody brought up like hey, what's the worst a big bad wolf and somebody tried it and like they said what they thought it was and it was so far off of what it actually was and we both win around and none of us could get it like it was really really funny and we had to look up the lyrics and you know, Kevin walked in in the middle of it. We were just like hey, what's this part saying and he would say it and we just started busting out laughing cuz nobody got it like it's real funny even even the members of the band don't know the words all the time. Yeah, but that's funny. Do you guys are going to be playing this weekend? And I believe I'm not sure if it's the same day but chaotic resemblance is also playing this weekend to same big. Yeah, I believe so. I didn't look at the lineup. I think the only people that I actually know where that are going to be there is spoken in the protest. I haven't I haven't really even see the list of everybody that's going to be there. I'm just kind of oh those people is like all right, where where we going cool I'll be there with you know, just show up and and be ready to line up yet. That's cool. Cool. I just got 5G put in this place. So it should be hopefully it should be rocking. I'm going to make a phone call. Yeah, you know, it's it's over here melting my brain. So if the next time you see me, I'm like a pile of goo, you know, that's what happened to me. All right. So you ready for this Dad joke challenge. Yeah, man. I haven't I have it prepared. Well, it's okay. I haven't looked anything up yet. You have to hang on 1 second off cuz I I am not good at them. Especially coming out coming up with a month top of my head. Oh, okay. I got I got a list here. I'll just try to I'll just try to read him in a way. That would make you laugh. Okay, that's what I'm going to have to do on mine. So okay. Hey everybody. Thanks for tuning into we are the body Radio podcast. I just want to say quickly before we get onto our episode guide all the this is Dawn thanks to the power and the technology that anchor. FM has provided to me with their free app. And they're free recording software built into the app. They make it super easy to get a podcast done. So here's what I challenge you to do. If God has something that God has put on your heart my challenge to you today. Is to download anchor. FM? And give it a shot make a podcast and let people know what God wants you to put in their hearts. All right, God bless everybody. Thank you so much for listening. I love you onto the episode. Who's going first you go first if you want since your guests, okay? All right, here you go. Did you hear about the restaurant on the moon? Great food. No atmosphere. Well done. I see you're wanting you're wanting to smile but well done. You win. So like how long do we have to hold him? What do you think's are fair? Like five seconds three to five seconds of life, you know, they affect like it's probably better. All right. So that's the first and the history of weird body Radio podcast and all other eighteen episodes as a first time that I did not laugh at it. Okay? Yeah, I'm probably picking the page worst ones that I also probably yeah, maybe I'm not reading them in a good way to know. The problem is is I'm not a dad. So these are actually effective coming out of my mouth. Wow. This is where we have to put it to the test because always been my theory so we have to know but to be fair I did. Already see that joke today, so so it kind of help but it was so funny. I did if I had to hold it for 10 seconds. I probably would have lost its really funny. We're probably on the same website. Let me let me go down to like the second page on Google, you know, the ones that really suck. Here's one unless you want to do another one that went off right crimes were okay. There you go. All right, go for it. Okay, you lost. All righty. No, no. No, it doesn't count if I laugh what what do you call a mac and cheese that gets all up in your face what too close for comfort food? Okay. All right, pretty good. 3 or 5 seconds. It's it's pretty yeah, not a not a not a mac and cheese fan. So, you know that my face was for the month for the fact that I don't like mac and cheese. All right, what did the drummer call his twin daughters? and a one and a two I laughed just in case no word me. I laughed I'll own up to it. There you go. One of my favorites. Yeah. Go I like Dad jokes. Sometimes he laughs. Sometimes it doesn't was that the joke. Yeah it was. I didn't get it, dad jokes. Sometimes he laughs. Oh, I see. I like telling my dad jokes, okay. Except you can't say my budget ruins a joke. You ready? All right. I bought some shoes from a drug dealer. I don't know what he laced him with but I was tripping all day. Okay, you win how many apples grow on a tree how many all of them? That's a very true fact it is actually. All right. Let's see here. Get normal after out now. Why don't they play poker in the jungle one, but they have too many cheetahs. Okay. All right, that's good. All right, my friend says to me what rhymes with orange and I told him know it doesn't. United your head, that's a laugh no, no, no. All right wage. I'm going to edit that. I'm going to put that right after all my jokes. All right. Let's see. What time did the man go to the dentist? 2:30 Touche. Yeah, that's all joke. I didn't I didn't think that one was going to win. I'm sure you've heard that one before I did but did you catch my counter pun? Account upon you. Yeah, I heard it. I heard it, but I'm not laughing cuz I'm going to win. I think you already did. All right. Good game. Why did the old man fall in the well? Why because he couldn't see that well. Nope, he didn't know. All right. How many more rounds? Are we going we go two more rounds. Okay. What did the Buffalo say when his son left off? There you go. Did I ruin that? Hey, I mean you knew you knew the answer to it, but he's almost left. 2 gold fish are in a tank one says to the other. Do you know how to drive this thing? Tank a c yeah the tank like a like an army tank. Right right. Sorry. That wasn't a joke. That was our very net loss. Why shouldn't you write with a broken pencil by because it's pointless. Yep. All right, it would be pretty fine. This is this your last show. I've already won so but you can try. All right. We'll see if you can break me. I'm going to play a little bit of both. Uh, dad joke relay. Hold on. Here we go then land on a random random one. Pick another random one inappropriate. I see a bit my uncle named his dog's Rolex and Timex off their his watch dogs. Yep, it's always good to have some watchdogs. I told my girlfriend she Drew her eyebrows too high. She seems surprised. I think all right. I got one more about say here's here's the thing. I would I would probably laugh at these or shake my head, but I know that we're in competition. So I'm like I'm dead panning you right now. I'm going back sixth grade drama class. Yeah, and you've also here's the other thing about jokes like as far as like me laughing and everything it is seriously one of those things where like we mentioned Josiah earlier. I've been around him so much that it's almost like you have to be as funny or funnier than him to make me laugh because it's always kind of like when people last like Hey, how do you deal with like haters or people saying bad things about you? I'm like listen, I've had twelve year olds. Say the most horrid things about me too that if you're not coming with that same same level of aggression and hurt then you're probably not going to affect me. So I bet I've been conditioned. Yes. I get picked on by twelve year olds too. So it's okay. Yeah, dude, man. They're ruthless. They are ride my skateboard in and I'm not sure if he was dead, but he was little and he looked at me told me I was going to die. And yeah, that's why I don't that's why I don't do online gaming cuz it would not be good for my soul. You know, I'm I was twelve year old scare me of the things that they would say to me. Oh a game but yeah. No, I just mute them because yeah, I don't play a whole what I do is Grand Theft Auto so Monday pretty bad. But yeah, yeah for sure. Yeah, but I just mute them. But okay, let's see. So how excited are you for the live stream of I know we talked a little bit about it. But like yeah now when we got the details on it which by the way I voted. So did you change your vote for you? Remember not allowed to say it? Yeah, you are. All right. I didn't know if it was like standard voting rules back again I think is on there. believe back again was under and I think southern hospitality might have been on there if it was. Yep and Big Bad Wolf I know I don't know if that one's but if it was I would have Jesse that would have been my three choices. Nice dude. That's awesome. Yeah, you asked if I'm excited about it. I'm I'm super stoked about it, you know with lovely door lock down. That was the other livestream show. We did back in May. That's the first time I've ever done anything like that. So we were we were actually dead service believe it or not. Like we we weren't we weren't sure of what we could pull off. We weren't sure of, you know how it would go if people would buy tickets or you know, all the all the things that come with trying something new all the doubting and everything, but when we got to the actual show day and you know, right before the show started with a 30 minute countdown and as soon as that 30-minute countdown started, you know, we're just kind of like okay, you know, whatever and then it would take down to 15 then it got the tint and then when it got about five minutes like we were all like wow. None of us ever get nervous like before show. It's just it's a feeling that left all of us a long time ago. But man it it right at that five-minute Mark were all just like like the butterflies are here like really nervous. Like, you know, this goes good. We don't have any like major technical issues and we played the show and found the response. I mean we were at as soon as the stream ended we were all like high-fiving each other. We were just super stoked and then to see everybody's like great feedback on it afterwards was, you know, just very rewarding to us because it was something we