19 Burst results for "Josh Zoom"

President Donald Trump announces 'phase one' trade deal with China

WSJ What's News

01:18 min | 1 year ago

President Donald Trump announces 'phase one' trade deal with China

"The US and China reached a partial trade on Friday president trump spoke to reporters in the Oval Office after meeting with Chinese Vice Premier Lu both realize for the beginning very important not only for giant only for the US but for the world our Josh Zoom Brune has more from Washington. It's really kind of incredible how far away we are from the sweeping deal that people thought was going to be possible in May it looks like they agreed on a very small number of things it looks like China's going to purchase more US agricultural products and it looks like the US is going to hold on off on a tariff increase that was set to take place in mid October and then what they've said is that they're going to continue working on this they're going to do several phases of D aw to get to their full Fang and this'll be phase one once they finished it they'll start working on a face to the US hasn't made a final decision on whether to impose tariffs set to take effect in December it also wasn't clear whether the administration would follow through on plans to grant licenses for American businesses to sell to Chinese telecommunications Ryan Hallway Trump's trade advisor Robert lighthizer said while way was being considered in a separate process. US stocks rallied on Friday on hopes the two countries would leave this week's talks in Washington with an agreement the S. and P. Five hundred broke a three-week losing streak

United States Ryan Hallway Trump Josh Zoom Brune China Washington Oval Office President Trump Robert Lighthizer Advisor Three-Week
"josh zoom" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"In the US negotiations are expected to resume on Monday the US Supreme Court begins its new term today and the court has some big cases on the docket focusing on issues including abortion gun rights and immigration on Tuesday the court will hear arguments case focusing on whether federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ people from discrimination in the workplace the president's verts to cancel the deferred action for childhood arrivals program or Daca will be in focus next month the Supreme Court has also agreed to rule on abortion restrictions in the state of Easy Anna and the court will take up gun rights in December and its first major second amendment case in a decade the US and China are gearing up for the latest round kind of trade talks in Washington this week and our Josh Zoom Rune says there's a new wildcard in the mix I think one thing that really complicates it's all of this is the kind of impeachment drama in Washington there's a big question I think over whether or not this weakens the president in the is of Chinese who view him as politically vulnerable or if this maybe makes the president you know more inclined to be tough on China to kind of show some of the things the administration is doing I guess what we'd say is that impeachment is a big wild card you know this is already extremely unpredictable these trade negotiations have been predictable from the very beginning people who've tried to guess which way it's going almost always gotten it wrong and I think this adds just another degree of unpredictability to it still there are some signs of Progress I think you can say that there's too positive signs that we're seeing one is that the high level negotiators are back at the table. I mean this is the first time since July that we've had high level negotiations is going to be the US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer Treasury Secretary and then China's top trade negotiators as well and this is a group that hasn't talked and I almost three months so that's a positive sign and the second positive sign is that China has started to buy more agricultural products in a in a meaningful way and we're starting to see some positive signs out of China they're really but buying soybeans they're buying pork again the US farm economy is really far away from I'm kind of recovered or back to health but this is kind of a step in the right direction that's The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune negotiators from the US and China Anna are set to meet in Washington on Thursday and Friday there's a slump in the IPO market investors were optimistic at the start of the year beginning with P interest Zoom Uber and lift all making their debuts the ride hailing companies have since seen declines live stock has fallen forty six percent and for stock has declined thirty four percent last week also brought bad news from a highly anticipated company planning to debut Shared Office Space Company we were pull the plug after the company came under scrutiny and it CEO step down according to a research note from Goldman Sachs IPO stock performance is at its worst.

US Supreme Court US China president Washington Josh Zoom Brune Easy Anna Daca Goldman Sachs IPO The Wall Street Journal Robert Lighthizer Representative CEO thirty four percent forty six percent three months
High-level trade talks between US and China resume

WSJ What's News

01:47 min | 1 year ago

High-level trade talks between US and China resume

"The US and China are gearing up for the latest round kind of trade talks in Washington this week and our Josh Zoom Rune says there's a new wildcard in the mix I think one thing that really complicates it's all of this is the kind of impeachment drama in Washington there's a big question I think over whether or not this weakens the president in the is of Chinese who view him as politically vulnerable or if this maybe makes the president you know more inclined to be tough on China to kind of show some of the things the administration is doing I guess what we'd say is that impeachment is a big wild card you know this is already extremely unpredictable these trade negotiations have been predictable from the very beginning people who've tried to guess which way it's going almost always gotten it wrong and I think this adds just another degree of unpredictability to it still there are some signs of Progress I think you can say that there's too positive signs that we're seeing one is that the high level negotiators are back at the table. I mean this is the first time since July that we've had high level negotiations is going to be the US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer Treasury Secretary and then China's top trade negotiators as well and this is a group that hasn't talked and I almost three months so that's a positive sign and the second positive sign is that China has started to buy more agricultural products in a in a meaningful way and we're starting to see some positive signs out of China they're really but buying soybeans they're buying pork again the US farm economy is really far away from I'm kind of recovered or back to health but this is kind of a step in the right direction that's The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune negotiators from the US and China Anna are set to meet in Washington on Thursday and Friday

