18 Burst results for "Joshua Landis"

"joshua landis" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

06:00 min | 7 months ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Earlier this month, , a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, , engine thousands, , and lift three, , hundred, , thousand homeless. . And a vast landscape of destruction. . Now, , Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. . Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. . So the poodle listen a broader historical context. . Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. . He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. . It's a pleasure being with you Tom. . Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. . Now, , today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? ? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. . Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. . So you have the same. . Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, , you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, , , five to ninety, , which was. . Patched up. . Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. . Bank. . In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. . and. . Supporting the exchange rate, , but it turned out that that <hes> was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. . The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. . So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, , but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, , which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's <hes>. . Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, , and of course, , as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. . To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, , tell us mall. . Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. . The League of Nations <hes> conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, , but they are called mandates and. . France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. . And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. . Well, , the problem is that <hes> within the years. . The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, , seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. . Political power. . And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. . National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, , the population which underlines how You know precarious. . The entire political system is, , and of course, , in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, , and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course <hes>. . Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. . . You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. . Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, , and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, , but it left a terrible legacy. . That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. . The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Brent Scowcroft Tom Switzer Pacific theater Middle East Sarah Kovner Syria Joshua Landis Ponzi scheme Beirut National Security Adviser Middle East Program Prime Minister Iraq sinise University of Oklahoma Australia Paris
The French history behind Lebanon's problems

Between The Lines

06:00 min | 7 months ago

The French history behind Lebanon's problems

"Earlier this month, a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, engine thousands, and lift three, hundred, thousand homeless. And a vast landscape of destruction. Now, Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. So the poodle listen a broader historical context. Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. It's a pleasure being with you Tom. Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. Now, today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. So you have the same. Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, five to ninety, which was. Patched up. Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. Bank. In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. and. Supporting the exchange rate, but it turned out that that was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, and of course, as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, tell us mall. Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. The League of Nations conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, but they are called mandates and. France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. Well, the problem is that within the years. The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. Political power. And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, the population which underlines how You know precarious. The entire political system is, and of course, in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, but it left a terrible legacy. That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Syria Middle East France Iraq Ottoman Empire Saddam Hussein Middle East Program Ponzi Scheme Beirut Prime Minister Joshua Landis League Of Nations Parliament TOM Australia University Of Oklahoma
"joshua landis" Discussed on The Stock Podcast | CEO and CFO Interviews

The Stock Podcast | CEO and CFO Interviews

13:22 min | 1 year ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on The Stock Podcast | CEO and CFO Interviews

"I'm sure you're upset. There's like stopping their foot. Saying why the Hell we just took out five million barrels a day and and the the markets went up but nothing they're going back down again yeah so so that's that's the that's the problem for Iran. They're going to really have to escalate much more if they're going to throw the international community and to a real tailspin and get a real fear of keeping the world into recession which is what they need in order to gain leverage at so you know. America can manage this. That's what America's thinking is. We can manage that. I'm trips with President. Trump is thinking. We don't want to send oil prices too high. It'll cause recession and so everybody his tiptoeing around in this new situation now. Let me address one more question here because everybody you know so. Many people in the United States are saying. Why the hell are we in the Persian Gulf. We don't need their oil. Why would we get escalating with Iran over oil. Why are we so tied into a Saudi monarchy that seems in many ways so retrograde fighting this big war in Yemen and chopping up people like cokie well it's because we got her hand in big in the Gulf. We Are you know if you look at it. From American strategic twenty few we're the hegemony in the Persian Gulf. Fifty percent of known reserves are under the Gulf. Most the exports of oil are coming out of the Gulf for the international community. If you can control that will you can hurt your enemies a China anybody else. If if China were to really try to oppose the United States take Taiwan really throw his weight around in in the East America could shut off its oil and that would bring China to its knees and China understands that if America withdraws from the Persian Gulf who's going to replace it. That's the question I think that's on the minds of many strategists in Washington. If China replaces IT IF RUSSIA REPLACES IT and begins to form alliances with Saudi Arabia and Iran in a in a very meaningful way that's going to change Asia World War three if we want to put it in such stark terms no America's one World War Two because as we were able to deny oil to the Nazis they lost at Stalingrad when they were making a drive to the Caspian Sea and to get Russian oil and they lost at El Alamein when Rommel and his desert wraps were making a drive towards the Suez Canal to choke off off British soil which all came from Iran through the Suez Canal those with a pincer movement the the hinge of fate as Churchill called it. Those two battles fought simultaneously Danish -Ly Stalingrad Alamein Germany lost both of them it was denied access to oil and its star plummeted and ran out of you know the the the it's Panzer units as air force ran out of gas at America understood after that if you want to win World War three you got to control energy yeah and it's it's been organized to try to get control of energy ever since that's why we've been in all these stupid wars in the Middle East and we support in Saudi Arabia even though at times it seems completely ridiculous country to support but our hands are tied. We've got golden handcuffs on and is costing us more and more and more to try to keep control of this and possibly a war with Iran which would break our backs and and that's it you know but how much how much money will America spend in order to remain the dominant superpower in the world. That's really the question. Genet is being begged in all this escalation. How much do Americans want to be the superpower that can call the shots and to what extent does it trust the other countries of the world to retreat from position and from the Persian Gulf and allow China and Russia and others Iran to emerge India to emerge as if not coequal at least with a lot more authority over international national peace who gets away who does not get oil and those questions are the big questions that are on the table today it seems to me through the installation and and and and so America really has to figure out what it what role is GonNa be in the world going forward. And how much money can it really afford to spend in order to preserve that supremacy yeah. I I actually am shocked. It didn't surprised at my own sort of lack of of insight into the dynamic that you just described with spectrum war and oil and you know I think a lot of people lose sight of that fact and forget history in so we do and we think we think that we we forget that. The world runs still in oil. We all talk about renewables electricity solar power all these new technologies which are extremely important and are coming on very quickly but we forget our dependency on oil the world demand for oil. Oh increases by between a million and a half to two million barrels a year. That's the expansion rate yeah of course it depends on on the growth in the world economy and all these other things is you'll know only too well but we're adding a billion people additional people able to the Earth every twelve years and they all want to drive cars. They all want big houses. They all want to eat meat all these things which we know require tons of energy in order to acquire and everybody's getting into the middle class not everybody but the hundreds of millions of New People are getting to the middle thanks to China China. The success of countries like India Turkey South Africa Brazil tons of countries are doing pretty damn well now. There's a lot of countries that are not doing well. You're falling and pieces at the bottom of this sort of Darwinian hunt for middle class but China and India loaner just chucking up hundreds of millions of new middle class last people all of whom wanted to live in Nice houses drive to cars you know send their kids to Harvard and eat beef and so that that requires lots of energy so I don't see ev replaceable renewables and all that really making giant dent in our consumption assumption of a will even if we get great growth of those industries still be tremendous desire to consume moyal and that's you know that's good news for Saudi Arabia and Iran and for Oklahoma Texas but it's it's obviously honestly very dangerous for the future of our planet and it means that the United States can give up. It's alliance with Saudi Arabia easily and that's what it really means. We're we've got these golden handcuffs on and we we really have to figure out what our priorities are in. Maybe we can step back from Saudi Arabia but of course that means other countries are going to step in and and we know that China you know they put their first first aircraft carrier in the oceans just several years ago but they've got clans to get a lot more in the ocean there revving up their military expenditures so even though the United States spends more than X. Ten countries combined. That's not going to be the case for much longer and it's it's going to break our back financially unless we do something about it because we can't continue to do that. Yeah it's funny. It's almost as though you heard the interview that I had with Mike Ross ben yesterday yesterday he with respect to ease and solar and renewable energy and there is this I mean he sees it every day because he's speaking to investors and portfolio managers there's analysts market commentators and he hears the exact same thing that there's just this lack of appetite to invest anything that has to do with hydrocarbons because there's this perception that renewable energies here and it's going to completely displace hydrocarbons in the in the very very near future which to make that transition. It's just it's hard to understand that investors. Who are there's a lot of smart people out there but for so many people who are involved in the energy markets who invest in whether it's futures are the equities to just say a well. You know I have no interest now because I think renewables are going to be here tomorrow. It's hard to believe that they can make that they can jump to that conclusion and and just acknowledgeable thinking yes wishful thinking in it you know. I think people close your eyes to the fact that there are just so many more people on the earth all the time the population explosion. We've gotten our hands on it. I you know we've got an control of it in Europe and the United States and many other developed countries who who got negative growth but so much the world is still coming out babies and and it's not just population growth. It's because people are beginning to get into the middle class. These buttons waves New People are getting into middle class and of course they all want now. Look at me. I live in a house. That's three thousand plus square feet. I've got two cars. What what do I really do you know I don't buy things with plastic on them anymore and I try little corners but basically my footprint imprint is here to stay. I'M NOT GONNA change the way. My House is heated and the car I will if the price is really change range yeah as long as I can avoid it. I'M NOT GONNA pay that extra expense and nasty. That's the terrible dilemma. The world is really locked in to this oil economy and it's very hard to change it. We can tweak it around the edges but so many things run on fuel and we're not going to replace them anytime soon yeah am. I hope Greta. Thornburgh doesn't listen to this interview. Maybe it'll I oh she does. I hope she gave convinces all dopes. I dope like me to get off my butt and to do something radical because otherwise we're GONNA burn up here and and Yeah I fortunately I've got a house in Vermont and I always tell myself. It's high in the mountains. You know that when the oceans begin to lap up over New York I got someplace to go and when it gets too hot here in Oklahoma and the giant mosquitoes and other things begin to just suck my blood out and I'm in the tropics that I I've got someplace to go. That's not really a strategy yeah so I will ask you to hedge your bets just a little bit here and a a. No that you've provided a really good case for Iran Iran as to responsibility but who else could just in terms of you know. If you put you know half chips on black or I guess it it would be a number in this case because there might be a number of different parties responsible for the attack on advocate. Who else in the region has something to gain from. I can't see I can't see anybody else. Being really behind US I can see Iraqi pro-iranian militias in Iraq having aided and perhaps launch some of these things from southern Iraq which is one of the possible sites or from Yemen. I mean it could be that the Iranians tim set up shop in in Yemen and had sent them there but of course we know there are a lot of reasons to doubt this actually and to think that it came from southern Iran or possibly from from water based on in the Persian Gulf but it hits your on your on said they would do it. They promised that they would escalate late. They have the technology and very smug of course denying it because they don't want to just put a big target on their four hundred. Make it too easy for the United States this but this is a this is an escalation over just what we think it is. I I'm convinced of it. Look we supply Saudi Arabia with their arms all their technology and we have experts were sitting there telling them how to use it and they're bombing the hell out of Yemen. They're killing tens of thousands of people starving anymore with American technology. We're helping Israel with stuxnet. We're doing. We're torturing Iran and twenty thousand in ways. We're at war with Iran. Iran seizes at war with them. We're starving there. People and this is the United States doing it of course America's Says No..