never done and it actually ended up being successful. So Thursday we are we are super stoked for this one because now we know what we can pull off. We know that the the the quality stream that we can pull off the quality video that we can pull off. So this one's a little less stressful as far as like, you know, all the unanswered questions and we actually learned a lot of things last time that we've improved Upon This Time Life not necessarily that we made mistakes but there was things that we figured out like, oh we could do this better next time or a different way. So doing this live stream thing. It's it's exciting because we thought we know what we're putting out now and we can confidently like, you know, tell people like hey, if you buy a ticket like we're going to give you a good product and we're going to we're going to hope hopefully help you have a good time in this in this unfortunate time of us not being able to be together in person. So very excited for it. Yeah, and it's exciting for for me because like I said earlier, I'm not always able to make it to the to the Jacksonville shows or you know, hopefully now I could start going into now. I got a better vehicle it start going into like Georgia and yep. South Carolina and and able to bring the podcast out to some of these shows too. So that'll be cool. Yeah, we've actually with the live stream too. It's actually opened up the possibilities like we've talked about like after we do maybe a long tour at the very end of it setting up as the last show being a live stream show to where if you weren't able to come see that particular tour cuz maybe we didn't come to your your area of the country or maybe you were working that night. You couldn't make it to the show doing a livestream show and selling online tickets for people that want to see that particular tour show happen along maybe with even the bands that are on tour with us. So it's actually open up a lot of possibilities some cool stuff and and and trying some things in the future that hopefully fans will enjoy and and and that they'll like so that's really when and and it's so awful. Some to see how everything everything still comes back around to glorify God covid-19 happens puts all these these bands at home. And and we as disciples know we want to we want to keep going. So we're going to push harder and harder and find a way to do it, which is the streaming and Boomer now God has used us to find a way to continue to glorify him and get the message out. And that's it's amazing. It really is amazing how every little thing doesn't matter if it's good or bad it glorifies God in some way. Yeah, man, it's a it's been cool man, cuz like their technology, you know is an amazing thing. It's an amazing gift an amazing tool that you know, God has given us and in the coolest thing about my team as far as disciples speaking I can honestly dead. Either the hardest working group of people that I've ever been around because any time we faced an obstacle which we do face. A lot of them. It just comes with the with the with the territory of torque in a band like you're always having to figure out like, okay something broke how we're going to fix it the tour bus broke how we're going to fix it, you know, just all these unforeseen circumstances and and this whole covid-19 was a month or seen circumstance and you know, fortunately in and I am unbelievably blessed like God God took care of all of us through this, you know, cuz we loss of our income in a day and like really really helped us and provided for us through this but it was pretty cool to see the birth of my team to where it was like, okay. What can we do, you know to to try to keep this thing going make a cool experience for the fans and also log Help out disciple as the business because the thing that people don't realize that the end of the day is that disciple is actually a business that has monthly overhead costs no matter what, you know, whether we're touring or not. Those bills have to be paid and you know, we had just started touring. So we had a ton of merch that we had just ordered and now there's no shows to sell that Merchant, you know, make that money back or whatnot. So we had to we had to come up with a creative way to cover our overhead expenses are monthly bills and all that and that's what that live stream provided but it wasn't only about money obviously, you know anytime we get on stage. We're we're there to to present the gospel and also like just connect with people and and play the music that we've heard. So many people tell us like personal stories by you know, and we wanted to provide that music while the entertainment industry was absent we wanted to play them. As for those people who may be needed to hear him in the middle of a very very tough time because a lot of people have been going through a very very very tough time of this. Yes. Yeah. Well, that's awesome. Well, thank you guys for for doing this and for for doing the live streams, it's really awesome. Because yeah, and and you know what? I am going to I'm going to put you guys do that live stream concert thing because there's a lot of concerts that I want to go to that. I can't so that'll be yeah. I'm going to look forward to that. No rush. I know it takes time, but That'll be something definitely looking forward to so you guys have that going you guys have the the rebel Society going if there are any listeners on here that don't know what the rebel Society is. This is a good opportunity for Joey to explain it to you. Yeah, man, the rebel Society is just a community that we started through the platform patreon. It's a paid monthly subscription and most people are like, oh you guys are only about money. It's like no that's not it where as musicians in a in a world where album sales no longer exist and all that and streaming has taken away a lot of our Revenue people forget that we're human beings and we have food too and that we that we have to pay the power bill and the water bill and you know provide for families and all that. So patreons just a way that we were like, you know what we can and we can create this community. That's a paid thing that's going to help us with personally would our monthly bills that come our way our mortgages and all that. But at the same time, When people are joined, they're not just giving us money. They're actually going to get disciple content out of it. So no matter what tier you you join at. We've got a $1 option a $5 option a $10 option and a $50 option. That's monthly no matter what tier you join at. We appreciate anything but we did not want you just say like give em give us stuff and be enough to be like, oh, thanks appreciate it. See you later. We wanted to provide cool concept back to you. So every month, there's brand new content is Kevin has his own show where he he talks. It's called nothing left unsaid he does a sermon monthly Josiah has a show called tracks talk where he breaks down like our actual our recording sessions took it shows you all the in and outs and inner workings of how we put songs together how we formed him. I have my own show called the breakdown where I'm all over the place. I'm an add kind of person so I got a dog It I gotta keep it changed up a lot some months. I'll sit in front of this computer screen. I'll talk kind of what's what I've been going through maybe some life perspective on different topics or I'll jump off the drum kit and break down how I play certain parts of songs and I've also started diving into doing some interviews much like this with different different friends and the music industry and just kind of here and they're sort of in their perspective. So and all three of us do that every single month new show and then we have two acoustic video every month of us performing a disciple Song acoustic song. We also let's see what else we got. We we have a show called story behind the song that all three of us do every single month where we we tell you all the stories behind a disciple song stories from the studio, and then we have stuff even on up into our bigger option where you can be on a zoom call with a dog. Every single month we have you get tickets to shows which does does does your nose good right now and then you get a every new merch item. That's Renee's to so if any of that sounds good to you you go to patreon.com disciplerocks and check it all out all the info is there so you have an awesome. Yeah. Yep. I'm a member dude. Thank you so much man. It's it's been so cool. Because like the $1 option for people who don't know it gets you into our private Facebook group and only Rebel Society members get to be in that Facebook group and it's like spawned so many friendships and people talking with one another like kind of about different topics and I've even seen where people who don't know each other. They actually start linking up at shows and people who get their Rebel Society shirt after six months. We started seeing those like pop-up ads, Shows and there'll be like a group of Rebel Society members together like hanging out just because and they didn't know each other before the community existed. So that that's really cool to see that kind of our idea spawned new friendships and people connecting and you know, just living their lives and and having having new friends and bonding over Disciple. Music. Yeah, that's really cool. Yeah. I'm awesome man. Well Joey thank you so much for coming on. We are the body Radio podcast. It's been a blast something that I've been looking forward to for the past couple of months now, so I'm glad I got to to do this. I'm really looking at man. Thank you. Yeah, I'm really looking forward to the live stream and I'm really looking forward to and I'm Claire in it the October concert. That way I can meet you guys in person again and this time man when I picture keep keep wage. Declaring it, man. We we want to play some shows, you know, so hopefully hopefully there's some kind of new breakthrough or development before then that that allows it shows to get back to normal. So we'll just hope for the best on that one. Yeah, so definitely man, man awesome. Thank you so much for coming on here and be talking to you soon. Yeah, man. Thanks for having me.