China United States Washington Josh Zoom Brune President Trump The Wall Street Journal Robert Lighthizer Representative Three Months
"josh zoom" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Stumbles over the past year of the no surprise to the world's purchasing managers and the people closely following the economic indexes that are produced from their views Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin says global purchasing managers indexes or PM is have come forth as a leading barometer of the health of the world's major manufacturing sectors. Josh set this up a really interesting economic index is produced all over the world. You know, it's it started in the United States. It's been produced in the United States for over thirty years. And what these indexes do is they talk to purchasing managers, but you're really interesting people in a lot of companies, the people that are in charge of ordering supplies companies apply managers purchasing managers procurement officers, and they just asked him whether or not their orders. Your prices are up. And all these very simple question and put that together to track. How the economy is going and end up being such interesting window into the economy. You know, you think about a CEO, and they're sitting there thinking about strategy and thinking about share price new things about investors about how to manage your company and all these things. Manager. And you know, this is the guy who imagine you're in a pencil company. This is the guy who only thing he's thinking about is how much would do I need to order how much how much a graphite. Do. I need to order laser focused on getting the supplies for the company, right? That ends up being a really interesting window into trends and economy are changing part is there data from purchasing managers more relevant today than ever. That's right. Advantage of this approach. One is think about a lot of economic data like the jobs report. Right. That's kind of a big one every month in the US. Is we talk about the jobs you put, but that's only US data. No one ever kind of there's no system in place to do that same number all around the world. This is too complicated. Too expensive other countries have their own little message. You know, there's no there's no strict comparability there. But you think about these purchasing managers index one of the things that still unique is performed in almost all the major economies. You know, no matter what the structure of your economy is. And no matter what industry Dr you have these purchasing managers. Didn't know what's going on. Indexes in Iraq. You know, think about how impossible it would be to put together a traditional jobs in the country like that. But it's fairly feasible to find the biggest company managers. What's going on? Did you see these indexes all over the world? They provide a fascinating window into what's happening in the global economy. Speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh zoom, Renae covers economics, and he's written a piece entitled to gauge the health of the global economy, look to purchasing managers are sort of these guys and gals been saying, well, the message lately has been one of quite a bit of concern, you know, in the last three months of this year, four months of this year. Everyone woke up to the fact that the global economy is really kinda weak by quite a few different measures, the the global trade just slowing down the stock market really because of this in the in the fall, but purchasing managers index is who'd been showing signs of concern for the entire year. These indexes really started going down in January. And so there's a lot of evidence that this wasn't going to be as strong of a year as twenty seventeen had been for the global economy. Eighteen wasn't going to be its strongest twenty seventeen. So do. They look how far how much foreign advanced do. They look. Well, they cover the month. They they covered the months. You know, the January survey will come out at the very first day of February. So come down almost in real time. But it, but it covers almost real time. What's happening in the month of in the month that the report happened? So the the general consensus right now for twenty nine to perhaps twenty twenty would be what Josh well, the general consensus is that things are a little soft heading into the new year. You know, it's it's only January and things could go any different direction, but the consensus so far from these reports that things are just looking at little soft at the start of the year, and how much do they weigh like geopolitical factors like you reference? You know, the the pencil maker before does he consider trade with China or perhaps some military conflict and elsewhere in the world. Well, the great thing about these indexes didn't way these guys have to they have to shut all that out. So that might be the reason that things are changing, but these purchasing managers, they're not the guy who thinks about what the invitations or the China trade war. This is the guy that says, I don't need to order as much would this month. And you put all that together. And you say, oh, there's less demand for word. This is something's going on in the economy. You know, they don't know that they are asked him about the reasons why they asked him how much demand they're seeing. And that's why it ended up being such a great barometer is Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin twenty minutes now in front of.

Josh zoom United States reporter Josh Wall Street Journal Brin Josh Wall Street Journal China CEO Iraq Renae twenty minutes thirty years three months four months
"josh zoom" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"So you can think of that as raising about twenty billion dollars. That's about the cost of the tariff at their imposing, and the thing they said at the time was that they were going to raise that tariff to twenty five percent. They were originally going to do that in January. But it's part of this truce they agreed to postpone it until March. So if they do it it would go from ten to twenty five percent. So you can think of that as being like twenty billion dollars in tariff payments jumping all the way up to about fifty billion now in practice. It'll be a little bit different than that. Because rather than companies continuing to import things from China. They might search for suppliers in other parts of the world. So it could be a really big disruption to trade between the two countries. And then the course the flip side of it is that every time the US has imposed tariffs on China. China has responded by imposing tariffs on the United States. So it's been really balanced. It's been a really tit for tat back and forth. And I think we can expect if the US did go. Oh forward with these big tariffs. China would respond with really big tariffs as well. And you know, we've already been seeing economic effects from this. I mean, it's obviously been a concern for the stock market. The stock market has really not liked it when these tariffs have risen. It's started to affect global trade numbers. Pretty obviously, you're seeing the global trade has down. And you're seeing starting to kind of take a toll on economic growth. Global economic growth has been weaker and the US could be in first lowdown this year to it's already slowed a little bit from it's really fast pace early in two thousand eighteen and so there's a lot at stake here if these tests actually go up higher. All right. That's Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh zoom. Maroon joining us from Washington with the latest on trade talks between the US and China. Josh. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal..

