5 Burst results for "Joshua Petri"

"joshua petri" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"joshua petri" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pedestrian safety ordinance I'm only allowed to stand here for the length of. Two red, lights before crossing the law also. Bars pedestrians from coming too close, to cars along several major, highways officials say the new law is meant to cut down on traffic, accidents but at a city council meeting after its passage some residents weren't buying. It I don't think they, actually really care about the people safety I think they just want rich people to be, able to go downtown without having to see homeless people that's Joshua Petri an activist and city resident his skepticism isn't surprising given, history just a few years ago Dayton was one of many American cities that. Strictly limited panhandling the city restricted it to daylight hours and required panhandlers to. Register with the police department then in two thousand fifteen the US supreme court ruled restrictions like these violated free speech rights According to. Ken Paulson a lawyer and president of the nonpartisan first amendment center. The government can't limit one citizen says to another it is that simple and governments made the. Mistake of trying to say you can't solicit you can't panhandle and government has, no business doing that so panhandling laws across the country were tossed, out and some business leaders weren't happy sandy guitar, heads the downtown Dayton partnership. For that panhandlers intimidate some visitors and keep others away we. Continue to bring more businesses downtown more people are living downtown but we still battle some of the perceptions. That downtown, not safe says they started to. Get more complaints after Dayton's lawns, changed the laws that were, in place we thought were were very effective but you know they were, shown to be unconstitutional so we needed to look at other alternatives they began. By looking at how other, cities were addressing the issue some including Portland Maine have launched programs Matching. Panhandlers with employers several have converted old parking meters into charity deposit stations with, varying levels of success. Ken Paulson with the first amendment center says many cities have found legal ways to work around the, ruling some like, Sacramento and Orlando, have banned aggressive panhandling or not taking. No for an answer Paulson says those laws are, likely to withstand potential court challenges because they address, conduct not speech, just as somebody calling your home is free speech if they. Call you thirty times that's harassment others like. Dayton are passing laws, officials say are meant to boost pedestrian safety but that effectively restrict panhandling lawmakers are careful not to use that word in the text of the law though mentioning panhandling down for any legislation that's, the key to, keeping a constitutional if you frame. It entirely as a traffic safety issue it. Is likely to be upheld the strategy is becoming increasingly popular local. Governments in Madison, Wisconsin, Pima county Arizona Sonal Springfield Missouri. And Wichita have all passed similar, laws for NPR news I, need for, Leslie You're listening to NPR news.

Dayton Ken Paulson Pima county Arizona Sonal Spri US Joshua Petri NPR Portland harassment Wisconsin president Maine Madison Wichita Leslie You Sacramento Orlando
"joshua petri" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"joshua petri" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pedestrian safety ordinance I'm only allowed to stand here for the length. Of two, red lights before crossing the law. Also bars pedestrians from coming too close. To cars along several major, highways officials say the new law is meant to cut down on traffic, accidents but at a city council meeting after its passage some residents weren't buying. It I don't think they, actually really care about the people safety I think they just want rich people to be able, to go downtown without having to see homeless people that's Joshua Petri an activist and city resident his skepticism isn't surprising given Danes history, just a few years ago Dayton was one of many American cities that strictly. Limited panhandling the city restricted it to daylight hours and required panhandlers to register. With the police department then in two thousand fifteen the US supreme court ruled restrictions like these violated free speech rights accord To Ken Paulson. A lawyer and president of the nonpartisan first amendment center the government. Can't limit will one citizen says to another it is that simple and governments made the mistake. Of trying to say you can't solicit you can't can't have and government has, no business doing that so panhandling laws across the country were tossed, out and some business leaders weren't happy sandy heads, the downtown Dayton partnership good. Four forties that panhandlers intimidates visitors and keep others away we. Continue to bring more businesses downtown more people are living downtown but we still battle some of the perceptions. That downtown, it's not safe says they started. To get more complaints after Dayton's lawns. Changed the laws that were, in place we thought were were very effective but you know they were, shown to be unconstitutional so we needed to look at other alternatives they began. By looking at how other, cities were addressing the issue some including Portland Maine have lunch programs matching Panhandlers with employers several have converted old parking meter isn't a charity deposit. Stations with varying levels of. Success Ken Paulson with the first amendment center says many cities have found legal ways to work around, the ruling some, like Sacramento and Orlando, have banned aggressive panhandling or not taking. No for an answer Paul's and says those laws, are likely to withstand potential court. Challenges because they address conduct, not, speech, just, as somebody calling your home is free speech if. They call you thirty times that's harassment others. Like Dayton are passing, laws officials say are meant to boost pedestrian safety but. That effectively restrict. Panhandling lawmakers are careful not to use that word in the text of the law though mentioning panhandling because of deaths for any, legislation that's the, key to keeping a constitutional if. You frame it entirely as a traffic safety. Issue it is likely to be upheld strategy is becoming increasingly popular. Local governments in, Madison, Wisconsin Pima county, Arizona Springfield Missouri and. Wichita have all passed similar, laws for NPR news I'm, eat pra, Leslie.