Josiah Kevin man Jacksonville Joey West Florida Facebook rebel Society South Carolina Odessa Nick Murray Hill Tony I Indiana Nashville Jeremy Camp Google morphine Fort Pierce Scars
Will Brinson "I think the NFL is going to go dark until training camp"

The Darren Smith Show

00:00 sec | 5 months ago

Will Brinson "I think the NFL is going to go dark until training camp"

"Well, it's been a long time and you know eighteen days given our current situations. It feels like a lifetime, doesn't it? It sure does. The world has changed in every eighteen days well, the world seems to change twice over again. I know I mean it's so. I'm a jam music. As as many people know you know, or or you know champions and you know oftentimes you take the whole premise of a lot of it. Is You take one? You're playing one song. You just sort of segue right into the next song without stopping well. If you're doing a creating jam for for for this the country right now, it'd be. It'd be like a corona era protest. It just didn't even start like there's no like those stop between song. He was just straight into and It certainly does make things. It's it's. It's hard to be done the thing where you look back and look at your normal further yet, but You know so weird. It's a weird thing to see. The last normal photo I have not done that. What's that all about? Well so you go back to your look on your phone and scroll in your in your phone back until the La- and maybe if you guys are like out and able to go out and about two, you're out taking pictures at bars again, but you know mean like might is I was getting Jonathan Jones CVs I was in Charlotte with My brother just startled. Simpson and we met up at Jada. Bar Grab a beer. And then there's some pictures from surgery, and then like the next Friday quarantine, and so none of your pictures since then. Are you out with friends and stuff, so it's you go back and look at your last normal soda. Alright That here in a little bit well. What is life like in North Carolina? We are not yet allowed back in bars. They've opened up restaurants to limited capacity beaches just within the last week you can go to the beach and you can actually stop and sit down and put down a beach towel on sitting chair, and all that sort of stuff. That's different than just about a week ago. what what is life like across the country in North CAC Alaska. Yeah pretty similar actually we've had beaches every for a little bit longer than that. We've been going down. you know I'm I'm lucky my in laws? I mean it's my in laws, but they haven't played it Ah, just near Rightful beach in my stepfather in law has a boat down there so and they've been really careful about social distancing and staying inside, but we'll go down and you know drive over to the to the burt ramp, and and take the boat out GonNa cruise around you don't stop and and do anything data like memorial. Day Down here was wild man. I mean it was Every people were out in full force a certain segment. Of the population. was running flags and felt like it's not like they won a victory over the virus. I'll let you jog your conclusions as to who I'm discussing. Where we gotta take this virus down. but I was pretty wide open, but it is. It is Kinda Open. It's a little concerning, because if you look at the stats and the right now it appears to me. I mean if you know I i. You know I I play with stats a lot. You know tears like looking at you. Know trying to identify who could be a breakout player like trying to see trends and things that are underlying statistics in statistics that you read, and if I'm if. If I'm looking at these stats that we're seeing from north. Carolina based on what's going on right now. It's hard not to look at this and see a situation where there's a second wave coming so I mean I don't know man. It's We'll see how this pans out. I hope for hopefully it works out for everybody, but it certainly concerning I think and I wouldn't be surprised. I hope we don't have to go back into lockdown. It's hard not to look at it and think all right. There's something amiss year. Right we'll Brinson picks podcast CBS sports, joining us on extra thirteen sixty. Will you live in a different part of the country? That is obviously and I said earlier. I know that there are states in the US that are more deep south than North Carolina. My first marriage I got married in North Carolina back in two thousand and three, and it was really some of my earliest exposure. My ex wife was from Virginia. Her family would travel down to the outer banks every single summer. So it just you know. It seemed like a place to go ahead and it didn't work. Obviously, that's that. Really one of the first places that I had any sort of exposure to the confederate flag and again it's a different world. They're not that you are different than than us, but here in southern California it's just as a different life, and I wonder if you have a quick thought, just on on the representation of the flag. Especially I know you're here for football, but just that NASCAR is is really really big in North Carolina and some of the stuff that maybe you've you've heard on that subject if you wouldn't mind. One first of all I would say everybody should go read Ryan McGee piece on, ESPN if you haven't already about the confederate flag, and and and what I'll go in the removal of these NASCAR races, I think it's obviously a very good thing for Nascar to do. IT IS A. Symbol of. I. Mean you know it was a symbol? That is extremely. I mean it's obvious what it represents but I would also say this and I mean just speaking frankly from someone who grew up in the south I think that. we are not. As young adults and kids in the south. At a white white kid in the south, I don't think that. Maybe, it was given. The same up in my parents are teachers anyway I don't society as a whole. I don't know that it was. It was given given the same weight that it. Probably she was given elsewhere in the country, or or the same way that it should've been given and I'm not I think it takes I think it takes becoming a little bit older and understanding things to really understand weight, and the Gravitas of what what the confederate flag really needs I mean you read about it in school? I get it but I just I just sort of wonder for teaching. All these things, the right way, and but yeah. I mean clearly if you are if you're not a white person in the south, the confederate flag is. Is Very, concerning thing and I think part of the problem that you have here to like. If you drive up ninety five from you know, Stay Ville to the Virginia border. You're going to see. What I think is the world's largest confederate slack I mean there's enormous in somebody's giant pot of land, so they can fly the confederate flag there. I think there are certain point you're not. You know you're not. You're not doing that out of some sort of sense of pride. You're doing that because it represents something that you want the world to know about you and I tend to think that what you're representing is not a positive message, and that is certainly concerning so I I don't I think I explained that correctly I don't know I. It is deeply