China United States Wall Street Journal Josh zoom Anne Marie New York reporter Washington twenty billion dollars twenty five percent
"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Welcome back. This is Washington today for Thursday, January twenty fourth I'm Steve Scully. Thanks for being with us. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that President Trump is considering appointing the first female, president of the World Bank. This follows the unexpected announcement earlier this month the president Jim Yong Kim will be stepping down the current. Interim president Kristalina Gorgon was in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. She was asked about this story. What do you think of female leadership and gender equality when we mean step up we make better decisions and the world is a better place for all. So we mean. Stand-up become Bahir those comments from the interim president of the World Bank. And joining us on the phone is Josh zoom Brune, he is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. I who's on the shortlist who is the president considering for this position. Well, thanks so much for having me. There's a couple of the White House is kind of confirmed that they're that. They're looking seriously at a handful of candidates the list could still change. I'd I'd caution that you know, there's still a couple of weeks before they have to formally put a personnel, and it's very likely that do names could emerge. But right now the name that's kind of getting the most discussion is in renew. You used to be the CEO of Pepsi Cola. She's still the chairman of the board. There has really interesting veto, obviously experience running a big multinational corporation, she was born in India. So she seen as someone who can kind of represent maybe the developing world a little bit. And she'd be the first woman to have the job. So she didn't really intriguing candidate. The physician. Gordon, clear. This point. But the US does make this election. Correct. Well, here's what's interesting about it is the US historically made the selection and the rest of the world has gone along with it. But that's not written down anywhere. There's no guarantee that it'll happen that way and the US when we controls about sixteen percent about one sixth of the voting power at the World Bank. So theoretically, they could get outvoted. So there's a little bit of a diplomatic dance that has to happen here to convince the rest of the world to go along with the US candidate. And that's why it would be helpful. If the US went with with someone who's potentially a really strong candidate like in your new year. Why did Jim Yong Kim step down? Well, he he he'd been in the job for a little over six years, which is which is a pretty long time. It was it was one complete term, and then a few years and his second term, and he had the opportunity to go. You know, the reason they cited is he had the opportunity to go work for a fund it does infrastructure investments. And so it was kind of an opportunity to do similar work to the World Bank. But in a private sector capacity, and he was you know, apparently ready t t to make that jump. So he stepped down a few years earlier than he needed to. We're talking with Josh zoom Bruin. He is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. Let me ask you about the World Bank as an organization, essentially, what does it do? Well, the World Bank is a really interesting institution. It's it's owned by almost all of the countries in the world has kind of shares that they've purchased in the World Bank and the World Bank kind of takes that capital that it got from all the countries around the world hundred and eighty nine countries and makes development loans for the most. Part. So it provides financing for kind of poorer countries that went to build bridges airports or highways, or you know, it works on environmental projects that works on it does it's been doing a lot in recent years on kind of helping deal with countries where they have huge inflows of refugees coming from war torn, you know, refugees from Syria coming across the border into other countries in the Middle East, kind of helping countries cope with that flight of refugees. So does a lot of really interesting work all around all around the world on development projects. It's a really interesting and and pretty in pretty large institution. Without explanation. A reminder your work available at wsJcom. Thank you for being with us. Thanks so much for having me. A mixed day..

World Bank US The Wall Street Journal president Josh zoom Brune Jim Yong Kim interim president chairman Steve Scully Washington Kristalina Gorgon Davos Switzerland White House Trump Pepsi Cola India CEO Gordon
"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And welcome back. This is Washington today for Thursday, January twenty four I'm Steve Scully. Thanks for being with us. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that President Trump is considering appointing the first female, president the World Bank. This follows the unexpected announcement earlier this month the president Jim Yong Kim will be stepping down the current. Interim president Kristalina gorgets was in Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. She was asked about this story. What do you think of female leadership and gender equality when we mean step up we make better decisions and the world is a better place for all. So we mean stand up become Bahir those comments from the interim president of the World Bank. And joining us on the phone is Josh zoom Brune, he is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. I who's on the shortlist who is the president considering for this position. Well, thanks so much for having me. There's a couple of the White House is kind of confirmed that they're that. They're looking seriously at handful of candidates the list could still change. I'd I'd caution that you know, there's still a couple of weeks before the formerly personnel. And it's very likely that do names could emerge. Right now, the name that's kind of getting the most discussion is New Year's used to be the CEO of Pepsi Cola. She's still the chairman of the board there as really interesting, obviously experience running a big multinational corporation, she was born in India. So she's seen as someone who can kind of represent maybe the developing world a little bit. And she'd be the first woman to ever the job. So she didn't really intriguing candidate. Position. Clear at this point. But the US does make this election, correct? Well, here's what's interesting about it is the US has historically made the selection and the rest of the world has gone along with it. But that's not written down anywhere. There's no guarantee that it'll happen that way and the US only controls about sixteen percent about one sixth of the voting power at the World Bank. So theoretically, they could get outvoted. So there's a little bit of a diplomatic dance that has to happen here to convince the rest of the world to go along with the US candidate. And that's why it would be helpful. If the US went with with someone who's potentially a really strong candidate like in your new year. Why did Jim Yong Kim step down? Well, he he he'd been in the job for a little over six years, which is which is a pretty long time. It was it was one complete term, and then a few years and his second term, and he had the opportunity to go. You know, the reason they cited as he had the opportunity to go work for a fund that it does infrastructure investments. And so it was kind of an opportunity to do similar work to the World Bank. But in a private sector capacity, and he was you know, apparently ready t to make that jump. So he stepped down a few years earlier, they need you to we're talking with Josh zoom Bruni is following the story for the Wall Street Journal. Let me ask you about the World Bank as an organization, essentially, what does it do? Well, the World Bank is a really interesting institution. It's it's owned by almost all of the countries in the world has kind of shares that they've purchased in the World Bank and the World Bank kind of takes that capital that it got from all the countries around the world hundred and eighty nine countries and makes development loans. For the most part. So it provides financing for kind of poorer countries that went to build bridges reports or highways or you know, it works on environmental projects that works on it does it's been doing a lot in recent years on kind of helping deal with countries where they have huge inflows of refugees coming from war torn, you know, refugees from Syria coming across the border into other countries in the Middle East, kind of helping countries cope with that side of refugees. So it does a lot of really interesting work all around all around the world on development projects. It's a really interesting and and pretty pretty large institution without explanation. A reminder your work available at wsJcom. Thank you for being with us. Thanks so much for having me. A mixed day. On Wall.

