19 Burst results for "Josh zoom Brune"

President Donald Trump announces 'phase one' trade deal with China

WSJ What's News

01:18 min | 1 year ago

President Donald Trump announces 'phase one' trade deal with China

"The US and China reached a partial trade on Friday president trump spoke to reporters in the Oval Office after meeting with Chinese Vice Premier Lu both realize for the beginning very important not only for giant only for the US but for the world our Josh Zoom Brune has more from Washington. It's really kind of incredible how far away we are from the sweeping deal that people thought was going to be possible in May it looks like they agreed on a very small number of things it looks like China's going to purchase more US agricultural products and it looks like the US is going to hold on off on a tariff increase that was set to take place in mid October and then what they've said is that they're going to continue working on this they're going to do several phases of D aw to get to their full Fang and this'll be phase one once they finished it they'll start working on a face to the US hasn't made a final decision on whether to impose tariffs set to take effect in December it also wasn't clear whether the administration would follow through on plans to grant licenses for American businesses to sell to Chinese telecommunications Ryan Hallway Trump's trade advisor Robert lighthizer said while way was being considered in a separate process. US stocks rallied on Friday on hopes the two countries would leave this week's talks in Washington with an agreement the S. and P. Five hundred broke a three-week losing streak

United States Ryan Hallway Trump Josh Zoom Brune China Washington Oval Office President Trump Robert Lighthizer Advisor Three-Week
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"The APP it's called H K map dot live from Beijing Yokota has more yes sold a diversey around this APP has been webling up actually over the last week or so and on how it went was apple initially rejected the sap during its review process but that move by Apple drew criticism last week across social media in the US and Europe and then the ober appeal that decision to apple and apple this time of the APP but that's when really the Chinese state media and consumers began criticizing apple so on Tuesday there was a very strongly phrased commentary against apple on the People's Daily on that's the official mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party and I think one reason why the state media strongly criticized apple in China on this issue is because anything related to sovereignty in China is a very sensitive issue as we're also seeing with the case of NBA they're clashing against the Chinese government and that commentary in the People's Daily called this APP quote toxic software and said it betrays the feelings of Chinese People Yoko says the situation has left apple and a sensitive position that's because a fifth of the company's sales come from China the current situation really shows or underscores the difficulty that American companies are facing these days if you're operating in China on their basically kind of cop between the Western markets consumers there are sympathize with the Hong Kong protesters and China and China's been trying to bring into this unrest apple said in a statement that it removed the APP due to concerns that endangered law enforcement and residents and fidelity announced that it too will eliminate commissions from its online brokerage the move follows similar announcements from its rivals Schwab Td Ameritrade and E. Trade so why are all of these firms eliminating commissions well it has to do with the digital nation of Wall Street that's reset many of the costs of investing so now some of the biggest players have been in a price war to attract consumers now our main story this morning trade talks between the US and China resumed today in wash in ten already the South China Morning Post reported that lower level U. S. China trade talks have made quote no progress in resolving the yearlong trade war one beating factor the backdrop for the talks has gotten more complicated Charlie Turner has been finding out more from Josh Zoom Brune Josh what do the Americans in the Chinese hoped to achieve this time publicly the two sides are still kind of talking a good game about the possibility of doing a big deal but most people those expectations are a lot lower than they were in May back in May when the talks broke down it really looked like there was a possibility of sweeping deal that was going to cover just a huge range of America's concerns with Chinese business practices it looked like you know the Chinese side was going to at these tariffs per perhaps taken off over time it looked like a big deal was really a possibility and now people are looking at thinking that a lot of those issues are probably not going to be resolved and hopes are lot more muted people are looking people think there's a much greater chance of a of a smaller deal if there's anything at all earlier this week US added twenty-eight Chinese companies to an export blacklist over human rights concerns the White House says it wasn't related to trade talks and I imagine channel disagrees with that right I mean this is one of the reasons that a really all encompassing deal has gotten a lot harder is that there's so many more issues on the table than there were or even five months ago you know they've been these new blacklists against Chinese companies a lot of these companies were targeted because they are companies that were involved in the surveillance in western China where China has been really behaving pretty rip repressively towards the Muslim population there and these companies had helped with that the US has a human rights concern there You know other issues we've seen we've seen everything going on with Hong Kong with the democracy protesters there with China cracking down on that the US you know kind of wants to support the Hong Kong protesters but it but that adds another dimension to the issues I mean we saw the NBA of all places get sucked into us China tensions when when the general manager of the Houston Rockets tweeted in support of the Hong Kong protesters I mean it's really gotten to be a really complex table of issue news and that's exactly part of the reason that it's going to be hard for the Chinese or for the US to kind of set aside all these things and say oh we're just GonNa you know we're going to make we're going to has just on trade we're going to ignore all these other topics it's actually gotten really hard to To narrow the discussions in that way could there be some smaller scale deal for instance China has resumed its purchases of soybeans from farmers you know with the White House perhaps postpone the tariffs that are scheduled to start October fifteenth or maybe ease up on restrictions again I wa Wa right I mean I think that's the kind of the perfect example of the of the lowered expectations that we're talking about here you know the US has made it clear that it wants to see these cultural purchases and China has actually started to come back into that market in in the last month that half and so there you know there has been some you'd call it progress on that issue and so you know is there a deal where China agrees to keep those act purchases and the US says well we're not going to add he knew tariffs you know that kind of thing where they where they make a mini deal and they say we're going to keep working on these other issues maybe they never do come back and work on those other issues net mini deal.

Beijing Yokota five months
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"In the US negotiations are expected to resume on Monday the US Supreme Court begins its new term today and the court has some big cases on the docket focusing on issues including abortion gun rights and immigration on Tuesday the court will hear arguments case focusing on whether federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ people from discrimination in the workplace the president's verts to cancel the deferred action for childhood arrivals program or Daca will be in focus next month the Supreme Court has also agreed to rule on abortion restrictions in the state of Easy Anna and the court will take up gun rights in December and its first major second amendment case in a decade the US and China are gearing up for the latest round kind of trade talks in Washington this week and our Josh Zoom Rune says there's a new wildcard in the mix I think one thing that really complicates it's all of this is the kind of impeachment drama in Washington there's a big question I think over whether or not this weakens the president in the is of Chinese who view him as politically vulnerable or if this maybe makes the president you know more inclined to be tough on China to kind of show some of the things the administration is doing I guess what we'd say is that impeachment is a big wild card you know this is already extremely unpredictable these trade negotiations have been predictable from the very beginning people who've tried to guess which way it's going almost always gotten it wrong and I think this adds just another degree of unpredictability to it still there are some signs of Progress I think you can say that there's too positive signs that we're seeing one is that the high level negotiators are back at the table. I mean this is the first time since July that we've had high level negotiations is going to be the US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer Treasury Secretary and then China's top trade negotiators as well and this is a group that hasn't talked and I almost three months so that's a positive sign and the second positive sign is that China has started to buy more agricultural products in a in a meaningful way and we're starting to see some positive signs out of China they're really but buying soybeans they're buying pork again the US farm economy is really far away from I'm kind of recovered or back to health but this is kind of a step in the right direction that's The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune negotiators from the US and China Anna are set to meet in Washington on Thursday and Friday there's a slump in the IPO market investors were optimistic at the start of the year beginning with P interest Zoom Uber and lift all making their debuts the ride hailing companies have since seen declines live stock has fallen forty six percent and for stock has declined thirty four percent last week also brought bad news from a highly anticipated company planning to debut Shared Office Space Company we were pull the plug after the company came under scrutiny and it CEO step down according to a research note from Goldman Sachs IPO stock performance is at its worst.