convoluted subject. I tend to think. It's the first is the very first place that I ever ever saw heritage. Not Hate and stuff doesn't happen anywhere else, and that's what I mean when it's convoluted like. If you grew up in inside of it, it's less you know like I if you're if you grew up with something, just sort of always being there and being around like it's less shocking than if you. If you show up like what what? What the Hell I mean, that's that's I think that part of the problem is that. I grew up in like a rural not of rural part of North Carolina, but I mean like we in a fairly rural and I mean it's. It's pretty commonplace. You perfectly frank. Again. Are there people though who you would say are sincere when they say it's about heritage and not hate because again. That's where I I saw that phrase. And it was an eye opener for me and I know that that's not what it is, but are there people who censor actually sincere when they say that sort of stuff. I think there are people who who sincerely take. Pride in. Their their family history and their relatives, but at the same time. You know when you take pride in that, you're also taking ownership of. Certainly! Some some less positive things you know whether it's somebody who was a slave, holder or somebody who operated in the KKK or something like that I mean like it's not. It's not as cut and dry. It's like you're just a fan of the competitors to you are you are inherently representing other things and you know? Look see what they went to war I guess the country, but they they tried to fight the entire country and and win a war that you know I mean. Boil down simply is was I for slavery purposes, and so yeah I mean it's pretty hard to justify by into it I. Don't buy into the heritage, not hate. I think that if you're looking for, you're looking for an excuse to to run the confederate flag up there at that point. We'll Brinson. CBS sports picks podcast joining us next to thirteen sixty again, relying on you geographically close to the Carolina Panthers yesterday. There were these images that everybody saw Jerry Richardson Statue. Being fork lifted the hell out of that place. How did that come about so quickly? And what's the reaction been like? Yeah this is kind of interesting, and it's but Jerry. Richardson not known as a You Know Jerry. Jerry Richardson falls into the older creepy white dude southern White Guy box. If you're if you're if you're trying to pin him into a certain demographic and. so jerry when he was forced to sell the team. PUT IT in a clause. When David tepper bought it that the that the statue had to remain in front of the stadium, and if you look at it, it's the most pandering statue, the planet in terms of like giving Jerry what he wants because he's. He's holding the football out well, he he's not like like he's not like posing for football in NFL glamour shot he's. He's giving football to the Carolinas like get out of here Bro and I, apparently, there are some clauses in the in the in the contract that would eventually allow for David Tepper to move on from the statute and I. Think one of them involves public safety. And with all of these statues, being toppled, the panthers were able to utilize that causes the hey. Look, we are worried. Somebody's GONNA come and topple this statue of Jerry. Richardson who while not a confederate, Joe, general or Christopher Columbus certainly could symbolize something that a p. people of color do not believe is a positive thing and as such. We considered a public safety concern. Get this puppy out of here. There's I. I tweeted like if I, if I bought the team from multiple billions of dollars and the statute of the old guy who who sold me, the team was in front of Stadium. The first excuse I got to move that Statue I. Get it the hell out there, and you can probably expect it not to come back one thing as as Joe, person of the Athletic Carolina's noted. Is that by removing the statute? Ironically I guess it now it created it removes independent for for fans to get into the stadium in a in a social distancing fashion. Interesting now, where's The statue? You're GONNA go what becomes of it. it's probably like. Junkyard I I don't I. Don't know what to do with it I would assume there's somebody with the panthers or somebody with David Tepper has storage facility where they can stash this giant statue for a while and I. It's not I. Would I don't think it's ever coming back? I mean look Jerry left under a a very dark cloud with all the things that he was alleged to have done in the office, and and all the things you hear about whether it's know like. Does his behavior towards women in the offices, behaviors towards people of Color in the office I. It's not it wasn't. It wasn't good at all. I mean everybody heard it, and so it behooves David Pepper I think to get hit to remove. Pull it in as far as far away as possible I. Don't know how you storage statue this big statue but I think we'll see a come back anytime soon. Yeah I would go drop it off on his front lawn. I don't know where it is to Jerry Richardson lives today, but I would have. That brought right there to his front lawn and just leave it there in the middle of the night. I, love, I love it, I think it's a great idea. You have to be careful if you're David, tepper, because if you say we're moving out of. Interest to public safety. You WanNa make sure that you don't. Like then turned out and and and and you know like the. Kid Public Safety. We had we didn't care. We got out of there one way or the other. You know what I mean like you gotTa. Make sure you don't you? Don't screw it up and and then violate the contract. We're a little bit less than. A week away from from seeing Roger Goodell's video statement in which she essentially repeated what it was that many very popular NFL players had to say about social justice. That was a week. Go tomorrow, so we're going on six days haven't heard much. Really haven't heard much from the. Commissioner's office haven't heard much from a lot of very very well known NFL owners. What is the sense? Will that you are getting of of when we will hear anything of significance from the NFL ownership or from the League office soon? Yeah, that's the point. During on the repeating thing I should have got lost like the. He didn't mention cabinets name. It's like well listen. There's players at least a video said we want to hear you say these exact words and then Roger Goodell, said those exact words. Then he got off the cue cards. Right I, mean he? They were like we want you to say this. We'll say this say this was either Roger Goodell. Read those things instead. There's exact thing so I don't I. I didn't get what people are sort of parsing a statement as if he came up with it, he was reacting responding to his players. I I? I think that the NFL will probably. D- Does anybody. Get Luckier than this league. I mean the pandemic hits, and it's the draft free agency, and all of that, and you can conduct all your normal business and be the heart. It'd hard the focus of the NFL. I the country you know without having to force people to go back into the workplace, and then the riots and the protests and the