World Bank US president The Wall Street Journal Jim Yong Kim interim president Josh zoom Brune chairman Steve Scully Washington Kristalina gorgets White House Trump Bahir Switzerland Pepsi Cola India Syria
"josh zoom" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The gig economy now say their estimates of its impact were too high skewed by spotty data and the recession of a decade ago. Alan Krueger of Princeton and Lawrence Katz of Harvard sifted through new evidence to explain how in two thousand fifteen survey. They overestimated how people cobbling together living from odd jobs, especially through apps like Uber would up end traditional work arrangements more from Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? Josh what happened in the middle of the decade? You know, twenty fourteen twenty fifty will the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll I'll summarize in layman's terms, you turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean. The lot of the people that turned to the gig economy. They just kind of did it as a temporarily at a temporary stopgap were they'd hit a little bit of hard times until they you know, they tried something out to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job. It's it's not the case in employers. Don't want to have employees anymore. That was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just use apt to temporarily stock up its workforce that wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit because of how weak the economy was what about the lack of benefits. The I mean that would that's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans, you know, were one worried about transition to the gig economy, and to why there was so much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs wants to have the opportunity to do it. You know in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks when you have the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very active people. And so, you know, it makes sense that people wouldn't want to labor market can necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if you weaken year, they could do it on the weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be real challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh whilst. Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of.

Josh zoom Brin reporter Wall Street Journal Alan Krueger Street Journal economics Harvard Lawrence Katz Princeton Syria two three years twenty minutes
"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Apparent over the past couple of years? Two three four years is that this story was really overblown. And in fact, the US labor market hasn't changed nearly as much as people feared. So where did the studies miss? There's two things one is that the. What is it? The economy was really quite weak in twenty you know, the LeBron Michael is really quite weak in the early part of this decade. And so a large number of the people who were doing gigs. We're actually doing it just because the economy was with temporarily week they weren't doing it because the nature of people with work vino was fundamentally changing it's just that when the economy's bad when people lose their jobs, or when they're not seeing the income growth that they want and need they're more likely to turn to alternative stuff. And then the economy gradually improved. They turn away from it. So, you know, I m- one reason this looked so overblown is because people didn't realize the extent to which it was a cyclical phenomenon that when the economy is really bad. It's natural that people turned to gigs. It's not a fundamental change in the US labor force. It's gonna continue after the economy kinda heels, and you know, now, you look at the labor market, and it's it's much healthier. And when you look at kind of the majors of the gig economy. Looks like they're much smaller as a result. Okay. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin has pieces called how estimates of the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll summarize in layman's terms, you turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, the a lot of the people that turned to the gig. They just kind of did it as a temporarily at a temporary stopgap, they were they'd hit a little bit hard times until they you know, they tried something out to to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen is, you know, over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job it. It's not the case in employers. Don't wanna have employees anymore. That was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just use app to temporarily stop its workforce. That wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit. Because of how the economy was what about the the lack of benefits the I mean that would that's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans were one worried about a transition to the gig economy, and you know, to why there was much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs once they had the opportunity to do it, you know, in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks. When you have, you know, the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very attractive to people. And so, you know, it makes sense that people wouldn't want the labor market to necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if you weaken year, they could do on busy weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be. Challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