US Supreme Court US China president Washington Josh Zoom Brune Easy Anna Daca Goldman Sachs IPO The Wall Street Journal Robert Lighthizer Representative CEO thirty four percent forty six percent three months
High-level trade talks between US and China resume

WSJ What's News

01:47 min | 1 year ago

High-level trade talks between US and China resume

"The US and China are gearing up for the latest round kind of trade talks in Washington this week and our Josh Zoom Rune says there's a new wildcard in the mix I think one thing that really complicates it's all of this is the kind of impeachment drama in Washington there's a big question I think over whether or not this weakens the president in the is of Chinese who view him as politically vulnerable or if this maybe makes the president you know more inclined to be tough on China to kind of show some of the things the administration is doing I guess what we'd say is that impeachment is a big wild card you know this is already extremely unpredictable these trade negotiations have been predictable from the very beginning people who've tried to guess which way it's going almost always gotten it wrong and I think this adds just another degree of unpredictability to it still there are some signs of Progress I think you can say that there's too positive signs that we're seeing one is that the high level negotiators are back at the table. I mean this is the first time since July that we've had high level negotiations is going to be the US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer Treasury Secretary and then China's top trade negotiators as well and this is a group that hasn't talked and I almost three months so that's a positive sign and the second positive sign is that China has started to buy more agricultural products in a in a meaningful way and we're starting to see some positive signs out of China they're really but buying soybeans they're buying pork again the US farm economy is really far away from I'm kind of recovered or back to health but this is kind of a step in the right direction that's The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune negotiators from the US and China Anna are set to meet in Washington on Thursday and Friday

China United States Washington Josh Zoom Brune President Trump The Wall Street Journal Robert Lighthizer Representative Three Months
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"To our stories on big tack heck and the Olympics here are some other top stories. We're following today. As we work struggles with lagging investor demand we report the Japan's Softbank is planning to buy at least seven hundred fifty million dollars worth of we work shares. The company is gearing up for its initial public offering. We work is hoping to raise at least three billion dollars at inside. Peo- putting its valuation between fifteen and twenty billion dollars that is far less than the forty seven billion private investors valued the company. It's last round of fundraising as we reported this morning we work has announced governance changes at the company and will listed shares on Nasdaq the Food and Drug Administration when is evaluating heartburn drug Zantac after learning of a probable carcinogen found at low levels in some versions of the drug officials are looking into whether the chemical no known as N. D. M. A. poses a risk to patients the. FDA says the levels of the chemical in preliminary test quote barely exceed amounts you might expect to find in common and foods the FDA says it will make its assessments available to the public as soon as possible. China has agreed to exempt purchases of US soybeans pork any other agricultural products from tariffs that have hit hard in the US Farm Belt The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune explains. It's been devastating for the US farmers and it's not just the terrorists themselves you know. China controls a lot of the companies that do the importing of these products their government has a lot of control over these companies and they've essentially just shut off purchasing from the US and instead they've been buying their their food from Brazil and Europe and other places and this is just raw total havoc on soybean prices and other crop prices so it's been extremely hard and you look at the numbers you know the US just on soybeans used to export around twelve thirteen fourteen billion dollars a year and that market has almost entirely disappeared for American farmers and then gone almost entirely to farmers from other countries and so it's it's a good sign if these tariffs come off and people can start selling back into China again but you really need to see large scale purchases sustained for a very long period of time time before farmers would even be back to where they were before. This trade war had started. You know any idea that farmers are going to come out. Ahead is months and maybe years away way I mean this is just this is really the very first step of climbing out of a very deep hole for American farmers. China made the exemptions. After president trump delayed a new round round of tariff increases the US and China are expected to resume trade talks in Washington next month. The London Stock Exchange has rejected a thirty six point six billion dollar bid from the Hong Kong Exchange our Margo Patrick explains that the lse expressed fundamental concerns about the deal in a letter on Friday Eddie including calling into question Hong Kong status as a financial gateway to Asia that was interesting because Hong Kong has had that sort of unquestioned -sition an as the way to tap into Chinese markets for a very long time now and with this letter LLC is saying we doubt that Hong Kong may even NBA The the financial city that companies will use to raise capital in China in that Western investors will wanNA connect with so they really called into question whether Hong Kong Hong Exchange even had something to offer them meanwhile LLC says it is committed to buying financial information and.

US Hong Kong Hong Exchange China Food and Drug Administration Hong Kong Olympics London Stock Exchange LLC Softbank Wall Street Journal Josh Zoom Brune lse Japan president NBA Asia Margo Patrick Europe
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, made that point explicitly saying this isn't a trade action. This is about the immigration crisis at the border right now. But of course, you know, this is a trade action. It applies tariffs to three hundred and sixty billion dollars worth of trade becomes into the United States from Mexico every year. So they might have motivated this because of their concerns about what's going on, at the border, but this is certainly a very consequential consequential trade and economic action that they've launched here. Do we have any specific? Details about what exactly President Trump wants Mexico to do in terms of taking steps to stem illegal immigration. And what are we hearing from Mexico? Mexico is very concerned by this action, of course. And they sent their foreign minister and a delegation to Washington today to kind of start talks right away to the US to. Kind of let them know that the situation from their perspective in what they think they're doing about it. The, you know, a US basically hasn't said specifically, what it wants Mexico to, to do other than to kind of reduce the number of people that are showing up at the border. And this, of course, has been rattling markets, not just in the US, but also worldwide. Yeah, I mean, this is such a big trade action. I, I again, it's three hundred sixty billion dollars roughly of goods that come to the United States from Mexico every day. And a lot of these are goods that had previously avoided the trade War, I mean, almost seventy billion dollars of cars and trucks comes into the United States from Mexico each year. A lot of the main car manufacturers, including the American manufacturers, GM, and Ford have enormous operations in Mexico close to fifty billion dollars of car parts comes across the border every year. And a lot of that is stuff that goes back and forth, multiple times because because we've had this NAFTA deal, these companies GM and Ford. And the international automakers as well. You know it's not unusual at all for part to cross the border multiple times before it makes it into a finished car. And now every time that part crosses the border, it's going to get hit with the tariff again. So this is just tremendously disruptive to the car industry. And then the reason I think it's rattling markets, more generally is because it really raises questions about the ability of any country to make deals with the United States. I mean Mexico is a country that spent an entire year, negotiating a very careful trade agreement with the United States, and then they got hit by this tariff that could become giant over time. I mean this could become the biggest tariff action, the administration has taken, and so if your China or Japan or the European Union, and you're trying, you're considering making a deal with this administration. You have to kind of wrestle with the possibility that you could make a deal work really hard on it, and get everyone to agree to it. And then a few months later, the US would decide to hit you with tariffs, and so it calls into question the entire. Fire ability of this administration to, to make any deals. I mean they've yet to make a real big trade deal. And this kind of makes you wonder whether or not I think this makes any observer wonder whether or not this administration is, is capable of making big trade deals, or whether it actually, desires to make big trade deals. So it just induces, a huge amount of global uncertainty in that sense. That's the Wall Street Journal's Josh zoom. Brune with the latest on President Trump's plan to impose new tariffs on Mexico. Josh, thank you so much. Big so much for having me. And for the latest developments on this story. Please be sure to check back on our website w s.