protest you say rights protests start, and there is all these questions about it and Roger Goodell out and does his things. You're breeze. Does staying SORTA everybody off their back onto their side and now? The NFL as we're, and the you know, the race issues in this country are not gonna just go away overnight, but now the NFL is entering this month long period where it is very very quiet, and so you might have lots of players speaking out, you know you can I think you can hide it. Get Away with it. If you're a owners in the League office, it'd be like hey, the sort of a dead period where kind of shutting down etc, etc, so I think I think they're going to go dark until you know training camp, time comes around. I would agree. I'm any preseason games you expecting. To I think. That'll be. That'll be interesting and I wonder in the League. I think at some point is is going to have to address. The issue of kneeling and I wonder if they'll just roll with it and try to decide for them. If the center has moved in this country in a certain direction as it relates to that type of protests, will they say well? It's more beneficial for us to be on that side of it, or will they stick a finger in the eye of the president and everybody who objects to to that form of protest? Will they keep the players in the locker rooms? I? Mean D. do you see them? At some point I would guess they're going to have to address this right well, even if they're entering, what is traditionally the the quiet time on the calendar? Yeah I mean I. Don't think they're going to have to address the protest stuff until we get to to training camp and when you get the training camp, you know assuming that we don't have a second wave of the virus, and all that and everybody's able to operate as fairly close to normal and the reporters at the practices, and all these guys are going to be asked about kneeling and asked about what they plan to do, and at that point I think things have become a lot more aggressive just in terms of being able to get responses from NFL teams and whatnot so. yeah I guess what I'm saying. Is that I think the timing works out for them where they just don't have to have the answers in you know in the immediacy like they just they can sit back and be quiet. Sort of let things play out and then gauge where everything is in. Hopefully if they're smart and Lord, knows usually they're not. They'll formulate some kind of plan as we get a little bit closer to the regular. Regular season. If that point, you could say okay. Here's what we're GONNA do, but it it. It would behoove them obviously to get their ducks in a row and be prepared to you know, have player be prepared for what the players are. GonNa do because it would be stunning if the players didn't Neil and be prepared to have a plan of action in place for how you want to handle these things as the season gets coaster. Well. It's always great to speak with you. Thank you for joining us. We do wish you and yours all the best and we thank you for for taking the time to join us and enlighten us on many different issues. Anything SMART. Aaron and I probably wouldn't as funny. is they usually or it's funny. You say usually game I guess, but well. Let me give you one more opportunity. Then I am currently watching a Spanish soccer match in which fans have been computer generated into the stands I. Know You're not watching this I posted a picture on twitter. If you want a reference it at some point, do you have a thought on whether or not? If you couldn't play in front of fans, what would will Brinson like to see? Would you like to see empty seats? Would you like to see tarps, or would you like to see CGI fans? Wow, that's very bizarre very clearly, not fans to. Write. It looks like like like a painting. Yeah. No, it looks like it looks like very. It looks dots. Painted although I guess I would I think if I was picking I would say all right if we're GONNA, do, football. Let's, let's hear. Let's hear what goes on. In the you know in the, let's hear what goes on behind the St Louis I wanna hear. I WanNa hear what's going on near the line of scrimmage. I WanNa hear everything that happens over the course of the Game I. Don't want I don't want. Piped in maybe I find of because I think the E. It'll be weird. Depending on how many fans are allowed in? But generally I think Kinda. Let go as naturally as possible. That's what would behoove the NFL the most. Okay all right I like it. When we got months to to sort through a lot of this stuff by the way I mean as we said, we'd spoken eighteen days, and it feels like eighteen years. We've got plenty of time. Be well well. We always appreciate it. You're the man. Dare, everybody. Thank. You Will Brinson picks podcast CBS sports dot. Com Yeah I I sorta. I'm trying to think of the style of painting. Right like there's a very specific style of painting where you just sort of take the paintbrush and smudge up against the canvas, and it sort of looks like that to me. Maybe it's just this type of CGI AGAIN I may. Not GonNa like it anyway, but you're studying like if you're watch if you're if you're in sports bar watching casually. Would you notices but? Why we're trying to appeal to that, no I'm just saying because it would look stranger if it's empty. It, there's nothing there in about. We know that something no I'm just saying you know you're we all know this, but you went in with a preconceived notion. You'RE GONNA. Hate it, no matter what are saying if you just kind of glancing up like. would. You really notice. Just glance it well. They're also having weird issues with it. Not It keeps turning on and off so now it's just becoming flat out. effing distracted flashes with a tarp here and there right. has done that. No, it just shows you an empty standard and Josiah full stand and blinks like traffic signal. Now I will say just as to prove that. I'm not completely closed. Minded in all of this. I didn't think I was GONNA like it with no fans and I actually did when I got up that first weekend Nev-. I've watched since y'all. Got Right, okay, but think of it this way. I I mean I don't stay up late, but when I do or when I've seen clips from Stephen, Colbert error or John. Oliver or Saturday night live or any of these shows that you're used to seeing in front of a live audience I July. I got used to it, and it's money I think we can do I think we can get used to it without having to put in laugh tracks, or or put Dobie images of people out there I mean I I've gotten used to to the way it works in comedy. And I think we'll. We'll get used to this if it's sports without fans but. Maybe, maybe I stand off in the minority. Plead temporary. It's temporary I'm okay with that for the next year. For as long as we have to go ahead and do this yeah I. Just think that this is again and they're not. This is the first, so you would expect that. They're going to have a couple of those heightened it up right and every league is now working off this model really. And other I wish I could have just shown you because they just showed. A Long Ball. They just showed it was empty. And then the fans pop back in, so it's. Distracting. Anyway backer.