Dayton Ken Paulson US Joshua Petri NPR president Portland sandy harassment Danes Maine Wichita Madison Paul Wisconsin Pima county Leslie Missouri Arizona Sacramento
"joshua petri" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"joshua petri" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Cities around the country have struggled for years to figure out a way to address panhandling a twenty fifteen supreme court ruling based largely on free speech, forced American cities to take many of their anti panhandling laws off the books. Since then, some city leaders have found creative ways ways to curb the practice April Leslie from member station w. Wia so gives us an inside look at what the city of Dayton is trying out. It's a bright muggy morning, and I'm standing on a narrow media near the ramp is seventy five. One of Dayton's major highways. Watching the traffic lights change under the city's new pedestrian safety ordinance. I'm only allowed to stand here for the length of two red lights before crossing the law. Also bars pedestrians from coming too close to cars along several major highways officials, say the new law is meant to cut down on traffic accidents, but at a city council meeting after its passage, some residents weren't buying it. I don't think they actually really care about the people safety. I think they just want rich people to be able to go downtown without having to see homeless people that's Joshua Petri and activist and city resident. His skepticism isn't surprising given Dayton's history, just a few years ago. Dayton was one of many American cities that strictly limited panhandling the city, restricted it to daylight hours and required panhandlers to register with the police department. Then in two thousand fifteen, the US supreme court ruled restrictions like these violated free speech rights according. To Ken Paulson a lawyer and president of the nonpartisan first amendment center government can't limit. One citizen says to another it is that simple and governments made the mistake of trying to say, you can't solicit, you can't panhandle, and government has no business doing that. So panhandling laws across the country were tossed out, and some business leaders weren't happy. Sandy guitar heads, the downtown Dayton, partnership, good or forties that panhandlers intimidate some visitors and keep others away. We continue to bring more businesses downtown more. People are living downtown, but we still battle some of the perceptions that downtown not safe. Udeur says they started to get more complaints after Dayton's lawns changed the law set worm place we thought were were very effective, but you know, they were shown to be unconstitutional. So we needed to look at other alternatives. They began by looking at how other cities were dressing. The issue, some including Portland, Maine, have launched programmes matching. Panhandlers with employers. Several have converted old parking meters into charity deposit stations with varying levels of success. Ken Paulson with the first amendment center says, many cities have found legal ways to work around the ruling some like Sacramento and Orlando, have banned aggressive panhandling or not taking no for an answer pulse and says, those laws are likely to withstand potential court challenges because they address conduct not speech. Joe says somebody calling your home is free speech. If they call you thirty times, that's harassment. Others like Dayton are passing. Laws officials say, are meant to boost pedestrian safety, but that effectively restrict panhandling lawmakers are careful not to use that word in the text of the law, though mentioning panhandling movie because of deaths for any legislation. That's the key to keeping a constitutional if you frame it entirely as a traffic safety issue, it is likely to be upheld. This strategy is becoming increasingly popular, local governments in Madison Wisconsin, Pima county, Arizona. Springfield, Missouri, and Wichita, they have all passed similar laws for NPR news. I'm April Leslie.

Dayton April Leslie Ken Paulson US Joshua Petri NPR Springfield Portland harassment Maine Missouri Udeur president Madison Wisconsin Joe Pima county Arizona Wichita Sacramento
"joshua petri" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"joshua petri" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"To the weather center and chief meteorologist craig allen they expect a clear sky or clearing across the area for tonight sixty five to seventy and about sixty in the suburbs and then a couple nice sunny days eighty to eighty five four tomorrow eightyfive on saturday those today's not too humid as we get on into sunday the humidity does increase mid eastern near ninety and eighty five tonight very warm very humid monday right now in the city we have the the sunshine mixed with a few clouds is currently seventy eight humidity fifty five percent and the southeast breeze at nine i'm craig allen and the wcbs weather center five fifty on the afternoon roundup new study finds a lot of drivers are using their phones while driving even when they have kids in the car bloomberg's digital editor joshua petri is on our newsline joshua who conducted this study and what did they find the study was conducted by each hospital philadelphia and the university of pennsylvania school of mercy that about half of parents are still using their phone while driving eaten with children in the car half wow what about hands free technology that they study you look add is that any safer he did not specifically examine handsfree technology however the study was limited to actions parents took while physically driving in a moving vehicle using their hands this is focused more on texting tweeting scrolling through instagram etc and this was a survey that people are responding to so i guess one could probably safely assume that the number may be higher maybe not everyone was truthful perhaps not everyone is truthful of course people generally are truthful when it comes to the surveys but yes of course some people may have given incorrect responses but the problem is still alarming understand the study also looked up the use of child safety seats over the numbers there fourteen point five percent of participants admitted that they did not always use a child restraint system that group of parents also more likely to engage in other risky.

bloomberg joshua petri philadelphia chief meteorologist craig allen wcbs weather center editor university of pennsylvania sch fifty five percent five percent
"joshua petri" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"joshua petri" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"The day on sunday sunnyside side temperature eighty nine degrees then big heat for monday ninetyone but you got the sunshine and the cbs weather center i'm lonnie quinn all right thanks lonnie it's three fifty a new study finds a lot of drivers are using their phones while driving even when they have kids in the car bloomberg's digital editor joshua petri is on our newsline joshua who conducted this study and what did they find the study was conducted by the children's hospital philadelphia and the university of pennsylvania school of mercy the study found that about half of parents are still using their phones while driving eaten with children in the car half wow what about hands free technology that they study looking to add is that any safer he did not specifically examine hand street technology however this study was limited to actions parents took while physically driving in a moving vehicle using their hands this is focused on texting tweeting scrolling through instagram et cetera and this was a survey that people are responding to so i guess one could probably safely assume but the number may be higher maybe not everyone was truthful perhaps not everyone was truthful of course people generally are truthful when it comes to the surveys but yes of course some people may have given incorrect responses but the problem is still alarming understand the study also looked at the use of child safety seats over the numbers there fourteen point five percent of participants admitted that they did not always use a child the strangest strength that group of parents are also more likely to engage in other risky behavior.

cbs lonnie quinn bloomberg joshua petri philadelphia editor university of pennsylvania sch instagram eighty nine degrees five percent