Wall Street Journal Josh zoom US Brin reporter vino LeBron Michael Syria Two three four years two three years twenty minutes
"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Staples, two leading experts on the gig economy now say their estimates of its impact were too high skewed by spotty data and the recession of a decade ago. Alan Krueger of Princeton and Lawrence Katz of Harvard sifted through new evidence to explain how in two thousand fifteen survey. They overestimated how people cobbling together a living from odd jobs, especially through apps like Uber would up end traditional work arrangements more from Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? Josh what happened in the middle of the decade? You know, twenty fourteen twenty fifteen twenty sixteen there was this kind of obsession with the way the US labor market. It's changing in in the term that everybody uses to describe this with the gig economy. It was fear that everyone was eventually going into kind of drift away from having a traditional employer and a steady paycheck, and instead was going to cobble together a living from working odd jobs. You know, working Uber in the morning and doing cast grab it projects and driving for delivery services and buying groceries. That, you know, there was a fear that he huge share of the US labor market was going to be kind of pulled into these activities. And in fact, there were a number of studies suggested a huge share the labor market already was in these types of arrangements. I, you know, I think one study came out suggesting that it many as thirty or forty percent of US workers, you know, essentially already were cobbling together work from a wide range of gigs. And what's become apparent over the past couple of years? Two three four years is that this story was really overblown. In fact, the US labor market. And changing nearly as much as people feared. So where did the studies miss? There's two things one is that the. One. Is it the economy was really quite weak in twenty, you know, the labor market was really quite weak in the early part of this decade. And so a large number of the people who were doing gigs. We're actually doing it just because the economy was with temporarily week they weren't doing it because the nature of people with work was fundamentally changing. It's just that when the economy's bad when people lose their jobs, or when they're not seeing the income growth that they want and need they're more likely to turn to turn it and stuff and then as the economy gradually improved they turn away from it. So, you know, I it m- one reason this looked so overblown is because people didn't realize the extent to which it was a cyclical phenomenon that when the economy is really bad. It's natural that people turn to gigs. It's not a fundamental change in the US labor force. It's gonna continue after the economy kinda heels. And you know, now you look at the labor market, and it's it's much healthier. And when you look at kind of the measures of the gig economy, it looks. They're much smaller as a result. Okay. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin. His piece is called how estimates of the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll summarize in layman's terms, you turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, the a lot of the people that turned to the gig economy. They just kind of did it as a temporarily a temporary stopgap they were they'd hit a little bit of hard times. And so they, you know, they tried something out to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job it. It's not the case implores don't want to have employees anymore. That was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just use app to temporarily stock up its work that wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit. Because of how the economy was what about the lack of benefits the I mean that would that's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans, you know, were one worried about a transition to the gig economy, and you know, to why there was so much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs once they had the opportunity to do it, you know, in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks. When you have, you know, the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very attractive to people. And so, you know. It makes sense that people wouldn't want the labor market to necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if we can year they could do it on busy weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be real challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

Josh zoom US Wall Street Journal Brin reporter Alan Krueger Harvard Staples Princeton Lawrence Katz Syria Two three four years two three years twenty minutes forty percent
"josh zoom" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Staples, two leading experts on the gig economy now say their estimates of its impact were too high skewed by spotty data and the recession of a decade ago. Alan Krueger of Princeton and Lawrence Katz of Harvard sifted through new evidence to explain how in two thousand fifteen survey. They overestimated how people cobbling together a living from odd jobs, especially through apps like Uber would up traditional work arrangements more from Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? Josh what happened in the middle of the decade? You know, twenty fourteen twenty fifty will the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll I'll summarize in blaming terms. You turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're. Desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, the lot of the people that turned to the gig economy. They just kind of did it as a temporarily at a temporary stopgap they'd hit a little bit of hard times. And so they, you know, they tried something out to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job. It's it's not the case in employers. Don't want to have employees any more that was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just us to temporarily stock up its workforce wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit. Because of how the economy was what about the lack of benefits the I mean that was. Yeah. That's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans, you know, were one worried about transition to the gig economy, and to why there was so much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs wants to have the opportunity to do it. You know in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks. When you have. You know, the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very attractive people. And so, you know, it makes sense that people wouldn't want to labor market necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if you can year they could do it on busy weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be real challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of.

Josh zoom Wall Street Journal Brin reporter Alan Krueger Staples Harvard Lawrence Katz Princeton Syria two three years twenty minutes
"josh zoom" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on 600 WREC