Iran Persian Gulf United States America Saudi Arabia China Yemen China China President Oklahoma Trump India Suez Canal Middle East Asia World RUSSIA Israel Stalingrad Alamein Germany
"joshua landis" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Skies seventy seven degrees traffic and weather together on the aids and all news one of six nine AM seven forty P. CVS the CBS news time three twenty one is a new as our news watch continues well Syria's long running war is pitted many different sides against each other in out Turkey is finding itself in the sights of Assad's guns on the crisis next door Jason Brooks talks about the latest developments in Syria with professor Joshua Landis director of the center for middle eastern studies at the university of Oklahoma the battle for it live took a nother Escala Tory turn with regime and Russian war planes bombing a Turkish convoy and hitting areas around Turkish observation post in it live went went wrong between Turkey and Russia and the mask is and how bad is the situation well it's quite bad it what went wrong is that the the agreement fell apart Turkey was not able to really control these rebel groups and we have to remember that the dominant rebel group in this region used to be the the arm of al Qaeda in Syria which was called el Nino throw organizations going for number of name changes it is separated itself since from the leaders of Allah avail Qaeda but it is a hard bitten jihadist organization it's not going to take orders from Turkey it's not going to retreat from the highway and so it's been on his own now that has Turkey in a sense of where it to this group and and they have a number of over a dozen observation points in it live province and one of them has gotten in the middle of this new advance and was bombed Turkey was resupplying the rebel groups and Turkey a and so the Syrian army bomb them and they got caught in between in a sense they're trying to keep your head down now they're pleading Turkey is pleading with Russia to stop the Syrians Assyrians are pushing ahead anyway and Russia is caught in a dilemma of trying to decide who to side with this offensive has been going on for quite some time the rebels have held out to some degree do you think there are on borrowed time that this will likely of wrap up by the end of this year or might last a bit longer than that I think it's going to last much longer than the end of this year there's a lot of territory these are extremely well armed rebels Turkey has provided them with anti tank missiles grad rockets all kinds of defensive weaponry do you think Moscow and Tehran will maintain troops on the ground in Serie a long term to ensure the longevity of the Assad regime yes they're not going to let this regime collapse after fighting for so many years and spending so much money this is very important to their strategic architecture in the north of the Middle East I think that Israel and the United States wish to roll back he run from Syria is going to remain just that a wish I think that they don't have the capacity or the wheel to turn Iran and Russia out of Syria to listen to the rest of this interview with Jay since subscribe to the crisis next door on radio dot com on the radio dot com app or wherever you get your podcasts three twenty five on the CBS moneywatch time the four billion dollar deal that brings into the.

seventy seven degrees four billion dollar
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And if they do when will they start just some of the questions surrounding the withdrawal of American forces from Syria following a confusing at times contradictory statements, which followed President Trump's unexpected troop pullout announcement last month. Well, today, we had an onset has the US military said it had begun the drawdowns from Syria. But there are still plenty of questions, such as what are the consequences of this villa. Joined now by Joshua Landis, director of the center, formerly studies at university of Oklahoma and author of the Syria comment blog, so the withdrawal has begun. Josh for I mean, what are the immediate consequences? Well, the consequences are that all the neighbors are eager to fill in the vacuum that America leaves and the Syrian army wants to move in. There. The Kurds are very interested in having the Syrian army move in rather than the Turkish army, which would treat the Kurds very badly. And they're engaged in talks in Moscow and down with the Syrian regime to try to figure out whether they can preserve some of their autonomy. Iraq has said that they will help Syria Vom ISIS along you frady's and Turkey says that they're ready to invade and move in. So what about the what about the time line or the the length of this withdrawal might take? Because there have been reports that pertinent of what you just said that the Americans were saying, look, we're going to wait until we get reassurances from Turkey that you are not going to attack our allies occurred. This is the this is the big confusion. That's that's going on in our in our foreign policy the US foreign policy team. Because once Trump came said, we're going to withdraw without consulting any of his people it led to massive confusion. We saw that confusion display just the other day when Bolton went to Ankara thinking he was going to speak to air to one the president. And everyone said, I'm not gonna talk to you. And why would he talk to him because Trump he said, I'm only going to talk to Trump which is. It's clear that Trump is that decision maker. And the military has said the same thing the military was quoted in the Wall Street Journal this morning spokesper. Somebody from from the defense department saying we don't take orders from Bolton. So there's massive confusion about when if and how the US is going to withdraw from Syria. We don't know and the foreign policy team in Washington is in shambles. Well, the military is now saying the spokesman for the the operation in Iraq is saying that the the drool has started on on on that basis. What what are the logistical challenges for the Americans as they pull out? Well, they've got a lot of equipment there. Do they leave arms with the why PG Turkey does not want them to be fighting Kurdish group and how quickly do they withdraw? Do. They go through Kuwait. I guess it would fly out Iraq does not want more troops. We saw Iraq complaining that if they they don't want those troops to move over into Iraq and stay there, but they would come through Iraq, I presume, and and then go through Kuwait and get there's a there's a big team in Kuwait and the Gulf that's ready to take them out. And of course, the bottom line for President Trump is he believes this is popular with American voters, and he in Iran on this policy of pulling troops out. Well, it is very popular. The American people can't understand why the US government has spent five trillion dollars fighting wards that don't seem to to produce anything. Good in the Middle East. They want that money spent here Trump ran on it. He's gearing. His campaign again. And so this is an important part of his campaign if he wants to keep his base and fight off the Democrats. He's got to continue with this withdrawal. Line. And we saw that in Afghanistan as well. He said he was gonna withdrawing Afghanistan that's through people into a tizzy, then he backed away from it slightly. So there's there's quite a bit of confusion in Washington. Joshua landis. Thanks very much. Indeed. You're listening to the BBC World Service. And this is news hour coming to live from London with James kumarisami. It's the BBC on WNYC in New York. Stay tuned coming up at ten this morning. It's the Brian Lehrer show today. It's ask the mayor mayor build Blasios will take your phone calls during his regular Friday appearance and talks about some of his proposals in the state of the city address, plus more on what's included in the green new deal. That's all coming up this morning on the Brian Lehrer show that starts at ten o'clock.

