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Trump discusses coronavirus with China's Xi

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Trump discusses coronavirus with China's Xi

"President trump issued a phone call with China's president xi Ching paying Friday to discuss efforts to contain a growing coronavirus outbreak NPR's Emily Fang reports of the call comes as China mobilizes to build mass quarantine centers and the number of confirmed cases continues to rise China's state news agency first provided a summary of the call it's a present she told trump that no effort had been spared to combat the virus she called such measures a people's war against the epidemic she has been noticeably absent this week as the outbreak has worsened appearing only Thursday degree the Cambodian prime minister visiting Beijing China has repeatedly criticized the US is decision to temporarily shut down its conflict and we'll have the outbreak epicenter and with accu its diplomats from there the US has also decided to bar any foreign nationals from entering the US of they've been to China and the last fourteen days and raised its travel alert for China to the highest level I'm leaving NPR news

Donald Trump Prime Minister Beijing China United States President Trump Emily Fang NPR
Grammys Chief On Leave Over Misconduct Accusation Just 10 Days Before Awards Show

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Grammys Chief On Leave Over Misconduct Accusation Just 10 Days Before Awards Show

"The recording academy which puts on the annual Grammy awards has placed CEO and president Denver Dugan on administrative leave just ten days before this year's awards ceremony and peer Scott Newman has details in a statement the academy says a formal allegation of misconduct has been made by a senior female member of the organization that independent investigators have been called in and that the move to suspend Dugan was needed to quote restore the confidence of its membership however it does not elaborate on the nature of the allegations nor in fact even whether Dugan herself is directly involved Dugan previously worked for bottles aids relief organization she took over at the academy in August from long time CEO Neil Portnow who sparked controversy with a remark that women needed to step up to get ahead in the music

CEO Denver Dugan Scott Newman Grammy President Trump Neil Portnow
Senate Republican express displeasure with Iran briefing

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:59 sec | 6 months ago

Senate Republican express displeasure with Iran briefing

"To Senate Republicans broke party ranks Wednesday by announcing support for a resolution to limit president trump's military powers against Iran Mike Lee of Utah and rand Paul of Kentucky made their decision after leaving a closed door briefing with White House officials the mountain west news bureaus need Hajji has more in that briefing Republican Mike Leigh's says trump administration officials tried to dissuade him another lawmakers from debating further military action on the Senate floor what we're told over and over again was it look this action was necessary and we can't have division we can't have dissension within our ranks within our government or else it senses the wrong signal to the Iranians I just I think that's completely wrong the call the briefing quote lame and insulting and says he'll support the war powers resolution it was introduced by Democrats and could force the debate and a vote in Congress limiting the truck ministrations role in escalating hostilities with Iran for NPR news I met Hajji

Republicans Donald Trump Mike Lee Utah Rand Paul Kentucky Hajji Mike Leigh Congress Iran Senate President Trump White House NPR
U.S. aviation regulator proposes tracking most drones

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

U.S. aviation regulator proposes tracking most drones

"The Federal Aviation Administration wants most drones to be tracked throughout US air space and here is Matthew Schwartz reports as drone use increases regulators are looking to address the security threats the FAA is proposal would apply to nearly all unmanned aerial vehicles from commercial delivery drones used by companies like Amazon to toy drones that could fit in a Christmas stocking any drone that weighs more than about half a pound would need to be able to broadcast its location and the name of its operator the rule is meant to give law enforcement greater ability to respond to security threats as these tiny aircraft proliferate throughout the country drones have caused airports to suspend flights and the FBI has warned that terrorists could use the devices to carry out attacks in the US the FAA says that being able to track drones could help prevent those attacks Matthew Schwartz NPR news

Federal Aviation Administratio Matthew Schwartz Amazon FBI United States
Black Rhino Born At Michigan Zoo

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Black Rhino Born At Michigan Zoo

"A Michigan zero is welcoming a rare holiday delivery W. D. E. T. is Quinn Klinefelter reports the masses are turning out to see the new baby boy black rhino is not exactly a Babe lying in a manger but it's close officials at the potter park is due in Lansing Michigan say a black rhino name dot C. delivered her first ever calf on Christmas Eve day black rhinos are endangered the total population dropped to under twenty five hundred by nineteen ninety five but has now come back to about twice that number officials say it's rare for a black rhino to give birth in captivity though zookeepers watch the birth through a video feed outside a bar and so dot C. under new baby boy could bond without being disturbed they say the public will have to wait until spring to meet the new right now when the weather is

Michigan W. D. E. T. Quinn Klinefelter Potter Park Lansing Michigan Dot C.
U.S. on alert after North Korean "Christmas present" threat

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

U.S. on alert after North Korean "Christmas present" threat

"The United States is on alert in Waco north Korea's threat to give the US a so called Christmas present and Paris I Asia Roscoe reports that North Korea said a year end deadline for the two sides to reach a deal on nuclear talks north Korean officials have not said what the Christmas present might be but experts are on the look out for some type of provocative action to go she says between the two countries have not made much progress even though president trump met with north Korea's leader Kim Jong hoon twice this year the key sticking point is Kim's demand for immediate sanctions relief president trump says that Kim must dismantle north Korea's nuclear weapons program before sanctions can be lifted North Korea analysts say the regime may take aggressive action to try to force another summit with trump US officials have expressed hope that the conflict can be resolved I used to Roscoe NPR news

United States Paris Asia Roscoe North Korea Donald Trump Waco President Trump Kim Jong Roscoe Npr
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:04 min | 7 months ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At mac found dot org this is one a I'm Joshua Johnson in Judaism naming ceremonies happen at temple shortly after a baby is born Abby hava Stein had a renaming ceremony at the age of twenty four in our tradition leaving Egypt wasn't and historical events alone in our tradition leaving Egypt was a personal existential leaving as well the whole door rather high of a down the road to the smoky even though we have he I mean it's right the family she grew up with was not in attendance Abby grew up as a specific boy this ultra religious sect of Judaism does not acknowledge the existence of transgender people she followed the life path set out for her marrying at eighteen becoming a father and a rabbi today she lived as a transgender woman and is no longer part of the city community Abby Stein joins us from NPR in New York she is the author of becoming eve my journey from ultra orthodox rabbi to transgender woman Abby welcome to the program thanks for having me can you give us a clear sense Abby of what gender and gender roles gender norms look like in the Hasidic Jewish community sorry how much time do you have it usually everything in the community from the way you address starting at age three from your place in society which school you're going to go to what do we gain a study in school where you send a synagogue or more specifically how often you go to synagogue while for for the command are obligated from age thirteen to pray three times a day most acidic women if they go to synagogue once a week that's a lot most of them don't even do that your place once you're married while both men and women are expected to get made around eighteen and have a lot of kids women are expected to do all the housework do all the cooking while men either stay and study or go out to work there is no overlap both physically and even metaphorically there is no connection between men and women since I was six years old I was told to not play with girls even some that were my first cousins as far as I can tell an act to try to study it for a while to for the community is the most gender segregated society in North America and they take it to an extreme how did you begin to realize that there was a discrepancy between your biological sex and your gender identity my realization was actually quite different than that my realization with a lot more and around each three even I started realizing that everyone's treating me as a boy which is very interesting and I think a lot about how much from that age do I really remember how much is my brain playing games that me but from what I hear them there I very clearly remember thinking why do my parents my teachers my siblings why does everyone think that I'm a boy it just didn't make sense to me in a way that I can't even make sense of it now what does that really mean to a three year old child and each to be I'd have the first physical kind of manifestation of gender which isn't a community boys though and have any hair cuts until the age of three and then I have my first hair cut and we get this like side curls staff to thick man we hear and I have this cutting my because while I was fighting with my parents I didn't want that it was just very clear to me somehow that everyone made a mistake my realization was a lot more I'm a girl and everyone is telling me that I'm a boy as opposed to Hey I'm not a boy and a girl I do want to say something that I think it's very important specifically given when we have this conversation a national stage which is that unfortunately I think people have developed these ideas that there is a one size fits all when it comes to trans people in obviously and we heard from Alex before interview the like because I think the non the non binary experiences sometimes even more intense and less understood by some people on the outside but in general there's no one way for people to feel while I felt it into a really young age that's not the story for everyone there's some people who to identify as women ask transforming who I haven't figured it out until their teenage years and sometimes even a lot later later in life just really important to point out but for me it was there from a really young age certainly for sure there can be a lot of confusion as a real aides to the various ways in which gender can manifest itself you have said as I understand that if the Hasidic community identified itself as trans phobic he would actually be a step forward that's pretty that's pretty severe yeah I use that as a joke a lot so for me growing up until around two thousand eight when I think that was the first and I'm exactly to your if it but when the first attempts to legalize gay marriage in new York's tie it there with it that was the first time I learned it gave people even exist because there was some people usually on the fringe of the fifth in the community you wanted to go for the community to engage and come out against it they are rumors at the at that I hear that a time I've no idea of there were right or wrong that it was a card I believe the Catholic cardinal I'm from New York to try to get the fifth at a community in came to visit trying to get the specific munity to speak up against gay marriage but the mainstream of the community establishment decided to ignore it and not because they supported gay marriage but they felt that it's so far out for them that it doesn't matter and when it comes to transfer people I didn't know the tribespeople excess until twenty twelve which was the first time I went on line which is another thing about this is that the community that since the internet became kind of a household item and I remember the first time in nineteen ninety nine and two thousand when the conversation start about the internet they put up a fight against the internet kind of banning it so I had no access to the internet until twenty twelve when I was twenty years old and that was the first time the first thing I Google plus whatever boy can turn into a girl and that's when I learned that they are other people like me so I always joke that I would be a sin I mean it's not totally it's part of it is serious that I was when I was twelve years old I had a teacher who went on a transphobic rant which sounds ridiculous sometimes that someone is trying to focus I don't even like tolerance I always focus and celebrating people and celebrating identities yet in a community like the top where they don't even talk about it just talking about it will mean that we recognize that we accept step I wouldn't know that I'm not alone that I would know that other people like me so I used to say my first goal is to get the call for the community to hate trance people because that will mean that other young kids in that community who were struggling will know that they're not alone and as I like to say thankfully four years later it's mission accomplished they are at least some for for the people who are transphobic which I know and I've heard back I've heard stories of young kids I someone told me awhile ago the story of a seven year old asking the teacher in class is it true that a boy could turn it can become a girl and it's forty think a conversation that I know is helping so many bowed in that community and a fundamentalist communities across the country and across the water I totally hear you in terms of just putting the word in people's mouths I mean I I was having a conversation you know not too long ago about the value of terminology of being able to name something because when you name something whether it's reclaiming the word queer or whatever it's a way of coalescing power because if there's a word for what you are there must be other people like you because that word exists and so what makes you feel like you're part of something that is not just you adrift in the universe but that you're part of something bigger I wonder if that identification that kind of realization that you are part of something bigger is part of what motivated you to ultimately leave the Hasidic community was was there a last straw or a a moment of realization or did it just kind of gradually happen over time yes and no and I would say to me there were two parallel journeys that would not necessarily to separate journeys never it very heavily influenced one by the other so when I was younger I always have different ways of dealing with it I think that the only reason I stayed relatively normal growing up but the fact that I had a creative imagination of trying to make sense of what I was feeling and whatever for a while I was planning a full body transplant for another while I was focusing on how I'm gonna get reborn as a girl and so on I had no actual all like scientific or any other context for what I have a feeling that when I was around twelve dad discomforts and that feeling of I am one thing that everyone else is telling me that I'm something else left to ultimately question and everything I was being told because to me if my parents and teachers could be wrong of something so existential about who I am gender wise they can also be wrong about god and about religion and about everything that has to be installed so I started out on this journey of questioning and reading books that I wasn't supposed to which is very easy to for for the community because they're more books that you're not allowed to read the book that you why and slowly I developed this process of questioning everything I was told to look to fly so by the time I reached age twenty by the time I went online I was already at a point where my religious beliefs my T. logical believe they're very different and out of the community the final kind of punch line the final straw from you with my son's Burt or as I like to say for now he's a son and he seemed very comfortable with that and and that was to me making it really hard to deal with folks not just with gender but also with religion gender was very obvious because we love to gender babies before they can see if that's the our focus on the gender of babies is ridiculous in my opinion this is the boys and a girl that whole yeah my gonna have a pink dress real blue Nestle I mean we all know what happens if you put a boy that thing Nasri right it's terrible it says that the focus on it and that was weighing heavily on the but at the same time having to raise a child in a community that I don't believe in their values regardless of gender it was both of these together the end up leading me to leave the community but the reason why I left the wasn't actually because of gender I think gender is what triggered an eight year period of questioning and studying and reading books from like Richard Dawkins the god delusion to at books on biblical criticism and so on Sir Richard Dawkins one atheist author yeah of site sort of sort of internet yeah and I actually read his book and he right talk in my book about it I couldn't beat English at a time and speak English and reading list I am and then at the but actually a three year period after I left the community when I wasn't observant at all I am ironically by now more observe and in in some ways I like to say I celebrated if instead of observing but still I'm more involved in Judea now than I was in twenty twelve but it still took me three years until twenty fifteen until I felt comfortable coming down and the reason for that was to fault first of all because of I didn't just leave because of gender but also realizing once I reach the so called outside world that trans people are still not accepted me talking of twenty twelve and I think so much of a change since twenty twelve we're talking here before transparent to orange is the new black before any of these visibility that we had over the past decade didn't really exist yet yeah and dat is a big reason what stopped me so to some extent people always expect you didn't come out until age twenty three and twenty four because of your community that I'm like partially and partially because we as a society we as an American society in every one of the fine if need to do a lot better when it comes to transfer actually from Virginia beach Virginia left this in our inbox I have been an atheist irreligious anti theistic person in my entire life and the main reason for that is being raised a Roman Catholic household it seems to me that all religions seem to really use religion as justification to for intolerance and to promote these ideals that does allow for any differences actually thanks very much for sharing your story with us hi tweeted.