Mexico United States Mick Mulvaney Trump President Acting chief Ford Josh Wall Street Journal GM European Union Brune Washington Japan China three hundred sixty billion do
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They really need to convince allies they can't necessarily just muscle their way through this. Josh zoom. Brune is an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Josh thank you for your reporting. Thanks so much for having me. And now to another Trump nominee this time in the DC circuit on Tuesday Naomi row appeared before the Senate Judiciary committee, if confirmed to the DC circuit court of appeals row would fill the seat left behind by supreme court Justice Brett Cavanaugh, but rows facing scrutiny over her current role within the Trump administration as well as controversial writings from her time at yell. Joining me to discuss row in her nomination Zoe Tillman legal reporter with BuzzFeed news, Zoe welcome to the takeaway. Thanks for having me. Your welcome. So let's begin by getting some background row. What are her qualifications to be a district? Judge row currently serves in the Trump administration. She leads the office of information and regulatory affairs, which means that she basically overseas the administration's deregulation push. So there's a lot of talk of shrinking the administrative state taking away powers from regulatory agencies and she's been in. Charge of coordinating all of that before that she was a longtime law professor at George Mason University. Now Scalia law school where she was very prominent thinker and writer on administrative law issues as she early on in her career had very prestigious clerkship. She clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas on the US supreme court and has just been a prominent conservative legal voice for a very long time. But she's never worked as a judge before. Is that right? That's right. She's never been. Josh she's written extensively on administrative law issues, which is a major part of the DC circuits docket. It's the main forum where if an agency passes adopts a regulation or does something and someone wants to challenge that that goes to the DC circuit. So it tends to attract nominees with a background in administrative law. But she has never been a judge herself. So we don't have judicial opinions to look we do have her writing about administrative law. So are you able to? To tell us what the policy implications of having her in the DC, circuit would be what would her judgeship? Look like it's always hard to predict what judges are going to do. But we do know that generally someone who has this kind of conservative legal jurisprudence on a court the DC circuit will mean when a case comes up challenging very big action by an agency. Let's take for instance, the clean power plan, which was a major environmental policy adopted under the Obama administration where something really big like that comes up we tend to see conservative judges citing against the agency, basically saying agencies should not have too much power. These are unelected officials. We shouldn't give so much deference to the agency it should be up to congress to make laws whereas judges appointed under Democrats more liberal legal jurisprudence tend to see more deference to agencies is okay and allowed for under the constitution. Right. And. She also got questions yesterday from Senator is based on the story that you broke about rows writings from Yale. Let's take a listen to some of my writings, I talked about the issue of of rape and sexual assault. And I emphasize that that rape and sexual assault are crimes for which men should be held accountable, and that no one should blame a victim of sexual assault. Or rape. I also attempted to make the commonsense observation that there were some actions women could take to make it less likely to be a victim of those horrible crimes told me more about what you found from her time. As a prolific op Ed writer at yeah. Yes. Even in college. She was a very strong conservative thinker and writer on campus and wrote a number of columns for several campus publications and a couple of them dealt with the subject of date rape. And as she alluded to in her testimony. She wrote basically that women who drink too much bear some responsibility if they're assaulted she. Wrote things like if a woman drinks to the point where she can no longer choose. Well, getting to that point was part of her choice, and these are comments that have gotten the attention of Democrats and some Republicans on the committee as well who have questions about whether that reflects her current thinking she also wrote about race affirmative action LGBTQ issues really touching every hot button subject that a judicial nominee would be expected to address one way or the other at her confirmation hearings. And then the question was does what she wrote two decades ago have bearing on her qualification to be a judge now. And she said some of the language she used made her cringe. She tried to explain that. She wasn't saying women are to blame if they're assaulted. But Democrats have said that they didn't really see enough.

professor DC rape Josh Naomi row reporter writer Trump Justice Clarence Thomas Wall Street Journal Senate Judiciary committee Brune Brett Cavanaugh assault US George Mason University Obama administration Zoe Tillman
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on KCRW

"Where they really need to convince allies they can't necessarily just muscle their way through this. Josh zoom. Brune is an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Josh thank you for your reporting. Thanks so much for having me. And now to another Trump nominee this time in the DC circuit on Tuesday Naomi row appeared before the Senate Judiciary committee, if confirmed to the DC circuit court of appeals row would fill the seat left behind by supreme court Justice Brett Cavanaugh, but rows facing scrutiny over her current role within the Trump administration as well as controversial writings from her time at yell. Joining me to discuss row at her nomination Zoe Tillman legal reporter with BuzzFeed news, Zoe welcome to the takeaway. Thanks for having me. Your welcome. So let's begin by getting some background on row. What are her qualifications to be a district? Judge row currently serves in the Trump administration. She leads the office of information and regulatory affairs, which means that she basically overseas the administration's deregulation push. So there's a lot of talk of shrinking the administrative state taking away power from regulatory agencies and she's been in charge of coordinate. Meeting all of that before that she was a longtime law professor at George Mason University. Now Scalia law school where she was a very prominent thinker and writer on administrative law issues as she early on in her career had very prestigious clerkship. She clerked for Justice Thomas on the US supreme court and has just been a prominent conservative legal voice for a very long time. But she's never worked as a judge before. Is that right? That's right. She's never been JiJi. She's written extensively on administrative law issues, which is a major part of the DC circuits docket. It's the main forum where if an agency passes adopts a regulation or does something in someone wants to challenge that that goes to the DC circuit. So it tends to attract nominees with a background in administrative law. But she has never been a judge herself. So we don't have judicial opinions to look we do have her writing about administrative law. So are you able to tell? Us what the policy implications of having her in the DC circuit would be what would her judgeship? Look like it's always hard to predict what judges are going to do. But we do know that generally someone who has this kind of conservative legal jurisprudence on a court the DC circuit will mean when a case comes up challenging a very big action by an agency. Let's take for instance, the clean power plan, which was a major environmental policy adopted under the Obama administration where something really big like that comes up we tend to see conservative judges citing against the agency, basically saying agencies should not have too much power. These are unelected officials. We shouldn't give so much deference to the agencies. It should be up to congress to make laws were as judges appointed under Democrats more liberal legal jurisprudence tend to see more deference to agencies as occa- and allowed for under the constitution. Right. And she also got. Yesterday from Senator is based on the story that you broke about rows writings from Yale. Let's take a listen instead of my writings, I.