President Trump Iraq America Syria US Joshua Landis Syrian army Kuwait Bolton Turkey Brian Lehrer Washington Turkish army US government Wall Street Journal WNYC Josh BBC World Service university of Oklahoma
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And he's doing it in Afghanistan is doing in Syria and to a certain degree as an American who needs better public schools and other things some eggs are going to have to be broken to bring the troops on. There's never a good time to withdraw Joshua Landis. Middle East expert in the US and William media in South Africa, more proof that the American president does what he wants. Have we got you William? We seem to have lost the line. Same question to you then roof if that's all right? Yes. Trump does what he wants. But he also does what he's promised in his election pledges. We can't forget that promise that Mexico would pay for the wall. Remember that in the government closed down because it hasn't indeed. Well something's accounts enforce but she's ensuring that somebody's going to. Under there's going to be a wall. And that's what he's sticking to. I mean, I'm find the whole thing with Trump is very confusing. There are some good things about him. I mean, the whole thing about how he's a nightmare. A lunatic is is is is absurd. He does ask the right questions. He asks the questions nobody else asks he asked him about he's taking on China staging. We have to be taking them China because it is becoming a massive Clooney par. And here he is just saying with any of these wars worth wanting to questions. Now, the problem is that he doesn't seem to be able to work with anybody who doesn't agree with. It's interesting that you still talk about we meaning America and Europe Britain who the west generally because he doesn't see us his allies. Does he well? And my great fear is that he might pull out of nation. But in the N T will you stick to we then? I I still a move fashioned enough to say we in the sense of the west, I think the whole where's the guys William Gamay day in on the African continent. How do you see this row? You know? I mean, Trump has been I mean, he's policies from boy recessing, he's been absolutely confusing. I mean, so one thing that we get. Veto peers is alienating friends. And you know, entities taken foreign policy almost a personal foreign policy. That's the first thing the second thing just in terms of you know. His friends are also being alienated ultra to snow, western friends and snow developing country, friends, I didn't actually I mean in Africa. I mean Africa has just been absolutely neglected took. I mean, you know for years I mean since he took over the hasn't been a permanent. The under secretary for African affairs. I mean, it does from African point of view is just seems that you know, it's not serious don't thinks. Hope that South Africa will stay off his radar presumably. Well, South Africa. I mean again over our land policy because what happens our Africa, you know, sort of right wing. Group's approach. Trump and said well, intervening Safi curve land-reform. Black government is country expert, great wide lot owned land for paying and Saunders or chaos and Trump baxley tweet on the subject of and so on. So again, he tells you to sort of personal. Politics becomes foreign policy. Thank you. So rotted the sort of evidence based policy that we we've been used to from the US in the past. You know, that seems to be gone now. This is the BBC World Service..

Trump baxley Africa William US South Africa China Joshua Landis Trump Afghanistan William media William Gamay Syria Mexico BBC World Service president under secretary African affairs Clooney
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But I think he's now saying that the time has run out, and I'm going to reverse this. And he's doing it in Afghanistan is doing Syria and to a certain degree as an American who needs better public schools and other things some eggs are going to have to be broken to bring the troops on. There's never a good time to withdraw Joshua Landis. Middle East expert in the US. The time is twelve minutes past the hour. This is the BBC World Service on Paul Henley with weekend. Now, there was panic as a three meter sue NAMI wave rushed onto a beach town resort in Java sweeping away 'cause and homes. The Indonesian authorities say at least six. Thirty two people have been killed. That's the number so far some six hundred of being injured by this anomaly in Sunder strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra the national disaster agency said in a statement that they believe the soon army was triggered by volcanic eruption under the sea on the spot of the famous Krakatoa volcano photographer. A Steen Andersson was taking pictures of the volcano on the beach when the soon NAMI happened. My family were up sleeping in the room. I was standing on the beach trying to fold the routes erupting. Volcano cock about during the evening. It was the heavy eruptive activity. Just prior to that wave hit the beach was no activity at all it was just dark out there on suddenly sold. It waiver calming huts around. It was two waves the first way walking back strong. I could run from it after doctor I run straight through the hotel where my wife, and my son the way sleeping. And I woke up when I will at waking them up. I heard bigger wave coming and I looked out the window and a second way hit then it was much bigger past the hotel it passed a role that cars couldn't drive through. I mean, we're push the all. After that second wave we have the older people hotel went straight to the forest next to the hotel. It goes up there. So we all run through the forest. And we're still up on the hill. Now, we don't dare to go downstairs. Our Indonesia correspondent Rebecca Hench Kirk joins us now live on the line from Jakarta. Rebecca, what more do you know about what happened? Well, we're heading to one of the worst affected areas. Now on the on the west coast of Java where we're seeing images of areas along the seed of these holiday area where people build very close to the ocean just reduced to rubble houses made out of bamboo and wood, but also cement buildings also crumbled official death toll is at sixty two. But we're hearing reports from the other side from the lump on side on the island of Sumatra with some officials saying that the death toll. They could be in the hundreds of very much, not sure. But there are a sense that this will get a lot worse. In terms of the scale of the devastation on a warning sign is always the number of people missing that significant at the moment, isn't it? It is indeed. And the officials as saying that there's still some areas which they haven't been able to contact yet. They have a full idea of the scale of the devastation. They're talking at this stage about nine hotels badly damaged at least five hundred homes, but that's very much focused on this area will wear heading this just outside of Jakarta, a holiday destination for people who were travelling during this holiday destination and the footage that we've seen of the moments where the Sonam hit one where a local band was playing to a crowd. And then suddenly the waves engulf the stage from behind the band really show. The fact that people had no warning that those waves were about to hit said that is also a bad sign for those missing people. Yeah. The Indonesian soon NAMI warning systems in the past had been criticized haven't they? What as far as you know has been the responsible parties. Yes, they have been criticized in this case was a different kind of Sonam e one that really happens with talking about something. Tree goodbye volcanic activity at Krakatoa this child of the famous volcano that sits in the soon destroyed it's been a ting and officials believe that it was caused by this volcanic activity, maybe a landslide under the water that was powerful enough to trigger it..

NAMI Sumatra Jakarta Rebecca Hench Kirk Joshua Landis US Afghanistan Sunder strait BBC Sonam Paul Henley Steen Andersson Syria Indonesia official twelve minutes three meter
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mcgurk resignation to stressing analyzing the possible threats and all the possible scenarios repair, our strategy or tactics do gardening. This matters as we already have our will to independently defend our people and the different groups giving and northern Syria against any attack against any threats to their life. Joshua Landis is director of the center of Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma in the US. I asked him shortly before we came on air, if he believed Islam state in Syria was a spent force caliphate has been destroyed, but there are still several thousand ISIS fighters. And if there is a lot of chaos and this handoff of the Kurdish territory and northern Syria. There's no doubt that ISIS. Could do a lot. Damage. There's not much point in having a foreign policy view in this administration. The differs from the president's is there for a long time. The Syria policy was run underneath the radar of the president. When Erdo on the Turkish, president escalated and threatened to go to war and start shelling. The US dominated northern part of Syria within the president got involved. And he decided that it was time to come home. So you can run the policy under the radar of the president. But not forever. It's a fairly stock situation on the ground. Isn't it that America is deserting an ally? The Kurds who are in grave danger from Turkey, clearly, the rollout of this policy. Change is very disconcerting for everybody involved. And the Kurds are in a panic on the other hand the Kurds have worked with the Syrians in the past just as they worked with the Americans in order to fend off the Turks as. Well, as ISIS, and we've got to remember that Assad needs the Kurds when he pulled out of eastern Syria in two thousand twelve in order to defend the cities in the west he handed the region over to the white PG, that's the Kurdish militia so us odd and the Kurds have worked together. The big question is will Turkey invade. And do what they've done in free in another province. They ethnically cleansed completely of its Kurds. And Syrian army is very interested in getting back. They started to deploy around the commissioning an important city, and the Americans the French the British all have time and capacity as they decide what to do in order to make sure that this region is handed off to Syrian army that negotiations with the Russians are carried out. We don't know the time line yet for this process of withdrawal from a Russian government point of view. It's all going swimmingly well in Syria. Moment, isn't it? It is indeed. And and many people in the United States are decrying this as a win for Russia a win for Iran on the other hand Syria is in some ways a poisoned chalice. It's not clear if this is really a Christmas gift or a lump of coal is estimated that series half a trillion dollars to rebuild the Syrian budget projected for two thousand nineteen is less than nine million dollars. That's less than Jordan or Lebanon, and it's a much bigger country. They've only set aside one billion dollars for reconstruction. And they need half a trillion. So whoever ends up with Syria is going to have a monstrous undertaking. What do you think is principally guiding President Trump in all of this? He didn't greatly care about this field of foreign policy. Previously was the phone call with Turkish president key. I think it was key. But I also think that. Finished with the midterm elections. Now, he's thinking of two years down the road when he has renewed national elections, and we we have to remember that when he ran for elections. The first time his mantra was I'm gonna get America out of these stupid wars in the Middle East. We spent five trillion dollars, and what have we got to show for nothing. And this was extremely popular with the American people because both Republican hawks and Democrats had been singing American power, and how to do this and that and Americans were fed up with it. Frankly, now, President Trump gave his generals time to do what they needed to do..