mac Joshua Johnson Abby hava Stein Egypt
Scholars testify there's enough evidence to impeach Trump

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:20 sec | 7 months ago

Scholars testify there's enough evidence to impeach Trump

"The house Judiciary Committee has heard from legal experts on whether there's a case for impeaching president trump three legal scholars call by Democrats say there is evidence to move forward while constitutional scholar and lone witness invited by Republicans says there is not Congress is scrutinizing trump's efforts to get Ukraine to investigate a potential

House Judiciary Committee Congress Donald Trump Ukraine
A new blood test could indicate multiple conditions with one sample

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

A new blood test could indicate multiple conditions with one sample

"A new blood test could predict multiple diseases with a single sample KQED science reporter Leslie in the clerk says UCSF positions publish their research today the new test which doctors are dubbing a liquid health check can measure five thousand different proteins in one blood sample Dr Peter Ganz is a cardiologists at UCSF patterns of proteins inform us about the risk of diseases such as risk of heart attack or stroke risk of developing diabetes or it can inform us about your current state of health like your physical fitness or the amount of fat in your

Leslie Dr Peter Ganz Kqed Reporter Ucsf
Schiff's panel 'now preparing' impeachment report

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Schiff's panel 'now preparing' impeachment report

"The house Judiciary Committee is set to hold its first hearing in the formal impeachment inquiry next week is NPR's Claudia chrysalis reports the president has until Sunday to decide whether he'll participate the hearing Wednesday will feature legal experts and cover the history of impeachment judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler says the panel will cover serious allegations of impeachable conduct against president trump meanwhile house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff said his panel is working on a report summarizing their findings after weeks of closed door depositions in public testimony lawmakers are exploring whether president trump leverage military aid to get the leader of Ukraine to investigate his political rival the hearing is title constitutional grounds for presidential

House Judiciary Committee NPR Claudia Chrysalis President Trump Chairman Jerry Nadler Adam Schiff Ukraine
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:02 min | 8 months ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one a I'm Joshua Johnson in Washington president trump came into office vowing to end what he called the Obama administration's war on coal we are putting our great coal miners back to work but this year the industry is still in decline eight coal companies to file for bankruptcy during the trump administration the latest Murray energy is the nation's largest privately owned mining company reports indicate the industry is looking to raise revenues and cut costs but what will that mean for the environment a year long investigation by grist and the Texas Tribune has uncovered one long overlooked consequence of coal mining in the Lone Star state joining us to discuss those findings is no Venus seductive I'm a staff writer at grist which is a non profit environmental news organization let me know welcome to one day thanks for having me to actual living the what got you on the trail of the coal industry in Texas what made you decide to start looking into it more closely sure we had a whistle blower approach us to say that there's a story that needs looking into and that is really what got us our start date we've known for awhile that coal companies were really struggling financially they were facing a lot of competition from cheap natural gas and renewables like wind and solar but we haven't really looked into the reclamation or restoration piece of it which is that mining companies are supposed to restore land to the way it was before they began mining and you know this was a little was telling us that coal mining companies were finding ways to cut corners and that's really what got us started what is your investigation font we found that primarily in Texas mining companies were using a lower standard to restore some of the land so like I said federal law requires that if you were using the land for farming or as pasture land before it was buying the mining companies are required to put it back to the way it was so that it could be used the land can be used for the same purposes again example we were finding is that mining companies were restoring the land to a standard called industrial or commercial land which is primarily meant for use for oil and gas activity or other industrial commercial purposes and in many cases we're finding that land that used to be used for farming for pasture land that was forced land was being converted to industrial commercial standards which meant that they didn't have to do soil testing to check for contaminants I didn't have to monitor the land for five or ten years to make sure the vegetation could grow on that land so it basically save mining companies our time and money can you give me an example of what the impact of this kind of look like was there one particular site among the ones that you studied that stands out to you sure we we talk to the PLO family in South Texas Andy had leased their land to a mining company of coal company in the region San Miguel on electric rule electric cooperative and you know my partner on the project your call clear went out and visited with this family and what she found was you know towering mountains of coal ash coal ash is a residue that's left behind are off to a cold as Barnes and that was deposited on that property she found sort of gray moonscape like regions on the property that where where really nothing was growing just he's dead zones on the property what kinds of consequences might come about from trying to see go back to agricultural use trying to farm trying to raise livestock on land that wasn't brought back to that past your standard after coal mining is over yeah in this case are the PLO's hardened by mental consultants to test that land and they found levels of heavy metals there that were higher than was stay for human consumption and for livestock as well so you know the consequences are very depending on the type of heavy metals that are present but many of these heavy metals are carcinogenic they can cause a number of cardio vascular and respiratory illnesses so there are real health consequences for both why life for animals and for humans moving into this touch anybody by a surprise I mean coal mining is literally a dirty business is anybody shocked that the land might be left in a less than clean state I don't think so I mean I think what's different about investigation as we were able to pull together the records to show that this was indeed happening and kind of provided proof of what a lot of people have suspected for a long time and one of the reasons why people have suspected this is because coal mining companies also supposed to restore land contemporaneously they're supposed to restore it as the goal was either mining on one section all the property they're supposed to be restoring land that's already been mind in federal law uses this word contemporaneously but it doesn't quite define what that means you know is a time line two wheels or five years or ten years and that's not clearly defined and in many cases across the country this is not just in Texas mines mine's that one mind decades ago are still being restored and so there have been questions raised rightly about why it's taking so long how common is this cost cutting practice is there any idea of how much of Texas is a courage this affects yeah we looked only in Texas of course and we got records from two thousand two onward and we found about ten thousand eight because in the state of Texas I will restore to industrial commercial standards now the cabbie out there is that in some cases the land might have been appropriate for those standards right if there was oil and gas activity happening on that land then perhaps it makes sense that you would use that designation but we specifically looked at three mines spread out across Texas and we find several thousand acres in those cases that were either all converted to industrial commercial when there was no reason to do so when there wasn't enough proof that that land was going to be used for those purposes primarily that's that's what we found is there any reason to believe that other states might also be cutting corners in terms of these environmental regulations I mean what what other states be allowing coal companies to clean the land to a lower standard knowing that there should be a higher standard it's possible again like I said we didn't look outside of Texas but given the fact that in places like Wyoming and Montana some of these mines war or doc up a good three to four decades ago and still haven't been fully restored they haven't gone through the full reclamation process and received bond release the fact that that is is happening in those states might indicate that it's worth looking into in other states as well now what about mines that are that old if you have a mind is three or four decades old it may have change hands the company may not exist anymore it may have been abandoned whose responsibility is it then so if a mine is abandoned it's ultimately the state's responsibility so federal under federal law there is money set aside for abandoned mining land clean up and that's distributed to states and the states then work with contractors to clean up that land tell us a bit more about the state regulators and how they factor into all of this what organizations in Texas state government regulate coal mines and their environmental impact sure so in Texas it's the Texas railroad commission that's in charge of overseeing coal mining and mine reclamation and what we also found during our investigation is that two of the top regularly does at the state agency were fired about a year ago offer essentially being too friendly ARE to industry I mean they were found retaliating against staff members who are voicing opinions that what I did was to industry so in cases we what we heard from our sources is that you know staff members were were presenting scientific technical opinions that won favorable to industry and these regulators will pushing back in retaliating against stop and ultimately it led to their to them being dominated and ultimately the resigned in lieu of termination so what we also found is that staff the state regulators to are are helping industry in some cases are to cut corners to find ways around some of those federal laws and state laws that require them to clean up land I love your reaction to Brandon's comment Brandon tweeted the coal industry just like any industry suffers from greed and capitalism novena isn't that simple it is a it's a little bit more complicated than that you know these these mining companies have been operating for decades and in many cases people will tell you that you know it's it's an industry that is providing a lot of economic wealth to really rural communities the three minds that we looked at our in far flung parts of Texas that don't have many although industries there that can support the tax base in in those regions and so it's a it's a complicated story in one of the pieces in one of the cities that we looked at these one of the small towns because mining is essentially seized in that little town there really struggling economically our people are out of jobs and they're they're trying to find new revenue to bring into the into the town so what happens next with all of this I mean are people whose land was ruined gonna sue is the state going to go after some of these companies what's the next step so in one of the cases that I mentioned the PLO family they have sued the mining company in that case is ongoing as for the other two minds that we looked into the state has maintained that clean up has happened as required under funded federal law for those to my site so it doesn't seem like the state is looking to take any action and before I let you go any other reaction from the state to your reporting just in in a lot of cases they declined to comment to our questions or respond to our questions but not generally they have stated that a clean up is really happened as required under federal law and that there's really nothing to look here novena so to see from a staff writer at Bristol novena thanks for talking to us thank you for having me when we continue we'll switch gears and talk about the object of our desire our meaning everyone will get a little thirsty with the host of the podcast first aid kit I'm Joshua Johnson glad to be with you and you're listening to one a from W. A. M. you and NPR.