"US steel producers, which prevailed in their push for the Trump administration to impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum have also proved equally effective and far more effective than any other industries that avoiding tariffs they don't want. It's a story from Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin. Josh what have you found what happened in the most recent round carrots is, you know, the United States has switched focus a little bit and his named at China and showed the way it works. You gotta understand the way. It works to understand the story is that the government publishes a list of all the stuff that we import from China. And it says, you know, we we to put tariffs on half of this list. Is there anything that? We shouldn't include that we shouldn't put tariffs on. And so the government puts this out for a request the US trade representative's office. It does it and industries can kind of write in and say don't put this on don't put that on. You know, we import that. And it. Turns out we went to look at what products had been taken off this list when the US government actually did this against China. They put two hundred billion dollars tariffs in place earlier this year just last month. And we looked at what industries were asking to get things taken off the list. It turns out that the mo- one of the most successful of all industries was the steel industry. So earlier in the year, they were asking for cares to protect them. Now, they're asking for tasks to be taken off the stuff that they want to bring into the country. And so they've really been successful at getting the government to, you know, work with them in both directions by adding cats to protect them, or whether it's taking away tariffs that they benefit that they benefit from their immobile. I don't know that dollar wise they've necessarily done the best. But it does seem like on a per request basis. The steel industry has done very, well and getting certain tariffs but struck out right? That's a key point. So they requested about one hundred thirty different products be removed from the list of items to receive care, and they. They got about half of their list accepted, which is much more successful than other industries. If you kind of look line by line. I mean, there's this whole system where we're different products have their own line. And they can be very specific, you know, they can be a specific medal like like a rare metal like molybdenum or they can be a specific piece of machinery steel industry. Astra Q items, I believe with the number to come off. And they got a half of them. Now, there's other industries that ask for a lot more items like the retail than the national retail federation I thousand items could be removed, and they only got you know, small handful. It's three percent or four percent or something like that taken off. But some of the items they got taken off we're pretty big ticket items. So one of these Campos is a lot of apple products. You know, this stuff that goes into apple watch. And some of the stuff that goes into iphones were taken off the list. And so that's only one or two items, but they're huge in volume appeared to somebody. These you know, compared to some of these things a steel industry requested molybdenum, it did a rare earth metal as an example there, you know, it's significant for the steel industry, but it's not anywhere near as as significant of an import something like an iphone. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? He's written a story entitled the steel industry gets what it wants on tariffs. So back to that initial point then why has the steel industry done? So well here, you know, I think the conclusion that a lot of people are kind of worried about is that there's an element of of favoritism in play that when the government gets so involved in policy like this where they're picking individual products individual industries to penalize or to protect it inevitably the case the government is picking winners and losers me. No, this is traditionally something that Republicans didn't like Republicans. Traditionally have not wanted to government to pick winners and losers. But obviously, this is a Republican administration carrying out this strategy. And so it's kind of introduced an interesting tension. A lot of the people who are kind of traditional Republicans on trade policy. I really unhappy with this really dramatic shift in what their party does on trade. And you know, the steel industry is one that the commerce secretary will barrages sharing involved in as an investor before he came into the government head of the US trade representative's office. Robert lighthizer was a attorney representing the steel industry. They were one of his big clients who are very large number of years. And so there's a feeling that you know, because the government has gotten so involved in picking winners and losers on trade that the ties these people had to this industry have have made them a little bit more sympathetic to their requests. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's. First.

government Josh zoom United States Wall Street Journal Brin reporter China representative apple America Robert lighthizer Campos attorney two hundred billion dollars twenty minutes three percent four percent
"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Become an increasingly large driver of global deficits accounting for forty three percent of all global deficits last year up from thirty nine percent in two thousand. Sixteen that's according to the International Monetary Fund's annual assessment of the state of global imbalances don't roll your eyes just yet the US remained by far the. Largest driver of? Global current account imbalances? In two thousand seventeen, running the, world's, largest, deficit, what's, that mean and what's, it, matter here's Wall Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom Brin Josh explain what's up well. Yeah the IMF every year takes a look at the trade imbalances all around the world the countries that have the biggest trade surpluses the countries that have the biggest trade deficit and what's been happening over time. Is that a number of countries have kind of gotten these deficits or surpluses into check. But one of the ones that happened has been the United. States in two, thousand seventeen the United States was by far the big Contributor to to. Kind of imbalance in the global trading system And it's and it's been of course the United States has had big. Trade deficit for a long. Time and wanted to take away they've been getting even bigger and last year the United States is about, the United States alone was responsible for about forty three percent getting. Close to, half of all the trade deficits in the world that means we'd. We import way more than others or more than we export it means the United States. Imports way more than it exports and it does. Soda scale it's really just unmatched anywhere else in the world I mean Would it be the. Next biggest country deny kingdom only had about one quarter decided? To. Canada's the, third-biggest something like one eight the size of the US of course they are, smaller countries which, is part of it but when you think about the sheer dollar volume they nobody in the world is. Creating sort of imbalance that the United States with the way it imports so much more than it experts, speaking, with Wall Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom, Brin and he's written a piece entitled US increasingly large driver of global trade deficits at least according to. The International Monetary Fund so. Is this what President Trump is trying to to address yeah I mean this is very much one of, the things that President Trump has talked about and you know to. Be clear like this is a trend that has gotten worse and worse for. A number of years so I'm not saying the map is not saying that President Donald. Trump caused a situation and then on yeah on. The contra This is something that the president has talked about quite a bit I, mean he has justified some trade actions by saying that their goal is to kind of bring down the deficits now there's a, lot of skepticism in whether. That approach will work because one of the things that dried. It seems to drive the large trade deficit from, the US and in fact that the government has been running such enormous fiscal deficit and that's actually something that the White House is kind of taken steps to make, a little, bit worse, the, White House is you really kind of increase the amount of spending reduce the, amount of revenue heading towards trillion dollar deficits. Every single year by their forecasts one of the only way? That. Country can, run at of government deficits that large is by importing more than they export, the country can't, the country can't provide all the fuel for what they wanna do they have to reach out to other. Countries for it and so there's an expectation that although the president has tried to target trade deficits with, his, trade policy's scope There are pushing in another direction it's not very clear whether or not the strategy is going to be successful How. About, Germany and Japan which both operate at a surplus the other way right with lots of exports that's right now Germany and, Japan RTD two biggest country so they they. Don't have surpluses that are anywhere, as big as the US deficit but, they are the two really big ones now the with Japan in particular there's. Kind of a rationale to it which is a very old. Country and it kinda needs to save up now so it's kind of related population can can get, through retirement so even though Japan has a very large kind of thought to be a good reason for it but Germany's especially extreme and we know that's. Gonna be a big focus actually this week because, President Trump even, meeting with the head of the. European Union he's meeting with him here in, Washington on Wednesday and you know. It's gonna be a big focus the fact that didn't Germany in the year European Union I wanted to places to still have a very big inbound not as big as. The US very big amount Josh Wall Street Journal, economics reporter Josh, zoom Brin fourteen minutes now after. The hour on This Morning America's first news.