Syria president Americans President Trump Joshua Landis ISIS United States Middle East Russia Turkey Syrian army Jordan university of Oklahoma Erdo director Assad Lebanon Iran
"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

14:21 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"When examined a number stories in issues in the news will begin with the diplomatic tensions erupting from the shootdown of a Russian military aircraft in Syria, which was blamed on the Israelis, although it was the Assad regime's barrage of anti-aircraft fire, which downed the aircraft killing all fifteen aboard. Joshua landis. The director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma who writes, Syria, comet a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics joins us to discuss efforts by Israel's prime minister Netanyahu and Russia's President Putin to calm the tense situation in crowded airspace. In a volatile area of combat with multiple local in its national forces butting up against each other since Israeli warplanes were attacking rainy and targets in Syria. At the time, the Russian maritime reconnaissance aircraft was shut down by the Syrians will analyze the apparent agreement between Russia and Israel to allow the Israelis a free hand to go after Iranian and his Bella. Targets in Syria, and we'll assess the deal between Russia and Turkey to create a buffer zone on Turkey's border with it. To avoid a humanitarian catastrophe confronted three million civilians trapped with the last jihad is fighting the Syrian regime with Russia winning in Syria and bolstering ties in Iraq. And iran. The bid arises that after the US spent five trillion dollars and lost thousands of American lives. It looks like the Russians have ended up with the spoils from our point and endless wars. Then we'll assess today's White House visit by pollens president Duda. Followed by a press conference at which both authoritarian leaders, Trump and doodo or able to choose softball questions from regime friendly reporters, Charles caption, the former special assistant to President Obama for national security who was director of European affairs on the national Security Council under President Clinton joys to discuss the key issue Trump, and dude it did not mention that is the growing authoritarian nature of the ruling party in Poland. And. The takeover of the country's media and courts, then finally we'll speak with Scott Kennedy, the director of the project on Chinese business and political economy at the center for strategic international studies and author of beyond the middle kingdom. He joins us to discuss China's tit for tat response to Trump's escalating trade war after two hundred billion in tariffs were slapped on them on Monday. And the likelihood that before long they'll be tariffs on all Chinese imports, with the exception of rare earth minerals. We'll also discussed the mysterious disappearance of China's biggest movie star joining us now, Joshua Landis is director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma. He writes, Syria comment, a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics. Welcome to background briefing Joshua Orlando being with you again. Well, thank you Joshua in this incident where the Syrians accidentally shot down a Russian military plane killing fifteen crew members on board. This is a maritime patrol plane coming in to land in Latakia, and what it coincided with was a is rally raid with I think three F16.'s blowing up Iranian targets, and the Syrians just threw everything up into the air and mistakenly shut down the Russian plane initially the Russians were angry and blamed the Israelis, but it seems like the Russians to the Israelis a trying to play this down. I mean Russia is not going to blame Syria in public. But I'm sure in private they going to have some pretty stern words with Assad. What do you think? Yeah. I think you're absolutely right. I think there will be some stern words for the Syrians of this is going to cause a a great deal of anger among some of the Russians working on Khomeini, the Russian airbase. That's right next to the ladder Kia. This is no small number of Russia's shutdown. Now, clearly the Syrians didn't mean to shoot the Russians down, but they they didn't take the necessary precautions, and there seems to be multiple mistakes. And that's what Putin put out a little statement following the shootdown trying to tamp down concern saying that this was a tragedy on many levels and it had been preceded by a number of mistakes. And clearly one of the big mistakes was that that the Israelis did warn the Russians, but they warned them with very little time. Perhaps only a few minutes earlier, and that doesn't seem to have gotten to the doesn't seem to have gotten to the Russian plane that was moving very slowly was clearly not seen as a threat to the Israelis because it was a slow moving surveillance plane and. And perhaps they didn't warn that particular plane, but the word didn't get to it. It didn't start to get out of the region and Syria launched missiles, which then attacked Russian plane and causing this disaster. But this comes out of a situation, that's extremely tense where there are many. Combatants in one teeny little area and this area around it live, and Lattakia has Iranians Turks rebels Syrians, Israel, and and so it's in a sense. It's almost surprising that more of these incident happened. So that I think is the key, isn't it? And it seems like a recipe for disaster. If you've got all this conflict going on and there are deconfliction arrangements between the US or the coalition. I guess they call themselves and the Russians and deconfliction between the Israelis and the Russians in the pantley. The Israelis have Russian-speaking air traffic, controllers speaking with the Russians and in this case, apparently they only gave them a couple of minutes warning that there's not a lot of aspects to begin with say you've got all these players in there. And my understanding is also a looming clash between the Assad. Iranian and Russian forces on on the US base that was the site of a previous attack in which Russian mercenaries killed. So. Intense, which is on the other side of the country near the Iraq border Jordanian right at the corner of the Iraq Jordanian Syrian border. When the Iranian troops made a lunch inside a region that America considers its fear of influence Syrian hunk of Syria and America blew down the attacked in Iranian convoy. But you know, in in part, this leads from the this comes out is going to increase the hostility also between Russia and Iran because Iranian troops are in Syria. Israel is committed to driving them out. And in over the last month. Well, over one hundred Iranians have been killed by Isreaeli attacks in inside Syria. So Israel is hunting Iranians in Syria. It wants to drive them out. And that's what Netanyahu said he's term to do is to get rid of all Iranian presence in Syria and America, the United States. It must be said is also said that Iran has to leave Syria. So this then runs into a problem with Russia because Russia is not going to protect the Iranians in Syria, and has made it very clear that it's going to preserve its good relations with Israel, and it will not use anti-aircraft missiles to take down Israeli planes, but that leaves odd in a sense having to defend the Iranians on the ground in Syria who he needs and he wants there. Because they're helping him fight against the rebels. But that means yeah. That that that means that in a sense, the Iranians must be very furious at the Russians because the Russians are not protecting them. And this has led to a Syrian shooting down Russian planes, which will get Russia mad at Syria, and in a sense. Everybody's going to be I think it's gonna take a lot to calm this down. Well, the Israeli planes apparently had attacked a number of Iranian targets. So presumably every day almost there. More Iranian casualties or his blah casualties, which I guess pretty much one in the same. Well, they're both there they're frequently work together with the Syrian troops. So there's been a lot of Syrian casualties as well. Because all of these are allies of the Assad government and have been invited into the country to help support the Syrian effort to retake the country from the rebels. And and so that is a complicated situation. And again, I'm speaking with Joshua Landis is the director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma. He writes, Syria, comet a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics. Well, I think Assad would be in power about for the Iranians because when the people rose up initially against this family dictatorship took to the streets in the thousands. This is during the spring back in two thousand eleven the Syrian army were ordered by Assad and by his psychotic rather Ma to shoot the people down in the streets. A lot of these Syrian army people simply couldn't kill around people. They just really couldn't do it and broke ranks. And there was a real mutiny going on within the Syrian army and Assad then turned to the Iranians who brought in the coulds the revolutionary God's the IDC. And they are perfectly capable of shooting innocent civilians in the streets to finally terrorize the Syrian people into not demonstrating, and I think and then of course, the civil war began the unarmed civilians decided to get on to. I mean is that a fairly facile sketch of how things happen, but is it to your mind accurate? Well, it has been a lot of escalation as you say, and and clearly Iran and Russian support both have been crucial to keeping us sudden power. Now, of course, it turns right around and says, well, if the Saudis, and the reason the Americans hadn't armed and sent arms into the rebels stay would have been defeated by professional army fairly lickety-split. That's an exaggeration. Clearly, we'll never know this is counterfactual history both sides through in weapons through in support. And and clearly the Russian Iranian support has been a superior support. Because the Americans got spooked by the rise. Don't hide on ISIS, and many others did too, and they stopped backing the Syrian rebels and ultimately refused to escalate once Russia jumped in two thousand fifteen and and we've got the situation we have today where the rebels are are have been corralled into this. Small province of it lab. And. It's touch and go whether that's going to the new agreement that's been struck between Turkey and Russia will lead to some kind of peaceful political resolution or whether it will break down, and they'll be more more violence. What of course, that has the potential of becoming the next exodus of refugees, that's three million essentially civilians trapped in Italy the tax closed the border. So this deal seems to involve some kind of Buffa for these people to retreat to while the Assad and the Russians in this Syrians, go after the fighters themselves is that the deal. Is you understand Josh? Yes deal today. That was struck yesterday is is temporary. There's this fifteen or twenty kilometer buffer zone. Where the Jihadist rebels who are quite numerous in the region have to leave a buffer zone. And. Others have to get rid of their heavy weapons, but the Jihadist. The terrorists who everybody agree are terrorists will have to get out of this buffer zone, which will be policed by both Turkish soldiers and Syrian soldiers. And so in some ways, it's a win for every side. It's a win for Turkey and the rebels because they get to put off Syrian invasion. It looked very imminent. It's a win for Russia because they can demonstrate on the world stage that they're not immune to humanitarian causes to trying to find a political resolution and also they gained twenty kilometers. You know, long strip around this small province that had well entrenched hard-bitten rebels in and they've gotta move back into the center of this province and same for us. I mean outside he hasn't really been president in this in this negotiations. But it means a weakening of the rebels and. It forces Turkey to confront the more Jihadist rebels. And that of course, the Russians will be looking to see if if it causes a real dissension within rebelling Turkish ranks. So and Turkey wins to were Turkey wins. Because it means there isn't an onslaught this terrible is humanitarian catastrophe that could have led to refugees streaming into Turkey again end many fighters, perhaps fifty thousand we don't know how many fighters there, including well over ten thousand jihadists in Al Qaeda linked groups could have been scattered across Anatolia, and that would have been bad news for Turkey..