NFL North Carolina Jerry Richardson Will Brinson football Roger Goodell David Tepper League CBS Virginia North CAC Alaska US Charlotte Simpson panthers California La Josiah David Pepper CBS
A Cuppa God #3 Revelation

A Cuppa God

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

A Cuppa God #3 Revelation

"Welcome take up a god. It's on pace reflection in today's shy about being forgiven even a devotional from Joshua chapter three is nine hundred thirteen registered date. Forgiven these by an forgiven. These are all Misha to coming. Despite all the parts of my heart on forgiven loved in the Mabel extended us so widen David comfy crossed. It can only be embraced. Christ if you enjoy shy could quite budgets you want me signoff them Jussia chuck three versus nine to thirteen juncture. said to these red lights. Come here and listen to the words that old yoga these how you will. I know that the living gods among you in that he will set the drive out before you the nights hittites headlines Presides Giga shots are more is engine besides Siaca the Covenant ruled and avoid yet will go into the Jordan ahead of Hugh now that she's twelve men for the jobs of Israel real one from each tribe and says the brace carry the Ark of the Lord of all year set foot in Jordan is waters flowing stream because of an standards for today is how you will know the living in got is among you Josiah Chuck to three vested something sometimes Kring to when giving when going through storm signs of presence in my life for Hoop Jussieu tells us how we we know that guys among us to go and listen to the words of God to have a relationship with him to raise the show that God is carving a path ahead to just as I sometimes take my eyes off Jesus and lead in desert feeling loaned spread letdown annita shopper awareness presence Lured Michael Shopping. My witness on your brain speak. Your Servant is listening in on it. So here's the sites why there's no shoutout through the coming week. I'm active in raising for bring me up and I will do series of challenges starting with the Fifteen K walk from experts to Wembley on on Friday. The Toba fifteen gay because there will be going along the gradient canal on the twelfth of October job. I will be getting my head. Shaved Ole to raise for break media and all of this will be documented. Three facebook. Live so you'd be able to to see what's going on like If you've not liked the facebook page bread raid media you need to go ahead and did it so you can view actually the fundraising going on now. The purpose of breath media eastern Christian organizations through broadcasting spread the word of God firing wide and to reach out to provide heating ministry their cost to be reaching out to people way the social media management went platforms and the design platforms of having a presence and the station. Some of these guys need upgrades in in some of these just need to keep up with at the moment so you can donate in various ways you can head to bitcoin dot com slash. Bring media or two done two slash support breath major where where corporate giving is is possible or you can buy shirt on bonfire dot com slash support breath media media all the proceeds will go to bring me. You can also give by texts through. What's up if you breathe? Be all the A T H E oil up a case to plus one nine eight double full three one six five. That's texting extinct breath. B. E. A. H. E. Two plus one nine eight double full three one six. He's five on what's up you'll you'll donations will make a great great difference It will enable me to keep a consistent in media presence into to give that broadcasting the full blast it should have because not even blasting going far and wide enough guts needs to go. Further is not going enough yet with your help. We'll be able to do that. The face of the father of glory the face of the Sun of suns the face of the original spirit. Paul all light upon us throughout this day. The podcast you just heard was made using anchor ever thought about making your own podcast. Hi cast anchor makes it really easy for anyone to get started. It's a one stop shop for recording hosting and distributing podcasts best of all. It's one hundred percent free. Sign up now at Anchor Dot F._M.. Slash new that's anchor dot F._M.. Slash new to get started.