US defense secretary in Iraq to discuss troops leaving Syria

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:25 sec | 9 months ago

US defense secretary in Iraq to discuss troops leaving Syria

"It was defense secretary mark espers on a previously unannounced visit to Baghdad to discuss Iraq's role in the US troops rolled down from Syria espers trip comes after Russia and Turkey agreed to a joint military effort to remove Kurdish fighters from northern Syria thousands of displaced Kurds fled to a rock during a Turkish military offensive that was launched after US troops were pulled from northern Syria two

Mark Espers Baghdad Iraq Russia Turkey Syria United States
US and Turkey 'agree deal for five-day ceasefire'

1A with Joshua Johnson

01:00 min | 9 months ago

US and Turkey 'agree deal for five-day ceasefire'

"There were big developments today regarding the ongoing violence in northern Syria vice president Mike pence announced that the US and Turkey have agreed to a five day cease fire in Syria from today I'm from the report thanks to the strong leadership of president Donald Trump the strong relationship between president air to one and Turkey in the United States of America the today the United States and Turkey have agreed to a cease fire in Syria Turkish side will pause operation peace spring in order to allow for the withdrawal of YPG forces from the safe zone for one hundred and twenty hours he and secretary of state Mike Pompeii met with Turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the capital city of Ankara in a press conference Mr Penn said that he had been assured by those on the ground that all

Vice President Mike Pence Turkey Syria Donald Trump United States America Mike Pompeii Recep Tayyip Erdogan Ankara Mr Penn President Trump Twenty Hours Five Day
Vaping-related illnesses surge in California

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

Vaping-related illnesses surge in California

"California health officials are continuing to see an increasing number of vaping related illnesses in the state can you dis Jeremy Siegel reports the California department of public health has identified easy one potential cases of acute lung disease among people with the recent history of vaping that's up from sixty seven cases a week ago health officials are urging people to get rid of any cannabis vaping products bought from unlicensed street vendors or pop up shops they have not yet identified the specific cause of the illnesses earlier this week governor Gavin Newsom announced an executive order aimed at cracking down on youth vaping and urged health authorities to increase enforcement efforts against the sale of a lizard vaping

Jeremy Siegel Cannabis Gavin Newsom California California Department Of Publi Executive
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 10 months ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one a I'm Joshua Johnson I know when our last few moments I I made a mistake I'm sorry George after two part question I didn't get an answer the second part I'm sorry George would you just describe more what your health care policy is how you would go about covering everyone I should have given you a chance to start on that I think I I think I did and that's with a public option where you have this nonprofit option that we don't have right now it's only insurance companies that are offering the insurance to Americans that are on Medicare or Medicaid and to me this is the right answer and you can do it on the exchanges are you can do it for the affordable Care Act you can do it outside of the exchanges but it would cover a lot more people and it would bring the cost down for everyone let's see if we can squeeze in one or two more questions Dan tweeted what would be her number one big ticket priority for her first two years in office okay the first one just in general because we always talk about policy but it's to change the tone of our politics and that's why I put up this a hundred day plan you can see it on in the club's shar dot com that has a hundred over a hundred things you can do without Congress because we need to change things up immediately in this country then when it comes to my policy priorities I would immediately and day one get us into the international climate change agreement again and bring back the clean power rules gas mileage standards something that trump has been bringing us backwards on when it comes to dealing with the climate crisis I would introduce immigration reform and make a commitment to get that done in the first year I know where the Republican votes are on that I know where the democratic votes are we can get that done it it's been long waiting and then the third thing is the economic issues that we touched on today add to address increasing the minimum wage making it easier for people to get childcare and certainly working on health care in terms of bringing down farmer prices last quick question those are things we can do in the first year last week. in that time for like a thirty second response on gun policy here's what Erin in south bend left in our inbox were seen far too many mass shooting and yet it seems like we always get into the same debate and nothing actually changes so what are you going to do as president to stand up to the NRA and the gun lobby and actually create some change on this issue senator we got about forty five seconds left I feel like I'm in the debate all right sorry I'm number one I have been standing up to the NRA since way back when I was a prosecutor I've long supported the assault weapon ban I ask your listeners if you care about this comic McConnell's office right now because we have in front of us universal background checks closing that Charleston Lupo and my bill at two so that domestic abusers don't get guns but in the long term I would take it to the NRA I sat across from trump at the White House pushing him on this I watched while nine times he said he wanted universal background checks I wrote down those hash marks on a piece of paper he followed that I won't we will get this done the American people are with us majority of trump voters are with us majority of hunters are with us.

Joshua Johnson forty five seconds thirty second hundred day two years
Major Hong Kong march called off after leading activists arrested

1A with Joshua Johnson

01:03 min | 11 months ago

Major Hong Kong march called off after leading activists arrested

"Pro democracy activists in Hong Kong canceled a planned protest for Saturday after police refused to grant them a permit organizer say they called off the event for safety reasons it would have been the latest in a series of ongoing protests since June meanwhile two key student leaders in Hong Kong's pro democracy movement five years ago have been arrested NPR's Emily find reports that the arrest came a day before Saturday's March Jim is he still a Hong Kong pro democracy activist groups that Agnes Chow and its secretary general Joshua Wong have been arrested by police and taken to police headquarters the minister members a Josh along with walking to a metro station when police pushed him into a mini van both Wong Chow took part in the two thousand and fourteen pro democracy umbrella movement which fizzled after more than two and a half months which partly inspired the more than four months of democracy protests which often Gulf the city this year a Hong Kong police spokesperson said any chance another umbrella movement leader was detained at the Hong Kong airport and route to Japan Thursday night it is unclear if he is still in police

Hong Kong Emily JIM Josh Wong Chow Japan Agnes Chow Joshua Wong Four Months Five Years
Opioid crisis: Johnson & Johnson hit by landmark ruling

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:59 sec | 11 months ago

Opioid crisis: Johnson & Johnson hit by landmark ruling

"Attorneys for Johnson and Johnson say they'll appeal of five hundred seventy two million dollar judgment in a landmark OP what liability case brought by the state of Oklahoma is NPR's wins our Johnston reports the judgment is a fraction of the amount the state wanted Oklahoma had sought seventeen billion dollars in damages and issuing his decision judge that Bachmann ruled that Johnson and Johnson's marketing practices had helped fuel the opioid crisis in the state my judgment includes findings of fact and conclusions of law that the state met its burden that the defendants misleading marketing and promotion of Felix created a nuisance looting of finding that those actions compromise the health and safety of thousands of Oklahomans this is the first trial in the U. S. seeking to hold a drug maker and accountable for helping fuel the opioid epidemic Johnson and Johnson says it plans to appeal winter Johnston