Naomi row DC reporter professor Zoe Tillman Josh Wall Street Journal Trump Justice Thomas Brune US Senate Judiciary committee Obama administration George Mason University Brett Cavanaugh Senator congress Scalia
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On Monday night. The Trump administration announced that the president will tap David Malpass as the next leader of the World Bank. As with many of Trump's appointees this nomination is generating its fair share of controversy due in large part to Malpass previous criticisms of the global institution. Josh zoom. Brune is an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal, and he's been following the nomination. Josh. How's it going? It's going great. Thanks so much for having me. Absolutely. So before we dig into Malpass remind us what is the World Bank's role on the global stage. Can you explain to us the World Bank's a really interesting institution? It was I set up by the allies at the end of World War Two and its purpose is to take money from the world's wealthier countries. And it puts them into loans that go to some of the world's poorer and developing countries. So it funds projects, you know, roads rails infrastructure projects ports things like that. It can also do health projects public education projects any anytime. A government needs financing for these kinds of basic economic development projects the World Bank is kind of the biggest institution that it can turn to and who is David Malpass David Malpass who the Trump administration kind of announced on Wednesday. They're putting forward for this job is the current undersecretary at the treasury for international affairs. That means he's the top person on international issues. The treasury department here in the US he was an adviser to Trump's campaign. He was on his economic advisory committee, and he's been at the treasury since very early on in the administration that seems like a job that would put you in place to get a position like this. But there there are folks coming out against his nomination. Can you explain some of their concerns about him if he were to lead the World Bank? Yeah. That's right on the one hand he's been working on issues like this for the past two years. He's gotten to know a lot of the relevant people who have kind of the same function that he does and other countries people who are decision makers when their countries vote the World Bank. But he's also been in a position where he's been the guy who's had to make. He's been the guy who's had to discuss the administration's policy for the World Bank, which is sometimes been very critical. So a lot of the world is kind of taking note that one of the institution's biggest critics is the person who's been picked to lead. It. What have his criticisms of the World Bank? Ben, well, they've been a handful one of them has been that the institution has continued to. Lend too much money to China. This is kinda gotten pulled into the overall tensions that the United States has China. If you think back twenty years ago, China was still a much poorer country and made a lot of sense that you are working to help them develop rails, and and infrastructure projects and things of that nature. You know, you fast forward today too much richer country. And so he's raised the question of whether this is a country that still needs the support of the World Bank. He's criticized other things at the main to, you know, questioning their business model the Bank last year had to raise more money from it's kind of donor countries around the world, and he was someone who was skeptical that they needed those funds, and he's criticized level of salaries at the Bank and just kind of a whole range of criticisms. They have made a lot of people that work at the Bank a little bit wary of his nomination. So how are these appointments typically made the US gets to pick the president of the World Bank? This is really interesting. There's no formal rule about this. But by tradition. The Americans have always. Put forward to candidate. So the way it works is all the countries that donate to the World Bank have voting power at the Bank. The US has the most voting power of any country that has about sixteen percent. So that's a lot. But it's not enough to automatically make every decision on its own. You know, the European Union, for example, if you put all the countries in the European Union together they have about twenty six percent of the vote. And so it's always been a tradition that the rest of the world has gone along with that the Americans put forward to candidate and everybody else around the world supports him. But that's why it's such an interesting moment right now, the US has put forward someone who's been such a critic of this institution. And so there's kind of a question of whether or not the rest of the world is still going to feel compelled to go along with it. It's kind of a test of American leadership in a situation where.

World Bank David Malpass Trump United States treasury Brune president Wall Street Journal Ben Josh China European Union reporter undersecretary twenty six percent sixteen percent
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on KCRW

"Administration announced that the president will tap David Malpass as the next leader of the World Bank. As with many of Trump's appointees this nomination is generating its fair share of controversy due in large part to Malpass previous criticisms of the global institution. Josh zoom. Brune is an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal, and he's been following the nomination. Josh. How's it going? Great. Thanks so much for having me. Absolutely. So before we dig into pass remind us, what is the World Bank's role on the global stage. Can you explain it to us the World Bank's a really interesting institution? It was I set up by the allies at the end of World War Two and its purpose is to take kind of money from the world's wealthier countries. And it puts them into loans that go to some of the world's poorer and developing countries, you know, so it funds projects, you know, roads rails infrastructure projects ports things like that. It can also do health projects public education projects any anytime. A government needs financing for these kinds of basic economic development type of projects the World Bank is kind of the biggest institution that it can turn to and who is David Malpass David Malpass who the Trump administration kind of announced on Wednesday. They're putting forward for this job is the current under secretary of the treasury for international affairs. That means he's the top person on international issues. The treasury department here in the US he was an adviser to Trump's campaign. He was on his kind of economic advisory committee, and he's been at the treasury since very early on in the administration. God that seems like a job that would put you in place to get a position like this. But they're they're folks coming out against his domination. Can you explain some of their concerns about him if he were to lead the World Bank? Yeah. That's right on the one hand he's been working on issues like this for the past two years. He's gotten to know a lot of the relevant people who, you know, have kind of the same function that he does in other countries people who are decision makers when their countries vote at the World Bank. But he's also been in a position where he's been the guy who's had to make. He's been the guy who's had to discuss the administration's policy for the World Bank, which is sometimes been very critical. So a lot of the world is taking note that one of the institution's biggest critics is the person who's been picked to lead. It what have his criticisms of the World Bank. Then well, they've been a handful one of them has been that the institution has continued to. Lend too much money to China. This kind of gotten pulled into the overall tensions at the United States has China. If you think back twenty years ago, China was still a much poorer country and made a lot of sense that you are working to help them develop rails, and and infrastructure projects and things of that nature. You know, you fast forward today, it's a much richer country. And so he's raised the question of whether this is a country that still needs the support of the World Bank. He's criticized other things at the main to, you know, questioning their business model the Bank last year had to raise more money from it's kind of donor countries around the world, and he was someone who is skeptical that they needed those funds, and he's criticized level of salaries at the Bank and just kind of a whole range of criticisms. They have made a lot of people that work at the Bank a little bit wary of his nomination. So how are these appointments typically made the US gets to pick the president of the World Bank? This is really interesting. There's no formal rule about this. But by tradition. The Americans have always. Put forward to candidate. So the way it works is all the countries that donate to the World Bank have voting power at the Bank. The US has the most voting power of any country that has about sixteen percent. So that's a lot. But it's not enough to automatically make every decision on its own. You know, the European Union, for example, if you put all the countries in the European Union together they have about twenty six percent of the vote. And so it's always been a tradition that the rest of the world has gone along with that the Americans put forward to candidate and everybody else around the world supports him. But that's why it's such an interesting moment right now, the US has put forward someone who's been such a critic of this institution. And so there's kind of a question of whether or not the rest of the world is still going to feel compelled to go along with it. It's kind of test of American leadership in a situation.