United States president Brin Josh Wall Street Journal International Monetary Fund Trump reporter Germany President Donald Josh zoom European Union Canada Japan White House Japan RTD America Washington forty three percent thirty nine percent fourteen minutes
"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The US has become an increasingly large. Driver of global deficits accounting for forty three percent of all global deficits last year up from thirty nine percent in two thousand sixteen that's according to the. International Monetary Fund's? Annual assessment of the? State of global imbalances, don't roll, your, eyes, just, yet, the US remained by, far, the largest driver of global current account imbalances in two thousand seventeen running the world's. Largest deficit what's that mean and what's it matter here's Wall Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom Brin Josh explain what's up well yeah the IMF every year takes a look at the trade imbalances all around the world the that have the biggest trade surpluses the countries that have the biggest trade deficit and what's been happening over time. Is that a, number of countries have kind of gotten these deficits are But one of the ones that haven't been the United States and in two thousand seventeen. The United States? Was by far the? Biggest contributor to to, kind of, imbalance, in, the, global, trading system and it's, and, it's been in the United States has had big trade deficit for a long time. And you know still wanted to take away they've been getting even bigger and last year the United States is about states alone was responsible for about forty three percent they're getting close? To All the trade. Deficits in the world That means we import way more. Than others or more than we export it means the United States imports way. More than it exports, and it does so at a scale it's really. Just unmatched, anywhere else in the. World I mean the next biggest country the United Kingdom only had about one quarter decided to the deficit is the US Canada, is the third-biggest something like. One eight the size of the US and of course they are. Smaller countries which is part of it but when you, just think about the sheer dollar, volume they nobody in the world news creating sort of in Dallas denied skates is with the way it imports so much more than, it experts, speaking with, Wall, Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom Brin and he's written a piece entitled US increasingly large driver of global trade deficits at. Least according to the International Monetary Fund so is this what? President. Trump is, trying to to address yeah I mean this is very much on and the things that President Trump is Talked about and you know to be clear like this is a. Trend that has gotten kinda worse and worse for a number of years so I'm not saying. The I'm is not saying that President Donald Trump caused a situation and then. Yeah on the contrary, this is something that the president has talked about. Quite a, bit I mean he. Has justified some of his trade actions by saying that their goal is to kind of bring down these deficits and there's a, lot of skepticism in whether. That approach will work because one of the things that dried it. Seems to drive the large trade deficit from the US, is in fact that the government, has been running such enormous fiscal deficit and that's actually something that the White House has taken steps to make a little bit worse, the White, House really, kind, of increase the amount of spending reduce the amount of revenue heading towards trillion dollar deficits every single year by their forecasts. One of the only ways the country can run kind of? Government. Deficits that, large is by importing more than they export you know the country Can't the country can't provide all the fuel for what they. Wanna do they have to reach out to other countries for it and so there's an expectation that although the president has tried to target trade deficits. With his trade policies his Co. policies are pushing in another direction it's not very clear whether or not the strategy is. Going to be successful How about Germany and Japan, which both operate at a surplus the other way right with lots of exports that's. Right now Germany and Japan Ardita two biggest surprise countries so they. Don't they don't have surpluses that are anywhere as big as the US deficit but they are, the two really big ones now the you know with Japan in particular there's kind of a rationale to it which is a very old country and it kind of needs to save up now so. That kind of, so that its population can can get retirement. So even though Japan had very. Like kind of thought to be a good reason for it but. Germany's especially extreme and we know that's going to be. A big focus actually this week because President Trump meeting with the head of the European Union meeting with, him here in Washington on Wednesday and you. Know it's gonna be a big focus to act it did Germany in the European Union the I wanna dis places is still very big imbalance not as big as the US but very big amount Josh Wall Street Journal economics. Reporter Josh zoom Brin fourteen minutes now after the hour on. This Morning America's first news.