Johnson Oklahoma NPR Johnston Bachmann Felix Five Hundred Seventy Two Milli Seventeen Billion Dollars
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 11 months ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Joshua Johnson today on one eight mark has Brownlee is a twenty something YouTube creator who's become a trusted source for all things tech but this isn't just some guy in his basement ranting into a camera one Google exec called him the best tech review around when you're in a position with an audience like this companies that make the wildest most cutting edge leading edge when I called dell tech how will want to put that in front of those eyeballs T. so they'll reach out we'll have you know motorized electric scooters are folding phones also crazy things that they want that's just ahead on one end live from NPR news in Washington I'm chaise Stevens president trump recently hinted that he might support stronger background checks for prospective gun buyers announces the existing law is very strong speaking on All Things Considered and pierced him accessible trump and Democrats say they're interested in some kind of gun legislation neither the president nor his advisers have talked into much detail about where they stand and we're still waiting to see what Democrats will accept them in there are a number of proposals now working their way through Congress the house Judiciary Committee is gonna come back from their recess early in order to take in an address some gun related legislation but we're not sure whether the president will support it whether the Republican controlled Senate will support it at the end of the day whether or not there's gonna be a bill that goes to the president's desk for his signature interest in mac reporting Israel's president is warning against politicizing support for his country and Pierce annual Estrin reports on the response to president trump's comment about Jews who support the Democratic Party last week to democratic congressman L. hun oh Mar and Rasheeda to leave were denied entry to Israel at trump's encouragement because they support a movement to boycott Israel over its treatment of Palestinians president trump return to the subject as he left the White House on Wednesday in my opinion.

Israel Rasheeda congressman L. hun chaise Stevens NPR dell Google White House Democratic Party Joshua Johnson Senate house Judiciary Committee Congress president trump Washington Brownlee
What Are The mechanics Of Currency Manipulation?

1A with Joshua Johnson

03:21 min | 11 months ago

What Are The mechanics Of Currency Manipulation?

"David Rennie we have a question about currency manipulation what are the actual mechanics is from guy he emailed us what are the actual mechanics of currency manipulation how do they do it what are the costs does it make the cost of say importing oil more expensive David or any that's a good question what day the dollar is your absolute expert on on what the US treasuries rules are for the carrying someone a currency manipulation but you know so to the question of China and its relationship with the dollar is is an extremely interesting and political one you mentioned oil purchases one of the things that China was expected to have done much more I think by now was to try and shift lotus stuff like going on into its own currency the run in the U. skills along these reports people saying about the tremendous amount of lending that China does too often developing countries through things like about road initiative again people awhile ago thought that that was going to be a lot of that was going to be the renminbi that they were that the you and that this is going to be kind of China's coming out policy as a global currency to a surprising degree that hasn't happened it still is basically very much was to the dollar and that then raises really fascinating questions about whether China is more vulnerable to the dollar than people think could in fact one of the you know there's a camera calling this using the China actually isn't quite as safe in this trade war with the U. S. as China says and one of the factors that is managing that dollar assets they don't hold is does that a lot because he's actually surprisingly ticklish question but I would to first talk to dollar the real test all right beside you because he is the the living must on this stuff about John you had something you wanted that as well yeah I think this is an important thing to remember also about the move on Monday to the the clerk China a currency manipulator this is something that politicians in America threatened on the campaign stump for decades it's become this big symbolic gesture but it is only symbolic really in trouble those can be one of the first things he did when I came into absolutely China crafted and has been resisted by his treasury because it exactly the rules that that that David talks about David dollar talks about the the but the point the point is it's been it's one of these threats that you start to wonder whether the threat is actually more powerful than the action itself by declaring China a currency manipulator really all he's done and physically is is required the US treasury to engage in negotiations with their Chinese counterparts there may be some sanctions down the line if those negotiations code go no where he's requiring the treasury to engage with the International Monetary Fund on on this issue which is interesting because the International Monetary Fund for a while now has has argued that the Chinese one is actually right about the right value for work should be in terms of the market and so there's a real question in this gets into the trump administration's tactics of of whether by deploying this threat with great bombast you're actually removing some of your leverage using one of your your tools with a little bit like the the bank robber who walks into a bank with a toy gun and pulls the trigger and rather than a bullet coming out you get a flag with the word bang coming out on it and and that is it you know you lose that leverage in the situation I and so I think and we're seeing the same thing on terrorists as well I

David Rennie
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He there I'm Joshua Johnson today on one eight we begin with comedian Robin feeding she's got a legacy on this program she was a guest in our very first week discussing political comedy her new show on HBO blend silliness with social commentary will explore themes program a black lady sketch show then we meet an impresario of hip hop fashion Daniel day the designer better known as dapper Dan the distinctive flashy look of early rap culture owes a lot to him and he still stylin into his seventy I'd love to hear from you comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one eight live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum president trump largely avoided controversy during a campaign stop in Cincinnati Thursday evening but he did acknowledge a previous flap from member station W. V. X. you bill Reinhardt reports last week the president fired off a series of tweets attacking congressman Elijah Cummings in calling his home district in Baltimore eight rodent infested mass Thursday evening he did criticize democratic leadership in cities without getting specific for a hundred years it's been one party control and look at him with your name one after another but I will do that because I don't want to be controversial Baltimore's mayor responded to the original tweets saying it was unacceptable for NPR news on bill right heart in Cincinnati on Capitol Hill is sweeping budget deal is on its way to the president's desk and senators will soon be heading back to their home states for a five week summer recess it follows a bipartisan drive to cement rescind spending increases for the Pentagon and domestic agencies NPR's Claudia gore solace reports some lawmakers weren't happy with the physical compromise the bipartisan deal will suspend the debt ceiling passed to twenty twenty elections and sat one point three trillion dollars for defense and domestic spending over the next two years in a tweet president trump called the deal phenomenal for the military veterans and US jobs it heads off a potential crisis but many fiscal conservatives oppose spending levels and here it's cloudy chrysalis president trump has promised to sign the measure which permits the government to resume borrowing about a quarter for every dollar it spends to pay its bills the US navy is confirming the death of a pilot whose fighter jet crashed in California's Death Valley Wednesday during a routine training flight Alex tell make of member station KQED reports the navy is withholding the name of the pilot for now the navy often uses the area called rainbow canyon for training missions it's informally called Star Wars canyon because the desert like landscape looks similar to the planet Tatooine in the movie franchise officials say the crash happened north of the naval air weapons station China lake which is about a hundred and fifty miles northeast of Los Angeles there's no word yet on what caused the plane to go down seven people on the ground were treated for minor injuries from the crash for NPR news I'm Alex ohmic the south Korean military says North Korea fired unidentified projectiles twice into the sea off its eastern coast Friday morning this would be the third round of weapons test by Pyongyang in just over a week president trump has said he wants to revive talks with North Korea on the duty there is ation of the Korean peninsula Thursday the UK France and Germany condemn north Korea's missile launches as a violation of UN sanctions this is NPR news from KQED news I'm terrace Siler there is increased security at the seventy fifth Santa Clara county fair the event kicked off today and comes just days after the deadly mass shooting some thirty miles away at the Gilroy garlic festival sheriff Laurie Smith says security personnel at the fair is at least four or five times what they normally half.

Joshua Johnson Robin three trillion dollars hundred years seventy fifth five week two years
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hey there I'm Joshua Johnson today on one eight southern stereo types in syndication some of television's greatest hits centered around characters from the rural south like the Andy Griffith show the Beverly hillbillies and he hot the true big audiences and urban markets and even revolutionize the technology of TV production but these are caricatures after all not laughing with southerners without them we'll look at the legacy of these characters especially Ernest P. Worrell played by Jim Varney our conversation is on tape but we always love to hear from you so comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one end live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum healthcare was once again a major focus during the second round of CNN's democratic presidential primary debate ten more candidates faced off in Detroit NPR sermon Kaman has more Democrats faced off over differing visions for how and how quickly to reform the nation's healthcare system at one point New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand said the group was losing the forest for the trees by getting bogged down in details instead of focusing on the broader goal of insuring all Americans New Jersey senator Cory Booker suggested the real enemy is president trump but this painting against progressives against mater saying one is on realistic in the other doesn't care enough that to me is the body or party and demoralizing us in face of the real enemy here former vice president Joe Biden who favors a plan that would build on obamacare sparred with California senator comma Heris whose proposed a Medicare for all plan that includes a role for private insurers sermon Kaman NPR news some pharmacists in Canada are concerned that changes allowing Americans to buy medications from Canada could lead to shortages then carbon Chuck reports the US announced American patients and businesses will be allowed to purchase drugs from Canada the spotlight was thrown on the issue after democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders joined a caravan of diabetics last weekend who cross the border at Detroit to buy insulin in Windsor Ontario with the price is ten times cheaper Washington's announcement has some pharmacists in Canada worried they say Canadian pharmacies already face shortages of more than one thousand types of medications one pharmacist the Miller says it's the worst he's seen in thirty years and he worries at those shortages will only increase of more Americans had north to buy medicine Miller says the drugs are stocked in made for the Canadian market not for a country that's ten times the size some also fear that the change in US regulations could push up prices for Canadians for NPR news I'm Dan carbon check in Toronto the federal reserve cut its key interest rate Wednesday by a quarter point the first reduction in more than a decade chairman Jerome Powell says the cut is designed to support a favorable economy it is intended to insure against downside risks from weak global growth and trade policy uncertainty to help offset the effects these factors are currently having on the economy and to promote a faster return of inflation to are symmetric two percent objective I would not rule out future cuts but he did say this is not the beginning of a long series of rate cuts the federal reserve last cut interest rates in December of two thousand eight during the Great Recession the Senate Armed Services Committee Wednesday approved general John heightened to be the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff this news is nomination to the full Senate a former aide accused him of unwanted sexual advances an airforce investigation found no evidence to support the allegations this is NPR news from cake you read the news on Jeremy Siegel a federal judge has overturned the two thousand six terrorism conviction of a farm worker from Lodi who was charged with training at a Pakistani terrorist camp KQED Sonya Derek says Hamid Hyatt's family is now calling for his immediate release the US government called Hyatt's conviction a win in the war on terror but his lawyers say he was railroaded forced into a false confession and not given a competent defense a judge agreed with that last part citing the failure of his lawyer to call multiple alibi witnesses hi it sister when he left high at says even though she never gave up hope the news stand her I couldn't believe it I had goose bumps I was crying but finally the truth is out he'll be out soon when exactly is still not clear the US attorney's office has not commented on whether or not they will we tried the case and send the attacks K. Q. E. D. means governor Gavin Newsom has signed an executive order to hire nearly four hundred edition all seasonal firefighters the move comes as the state braces for the worst of fire season in the months ahead cal fire chief Tom Porter says the additional firefighters will allow some engines to increase their crews from three to four people one additional body.