Syria Russia Assad Israel Turkey Syrian army Iran Joshua landis United States Middle East university of Oklahoma director President Putin Assad regime Iraq president White House Netanyahu
"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"It was returning to its base in the Takia fifteen Russian criminal kill initially the Russians blame the Israelis the Russian defense ministry spokesman said the Israeli politics are using the Russian aircraft as a shield and pushed it into the line of fives of the Syrian Defense. But since then, of course, it seems about Putin and Netanyahu calm things down and reassured each other. And the Israelis have expressed sorry. Zero at the death of the Russian Ammon. But they've also made it clear that it was a serious shot the plane down what is at the heart of the bromance. If you will between Netanyahu and Putin. What does Netanyahu get out of it? And what is Putin get out of it? Well, it's a very important. It's a very important understanding because Russia and Israel are going to be neighbors in Syria for a long time to come. I said it's one this war with Russian support. The Russians are well in Scots there. There's a naval yard and Tartus, and they refit their ships there. So Russia Netanyahu need each other. They need to come to understandings and Russia has. Told the Israelis that it will not protect the Iranians in Syria. It can't push them out for Israel. But Israel has the freedom to go in and kill them. And that's what these Israeli planes were doing when they were were theoretically shot at by the Syrian planes, and this Russian plane was shot down by mistake is they were trying to push out the Iranians so Russia is not standing in the way of this Isreaeli effort to clear the Iranians out of its northern neighbour. And so in that sense, both Russia and Israel, having understanding Russia can stay in Israel, it stay in Syria and will not be attacked by Israel in any way. But the Iranians will not be protected. So what happens, then if as roommate there's a likelihood of some military action against Iran in the Gulf but Netanyahu and the crown prince Saudi Arabia NBS, I really itching to do something and Bolton the Nash good advisors. Brought in real Uber. Hawk deputy of his to be in charge of Iran. And it looks like the hawks are gathering on outside to do something this concern that as the Malik pro closes in on Trump. Did he might lash out with some kind of wag the dog war? If any of this happens, obviously, it could have catastrophic results, but how would the Russians see that? How would it affect the relationship with Israel? They giving the Israelis a green light to pound the Iranians inside of Syria would that extend to the Americans going after Iran itself. No, I don't think. So I think there is a Russian Iranian alliance. In many ways. Russia has found a new role in the Middle East in that is supporting Iranian backed regimes like. The Syrian regime and Russia has a role in supporting a in a sense, the Shiites if you want to be very gross about it or very over-simplified. United States has recommitted itself to defending it's sunny allies that Saudi Arabia and hot to the Gulf states, Jordan and has abandoned President Obama's effort to balance the Iranians against the Saudis, really and has turned against the Iranians. It quite quite vigorously and that opens the door for Russia to become the champion of Shiites. Whether it's his Bola, whether it's outside regime tried to find a place in in Iraq as well. And so Russia has become an essential mediator and on the side of Iran. And then I don't think if there were an attack on Iran, I think Russia would be quite upset. I doubt it will come to that. I think that Saudi Arabia and Israel have Iran where they want it right now, which is that America's doing the heavy lifting against Iran. It has put renewed sanctions. We just heard the secretary of state of the United States warn European countries that if they continue to do business with Iran past November, there's going to be very steep consequences and the Europeans are pulling out. Most big fortune one hundred companies are. Yanking whatever investments they had any Ron and they're stopping to do business with it. So I think that Iran's gonna be under tremendous economic pressure in the coming years and will become poorer and poorer and this, of course, will increase the social cleavages within Iran, and may lead to some kind of uprising against the regime, which is what I think would cheer both Saudi Arabia and Israel. Well, just in closing. The does seem a terrible irony that the US liberated if that's the right term Iraq from the grip of a Sunni dictator and handed the power that they never had before. And it's also handed Iran and almost amount of influence in Iraq as well. So it's a great irony. And after all of the lives lost in that gnome as treasurer of trillions of US tax payers money pulled into Iraq that the Russians should be the. Efficiencies. Indeed. And that's you know, I think American generals have been decrying this and think and trying to figure out what you know, how did America miscalculates so badly in its Iraq adventure, and we heard from this new, you know, the latest Woodward book. Fear that that he uses the grand total for the cost of both Afghanistan and Iraq is between five around five trillion dollars, which is a staggering amount of money. Well, Josh Landis. I think you very much for joining us here today. I was a pleasure in. So thank you. And again, I be speaking with Joshua Landis who is the director of the center of the Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma. He writes, Syria, comet a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics. We take a base station break. We're back looking into the press conference at the White House today with both authoritarian leaders Trump and due to Poland were able to choose softball questions from regime friendly reporters..

Iran Russia Israel Russia Netanyahu Syria Iraq Saudi Arabia Putin United States Russian Ammon Syrian Defense Middle East Tartus Joshua Landis America university of Oklahoma Trump Poland Josh Landis
"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