World Bank David Malpass United States Trump Brune treasury president Wall Street Journal Josh China European Union reporter under secretary twenty six percent sixteen percent twenty years two years
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Welcome back. This is Washington today for Thursday, January twenty fourth I'm Steve Scully. Thanks for being with us. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that President Trump is considering appointing the first female, president of the World Bank. This follows the unexpected announcement earlier this month the president Jim Yong Kim will be stepping down the current. Interim president Kristalina Gorgon was in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. She was asked about this story. What do you think of female leadership and gender equality when we mean step up we make better decisions and the world is a better place for all. So we mean. Stand-up become Bahir those comments from the interim president of the World Bank. And joining us on the phone is Josh zoom Brune, he is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. I who's on the shortlist who is the president considering for this position. Well, thanks so much for having me. There's a couple of the White House is kind of confirmed that they're that. They're looking seriously at a handful of candidates the list could still change. I'd I'd caution that you know, there's still a couple of weeks before they have to formally put a personnel, and it's very likely that do names could emerge. But right now the name that's kind of getting the most discussion is in renew. You used to be the CEO of Pepsi Cola. She's still the chairman of the board. There has really interesting veto, obviously experience running a big multinational corporation, she was born in India. So she seen as someone who can kind of represent maybe the developing world a little bit. And she'd be the first woman to have the job. So she didn't really intriguing candidate. The physician. Gordon, clear. This point. But the US does make this election. Correct. Well, here's what's interesting about it is the US historically made the selection and the rest of the world has gone along with it. But that's not written down anywhere. There's no guarantee that it'll happen that way and the US when we controls about sixteen percent about one sixth of the voting power at the World Bank. So theoretically, they could get outvoted. So there's a little bit of a diplomatic dance that has to happen here to convince the rest of the world to go along with the US candidate. And that's why it would be helpful. If the US went with with someone who's potentially a really strong candidate like in your new year. Why did Jim Yong Kim step down? Well, he he he'd been in the job for a little over six years, which is which is a pretty long time. It was it was one complete term, and then a few years and his second term, and he had the opportunity to go. You know, the reason they cited is he had the opportunity to go work for a fund it does infrastructure investments. And so it was kind of an opportunity to do similar work to the World Bank. But in a private sector capacity, and he was you know, apparently ready t t to make that jump. So he stepped down a few years earlier than he needed to. We're talking with Josh zoom Bruin. He is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. Let me ask you about the World Bank as an organization, essentially, what does it do? Well, the World Bank is a really interesting institution. It's it's owned by almost all of the countries in the world has kind of shares that they've purchased in the World Bank and the World Bank kind of takes that capital that it got from all the countries around the world hundred and eighty nine countries and makes development loans for the most. Part. So it provides financing for kind of poorer countries that went to build bridges airports or highways, or you know, it works on environmental projects that works on it does it's been doing a lot in recent years on kind of helping deal with countries where they have huge inflows of refugees coming from war torn, you know, refugees from Syria coming across the border into other countries in the Middle East, kind of helping countries cope with that flight of refugees. So does a lot of really interesting work all around all around the world on development projects. It's a really interesting and and pretty in pretty large institution. Without explanation. A reminder your work available at wsJcom. Thank you for being with us. Thanks so much for having me. A mixed day..

World Bank US The Wall Street Journal president Josh zoom Brune Jim Yong Kim interim president chairman Steve Scully Washington Kristalina Gorgon Davos Switzerland White House Trump Pepsi Cola India CEO Gordon
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And welcome back. This is Washington today for Thursday, January twenty four I'm Steve Scully. Thanks for being with us. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that President Trump is considering appointing the first female, president the World Bank. This follows the unexpected announcement earlier this month the president Jim Yong Kim will be stepping down the current. Interim president Kristalina gorgets was in Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. She was asked about this story. What do you think of female leadership and gender equality when we mean step up we make better decisions and the world is a better place for all. So we mean stand up become Bahir those comments from the interim president of the World Bank. And joining us on the phone is Josh zoom Brune, he is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. I who's on the shortlist who is the president considering for this position. Well, thanks so much for having me. There's a couple of the White House is kind of confirmed that they're that. They're looking seriously at handful of candidates the list could still change. I'd I'd caution that you know, there's still a couple of weeks before the formerly personnel. And it's very likely that do names could emerge. Right now, the name that's kind of getting the most discussion is New Year's used to be the CEO of Pepsi Cola. She's still the chairman of the board there as really interesting, obviously experience running a big multinational corporation, she was born in India. So she's seen as someone who can kind of represent maybe the developing world a little bit. And she'd be the first woman to ever the job. So she didn't really intriguing candidate. Position. Clear at this point. But the US does make this election, correct? Well, here's what's interesting about it is the US has historically made the selection and the rest of the world has gone along with it. But that's not written down anywhere. There's no guarantee that it'll happen that way and the US only controls about sixteen percent about one sixth of the voting power at the World Bank. So theoretically, they could get outvoted. So there's a little bit of a diplomatic dance that has to happen here to convince the rest of the world to go along with the US candidate. And that's why it would be helpful. If the US went with with someone who's potentially a really strong candidate like in your new year. Why did Jim Yong Kim step down? Well, he he he'd been in the job for a little over six years, which is which is a pretty long time. It was it was one complete term, and then a few years and his second term, and he had the opportunity to go. You know, the reason they cited as he had the opportunity to go work for a fund that it does infrastructure investments. And so it was kind of an opportunity to do similar work to the World Bank. But in a private sector capacity, and he was you know, apparently ready t to make that jump. So he stepped down a few years earlier, they need you to we're talking with Josh zoom Bruni is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. Let me ask you about the World Bank as an organization, essentially, what does it do? Well, the World Bank is a really interesting institution. It's it's owned by almost all of the countries in the world has kind of shares that they've purchased in the World Bank and the World Bank kind of takes that capital that it got from all the countries around the world hundred and eighty nine countries and makes development loans. For the most part. So it provides financing for kind of poorer countries that went to build bridges reports or highways or you know, it works on environmental projects that works on it does it's been doing a lot in recent years on kind of helping deal with countries where they have huge inflows of refugees coming from war torn, you know, refugees from Syria coming across the border into other countries in the Middle East, kind of helping countries cope with that side of refugees. So it does a lot of really interesting work all around all around the world on development projects. It's a really interesting and and pretty pretty large institution without explanation. A reminder your work available at wsJcom. Thank you for being with us. Thanks so much for having me. A mixed day. On Wall.