Joshua Johnson thirty years two percent
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Iran for NPR news I'm teri Schultz in Brussels the most famous archaeological site in grace the acropolis was closed to visitors Thursday because of the European heat wave temperatures rose to more than ninety six degrees in Athens officials say if it's that hot on Friday the crowd was to be closed again an estimated thirty three million people visit the site every year I'm Nora Raum NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include Sierra Nevada brewing company family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle more at Sierra Nevada dot com and support for in also from the listeners of KQED happy fourth of July mostly cloudy breezy conditions and fog as well near the coast lows in the fifties Friday through Sunday expect mostly cloudy skies in the morning then becoming partly cloudy highs in the fifties to the upper sixties near the coast and warming into the mid seventies further away from the coast the time now six after eleven here's one a previously recorded on KQED public radio this is one day I'm Joshua Johnson in Washington we're not in Kansas anymore are you a good all this year the film adaptation of the wizard of oz turns eighty it's considered one of the most influential films ever made for many reasons it's one of the first movies made in Technicolor both the recording industry association of America and the national endowment for the arts have ranked somewhere over the rainbow number one on their songs of the century list it helped launch Judy garland's career ended launched a cottage industry of people who believe that it is much more than a modern fairy tale joining us from NPR in New York is John freaky he's the co author of seven books about oz including the wizard of oz and illustrated companion to the timeless classic he also won two Emmy awards for the PBS American masters series on Judy Garland John welcome to one day thank you very much oz it's been fun for me since I was five years old so this is a pleasure so joining one lot of credit what well you you're the guy they tell me that you are like a V. guy to talk to about the wizard of oz and I'm curious how old this fascination started for you what is it about the wizard of oz that that put you what started with the movie SO this all ties in I was five the first time the movie was on TV back in nineteen fifty six and up to them my heroes have been Walt Disney's three little pigs but I love music and something about the story the characters Judy is Dorothy the people she meets the songs certainly are just fascinated me and I'm not alone in that but I'm the one for whom it has fortunately become a career and makes it as I say from the fund to share fun to talk about this stuff what is it at the core of the wizard of oz that you think makes the film resonates so deeply I think two things number one it's the story of a journey the bios book or the oz books the film certainly is something to which anyone can relate to if you correlated to the idea of life's journey you goal from place.

Iran Brussels NPR teri Schultz one day ninety six degrees five years
Texas, K. E. R. A. And Mallory Fox discussed on 1A with Joshua Johnson

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Texas, K. E. R. A. And Mallory Fox discussed on 1A with Joshua Johnson

"The homeland security inspector general S. calling overcrowded border detention facilities in South Texas a ticking time bomb a new report calls for immediate attention to address shortages of food and other basics siding conditions at five facilities visited last month several doctors are offering to help alleviate health conditions at my current attention facilities that are housing children in el Paso they say they can't get in K. E. R. A.'s Mallory fox has more pediatrician Jose Manuel de la Rosa volunteers treating migrant children who've been released from custody he says without proper training it's easy to miss signs of dehydration or other distress in children there's there's an old pediatric saying that children are not little adults the physiology is completely different children go and going going up playing with a fever of a hundred three hundred four and they keep going until they stop several pediatrician

Texas K. E. R. A. Mallory Fox Jose Manuel Fever El Paso La Rosa
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson in Washington. Many of us know the grief of losing a parent, a grandparent, or friend, the grief of losing a child can be its own special nightmare for years ago. Jason green lost his daughter, a toddler she was hit in the head by a brick that fell from a building in Manhattan. For Jason and his wife that began a journey through hell not just to hell. But through it, meaning they found a way to the other side, Jason green joins us now in studio. His new memoir is called once more, we saw stars, Jason welcome to one A. Thank you so much for having me. Tell us about your little girl, Greta the, the child who died, what was she like she was very conversational for a two year old she, we had a joke, that when she was old enough to say, I wanna puppy, we'd get her one because she loved dogs. But then she said, it fourteen months, which was way too early. Like the way she thinks. So we, we had to expend the sentence, we said, okay, now it's mother father. Please give me a dog. I will walk it and feed it. We had this show because we were sure, we had all this time she was incredibly observant and funny, her her grandmother, used to say, oh, she gets the joke, whatever that meant you had to look in her eyes like she got the joke. The first picture, we ever took her actually, when she just been born her eyes closed, obviously, and she's got a little smirk on her face. So she definitely had a very wry sense of humor, talking about the way that she began to kind of intertwine in your life and the life of your wife, Stacey, her mother. Well, Greta was our first child. So she changed and expanded, and disrupted our lives the way that any new child does. We brought her home to our apartment. We lived in a different neighborhood, in Brooklyn at the time, and she slept car alarm just left there yelling cats, all the things that you deal with, and in New York, and we would take on the subway all the way up to Denver west side pretty regularly to spend time with her grandma. Bother her. Grandma sues as she was known. And when she was still pretty young, when she was old enough, but still pretty young, she would have sleepovers with her grandmother and takes pictures. It's to have way too late meat popcorn, and all that fun stuff. And so she became part of this little extended family that we had a right in New York before we get into the crux of the story of how you lost, Greta. I just want to make sure that we set the proper tone for this conversation. First of all, how are you? How are, are you? Okay talking about this. Yes. I think that there's one thing that I've found to be true for me. And for any other grieving parent that I have met through this journey. And that's talking about your child is profoundly healing. It can be joyful. It can be painful, but it feels good to talk about, Greta. It feels good to be asked questions about her. It's cathartic to talk about what happened because it's a reminder of both her life, and what we've lived through together as a couple. So, yes, I am. I'm. More than okay to be talking here with you about God. I'm grateful to be here. Typically, when you talk to someone about a loss, one of the first thing you say is I'm so sorry for your loss. Mike condolences your story is kind of about the process of how you went through this. Yes. So. I'm not sure how appropriate it is for me to say. First of all, I'm sorry about the death of your of your daughter is that I'm just wondering what tone you would like to set the way we talk about her. Well, I mean what happened was tragic. And so, of course, it's, it's always welcome for someone to say that they're sorry when something bad happens. It's very common response. And I think that my biggest message I want to send out to anyone who doesn't know what to say is that this is either comforting not comforting depending. How you look at it I suppose, there's no right or wrong thing to say, I mean, maybe there are some really wrong things to say you'd have to go pretty far in that direction, too, because nothing you can say, can make it better truly what you can offer is your presence, and that matters more than any individual insight, you might have in matters. More frankly, than the clumsy thing, you might say, and then curse yourself for saying moment later. We had friends who said things that they probably regretted later, but it didn't matter to Stacy or Stacy is my wife is nearly as much as the fact that they brought dinner they sat. With us. They watch us cry. So I think that the tone is much more about the person that you are talking to. I mean we try to take cues from the people that we talked about how they feel about their children's losses. And when we've met other bereaved parents, and I think that's generally a sense of openness is great. Talk to us about the day that Greta was injured and the days that followed. She was with her grandmother, Susan, at the time, right? Yeah. She was having a sleepover Stacey. And I kind of dropped her off to have a date night of sorts to sort of go out to dinner together and look each other in the eyes and have a conversation between two adults, this very normal thing that young parents do nothing marketable about it at all. Really? And in the morning, we had texted with Susan to check in on her, and they'd been having a wonderful time, and she said, listen, guys, take all the time you need. We're having the time of our lives. And Stacey is sort of lingered in the apartment. And as we were getting ready to go that afternoon. We were going to go see a movie together then to go pick up, Greta, I pulled out my cellphone just habitually actually Stacey pulled her out first and saw that her mother had called her and not left a voicemail or texted her, and that was unusual because generally speaking, we, it was, like pulling teeth to get them to check in with us because they were so busy having their own fun. And then I pulled out my phone and saw that I missed a phone call to. And I think we both knew that, that indicated something was. Off. We were still waiting for the elevator in our building at that moment. And then I called that Susan and she answered the phone and I could hear there's a commotion behind her. And she said, oh, Jason. It's so horrible. So those are the first words I heard, and that was my first inclination that something terrible happened. She was struck by falling bricks as well in the leg. She was very much in shock. And so we only really internalize that had been badly hurt that she was in an ambulance, and that she was breathing on her own now, which is what Susan told us and that indicated to me that at one point, she hadn't been, and that we were about to enter into a new phase of our lives. So you race to the hospital. I'm sure up to the hospital. Yep. Is fast as we could? And. Got to the ER and were waved through and the ER is a place of emergencies. So everyone there is, you know, operating on a gentleman. But even in that environment I think stays in our aware that people were looking at us. With a sort of haunted, look. And that's when we went into this little room and saw our daughter. And I think I knew I think I knew even then without knowing her medical condition that where she was was not a place that you come back from. Whether or not, I knew intellectually or otherwise that she was gone forever. I knew that she had gone to a place that probably like I said. Sort of a point of no return. How did the hospital staff do in terms of supporting you giving it to you straight, telling you about your options? What was that, like? I can say without qualification they were wonderful. We're so grateful. Still to the team at the pick you that hospital the pediatric intensive care unit. Yes. Exactly. They treated us with the exact compassion and care. And they told us everything, frankly. We knew that Greta was getting the best care that was possible to give her at that time, we chose to donate, her organs, when we learned that her prognosis was indeed fatal after they tried to operate. And then we entered into that phase where we were waiting by her bedside while they found recipients. And while that was also a very dark time it was a time that we were aware of being given in a way because we knew she was gone, but we were still by her side. And we knew that we had sort of finite amount of time by her bedside to say our goodbyes and our family got to come in. And how did you say goodbye? How did I say goodbye? Necessarily mean the words. But what did you do? I sang songs. Stacey climbed into bed with her. My brother-in-law went to our -partment and brought in some things from the apartment of hers. We played guitar. We put address on her that she loved put it over her bed. Things like that, just to sort of invoke a feeling of her spirit and her life and to communicate. Communicate is a strange word but to send out this message that we loved her, you know. And I'm not sure of thought too much about whether or not she was receiving it or not. But it was important to us to send it out. What was the most helpful most supportive aspect of what your friends and family did for you in the days weeks after past, you know, I think I, I accidentally touched on this I they basically they were there and it's such a simple thing. They didn't flinch. They didn't flinch from the horror, even though many of them were parents with children grad, his age, who in fact, the children were Greenwich, friends, they stared at right in the face. They sat by our side. They brought us dinner. They joked with us when we needed to talk about something mindless to take our minds off of it. You know they, they drank with us. They ate with us. They were just hair no-one cut themselves off because it was too painful for them to contemplate. And I still looked back on that with some off and wonder because that seems so unlikely that nobody in our lives and our circle would would turn away from something like that. Is there anything other than turning away that in retrospect, you're grateful that they did not do? I'm grateful. They did not do. You know that's a tough one. We spent a lot of time counting up what we were grateful for it just as a survival mechanism. We already were very aware of all the things that we did not have, and we were in a profound state of despair, as anyone grieving a child or anyone grieving really is that I don't think that we were aware of what wasn't happening that was one mental gymnastics too far for us. I think in that state that makes sense we should note that after grits death UN. Stacey felt you needed something more. You went up to Massachusetts to the crippling center of yoga and health where you participated in grief workshop led by David Kessler. David will join us in just a moment to continue our conversation with Jason green. He's the author of once more we saw stars. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A from W. A. M U.