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52: What I Learned From Bad Bosses

Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran

16:58 min | 1 year ago

52: What I Learned From Bad Bosses

"Hey, this is Barbara Corcoran. You are now tuned into business unusual and everything you ever learned about business. Throw it out the window. I'm going to tell you the real deal listening today. I'm going to answer all your burning questions about work life starting accompany getting on track and much much more be sure to call into the business unusual hotline with your question at eight Barbara that's eight eight B A R B A R A, but I I've had plenty of bosses in my life. And I know that a real bad one is sure to kill you confidence. I've been getting so many questions from people about what to do when their boss doesn't see. I'd I when they don't feel like they're measuring up how to handle that. Well, today, I'm going to answer a lot of questions about bed bosses. So if you've got one listen up. Hey around. My name is volunteer for coming from Toronto Canada. My question is how did you deal with a years or both that those you that failure is not an option they'll send really liked to fail or nerdy. I'm only those say fits how do you deal with those cards? Thank you. Valentin if the guy you're working for we'll let you fail. I would suggest you replace him move on. You're never going to be the best person you can possibly be if you're not allowed to fail. I twenty two jobs before I start my own business, and I can tell you that if you have a boss doesn't allow you to make mistakes or better encourage you make mistakes, you've got a bad, boss. The reason I say this is because you need to make lots of trial and error is to figure out what really works in any business and to get better results and to get better than you competition. Imagine telling the kid they can't try this. So that they ought to just be good at it. It's ridiculous. But people do at work all the time. I would suggest Valentin use start shopping for new boss as of today because you're never going to grow under the stranglehold that this guy has you wonder because he doesn't allow mistakes. He's just not a smart boss while I was building my business. I got a call one time from a producer who said he wanted to do a real estate show on New York City real estate, and he thought I'd be perfect for it. I agreed no one knew more about New York real estate than I did. And I went out for that addition, totally confident I worked really hard. And did my best that I'd be hired. They were really wowed by my performance. But a week later. I get a call telling me that they hired a twenty two year old woman. She worked for me, but she was an ex model and she was beautiful. She was dumb as a board. But she was beautiful and she got the job. I wanted to crawl under a rock and like I didn't even like her. Honestly, I felt like firing that was. My knee jerk reaction. But you know, what I didn't said I made a public failure of it. I was smart enough to rise up announce everyone in the company five hundred people at assails me that I had great news that this young neophyte was going to be the real estate expert on this TV show, and let's give a round of applause, and then I told him the story about how confident I was I fell on my face. I was embarrassed. I was angry. But I got back up and realize how good it was for the business. And guess what happened? Everybody knew they had permission of fail everyone. There knew they had permission to try and fail. And it was no Lauren embarrassment. I use that opportunity. Teach a great lesson that your boss just doesn't know people have to be given permission to fail. Otherwise, they never grow. Hi, Barbara this Bertel from Franson Kentucky. Thank you for taking like with two. If I were to take first step to become a good or better Tim late. What would that still be Alberta? You're asking how to become a better team leader? I to tell you a very capable of that just by virtue of the fact, you're asking that question and my short answer on this is you've got to walk which talk if you want people to work extra hard. You gotta make sure you're working extra hard. They'll follow your example. If you want people to be team players, you have to make sure you support every team member in every way, you possibly can. Boss to best leaders in the world lead, by example. And there's absolutely no substitute word is no other way. I think I'm a great boss. I feel I've always been a decent boss. But I've learned to be a really good one some willing to do anything that I'm asking anyone else to do. And you know, what that does? If breeds equality quality a approves trust. But I learned about being a good boss actually from having a whole string of bed bosses. You know, often seeing something really poorly done makes you pretty good at doing better. Let me tell you a few of what not to do by way of the bosses. I had to make sure that you avoid that entirely. One job. I had at of my twenty two before I started the business of real estate was I worked for ten company as administrative assistant what I learned in that company is that politics count and my boss played politics constantly. I was finding myself in competition with the other administrative assistant. I didn't know how I was in that position. But he constantly pointed out what she was doing better than me. And what I was doing better than her and a bread not mentioned. And what it did for us? Is it didn't make us a team? It made us pit against each other wasn't even idea. It was just a bad fos. Be careful the politics favouritism. I learned in that job never to be that kind of boss when I became a boss. Another job. I had was that a hotdog stand and I did a fabulous job on the highway selling hot dogs. I think my sales are bigger than most others. But I had a boss that just couldn't give me a compliment sign. Never knew that. I was doing better. I had a good day. I use proud of me. I would die for compliment by summer's end working that job. I was losing the wind in my sails he got to learn to compliment people when the compliment is due. I had another job where I had a negative boss. She was negative in the most menial kind of mean nasty way. I was a nurse's assistance, and I had to post temperature charts for the cancer ward of all the patients from the temperatures that were taken the night before. And she would constantly asked me is your number eight did you reverse that is that a good number? She was on my back like a monkey, and you know, what I learned from not boss that terrible, boss. Never ride someone's back convey confidence. I know you could do it. If there's an error. You can correct. But never ride somebody in point at what the doing wrong. They lose this spirit. So those were three bosses I learned a lot from. But let me also mentioned a couple of great bosses. I had in how I'm Eric them. Really? When I went into my own business. They never left my mind. I worked for Allan as a real estate secretary for development company and Alan gave me compliments galore. I even told my take shorthand, I could barely do it. I would just write my own letters after dictated had very little do with what he dictated. But you know, what he would just smile and say that's nice letter, Barbara and sooner or later, where do you think happened? I would kill myself that guy just to be accurate Mishra. I found a way to make his letters perfect. That's a good boss. I learned to mimic that as a boss myself. And of course, the best boss of all time was Josiah phony where I worked as receptionist answering the phone he was an example of total trust as a receptionist for a big development company when I went to him and said, I thought that the plumber was going out to his buildings too often to make plumbing repairs. I uncovered a great kickback scheme. He loved me for that. And I suggested. Hires own plumbers, and he saved a ton of money. If he didn't trust my opinion, he wouldn't have saved the money, and I wouldn't have gotten promoted what a great guy, and