World Bank US president The Wall Street Journal Jim Yong Kim interim president Josh zoom Brune chairman Steve Scully Washington Kristalina gorgets White House Trump Bahir Switzerland Pepsi Cola India Syria
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Conversation about the life of business and the business of life. This is the opening bell with Steve on twenty. Good morning. Welcome back to the opening bell. Thanks for being here. With us on our Tuesday edition of the broadcast. A pair of experts on the gig economy, say they overestimated, the impact of how people were making a living doing various jobs like driving for Uber, and how that would affect the traditional work arrangements that most of us have joining us this morning to talk about this is Josh zoom Brune from the Wall Street Journal where this story appears Josh good morning. Welcome to the opening bell. Thanks so much for having me, a pleasure to have you. Because I know we have been following a not only a Wall Street Journal is reporting on this over the years, but this story in general. A lot was made over the gig economy back in twenty fifteen then earlier than that. How what did they these experts? Get it wrong. How significantly? Yeah. It's a great question. It's a really interesting topic. I mean back in two thousand sixteen that was the year that Hoover was I valued more than General Motors your valued more than four. It's kind of exemplified how big people thought they get the Konami was getting and you know, what kind of turned out to be the case. Is that Uber was a real phenomenon. There's a lot of people that drive for Uber. It's a big service that a lot of people use. But most of the other things in the gate economy, especially when it comes to things to people, you know, take hours out of their day to to go work on on this page web platforms turns out, or for the most part very very small. And so so, you know, things are the what happened anyone is that there was one company that was really growing in a big way in this space, and that's still there in the numbers. I mean, there's no doubt. There's. A little bit more of this activity just kind of gig work, then there was a fifteen years ago or something like that. But the other the other reason is that, you know, back in twenty fourteen twenty fifth seed earlier this decade, the labor market was still a lot weaker. And so some of the things that looked like people shifting to the gig economy. We're actually just people trying to cope with the labor market because it was still so damage from the recession started in two thousand seven, and that's kind of one of the big takeaways here is that some of the things that looked like people worried that the economy was kinda shifting this way. And it really permanent way. In fact, you know, people were temporarily doing some things to make ends meet. It wasn't a permanent shift in the way, the labor market worked these experts. Alan Krueger of Princeton and Lawrence cats have Harvard. How do they realize that they perhaps had something wrong? Here was it that when the job market as you described. It started improving and they saw that people were not doing these gig jobs anymore. How did they realize that they were off? Yeah. Well, one of the big reasons that a mystery is the Labor Department who who typically, you know, they're the ones that produce the monthly jobs report that everyone uses to gauge how the economy's doing the traditional monthly jobs report didn't ask questions about kind of alternative work arrangement is it asked if you had a job, but it didn't ask the nature of how that job was structured. Now. The legally part we used to do a special set of surveys on exactly that question. But starting in two thousand five the Labor Department kept requesting it, but congress winning give them funding to study the issue, and that was exactly kind of the period when one they Konomi got really weak in the recession started, no seven the labor market was really week for, you know, five six seven years really log a really unusual period in US history. That was exactly what the Labor Department stop sitting in question. And that was exactly the moment that you know, some companies did have especially. Had real success. And so there was kind of this black hole. Right. Wouldn't just happened. And so who and cats which really economists are both really well regarded economists who had stepped in and tried to do surveys of their own. And eventually what happened is congress kind of saw how important this question was in two thousand seventeen they went out and deliver department was able to kinda use some other money that it had to do a new version of the survey they were able to get the survey done, and that kind of showed once they were able to do the comprehensive survey these really high estimates were were wrong, and she'll Krueger and cats are kind of reckoning with how that data once it was finally collected. You know, didn't come out the way that people had expected. So Josh now, we have we're in a situation where the job market is so hot that it may be hard to tell again. But a lot of the folks who had gig jobs have back then have. Now gone onto full-time employment. Is that a fair assessment of how things have panned out? That's exactly right. I mean, people saw that this is maybe a permanent shift in the labor market that we were gonna go toward a future where every company every occupation. No matter what it was you were gonna work through an app. I mean, it's it's kind of crazy distinct now five years ago, people were writing pieces saying that that's what was going to happen. But you know, what's the economy's good? When people have the opportunity to find fulltime work date. Dave that's the direction they want to go. When companies have the ability to offer people a fulltime job that kinda gets them better more stable employee benefits to company too. So that even when the economy's good people are going to work this way. Just not the case. Is there a sensitive to how many people are doing these gig jobs nowadays is it is it can we put a percentage on the number of people who have jobs in the gig economy. There's a lot of different ways that you that you might wanna fight. It is you're talking about people who who kind of actually get a significant share of their income from going on an app working an hour or two at time whenever there's demand available for small gigs. You know, that was the original idea to get Konami. That's exactly what Lubar and the other driving apps. Do there's also food delivery ones if you look at those and again that has been gross here. But you're talking about maybe one or two percent of the labor market. You know, that's that's several million people. It's not it's not nothing but a deck, but earlier this decade sports thinking that you know, maybe it was twenty thirty forty percent. And then there's a couple of bladder categories. You can figure like the number of people that are independent clock contractors that are on call. That are temp workers when you taking all those kinds of things it's a ends up being around thirteen percent or something like that. Yeah. That's that's not nothing, but not taking over the labor force. And in fact, you know, there were always independent contractors people who are on call. You know, they're always home home contractors repairman kind of worked one job at a time. So not all this activity is is completely new and the gross in it. You know, you're talking one or two percentage points. It's it's happened. But it's not completely changed the US labor market. You mentioned something earlier that I think is another kind of offshoot of this that was created by this wrong data, and that was the evaluation of at Uber were there other companies that were impacted perhaps positively then by this estimated now negatively now seeing some of their capital or perhaps their valuation significantly or even somewhat decrease after these estimates kinda shook out. Yeah. I mean at the time it really because this seemed like it might be a applause. You had companies in San Francisco, especially Silicon Valley who are trying to become, you know, the Uber for everything, you know, the Uber for dog walking the Uber for doing your laundry. Uber for washing your car. And you know, the reality is that there was there was over. And then the other companies, you know, they just didn't take off at the same scale. You know? Uber's main competitor list is is the same basic idea you use the app to get drivers. It's it's thought to be around, you know, less than one fifth or something. The size of Uber food delivery apps. People do use on a pretty regular basis, but you're still talking a fraction of the size of Uber. And then, you know, some of these other ideas, you know, the Uber for TV delivery. But I want to get into the specific financial companies, you might know the name because I don't know. Exactly how they're doing. But you know, it worked for all these other topics. Most of these never really took off at all. Yeah. And some of these companies I mean, one of the ones I think about his task rabbit for contractors and people doing repair work. That's another one they're not public company. So it's really hard to know exactly how they've been impacted. Yeah. I think some people certainly work on them. But it like most people are going to spend most of their day on an app like task grab it. I mean that was just clearly that was just clearly exaggerated. I mean, people people do use these things and people do but put put their labor on there. I mean, let's see something like task. But you know, you can do things like you could use things at contractors would have done, then you're just hanging on you're just playing him on task rabbit instead of the jello pages. And so when you're talking about that kind of you're not actually talking about as big of a change in the labor market. So some of these apps, you know, really are getting used in these sites are really use. But they're not actually changing things. They're just kind of a new intermediation for people in some industries always worked. What's the takeaway here? What's the lesson that we learned is not to take some of these pronouncements at face value and do a little bit more of our homework before we believe them. Yeah. I mean, this is just an example of kind of the hype machine getting carried away. I mean, I think one of the big lesson is to kind of ask yourself. This all the people who are talking about a topic or trying to raise money, you know? I mean that was the case with the gig economy is part of the reason there was so much hype about it is because all of the promoters of it where people who are trying to raise money on the basis that it was a really big trend and that should have raised a little bit more of a red flag. If the only people talking about it. Are trying to raise money off. It you kind of think of bitcoin last year is being a very similar phenomenon with people who were enthusiastic about it. We're also people who are trying to get very very rich off the idea. It's a little bit of a red flag in terms of what their incentives worth definitely. Well, Josh, we appreciate you being with us this morning. Great conversation come back and join us sometime. Yeah. Thank you so much for having me, Josh zoom Brune is with the Wall Street Journal, and we're going to link up to this historian this about the gig economy in the podcast of the opening bell. Love that later on this morning, five forty eight hour on the opening bell time to update traffic.