Greta Stacey Jason green Susan Joshua Johnson New York Manhattan Washington David Kessler Stacy Mike Brooklyn Massachusetts Denver Greenwich fourteen months two year
China says will respond if U.S. insists on escalating trade tension

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

China says will respond if U.S. insists on escalating trade tension

"President Trump is defending his use of terrorists as a tool for international diplomacy. Well, Trump opted not to impose tariffs on Mexico, this week, NPR's Scott horse reports that he still retinue taxes on imports from China. The US embroiders have a moment to catch their breath after new trade war with Mexico was averted but another battle with China is still on the horizon. President Trump's expected to meet with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping later this month, Trump whole CNBC if they're not able to make a deal he's prepared to expand at twenty five percent tariff to virtually everything the US buys from China were expected to meet, and if we do, that's fine. And if we don't, as I look from our standpoint, the best deal, we could have is twenty five percent on six hundred million dollars. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin got an earful this weekend from fellow finance ministers, who complained that trade tensions are dampening global economic growth, Scott Horsely, NPR news.

President Trump China Donald Trump Scott Horsely Mexico United States NPR Xi Jinping Steven Mnuchin Cnbc Twenty Five Percent Six Hundred Million Dollars
How does age affect pregnancy outcomes?

1A with Joshua Johnson

01:24 min | 1 year ago

How does age affect pregnancy outcomes?

"More people are getting pregnant over aged thirty some doctors still consider a pregnancy past thirty five to be a geriatric pregnancy. How does age affect pregnancy outcomes? So. Geriatric pregnancy. I that would be term. We'd also want to avoid. I think over what's interesting today to two factors that are going on with the pregnancy lost. One is the maternal factors that could be important in terms having a healthy pregnancy. And the other is the very real biology that as a woman's ovaries age, the eggs, inside them, become more likely to have chromosomal abnormalities and those as Dr Perret had mentioned at the beginning of the program are the most common cause of sporadic pregnancy losses. So what you'll find is, as a woman ages, especially over age thirty five and then over age forty the chance at any particular egg has a genetic abnormality increases significantly and thereby increases the rate of pregnancy loss, because they're crumley, abnormal. The good thing about that is the chromosomal abnormal chromosomal abnormalities, a cause of pregnancy loss, is something that is now much more able to be treated and prevented by things like egg freezing. Amber. Oh, freezing. And genetic testing the embryos prior to transfer for women who go through

Dr Perret
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. We're talking about guns race and law enforcement with criminal Justice reporter, Wesley Lowery of the Washington Post. Former public safety chief Cedric Alexander and RJ young author of the memoir. Let it bang young black man's reluctant odyssey into guns. Today's discussion is produced in partnership with the public media reporting collaborative guns and America, it's based here at W AM. You were one as produced you can find out more about it online at guns and America dot org. Now before we get back to our guests. We wanted to add one, especially important voice to this conversation. You may remember the case of Landau Casteel, a black man who was shot dead by police officer it happened back in July of twenty sixteen in falcon heights, which is a suburb of Saint Paul Minnesota police pulled Casteel over while he was driving with his girlfriend and her four year old daughter. He was legally carrying a gun legally the officer. Shot him when he says he thought Casteel was reaching for his weapon that's day. Falente Castells mother. Valerie was listening to one A on Minnesota public radio, and she left this voice mail in our inbox salary. Casteel from Minnesota, I'm from Landau Cathy's mother. And I just wanted to say that it's a shame that officer grade of a black family that consists of a name woman and Chao even though they were looking for a robber they were looking for a black man, and my friend just happened to come down which dream. And he's a style of two mile, and he Koos bad leaks. Thou happened the right to carry it. They automatically get seconds to black. And I just want to say that. I don't think any match you have that much power to make a decision whether a person or dads, just because they informed them that they have the right to carry in that they have a weapon on damn, and what was done frightening, a family, a man woman and child that you would go to that extreme of murdering a black man just because he had a weapon on him. That was Valerie Casteel. Her son Philander was shot dead by police officer during a traffic stop back in July of twenty sixteen. The officer was charged with second degree manslaughter among other charges, but a jury acquitted him and he later left the police force Centric. I wonder how you would react to what we heard earlier. In that clip with Angela, and Derek particularly Angeles saying that she's a gun owner because she's not sure she can trust the police in a moment where she's endanger. Well, I think it's one thing we need to be clear of before. I say anything else is that race still is an issue in this country. And certainly when it comes to gun ownership in people of color, particularly African Americans. If we look at recent events over the last number of years that have occurred. With Tamir rice for an example, and others. It certainly do create a great deal of pause of people of color because they do feel and there's even research that suggests and I published a paper about two years ago. In Harvard Yale review, and there's significant research that strongly suggests that people of color, particularly African Americans are more likely to be shot by white and black police officers, then they're white male counterpart. Now, that's certainly speaks to a much deeper issue within our society, but it's a very realistic one and read this perceived a real for those of color. It is a great concern. Because when you see these e Pence occur over and over and over and played out on our televisions and played out on videos. Transferred around the world and around the globe. It creates a great deal of ain't it is not right. It is unfair. Because anyone who's an American citizen who's a gun owner should feel if they want to be the to open carry they should be able to do. So so we're tweets a bigger problem and a greater concern. But for me as a former law enforcement executive, I particularly think it goes back to a number of things we have to think about we can identify issue, but we also have to identify some remedy to go along with it. And it's how we recruit police officers today around their own certificate in their own bias and unconscious implicit or explicit by sees that we all all of us may have it's how we recruit it's how we train in. It's how we supervise and those are going to be three out of their Ables. And I think going to be critically important in order to people of color, particularly African Americans to be able to feel like any other American in this country. They can rightfully and legally care their firearms as stated by their particular state that they may happen to live you. Yes, cedric. I believe in our past conversations you've talked about that as well. As about how it's partly the internal responsibility of law enforcement agencies to be mindful of the people that they bring in the way, they bring them in the way, they prepare them to hit the streets. And then the way that they deal with problems as they may arise RJ. I wonder what your reaction was to what we heard from. Angela and Derek particularly this idea that this is a right that that African Americans have just as much right to exercise as anyone else. And also the concern about being able to fend for oneself in case. Law enforcement doesn't come to your rescue. Black folks fighting for equal rights is nothing new and having to live in a world where you're constantly on edge about what the government that is supposed to protect. You is going to do is. Also, nothing new. So I understand it. I was raised in it from Tulsa raising has Berg Mississippi. I live Panama City, Florida. I understand, but I don't have time for law enforcement to figure out what's wrong with it. I don't have time for the recruitment to change. I I'm thirty one man. You know, the folks that you were talking about to open this show like Djamil Roberson and Antic mean, they're my age. You know, we're not we're not talking about dudes that have lived into their forties and fifties we're talking about millennials. We're talking about me, and I'm not going to give anybody any opportunity to believe them already in their head. Josh woman. I got dreads I got eighteen tattoos. I wear Jordan's. I don't get to walk around saying I have I'm going to school and get a PHD that I love football that I'm eagle scout. No people are going to make a spot judgment. And they're going to do something about it because the terrified and afraid, and because I'm terrified and afraid I'm not going to give them any more opportunities to think that I'm bad and one way that you can think somebody's bad Abbott a firearm because it's like having Thors hammer on your hip. Everybody's got over to him or on their hip now. Imagine trying to go up your door. I say, hey, man. Why don't you put down the hammer? It makes us all kind of you know, edgy. Look at you like, you're crazy. And say, no, you go get your own hammer. So we got a bunch both walk around hammers. And I just decided put mine down. That's gotta be a complex relationship though. RG? I mean, you do have a second amendment right to carry depending on where you are you're laws on concealed carry and so forth. But I wonder how you kind of came to reconcile those things for yourself knowing that openly carrying or even just owning a firearm could put you at more risk of being killed by someone in the heat of the moment. But at the same time knowing that you as an American have the second amendment right to keep him bear arms. Like was there a moment for you RJ when those two reconciled when that kind of settled for you. Sure, I know that little over one hundred years ago now maybe one hundred thirty years ago. It was a legal for me to have a fire. Anybody looked like me folks were breaking into other folks as how just you take guns from folks that look like me, so I keep guts right for that reason. Because it wasn't granted. It was something that wasn't given to someone who looked like me who had to fight for that right to have it. And I am not regular in that my grandmother. Put her body on the line lost her business. Sue the state of Mississippi in one. So that I could put a piece of paper into a ballot box. So yeah, I understand and I get it. But I also talked with my grandmother before she passed about this. And she always told me you have to treat. Everybody's fear as if it is real because to not treat their fear like it is real. Is to incite their ear is to make them furious because you would feel the same and she told me she never got anything done by threatening violence or being violent. Now, I have friends that have decided like many of the folks whose comment you read that they will shoot back. My mother is one of them. So that's even more complex. But it's not for me to tell you what you're going to do or not do with a firearm and the second amendment as it is is quite. I'm getting upset about it. Because the the second amendment does not go far enough in it for anybody at all. It's problematic. Michael emailed. The anecdotes are terrible. But may misrepresent reality what are the number of shootings broken down by race was Lee Lowery? Let me bring you back into this. We talked about Djamil Roberson emancipate Bradford junior. Do those incidents reflected the norm. Are they an aberration? What do we know about the numbers? Sure. And so it's interesting because these types of shootings shootings of quote, unquote, good guys with guns are very hard to quantify. They don't happen that often. Although when they happen are they do seem to happen. More often with black victims what you might also classify would be cases in which you see black police officers who are shot by their colleagues. Maybe once a year you hear a case like that. Right. A plain clothes black officer responds joins a case and ends up. Either. Getting roughed up or in some cases shop is colleagues. And so we don't necessarily comprehensive numbers on these good guy with gun shootings. But we do have comprehensive numbers are are on police shootings broadly, right that we know how often certain people are shot by. Killed by the police in half and other people are since about two thousand fifteen and this is from a database my colleagues, and I keep at the Washington Post, and she doesn't fifteen they've been about four thousand people in the United States who've been shot and killed by police now when you consider the representation in the population, black Americans are not only more likely than white Americans to be fatally shot by police black police shooting victims are also more likely to have an unarmed when shot by police, right? So victims who pose less of a deadly threat to police who are black are more likely to be shot. Right. And so about fourteen percent of black people who are shot and killed by police were unarmed compared to about six percent of white people. And so again, the reason that I bring up the the armed unarmed paradigm in this conversation is not to say that. Well, you know, just more people who are white people are more likely to be armed when they're shot and killed by police. That is true. It's also saying are black people who pose less of a threat, objectively less of a threat. Someone who is on armed more likely to find themselves killed because what does that tell us? Us about how black people are perceived even when they don't have a firearm. One one quick thing as listening the conversation earlier about the second amendment, and and whether or not black Americans have this right to carry which obviously in terms of the letter of the law. We do it reminded me a quote from the writer fantastic coats are going to be a crude paraphrase. But I remember him talking once in a question and answer and saying something along the lines of, you know, to be black in America to watch other people do things, you know, you never could do. And so yes, of course, black Americans have the right to carry firearms. But again, black Americans know that we can't quite do everything that that our brothers and sisters of different races might be able to do without suffering some repercussions, and it gets to this long standing paradigm and black America about deliberate decisions we make that are self protectionist. And sometimes not doing things that we are otherwise entitled to do if only as a means of trying to keep ourselves safe and then America's history with guns. As was.