17:08 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Among the story is set in southern California during the Cuban missile crisis. It depicts one day in the life of a middle aged gay Englishman named George professor in Los Angeles who is adjusting to life after the sudden death of his lover the novel was deemed by writer, Edmund white to be one of the first and best novels of the modern gay liberation movement in two thousand eight acclaimed fashion designer Tom Ford, directed a film adaptation of the novel. Starring Colin Firth is George the film captured the texture of a gay couples life together making it one of the most realistic depictions of gay domesticity in cinematic history, the rainbow minute gets produced by Judd Proctor and Brian burns at WRR in Richmond, Virginia and read by volunteers like me, Mike Heineman. It's just after four am on Wednesday morning, and you are listening to WRR L P ninety seven point three FM Richmond. Independent radio up next is background briefing with Ian masters. Hello and welcome to background briefing. Available. Twenty four seven a background briefing dot org. Me and masters in today when examined number stories in issues in the news, we'll begin with the diplomatic tensions erupting from the shootdown of a Russian military aircraft in Syria, which was blamed on the Israelis, although it was the Assad regime's barrage of anti-aircraft fire, which downed the aircraft killing all fifteen aboard. Joshua landis. The director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma who writes, Syria comment, a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics joins us to discuss efforts by Israel's prime minister Netanyahu and Russia's President Putin to calm, the tense situation in a crowded s pace in a volatile area of combat with multiple local in its national forces butting up against each other. Since Israel warplanes were attacking Iranian targets in Syria at the time, the Russian maritime reconnaissance aircraft shut down by the Syrians. We'll analyze the apparent agreement. Between Russia and Israel to allow the Israelis a free hand to go after Iranian and his Bella targets in Syria, and we'll assess the deal between Russia and Turkey to create a buffer zone on Turkey's border with it live to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe confronted three million civilians trapped with the last jihad is fighting the Syrian regime with Russia winning in Syria and bolstering ties in Iraq and Iran. The bid Arnie arises that after the US spent five trillion dollars and lost thousands of American lives. It looks like the Russians have ended up with the spoils from our point an endless wars. Then we'll assess today's White House visit by pollens president Duda. Followed by a press conference at which both authoritarian leaders Trump and due to able to choose softball questions from regime friendly reporters, Charles caption, the former special assistant to President Obama for national security who was director of European affairs on the national Security Council under President Clinton joys discuss the key issue Trump, and dude it did not mention and that is the growing authoritarian nature of the ruling party in pollen and the takeover of the country's media and courts, then finally we'll speak with Scott Kennedy, the director of the project on Chinese business and political economy at the center for strategic international studies and author of beyond the middle kingdom. He joins us to discuss China's tit for tat response to Trump's escalating trade war after two hundred billion in tariffs was slapped on them on Monday. And the likelihood that before long they'll be tariffs on Chinese imports with the. Exception of rare earth minerals. We'll also discussed the mysterious disappearance of China's biggest movie star joining us now, Joshua Landis is director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma. He writes, Syria comment, a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics. Welcome to background briefing Joshua land being with you again. Well, thank you Joshua in this incident where the Syrians accidentally shot down a Russian military plane killing fifteen crew members on board. This is a maritime patrol plane coming in to land in Latakia, and what it coincided with was a is rally raid with I think three F16.'s blowing up Iranian targets, and the Syrians just threw everything up into the air and mistakenly shot down this Russian plane, initially the Russians were angry and blamed the Israelis, but it seems like the Russians. The Israelis are trying to play this down. I mean, Russia course is not going to blame Syria in public. But I'm sure in private they going to have some pretty stern words with Assad. What do you think? Yeah. I think you're absolutely right. I think there will be some stern words for the seriousness is going to cause a a great deal of anger among some of the Russians working on the Russian airbase. That's right next to the Kia. This is no small number of Russia's down. Now, clearly the Syrians didn't mean to shoot the Russians down, but they they didn't take the necessary precautions, and there seems to be multiple mistakes. And that's what Putin put out a little statement following the shootdown trying to tamp down concern saying that this was a tragedy on many levels and it had been preceded by a number of mistakes. And clearly one of the big mistakes was that that the Israelis did warn the Russians, but they warned them with very little time. Perhaps only a few minutes earlier, and that doesn't seem to have gotten to the doesn't seem to have gotten to the Russian plane that was moving very slowly was clearly not seen as a threat to the Israelis because it was a slow moving surveillance plane and. And perhaps they didn't warn that particular plane, but the word didn't get to it. It didn't start to get out of the region and Syria launched these missiles, which then attacked Russian plane and causing this disaster. This comes out of a situation that's extremely tense where there are many combatants in one teeny little area and this area around it live and Lattakia has Iranians Turks rebels Syrians Israelis, and and so it's in a sense. It's almost surprising that more of these incidents happened happened. So that I think is the key, isn't it? And it seems like a recipe for disaster. If you've got all this conflict going on and there are deconfliction arrangements between the US or the coalition. I guess they call themselves and the Russians and deconfliction between the Israelis and the Russians in the pantley. These rallies have. Russian speaking air, traffic, controllers speaking with the Russians and in this case, apparently, then he gave them a couple of minutes warning. But there's not a lot of aspects to begin with say you've got all these players in there. And my understanding is also a looming clash between the Assad Iranian and Russian forces on on the US base that was the site of a previous attack in which Russian mercenaries killed. So. Just as with intent, which is on the other side of the country near the Iraq border Jordanian right at the corner of the Iraq Jordanian Syrian border. When the Iranian troops made a lunge inside a region that America considers its sphere of influence Syrian honk Syria and America blew down the attacked in Iranian convoy. But you know, in in part this leads from. This comes out is increase the hostility also between Russia any Iran because Iranian troops are in Syria. Israel is committed to driving them out. And in over the last month. Well, over one hundred Iranians have been killed by Israel, the attacks in inside Syria. So Israel is hunting Iranians in Syria. It wants to drive them out. And that's what Netanyahu said he's determined to do is to get rid of all Iranian presence. Syria in America. The United States. It must be said is also said that Iran has to leave Syria. So. This then runs into a problem with Russia because Russia is not going to protect the Iranians in Syria, and has made it very clear that it's going to preserve its good relations with Israel, and it will not use anti-aircraft missiles to take down Israeli planes, but that leaves Assad in a sense having to defend the Iranians on the ground in Syria who he needs and he wants there because they're helping him fight against the rebels. But that means yeah. That that that means that in a sense, the Iranians must be very furious at the Russians because the Russians are not protecting them. And this has led to Syrian shooting down Russian planes, which will get Russia mad at Syria. And in a sense. Everybody is going to be I think it's gonna take a lot to calm this down. Well, the Israeli planes apparently had attacked a number of. Iranian targets. So presumably every day almost there are more Iranian casualties all his blah casualties, which I guess pretty much one in the same weather. They're both there they're frequently work together with the Syrian troops. So there's been a lot of Syrian casualties as well. Because all of these are allies of the government and have been invited into the country to help support the Syrian effort to retake the country from the rebels, and and so that is a complicated situation. And again, I'm speaking with Joshua Landis is the director of the center for Middle East. Studies at the university of Oklahoma. He writes, Syria, comet a daily newsletter and blog on Syrian politics. Well, I don't think Assad would be in power about for the Iranians. Because when the people rose up initially against this family dictatorship took to the streets in the thousands this during the Arab spring back in two thousand eleven the. Syrian army were ordered by Assad and by his psychotic rather Ma to shoot the people down in the streets. A lot of these Syrian army people simply couldn't kill around people. They just really couldn't do it and broke ranks. And there was a real mutiny going on within the Syrian army and Assad then turned to the Iranians who brought in the goods, the Revolutionary Guards, the IDC, and they are perfectly capable of shooting innocent civilians in the streets to finally terrorize the Syrian people into not demonstrating, and I think and then of course, the civil war began the unarmed civilians decided to get on. I mean is that a fairly facile sketch if things happen, but is it to your mind accurate? Well, there's been a lot of escalation as you say and and clearly Iranian and Russian support both have been crucial to keeping in power. Now. Of course, it turns right around and says, well, if the Saudis and the Americans hadn't armed and sent arms into the rebels stay would have been defeated by professional army fairly lickety-split. That's an exaggeration. Clearly, we'll never know this is counterfactual history both sides through in weapons through in support. And at clearly the Russian Iranian support has been the superior support because the Americans got spooked by the rise. Don't hide on ISIS, and many others did too, and they stopped backing the Syrian rebels and ultimately refused to escalate once Russia jumped in two thousand fifteen and and we've got the situation we have today where the rebels are are have been corralled into this. Small province of Italy. And it's touch and go whether that's going to the new agreement that's been struck between Turkey and Russia will lead to some kind of peaceful political resolution or whether it will break down, and they'll be more. More. Well, of course, that has the potential of becoming the next exodus of refugees, that's three million essentially civilians trapped in Italy, the Turks closed the border. So this deal seems to involve some kind of Buffa for these people to retreat to while the Assad and the Russians in this Syrians, go after the fighters themselves. This is that the deal as you understand it. Josh. Yeah. So the deal today that was just struck yesterday is is temporary. There's this fifteen to twenty kilometer buffer zone. Where the Jihadist rebels who are quite numerous in the region have to leave the buffer zone and. Others have to get rid of their heavy weapons, but the Jihadist terrorists who everybody agree are terrorists will have to get out of this buffer zone, which will be policed by both Turkish soldiers and Syrian soldiers. And so in some ways, it's a win for every side. It's a win for Turkey and the rebels because they get to put off. Syrian invasion. It looked very imminent. It's a win for Russia because they can demonstrate on the world stage that they're not immune to humanitarian causes to trying to find a political resolution and also they gained twenty kilometers long strip around this small province that had well entrenched hard-bitten rebels in and they've got to move back into the center of this province and same for outside. I mean outside he hasn't really been president in this in this negotiations. But it means a weakening of the rebels, and it forces Turkey to confront the more Jihadist rebels, and that of course, the Russians seriously looking to see if if it causes a real dissension within rebel and Turkish ranks. So and Turkey wins to were Turk. Wins. Because it means there isn't an onslaught this terrible is humanitarian catastrophe that could have led to refugees streaming into Turkey again, and many fighters perhaps fifty thousand we don't know how many fighters there, including well over ten thousand jihadists, and Al Qaeda linked groups could have been scattered across Anatolia, and that would have been bad news for Turkey. So for the moment, this seems contained, but that's only for the moment. Well in this diplomacy that you're talking about between Russia in Syria. The conspicuous absence of the United States is rather glaring. Don't you think it is glaring, but the United States has played a role Brazil and Trump tweeted that it would be very rash of Syria to go ahead with this onslaught that perhaps hundreds of thousands could be killed in America would not stand for that. He didn't say not stand for it. But he put it in language that serious shouldn't do that. And so I think it increase the pressure on all sides to find a diplomatic agreement. But you're right Russia. United States has been sitting this one out and. It's been watching the Turks Russians Syrians battle it out. And I think. America comes out a winner as well. Because the problem is contained jihadists are not scattered around. Hopefully, it'll get rid of some of their guns, and it it puts Turkey in a position where Turkey has to confront the jihadists and America wants those jihadists at the end of the day wants them destroyed so back to the the shit of the Russian electronics intelligence plane, which was seventy five kilometers off serious Mediterranean coast..