Josh Wall Street Journal Labor Department Konami Alan Krueger US Brune Steve General Motors Hoover San Francisco Lubar Dave Silicon Valley Princeton Harvard Lawrence congress
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Association. Of auto dealers is include auto parts manufacturers. All got to get it either groups that always agree with each. Other on everything but? They, all got together and urged the president not to move forward With with this kind of, threat to put a twenty five percent tariff on any automobile or. Automobile part coming into the United States we're talking with Josh zoom Brune of the. Wall Street Journal and let's take a step back talk about that twenty five percent what does that mean for the price of a car what parts are we talking about and any reaction from. The White House would be any part of the car that is brought in from another country and, you know the way the auto industry works? In the United States is whether you're looking at you know no matter what brand of car? You're looking at there's a lot of the components of that car it were built, in another country even if the final assembly is done. Here in the United States the supply chain of these. Companies is international and the companies you. Know yesterday I wanted. To senior vice president of Toyota gave some figures and you know he said that for some of the common brands of cars that, Toyota produces the camera I believe you said it would be an eighteen Hundred dollar cost increase from these tariffs for a Toyota Sienna you said it would be like three thousand so we're talking, about you know increase in the thousands of dollars for kind, of ordinary cars that would result. From these tariffs and you know. The figures are going to be we don't have the? Exact figures for other models of? Cars but they're presumably going to be on a similar order of magnitude we're talking about thousands of dollars more in. The cost of every car in the country potentially which is as the alliance of automobile manufacturers puts, it a, domino effect with the price of a car the. Dealers and manufacturers and the suppliers it'd be just. A remarkable disruption to the industry. And one final point because you're saying that the auto industry is, raising the alarm bells is the White House listening well you know just today President Trump was asked about a meeting that he's having next, week with the, European Union any kind of again trotted out the threat of putting in these tariffs in, place and said that you know if you're up Doesn't agree to deals at, the US likes it that they're going to. Get hit with these, tariffs and, so it seems like the concern from the US industry the the US factories that could be, affected by this isn't we're kind of reaching that. Same level with the president who still you kind of has, a priority it seems like wanting to get leverage in some of. These negotiations with Europe and he's also cited these car tariffs there's leverage in the negotiations that, are going, on with Mexico and Canada over a new more North American Free trade agreement over a new, NAFTA the Wall Street Journal headline the. Auto industry pushing the White House to back off on tariffs the reporting of Josh zoom Brune here in Washington thank you for being with us thanks so much for. Having, me and, here's more, with the president at the White House I have just returned from a very historic Europe. Where we've made incredible, progress toward achieving greater peace security and prosperity for America for our allies and, in fact for the entire Your world the meetings with NATO. The United Kingdom and with Russia were a tremendous success of I think you will see that play out over a period of years frankly but. There were tremendous, success at home Economy is, thriving booming like I, would say never before people are looking and they're trying to, find times is never been a time like this we've created more than three, point six million jobs since the election We are in the longest positive job growth straight in. History and the history of our country or at least on record Unemployment has fallen for every demographic group every single roof African American unemployment has reached, his lowest levels by far President Trump earlier today. At the White House in Great Britain today it was. The ten, days ago where British Foreign Secretary had resigned his cabinet position today in the house of Commons Boris Johnson said it's not too late to save Brexit. Is he accused Prime Minister Theresa. May have in his words dithering over the UK's..

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Dealers, it's include auto parts manufacturers all to get it either Groups that always agree with each other on. Everything but they all got together and urged? The president not to move forward with these with this kind of threat to put a twenty? Five percent tariff on any automobile or automobile part coming into the United. States we're, talking with Josh zoom Brune of the Wall Street Journal. And let's take a step back talk about that twenty. Five percent what does that mean for. The price of a car what parts are. We talking about and any reaction from the White House A would be, any part of the car that is brought in criminal their country and you know the, way the auto industry works in the United States is whether you're looking at you know no matter what brand. Of car you're looking at there's a lot of the. Components that car that, were built, in another country even if the final assembly is done here in the United States the supply, chain of these companies is international and the companies. You know yesterday the senior vice president of Toyota gave some, figures and you know he said that for some of the common brands of cars at Toyota produces the Cami I, believe you said it would be an eighteen hundred dollar cost increase from these tariffs for a Toyota Sienna you said it would be something more like three thousand so we're talking about you know increase in the. Thousands of dollars for kind of ordinary cars that would result, from these tariffs and you know. The figures are going to be. We don't have the exact figures for other models of? Cars but they're presumably going to be on a similar order of magnitude Talking about. Thousands of. Dollars more in the cost of every car in the country potentially which is as the alliance of, automobile manufacturers, puts it a domino effect with the price of. A car the dealers and manufacturers and the suppliers it'd be just a remarkable. Disruption to the industry and one final point because you're saying that, the auto industry is raising the alarm bells is the White House listening well you know just today President Trump was asked about. A meeting that, he's having next week with the European Union any kind of again trotted out the threat, of putting in these tariffs in place and said that you know if Europe doesn't agree to deals at the. US likes it that they're going to get hit with. These terrorists and so, it seems, like the concern from the US industry the the US factories that could be affected by it, isn't a kind of reaching that same level with. The president who still you kind of has his priority it, seems like wanting to get leverage in some of these negotiations with Europe and he's also cited these car tariffs as leverage in the negotiations that are, going on with Mexico and Canada over. A new more North American Free trade agreement over a new NAFTA the Wall Street Journal headline the auto industry pushing the White House to back off on tariffs the. Reporting, Josh zoom, Brune here, in Washington thank you for being with us thanks so much for having me and here's. More with the president, at the White House I have just returned from a very historic up to, Europe where we've made incredible progress toward achieving greater peace security and prosperity for America for allies and in fact for the. Entire world the meetings with NATO the United Kingdom and with, Russia a tremendous success and I think you'll see that play out over a pair of years frankly tremendous success at home our economy is thriving and booming like. I would say never before people are looking and they're trying to find Times. And there's never been a time, like this we've created, more than three point six million jobs since the election We are. In the longest positive job growth straight in. History and the history of our country for at least on record Unemployment has fallen for every demographic group every. Single African American unemployment has reached his lowest levels by far President Trump. Earlier today at the White House in Great Britain today. It was, the ten days ago where British Foreign Secretary had resigned his cabinet position today in the house of Commons Boris Johnson said it's not too late to. Save Brexit is he accused Prime Minister Theresa may have in his words dithering over the UK's strategy for leaving the EU We have time in these negotiations we have changed. Tack once, and we can change again the problem..