officer Valerie Casteel America Washington Post Djamil Roberson Minnesota Joshua Johnson Angela Falente Castells Cedric Alexander Derek Landau Cathy Wesley Lowery Saint Paul Minnesota Chao
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Duke charitable foundation whose clinical scientists development awards support promising early career physician scientists and their research efforts to improve human health and from the listeners who support this NPR station. This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. Where do you do your shopping online the mall local businesses little bit of all of the above? Why do you shop there and not perhaps in other places? We are discussing the future of brick and mortar retail with professor Barbara econ of university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school, professor Louis Hyman, a retail historian at Cornell University, and Paula rosenbloom co-founder and research analyst at our s our research, which is a retail analytics firm, we'd love to hear from you, especially if you deal with or work in brick and mortar retail, maybe you are working at a physical store in real space. That's doing well. What are you doing? That's working perhaps you one of those folks who works in a shopping mall where eighty percent of the storefronts or closed, and the only people you see here folks kinda doing their daily cardio, what is happening in your mall. What is that like to work in a place that is just kind of slowly sliding away tend to incite share what you know about brick and mortar retail these days comment on our Facebook page tweet. Us at one A or Email one A at W A M U dot org. Professor hyman. Let me come back to you and pick up where we left off with Sears. We heard from Dan who called from New Hampshire. He left this in our in box. At my first experience of seeing what I knew is an iconic deers store brand. Being craftsman I grew up with my dad was a mechanic and a machine shop employees, and we just grew up knowing that craftsman if you bought the best at Sears, you could always return it because it was fully warranty deed and with.

Professor hyman Sears professor Barbara econ Joshua Johnson Duke charitable foundation Dan Paula rosenbloom professor Facebook NPR Cornell University Wharton school New Hampshire university of Pennsylvania research analyst co-founder eighty percent
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. We are discussing farmers in America, and how farms are holding up with our current economic situation. Trade war between the US and China. We're speaking to Lynn roar Chaib cheer, the Illinois soybean association, who's joining us from Illinois public media and peak Kaplan, a member of the national milk federation board who joins us now from Wisconsin public radio Fritz rights as formers in southern Minnesota. We don't understand how many of our colleagues support Trump ISM the quote unquote, subsidies proposed to help with this trade war are a redo of a sixty s subsidy program that didn't work then this won't help. Now, we want trade not subsidy. And Jason wrote on our Facebook page, I own a small, Kansas dairy farm. The dairy industry has faced four years of below cost of production milk prices. The tariffs pushed prices, even lower this summer. I'm still waiting to see any money from Trump's bailout. I've watched many of my last, friends and neighbors dairy farmers throw in the towel. Since I'm still relatively young thirty seven. I'm exploring on farm processing making artisanal cheeses. We'll see if this is enough to keep this fifth generation farm afloat Pete. I'd love to hear your reaction to what Jason wrote to us. Well, I think he was dead on. We are dairy farmers in this country are facing decisions where. We get it. We're in a commodity. We're in a commodity business unless you get really close to the consumer which some co ops trained, do and individual farmers are trying to do but selling commodities you're going to have up years down years, and we were for a long time for probably twenty years in a kind of a three year price cycle, and it was fairly reliable because I think it had to do with actually the life cycle of a cow because it takes about two years to get a young one up to milking agent and then the three year cycle, but we're now in the fourth year, and there's nothing real bright on the horizon. So I think farmers are getting really tired of working for nothing or actually pulling equity out of their business and making long term decisions of of ending this business at their family's been part of for a long time. And it's it's it's in your blood. They say that a dairy farmer never actually. Quits, he can stop working, but he's always a dairy farmer. What is it about dairy farming? That's in your blood. Can you can you describe it for me? It's it's the part of knowing that every day those cows, depend on you. You gotta be there to feed them. You gotta be there to Malcolm. And it's your mind never leaves. It you go to sleep you fall asleep..

Jason Joshua Johnson Lynn roar Chaib US national milk federation Trump Illinois soybean association America Illinois Wisconsin Minnesota Facebook Kaplan China Kansas three year milk twenty years four years two years
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. Rachel Mitchell is continuing her questioning of Christine Blasi Ford trying to suss out the precise. Details of the night of this assault already. It seemed like she may have found a discrepancy between the letter that professor Ford sent to Dianne Feinstein and her recollection of things today, particularly the conversation that Brett Cavanaugh and Mark judge supposedly had as they were walking down the stairs after this assault in the letter. It stated that there was a conversation. But just now in testimony professor Ford said she couldn't hear it because she was upstairs, and they were heading downstairs. So clearly the GOP line of questioning is aimed at trying to suss out or poke holes in whatever the original account was looks like we're going to go to a break in the hearing shortly recess but let's listen back in for now. Place called the naval research center on Clara Barton Parkway. Okay. Was that a house or an apartment, and it's at my parents home. Okay. Okay. Durbin chairman, I ask consent to enter into the record. Letters of support for Dr Ford from her classmates at school. Twelve hundred alumni the school one hundred ninety five of your colleagues, students and mentors. Fourteen hundred women who men who attended DC schools and fifty members of the school faculty who are calling for full FBI investigation. Asking certain these into the record without objections ordered duck Ford is difficult as experienced must be in want. You to know that your courage in coming forward has given countless Americans the strength to face their own life shattering past and to begin to heal their. By example, you hit brought many families into an honest, and sometimes painful dialogue, the should have occurred longtime ago, I'm sorry for what this has done to you.