Syria Russia Turkey United States Assad Joshua landis Israel Middle East university of Oklahoma director Syrian army Iran President Putin Assad Iranian America Assad regime Iraq Turks
"joshua landis" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"They say that they've saved over one hundred and fifteen thousand lives. It was hoped more white helmets could be evacuated, but they've been hemmed in by state fighters. Resistance to Assad is crumbling and a medical lifeline in southwest Syria has now been cut Mark Lowen in Turkey. So why did Israel intervene in Syria? James kumarisami spoke to Joshua Landis head of the center for Middle East studies at the university of Oklahoma. They're doing a big favor for the United States and for the European powers in carrying out important humanitarian work. We've noticed that throughout the war. Israel has taken a number of Syrian rebels as well as their family members and civilians who've been wounded, treated them in their hospitals has tried to do humanitarian work in Syria. Of course, Israel has been bombing series of same time attacking Iran, and placements Syrian emplacements shooting down the odds Syrian plane. But for Israel, this is about doing a good deed. But as you allude to, it's something that's happening on Israel's doorstep and is very much a a military conflict that Israel is getting involved in his well, yes, Israel has increasingly become involved in the Syrian civil war. It has supported a number of rebel groups hoping to build a small buffer zone that has collapsed now. So Israel is gone back to dealing with the Assad government and particularly through the Russians and this means that the rebels are collapsing and some of them are seeking asylum through Israel to the west. How would you characterize. Is the current state of the war in Syria, where the rebellion that started in two thousand eleven is now at an end, the destruction of the debt on claim in the south is the last region where rebels fought against the government without foreign troops on the ground. Still almost forty percent of Syrian territory is still held by rebel groups that are supported by foreign militaries in the north of Syria. The United States special forces hold about thirty percent of Syrian territory. Turkish forces allied with local rebel groups occupy another five to ten percent of Syrian territory in the north. So the war is far from over and thought about the the white helmets who remain. It was thought that eight hundred people were were meant to be getting out. But so far only four hundred twenty two confirmed to have. Left the country under this operation, what fate awaits those who are unable to leave the country. Think many of them will be persecuted by the Syrian government, very likely because they're seen as an arm of the rebellion. Some of them may be able to escape persecution, but they are clearly going to be terrified today. They have every reason to be extremely worried and just a final on this operation and the work that the Israelis have done. It did used to be international organizations like the Red Cross. He would do it. Yes, it did, but it was much too dangerous to operate in rebel territory in Syria. The uniqueness of the white helmets is that they had good relations with most of the rebel militias who accepted their help and who knew them and trusted them. So they could operate in these rebel held territories. And this is what so infuriated. The Syrian government who accused them of being. NG proxies in a sense of these rebel troops, it was the uniqueness of the Syrian civil war where humanitarian organizations could not get in and end this underlying some of the ambulance and difficulties of operating in Syria, Joshua Landis of the university of Oklahoma, four years ago. He was celebrating winning the World Cup with Germany, but on Sunday, quit international football, accusing some in the German Football Association of racism. The stone whose Tukish origin has faced criticism for having his fatal taken alongside techies president, wretched type zone in a social media post. He said it is with a heavy heart that because of recent events, all no longer be playing for Germany. When I have this feeling of racism and disrespect on cheap, Ryan Tut is a sports journalist who specializes in German football. Renowned for being one of the quiet members of the squad in terms of eat badly. Spy speaks to the media. He explained his reasons for why he didn't do that in the aftermath. And he didn't feel that he was being listened to. And the thing is, is that this is it opens up a much bigger debate than just football. Here..

Israel Syria Syrian government Joshua Landis United States university of Oklahoma Assad government James kumarisami Assad Middle East Turkey Mark Lowen football Iran Red Cross German Football Association of Germany Ryan Tut president
"joshua landis" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"They say that they've saved over one hundred and fifteen thousand lives. It was hoped more white helmets could be evacuated, but they've been hemmed in by state fighters. Resistance to Assad is crumbling and a medical lifeline in southwest Syria has now been cut Mark Lowen in Turkey. So why did Israel intervene in Syria? James kumarisami spoke to Joshua Landis head of the center for Middle East studies at the university of Oklahoma. They're doing a big favor for the United States and for the European powers in carrying out important humanitarian work. We've noticed that throughout the war. Israel has taken a number of Syrian rebels as well as their family members and civilians who've been wounded, treated them in their hospitals has tried to do humanitarian work in Syria. Of course, Israel has been bombing series of same time attacking Iran, and placements Syrian emplacements shooting down the odds Syrian plane. But for Israel, this is about doing a good deed. But as you allude to, it's something that's happening on Israel's doorstep and is very much a a military conflict that Israel is getting involved in his well, yes, Israel has increasingly become involved in the Syrian civil war. It has supported a number of rebel groups hoping to build a small buffer zone that has collapsed now. So Israel is gone back to dealing with the Assad government and particularly through the Russians and this means that the rebels are collapsing and some of them are seeking asylum through Israel to the west. How would you characterize. Is the current state of the war in Syria, where the rebellion that started in two thousand eleven is now at an end, the destruction of the debt on claim in the south is the last region where rebels fought against the government without foreign troops on the ground. Still almost forty percent of Syrian territory is still held by rebel groups that are supported by foreign militaries in the north of Syria. The United States special forces hold about thirty percent of Syrian territory. Turkish forces allied with local rebel groups occupy another five to ten percent of Syrian territory in the north. So the war is far from over and thought about the the white helmets who remain. It was thought that eight hundred people were were meant to be getting out. But so far only four hundred twenty two confirmed to have. Left the country under this operation, what fate awaits those who are unable to leave the country. Think many of them will be persecuted by the Syrian government, very likely because they're seen as an arm of the rebellion. Some of them may be able to escape persecution, but they are clearly going to be terrified today. They have every reason to be extremely worried and just a final on this operation and the work that the Israelis have done. It did used to be international organizations like the Red Cross. He would do it. Yes, it did, but it was much too dangerous to operate in rebel territory in Syria. The uniqueness of the white helmets is that they had good relations with most of the rebel militias who accepted their help and who knew them and trusted them. So they could operate in these rebel held territories. And this is what so infuriated. The Syrian government who accused them of being. NG proxies in a sense of these rebel troops, it was the uniqueness of the Syrian civil war where humanitarian organizations could not get in and end this underlying some of the ambulance and difficulties of operating in Syria, Joshua Landis of the university of Oklahoma, four years ago. He was celebrating winning the World Cup with Germany, but on Sunday, quit international football, accusing some in the German Football Association of racism. The stone whose Tukish origin has faced criticism for having his fatal taken alongside techies president, wretched type zone in a social media post. He said it is with a heavy heart that because of recent events, all no longer be playing for Germany. When I have this feeling of racism and disrespect on cheap, Ryan Tut is a sports journalist who specializes in German football. Renowned for being one of the quiet members of the squad in terms of eat badly. Spy speaks to the media. He explained his reasons for why he didn't do that in the aftermath. And he didn't feel that he was being listened to. And the thing is, is that this is it opens up a much bigger debate than just football. Here..