White House president United States Josh zoom Brune Europe Wall Street Journal Toyota senior vice president Toyota Sienna Trump Boris Johnson NATO Josh zoom Great Britain European Union Secretary United Kingdom UK Brexit
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Product i should be prepared for higher prices there's a good chance that they would put that on the list but again there going to build a list of two hundred billion in projects there's about four hundred billion in products out there so they could choose because i phones you're such a highly visible product they could try to find the other product so no i mean i wouldn't say it's a guarantee that your iphone is gonna get hit what i would say is a guarantee is something you buy you buy it from china you might not realize it but you buy from china whether it's your iphone whether or not it's batteries whether it's clothing a lot of electronics televisions i mean there's a huge amount of stuff that we we buy extensively from china and some of that stuff is sure to be hit if they move forward with this josh is it likely that consumers will absorb all the costs of the terrorists in the form of higher prices or we'll retailers eat at least part of the cost retailers will probably some part of the cost but they don't need to eat very much of it you know it's it's generally been pretty easy for retailers to pass long the costs we we actually have a example of this because back in january they did put tariffs on washing machines i was actually one the first tariffs at the trump administration actually put into place and since they've done that they put a twenty percent tariff on washing machines i think it was twenty percent and in the last three months of the price that consumers pay for washing machines jumped seventeen percent so almost the entirety of that tariff his been paid by consumers you know people don't buy washing machines very often so you don't it's not something you go by every other month so it's not something a lot of people are really aware of but the evidence is pretty strong that it's been consumers that have paid almost the entirety of that tariff there has to be a process that the trade rep undertake before the tariffs go into effect so how long would it take before tariffs are actually applied well the process involves several steps you know they have to identify their preliminary list of products and then they hold a public hearing where companies can come testify and you know they could say look there's only one factor in the world that makes this product if you put a tariff on this it's gonna cause big problems the process in the past has taken about three months and it probably can't go much faster than that we would probably be looking for these tariffs to hit you know in the early fog possibly september if they if they continue to move ahead with the process wall street journal reporter josh zoom brune joining us from washington thanks josh thanks so much for having me and that's what's news this is charlie turner from the wall street journal enjoy the what's news podcast then try the what's news newsletter sign up at w s j dot com slash newsletters that's wsj dot com slash newsletters.

twenty percent three months seventeen percent
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Serena williams has withdrawn from tennis's french open due to a muscle injury that caused her pain during her serves this was williams first grand slam tournament since the australian open twenty seventeen she was scheduled to play maria sharapova in the quarterfinals and opponent she beaten nineteen times in her career losing to her just twice and apple is holding its annual worldwide developers conference this week for live updates from the conference including takeaways from the twenty eighteen keynote head to our website w s jane dot com or the w s j app up next how trade tensions could impact the g seven summit this is what's news from the wall street journal this podcast is sponsored by intel not that you would push your computer to new limits but you could with the eighth gen intel core processor with intel obtain memory and when i say push i'm not just talking about open photoshop i'm talking about opening photoshop and illustrator and every application on your computer at the same time just for fun new computers powered by the eighth gen intel core processor with intel opting memory are now faster and more responsive which means you can open load and launch like never before learn more at intel dot com slash you could thanks for listening trade tensions are high heading into the g seven summit later this week with the us alienating major allies over steel and aluminum tariffs on top of that the us and china are still trading threats on trade policy all that is keeping fears of a trade war high joining us now from washington is wall street journal reporter josh zoom brune josh let's start with that statement over the weekend six nations canada france germany italy japan and the uk banded together to express quote unanimous concern and disappointment how unusual is that you know as far as we can tell it's almost entirely unprecedented the g seven is a group of america's closest allies e you know consists of canada italy france germany the united kingdom japan and that you're in the european union also participates i mean these are.

america canada italy france uk germany france canada josh reporter european union Serena williams japan washington china us intel wall street journal apple maria sharapova
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"What's news from the wall street journal top stories and timely insights i'm anne marie for totally in new york trade tensions remain high as we look ahead to the g seven summit later this week the wall street journal's josh zoom brune joins us with the latest in just a moment i these news headlines president trump says legally he has the quote absolute right to pardon himself in a tweet he added but why would i do that when i have done nothing wrong the tweet referred to an investigation into alleged collusion with russia on sunday the president's lawyer former new york city mayor rudy giuliani asserted that the president could legally pardon himself the supreme court has ruled in favor of a christian baker who refused to make a cake for a same sex couple the court says the colorado baker didn't get a fair hearing before a state civil rights commission but the decision falls short of a ruling on whether or not religious merchants have a constitutional right to deny services to same sex couples the matter now returns to the lower courts microsoft is buying get hub a service used by developers to share and collaborate on code for seven point five billion dollars in stock it seen as a move that could help microsoft elevate its cloud computing business get hub was valued at two billion dollars just three years ago after managing to raise two hundred fifty million from venture capital firms including sequoia capital.

wall street journal anne marie trump russia president rudy giuliani colorado microsoft sequoia capital new york five billion dollars two billion dollars three years
"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"josh zoom brune" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with twohour appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinitycomservice this is tech news briefing from the wall street journal i'm tanya bustos reporting from the newsroom in new york so if you're looking for a job intact there are eight cities in particular that offer the best highwage tech jobs real quick they are seattle san francisco san jose austin rally washington baltimore and boston these tech hubs account for more than twenty seven percent of the listings for tech jobs in the us joining us now with more patching in from dc is the wall street journal's josh zoom brune welcome thanks so much for having me among the higherwage jobs ones that pay over 100 grand it's interesting ford of ten of these openings are in these particular eight cities is that striking you know in your piece that in theory these jobs can really be done anywhere what do we make of this major concentration yeah it striking for a couple reasons i mean the one is theoretically these tech jobs you could doom from anywhere right i mean why why couldn't you have somebody who's located in salt lake city why couldn't you have somebody who's who's located in a rural area do do this work but in practice what this research is finding is that the really high wage tech jobs not only are they are they more concentrated than medium tech jobs but they're getting more and more concentrated over.

wsj comcast windows wall street journal tanya bustos new york baltimore us salt lake city seattle san francisco san jose washington boston twenty seven percent twohour