Christine Blasi Ford assault Joshua Johnson Clara Barton Parkway Rachel Mitchell GOP Brett Cavanaugh professor FBI Dianne Feinstein Durbin chairman Mark
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one A. Let me. Work my way around through the three of you. And just kind of get your sense of all of this. Whether this road to redemption thing seems justifiable surprising referential, Monica Hesse. I know we got a pause shortly. But let me start with you, your general gut check on all this. Well, I think when we talk about a road to redemption, we should be talking about it with a scalpel and not with a bludgeon because there's a vast difference between Harvey Weinstein and Louis C K and Chris Hardwick there. We're talking about variants and shades of gray. And for some of these men, I do think that there's a path to redemption. And I some of them I think that they've they've foregone their right to be in the in the public eye in any case Celeste. I don't think that many of the jobs. These men had were they were not entitled to them. My reaction is there redemption is their personal journey, and it has nothing to do with the public. But if I hired a Bank manager who then stole money, I would not put that person in charge of money again. So if some of these men have shown they they abused power when they have it. I would probably not put them back in power over other people again, Katie. Yeah, I agree with both Monica and Celeste. When someone has proven to be incompetent at their job or a toxic BAAs toxic force in the workplace. I don't think that we're under any obligation to give those people a vision of the same prestige or the same job that said, I also do think that like Monica said, there's a lot of nuance between these cases, and we need to be careful not to sort of lumped everybody under Harvey Weinstein. Tobias wrote on our Facebook page, we do love a comeback story. But some people just need to stay down. Go back to work provide for your family, but in a different area, low key and out of the spotlight. We'll continue our conversation in just a moment with Celeste Headley, Monica Hessy, and Katie Herzog. And we welcome your questions and thoughts as well. We'll also keep an eye on the rod Rosenstein story. And if that continues to move we'll let you know, I'm Joshua Johnson. And you're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR. Support for.

Celeste Headley Monica Hesse Harvey Weinstein Facebook Monica Katie Herzog Joshua Johnson rod Rosenstein Monica Hessy Chris Hardwick Tobias Louis C K
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes up in way of the warrior kid particularly the first book where mark is just starting to get to know his uncle jake this navy seal who's getting ready to go off to college he's got this conception about what the seals are particularly because he's being bullied by another kid and he's like all right you can teach me to defend myself so i can kick that kids but and it's interesting how in the beginning of the book i don't wanna give too much of the story away but one of the first things that jake has to do with mark is adjust his mentality around the seals the military and warfare and make it more philosophical and less militaristic well yeah and that's actually interesting because when people the title the book right way the war your kid and some people get scared they i don't want my kid to be a warrior kid that's gonna fight everyone while the opposite is actually true and when you have a person that is trained that is capable that is confident the chances that that person is going to do something aggressive is a lot less and i'll tell you the more i trained i trained a lot of brazilian jujitsu i work out hard the better i got it fighting the less apt i was to go and fight because i realized i didn't have anything to prove to some knucklehead on the street that's glaring at me and so that aggression is a misconception that the first thing that again like i said the first thing a warrior want us go to war the warriors the one that's saying hey let's think about what we're doing let's make sure we have a clear end state in before we go forward so the ideas of leadership i imagine some of them came as a surprise to you or they were lessons that came later on oh definitely definitely learned and it was a it was a long slow learning curve learning about leadership i do wanna talk more about that learning curve and particularly how you apply some of these lessons to parenting we're talking to jaakko willing whose latest book is called the dichotomy of leadership also the author of the children's books the way of the warrior kid i'm joshua johnson glad to be with you you're listening to one a from w a m u and npr.

jake joshua johnson jaakko
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A i'm celeste headley sitting in for joshua johnson we're discussing the net flicks special private school negro with stand up comedian and cnn host of united states of america w kamau bell and we'd love to hear from you you can send it to your thoughts and maybe you have questions for kamau bell you can comment at our facebook page tweet us at one a or email us one at w a m u dot org let's talk a little bit about your daughters sweet yeah because you you talk about them a lot and i find it really kind of endearing how much you love the show doc mick stephen's animated show i have a long record of loving very very long it's not just something that you mentioned in your new special but you know i follow you on twitter you are really excited when the dad in dock mick stephen's got a name yeah he hadn't had a name of it to that point he was just dad mixed ovens and so there's marcus and i was like yeah 'cause i've sort of identifying with the data doc week stephens and you know certainly you know and so for me it was like exciting i forget we did he has a name it's marcus why do you identify with him i mean i'm a dad i'm a black dad and there's not a ton of black dads read a watch on cartoon programming that my kids are watching i'm not saying there's not other black dads and cartoon programming but there's not you know my daughter's other favorite shows there's no that's all animals switzer snow and so to see a dad who's actually he's the show he's a good dad he's not like a foil for a good dad he's a good dad he cares about his kid he's always giving her vegetables to eat she eats them he he's he's got a garden i mean what's like about marcus mick stephen's so i find it interesting to to sort of compare and contrast the way you talk about doc mick stephen's as opposed to the way you described the tv that you consumed as a young man because you didn't have the same sort of black role models that your your daughters now have and so i wonder how how how big of a change is that from the time that you were watching the incredible hulk and spiderman as a kid it's a huge change i mean it's it's it's i mean people say it's peak tv for grown ups its peak tv for everybody's p tv for children to and i was always i mean my whole life i've hated the way people sorta condescend to the idea of watching too much television i don't know i live in the bears people say i don't watch tv if that makes them smarter and i only have net flicks because that's not tv and so for me it's about choices my mom as well as much as i watched like the incredible hulk and spiderman also watch a ton of pbs when i was a kid and i also watched a ton of like political show what sixty minutes in my house because that's what the tv was on the tv when it was sunday nights and so i watched the very wide variety tv and i know that it helped make me smarter and more and more interested in the world and so for our for our daughters it's the same thing it's just they have a much wider array of things to choose from and i mean you read a lot of comic books it wasn't just watching the the superheroes on tv there's a really long great rant in your book about all the black superheroes that for some reason have black in their names no fence black panther and black lightning but that's just the way that's the way it was right right have a secret age alias if you become black lightning right but yeah exactly nobody goes here it's a bird of the plane it's white superman okay so but you you say even say comic books are are important that this isn't just pop culture what makes it so important but the i mean they're more important now they were when i was a kid ubiquitous nature of them the fact that a lot of kids start reading started former love of reading through colic books the fact that it's about images that are sort of imprinting in your head and if you don't see anybody in that space for you.

celeste headley joshua johnson cnn united states kamau sixty minutes
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one a i'm joshua johnson visiting k u e r public radio in salt lake city i wish you could see what i see sitting here in the studio behind me is an incredible panoramic view of the ochre mountains it's the western edge of the valley that salt lake city lies in the wasatch mountains are to the east and the north it's serene and its majestic and it's really easy to see why this area is growing right now i mean this is the kind of land that a lot of people want a piece of and that's the point who owns this land what it's used for and the claims that are made on it are increasingly controversial back in december president trump reduced the size of two national monument in southern utah bears ears was put under federal protection by president obama that was reduced by eighty five percent or more than a million acres the other monument grand staircase escalante was cut nearly in half states rights native tribal rights environmental concerns and energy interests are all tied up in this matter of all the ideas we got from you for stories that we should discuss when we visited utah this one by far stood out as your priority joining us in studio to discuss it is judy phase a reporter for k u e r news judy welcome to one a high tashaun also with me in studio is stephen block legal director for the southern utah wilderness alliance steven welcome thank you and joining us from denver colorado is kathleen scum president of the western energy alliance kathleen thanks for making time for us pleasure to be on we know there's plenty of you with questions and thoughts about this so please don't be shy with your thoughts about how we use an portion land in the west email us one a at w a m u dot or tweet us at one eight or comment on our facebook page before we dive in we should note we did reach out to the department of the interior to invite either secretary zinke or another representative of the department to come in we did not hear back but that invitation stance judy face let me start with you when we hear the term monument like bears grand staircase.

joshua johnson salt lake city trump obama utah colorado president zinke representative reporter stephen block director steven denver facebook secretary eighty five percent million acres
"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"joshua johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one a i'm joshua johnson in washington anti semitism manifest itself in a lot of different ways in the past year jewish cemeteries have been desecrated in saint louis seattle and philadelphia to name a few millions of tweets have been sent perpetuating hate speech stereotypes and conspiracy theories white nationalist chanted jews will not replace us at a rally in charlottesville bomb threats were made against jewish institutions harassment vandalism occurred in schools and on college campuses the antidefamation league reports than antisemitic incidents soared in two thousand seventeen with nearly two thousand reported according to the last year marked the largest single year increase on record sixty percent that six zero percent to what do we attribute this recent uptick a threats to jewish communities how do we discuss antisemitism with the nuance that it requires and perhaps most importantly how do we fight it we'd love to hear your thoughts and we'll get some of your stories to and this is a complex issue and today we're taking on just a piece of it by focusing on the rise of antisemitism in america particularly in the year and a half since donald trump became president joining us from npr in new york to help us do that is jonathan green blatt the ceo of the anti defamation league a non governmental organization that fights anti semitism and other forms of bigotry jonathan welcome to one a thank you for having me joshua joining us on the line is you're villa mccoy the ceo of dimensions consulting a nonprofit that provides training in diversity equity and inclusion villa welcome thank you here with us in studio is jonathan weisman the deputy washington editor of the new york times he is the author of the new book semitism being jewish in the age of trump jonathan thanks for joining us thanks for having me and also with us in studio is jeffrey her.

editor jeffrey her jonathan weisman jonathan green america harassment charlottesville saint louis washington the new york times joshua johnson ceo new york npr president donald trump vandalism philadelphia seattle six zero percent