Israel Syria Syrian government Joshua Landis United States university of Oklahoma Assad government James kumarisami Assad Middle East Turkey Mark Lowen football Iran Red Cross German Football Association of Germany Ryan Tut president
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the bbc world service i'm paul henley with weekend syria now and russia and syrian rebel groups have reached an interim ceasefire agreement in serious southern province of dara after weeks of violence in the area syrian government forces now retaken that border from the rebels the offensive resulted in more than three hundred thousand civilians fleeing their homes most of them heading toward serious border with jordan and the israelioccupied golan heights jordan's foreign minister i'm answer fatty has been involved in this latest round of talks our understanding is that the regime and the opposition groups through the restaurants have been able to reach an agreement under which they schilling would stop and which also provides for guarantees that civilians would be protected displaced persons will have access to go back to their homes and villages and towns and there would be arrangements to secure the border from within the city inside so what does this ceasefire means joshua landis is director of the center for middle east studies at the us university of oklahoma it's been agreed with the russians the rebels who want to go to the north into it lib province where the turks aren't command can get out russian police will also be put into the region so there is some protection there's going to be a third party there the rebels will trust the russian police more than l trust assad people they're allowed to keep their light arms they've had to give over all of their heavy weapons we don't know the details about who's going to be policing the ground exactly but there will be rushing police there is it hard for the rebels to say anything other than they're running away here they're about fifty six different rebel groups in the greater region and the regime has been talking to many of the leaders of those rebel groups for quite some time some have already made reconciliation what they call reconciliation agreements so it's been a rebel by rebel there's no central leadership for the rebels so each different militia has been making independent agreements with the regime data the city is the big prize here so that agreement has taken the jordanians has taken the russians and everybody's been involved how significant you think all this is this is very important this is really the end of the syrian uprising as we know it there are many rebel groups up north but they are protected by turkey in a turkish controlled zone and then there are those that are in the american controlled zone but this is the last independent rebel on clave and as it collapses now as we see it collapsing very rapidly that will bring to the end all of the independent rebel groups will this region be safe enough for people who fled their homes to return to the hope will be that order will be brought and we've already seen the regime pumping out videos of older particularly older inhabitants of this region who are saying that they hope that security will return and that they want the regime's return it's a very divided area there were people who were very unhappy under rebel rule and and more and more people became unhappy with rebel rule because there were so many militias they turned into local warlords there was no security no jobs and people are hoping that the regime will be merciful joshua landis director of the center for the middle ea study at the university of oklahoma the time on weekend is coming up to twenty three minutes past seven gmt nealon jonah roy are you a world cup fan have you become one during the course of the event i'm a convert you convert i used to watch football but ineffectively and only because i grew up in calcutta and it's almost the lord that you have to watch football day and quasi as a new a surprise pleasure to you followed football from from a young age but i sort of lost interest i didn't really have the time to follow it but i think this competition this world cup is sending becoming very interesting i saw the england the.

paul henley syria russia bbc twenty three minutes
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The problem and in wars especially warlike series where that's gone on for seven years both sides are completely exhausted and the syrian government probably feels the generals on the ground don't have any more men so they're reaching for whatever they have in order to win an and that's now the united states can dissuade that use by using a lot of firepower as they did over the weekend and hurting assad which which they did these plants are no the jewels of the syrian military experimentation so so it can deter the trouble is is that as you say for most syrians this is a very disappointing move because it's not going to change the course of the civil war it's not taking the fight to outside it doesn't change america's basic policy joshua landis many thanks joining us on the line from beirut is our correspondent lena jab lena we heard defiance earlier from syria's ambassador to the un what are you hearing about the impact that yesterday strikes had in terms of targeting syria suspected sites of chemical weapons production well there are two views on this basically from the government side and their loyalists their condemnation gets calling it an aggression over their own land and it definitely destroyed these three sites according to the u s that had an chemical facilities in chemical storage but for the course of the war and for the pilot of president bashar assad did it did not change anything these these are limited to the use of chemical weapons but not to his air force or air powered or military power none of these locations where targeted so president that's how is still on the winning side of the war and we continue using these kinds of conventional weapons in his fight that can against all the opposition if we look back at the past seven years the vast majorities of all day nearly five hundred thousand people killed in this war would killed by conventional weapons not by chemical ones did it show a disregard for protocol on the part of these three countries that launched attacks yesterday that they did these attacks on the day the chemical weapons inspectors would you to start their investigation i think this was like mainly it's been discussed for almost a week to reach the momentum between the three countries to take this decision it would.

syrian government united states america beirut syria bashar assad president joshua landis seven years
"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of interference and colonialism at the the words syria's ambassador to the united nations joining us now on the line is joshua landis director at the center for middle east studies at the university of oklahoma a regular on this program currently in rome welcome joshua what are the chances that these strikes will achieve their aim of warning president assad off chemical weapons i think it's probably will work the problem is that chemical weapons are a very narrow bandwidth in the total destructive power that's going on in this in this civil war only about one thousand nine hundred people have been killed with chemical weapons now of course that's that's a big number but compared to half a million it's very small so although the us can deter the use of chemical weapons and it should be remembered that this chlorine gas was not originally added into obama's two thousand thirteen list of chemical weapons that were prescribed they added in later and then america didn't punish aside for his use of that particular chemical weapon because it killed very few people this one killed a lot of people so in a sense they're trying to plug a hole that was opened up from the stakes in the past what exactly is the big distinction between chlorine or other chemical weapons and the scores of other horrible ways that have been used to kill people in the syrian war well that's the that's the question that my son keeps on asking me and it's a very hard one to answer now of course we saw the film and it is a gruesome way to die and there is clearly advantage in in trying to prescribe certain types of weapons the problem is that weapons of mass destructions work we saw that because the united states ended world war two and got the surrender of japan by using the atom bomb and killing roughly two hundred thousand people at nagasaki and here she even of course tokyo one hundred forty thousand people were killed with using napalm over wooden city so vietnam the united states us twenty million gallons of napalm and agent orange in order to clear the jungles and burn those people below so chemical weapons are useful if you want to win that's.

tokyo japan america president rome university of oklahoma joshua landis nagasaki syria united states obama assad director united nations twenty million gallons
"joshua landis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mising abroad and tough response to the chemical attack or look weak in the eyes of russia and iran that assad in his inner circle should be considered war criminals legitimate military targets if you have the opportunity to take him out you should ensure ground is air force you should destroy air force which should set up safe zones inside of syria telling the russians and the iranians in anything left of assad if you cross this line we'll shoot you down now that sounds a lot like what we've been discussing earlier segment i i want to bring on a third voice now joshua landis is professor of middle east studies at the university of oklahoma and a syria expert he joins us today from a retso italy josh welcome to pleasure being with you thank you so much for being here josh what do you make it as mess well keeping a line on the non you know the international agreed not using chemical weapons is important it was established by bama it was upheld by trump in his first strike against syria and i think it's an international norm that needs to be upheld with art agree with iron that you can make us you know change his calculations towards this and i think is analysis is correct the question then is the larger question for us policy is should the us retain its control over thirty percent of syrian territory and the north of syria and try to turn the kurdish presence there into a viable independent or or a thomas nation a military force and to rebuild northern syria that i think is a fool's errand i think the united states is largely lost in iraq syria and lebanon iran russia have begun a predominant position here particularly iran and we're not going to be able to roll back you run our strategy today is by withholding series oil of which fifty percent more than fifty percent is in the north which we control and water and agriculture land.

russia assad syria professor josh bama trump us iran joshua landis university of oklahoma iraq lebanon fifty percent thirty percent
"joshua landis" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"joshua landis" Discussed on Here & Now

"How's that he's doing this we just have a minute left which your sense of the white house in the oval office this week after last week you had the exits from his inner circle senior adviser hopex his son in law jared kushner lost his temporary security clearance here of this there's reports of an almost shakespearean tone in the president angrily wandering the halls with with your sense some of this perhaps is driven by anxiety about robert muller the special counsel in his investigation and all of the areas that it's getting into both of things that happened since the president took office and things that his family may have been up to over a number of years going back and involving perhaps russian money and all of that is upsetting to the president and upsetting to some of the people around him but there's also the sense of the president liking it kind of chaotic atmosphere in which to operate so much of this is his doing and i suppose in the end it may be his undoing as well not necessarily have to wait and see whether you know he he ran as a disruptor there's a thin line between disruption and something unraveling and we don't yet know where we are in npr as senior washington editor and correspondent run elving thanks as always thank you robyn in syria today a convoy of forty six eight wchs crossed into the region of eastern gouta the area has been under siege by syrian government forces for months but fighting has escalated in the past two weeks more than six hundred have died the convoy is expected to bring in desperately needed food and medical aid but according to the world health organization syrian authorities rejected many of the supplies including trauma and surgical kits joshua landis is director of the center for middle east studies at the university of oklahoma and rights the blogs syria comment he's on a skype line josh welcome back it's a pleasure now we've known that people are in desperate need of supplies in this area the last convoy came on february fourteen with assistance for just seven thousand people a reminds us the need in eastern gouta right now well it's tremendous this is an area big supper of a farming supper with lots of villages towns in it it revolted against the regime early on in this.

president robert muller special counsel editor syria director gouta senior adviser jared kushner washington robyn joshua landis university of oklahoma skype two weeks