when I went out on start my own business. He was the first guy to give me an actual listing that I could rent which was by first commission, check of three hundred and forty dollars a great boss that wound up in a great place for him. And for me. But let me return to the original point you've got to walk, which you talk. If you go to lecture to people and tell them what they should be. They're gonna listen to you for a week or two and after that has slipped service and the turning off their ears. If you actually do what you're asking them to do and lead, by example, you'll find you'll have a team of people that are exactly like you. Let's take a short break to talk about a company. I love my friends at onto business loans. If you're determined to build a business, you're gonna find along the way you're going to need some financing to help you get there. I remember when I was building my business. I couldn't get a loan from anyone when I needed the cash if I went to a local Bank. They didn't wanna lend to me I was just a little small fry. But if you're building your business, you know, what you need the money for and I say to you go to my friends at on dick business loans by going to on-deck dot com slash Farber. Let me tell you why they give small business loans to five hundred thousand dollars and the best part is they make decisions in minutes. Funding is as fast as one day on deck values cash. They know it's an important part of building a business. It's not just about your credit score. Like the big guys do on deck has amazing customer service. They have over sixteen hundred five star reviews on trust pilot. Don't forget to visit my friends at on-deck dot com slash Barbara on dick business loans. Tell them. Barbara sent you. Now, let's get back to the show. Hey, Barbara, this is Adam from Prescott Arizona, I'm originally from New Jersey, and I've been living out here few years, and I just noticed that there are a lack of some really important chain businesses that I grew up loving over on the east coast that don't exist here. And in my mind, it seems like a no brainer to take out a loan and possibly become a franchisee of one of these businesses that seems to be so sorely needed in this kind of market one of the not so obvious challenges that I might face, and why aren't more people doing this? Or are they anyway, thanks a lot for all your wisdom. And for all the cool stuff. You're gonna start tank. I drove Adam you have no New Jersey accent anymore. How'd you pull it off? You give me a tip back. I've been trying to lose my New Jersey accent, my whole life, and I haven't succeeded. So go ahead full nine for me. Please. Okay. I think you should slow down big boy just because of brand does well in the northeast doesn't mean anything about it too in well somewhere else, you have to do some careful research in my mind to make sure that a brand for one part of the country is a good fit for another part of the country, for example, one of my most successful franchises. I invested in shark tank is cousins, Maine lobster, and they do double the business in one state over the franchise in the very next state for no other reason other than it fits one St. better than another. It's the same great lobster rolls. But different cultures different climates, different tastes. So you better. Do your homework. If you decide to buy a franchise and bring it to your neck of the woods. Most lenders will want to see a track record of success before they approve a small business slow. You should be aware of that. And with you being a new franchise owner without experience, it's gonna make it tough or impossible to qualify for a typical business loan the best way to finance. It is through the franchise itself. Most franchises or for a financial plan because they wanted sell these franchises to people like you and many will help you get on your feet by providing the needed financing, and that's really where you should shop for the money. So before you plunge in again, my advice is you better too little research because of what goes well in one neck of the woods doesn't mean it works in another. Hi, Barbara if found from Albany. I wanted to ask you about businesses that are pre revenue. How can we show investors that we are worth investing into and not just the red flag? Donna, you're not gonna show investors you're worth investing in until you've prove your concept that whatever you're selling can actually sell and on a consistent basis. The fact of the matter is that no one likes to invest in a dream, especially savvy well, educated money to investors. The too smart, you need to prove your concept showing it does actually work whatever you businesses, and that a lot of people are willing to pay for it. And then once you've done that you can raise other people's money. The only exception is if you've discovered some fun nominal technology that nobody else has and that anyone would recognize as pure genius. Then you can go out and sell it free revenue because people find irresistible that something new that's going to run away from them. Like a technology play has to be taken Wallace hot you have to get an early. But that's probably one tenth of one percent. Even. Of all the businesses out there that are getting started. But for the general businesses out there ninety nine point nine nine nine nine nine percent of them you need to show that it works. That's when people open their wallets and give you the cash. And ESPN Instagram do the same income qualifications apply to business loans as regulations, no business loans. Impersonal owns looked at very differently. Andy, personal loans are based on your personal financial statement and your personal income for a business loan. Your local Bank typically expects very different qualifcation 's they expect several years in business a FICO score over seven hundred and about a million dollars in annual revenue. That's what you need to get a typical business loan small business lenders are usually a lot more laid back. I know for example, my sponsors on day look for a healthy business with at least a year being in business one hundred thousand dollars in annual revenue and a FICO score of six hundred or better for the business owner, and that's the difference between a small business lender. And a Bank. And that's all the questions. We have time for today. If you have a question leave me a voicemail in the business unusual hotline. Eight eight eight Farber that's eight eight eight B A R B A aren't a you can also tweet it to me at Barbara Corcoran. And I may just answered on a future episode. You've been listening to business unusual with me. Barbara corcoran. Come back next week to hear more steps. And missteps I took on the path to success. Business unusual is part of the iheartradio podcast network. Search and follow business unusual on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. When you're building a business. Cash flow is never even you want to expand open a new office by manufacturing facility, where do you go? Well, I can tell you that I used to go to banks, and I never got the money. I need it. I was just a small fry. But if you're building your business, you know, you're going to succeed, and you know, what you need the money for go to my friends at on-deck business loans by going to on-deck dot com slash Barbara. Let me tell you why they give small business loans of two five hundred thousand dollars in the best part is they make decisions in minutes. Funding is as fast as one day on deck products are always telling your specific business deeds with lots of loan of payback options on deck values cash, though, they know it's an important part of building a business. It's not just about your credit score. Like the big guys do on. Dhec has amazing customer service. They have over sixteen hundred five star reviews on trust pile. Don't forget to visit my friends at on-deck dot com slash Barbara.

Barbara Corcoran Valentin Farber business owner Toronto Canada New Jersey Josiah New York City New York team leader Lauren Maine Tim Alberta Dhec producer Eric