United States President President Donald Trump International Monetary Fund Josh zoom Brin reporter Germany Wall Street Journal Brin Josh Japan Josh zoom United Kingdom European Union government Japan Ardita America Street Journal White House Dallas Canada
"josh zoom" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The world I mean the next biggest country, denied kingdom only had about one quarter decided the deficit. Is the US Canada is the third-biggest it's something like one eight decides of the. Smaller countries which is part of it but when you, just think about the sheer dollar volume they nobody in the world news creating this sort of imbalanced at the United States is with the way it imports so much more, than experts, speaking with Wall, Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom Brin and he's written a piece entitled US, increasingly large driver of global trade deficits at. Least according to the International Monetary Fund so is this what? President. Trump is, trying to to address yeah I mean this is very much one of the things that President Trump is Talked about and you know to be clear like this, is a, trend that, has, gotten kinda worse and worse for a number of years so I'm not saying, the map is not saying that President Donald. Trump caused a situation and then yeah on the contrary this? Is. Something that, the president has talked about quite a bit I mean he has Justified some of his trade actions by saying that their goal is to kind of bring down these. Deficits now there's, a lot of skepticism in whether that approach will work because one of the things that dried it seems to drive the large trade. Deficit from the US is in fact that the government has been running such enormous fiscal deficit and that's actually something that. The White House is kind of taken steps to make a little bit. Worse the White House you really kind of. Increased amount of spending reduce the amount of revenue heading towards trillion dollar deficits every single year by their forecasts one, of the only, ways that country can run government deficits that large is by importing more than they export to country can the. Country can't provide all the fuel for what they wanna do they have to reach out countries for it, and so there's, an expectation that although the president has tried to target trade deficit. With his, trade policies Fiscal policies. Are pushing in another direction it's not very clear whether or not the strategy is going to be successful How, about Germany and. Japan which both operate at. A surplus the other way Ray with lots of exports that's right, now Germany and Japan Ardy two biggest surprise. Countries, they don't, have surpluses that are, anywhere as big the US deficit but, they are the two really big ones now you know with Japan in particular. There's kind of a rationale to it which is a. Very old country and it kind of needs to save up now to kind of population can can get, through retirement, so even though Japan has a very large plus kind of thought to be a good reason for it but Germany especially extreme and we know. That's going to be a big focus actually this, week because President, Trump meeting with the head of the. European Union he's meeting with him here in Washington on Wednesday and you know it's. Going to be a big focus the fact it didn't Germany in the year European Union the places to still have a very big imbalance not as big. As the US big amount thanks Josh Wall Street, Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin fourteen minutes now after. The hour on This Morning.

President Trump US President Josh zoom Brin Germany Japan White House President Donald reporter International Monetary Fund European Union Street Journal Japan Ardy Canada Washington Ray fourteen minutes trillion dollar one quarter
"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Dealers, it's include auto parts manufacturers all to get it either Groups that always agree with each other on. Everything but they all got together and urged? The president not to move forward with these with this kind of threat to put a twenty? Five percent tariff on any automobile or automobile part coming into the United. States we're, talking with Josh zoom Brune of the Wall Street Journal. And let's take a step back talk about that twenty. Five percent what does that mean for. The price of a car what parts are. We talking about and any reaction from the White House A would be, any part of the car that is brought in criminal their country and you know the, way the auto industry works in the United States is whether you're looking at you know no matter what brand. Of car you're looking at there's a lot of the. Components that car that, were built, in another country even if the final assembly is done here in the United States the supply, chain of these companies is international and the companies. You know yesterday the senior vice president of Toyota gave some, figures and you know he said that for some of the common brands of cars at Toyota produces the Cami I, believe you said it would be an eighteen hundred dollar cost increase from these tariffs for a Toyota Sienna you said it would be something more like three thousand so we're talking about you know increase in the. Thousands of dollars for kind of ordinary cars that would result, from these tariffs and you know. The figures are going to be. We don't have the exact figures for other models of? Cars but they're presumably going to be on a similar order of magnitude Talking about. Thousands of. Dollars more in the cost of every car in the country potentially which is as the alliance of, automobile manufacturers, puts it a domino effect with the price of. A car the dealers and manufacturers and the suppliers it'd be just a remarkable. Disruption to the industry and one final point because you're saying that, the auto industry is raising the alarm bells is the White House listening well you know just today President Trump was asked about. A meeting that, he's having next week with the European Union any kind of again trotted out the threat, of putting in these tariffs in place and said that you know if Europe doesn't agree to deals at the. US likes it that they're going to get hit with. These terrorists and so, it seems, like the concern from the US industry the the US factories that could be affected by it, isn't a kind of reaching that same level with. The president who still you kind of has his priority it, seems like wanting to get leverage in some of these negotiations with Europe and he's also cited these car tariffs as leverage in the negotiations that are, going on with Mexico and Canada over. A new more North American Free trade agreement over a new NAFTA the Wall Street Journal headline the auto industry pushing the White House to back off on tariffs the. Reporting, Josh zoom, Brune here, in Washington thank you for being with us thanks so much for having me and here's. More with the president, at the White House I have just returned from a very historic up to, Europe where we've made incredible progress toward achieving greater peace security and prosperity for America for allies and in fact for the. Entire world the meetings with NATO the United Kingdom and with, Russia a tremendous success and I think you'll see that play out over a pair of years frankly tremendous success at home our economy is thriving and booming like. I would say never before people are looking and they're trying to find Times. And there's never been a time, like this we've created, more than three point six million jobs since the election We are. In the longest positive job growth straight in. History and the history of our country for at least on record Unemployment has fallen for every demographic group every. Single African American unemployment has reached his lowest levels by far President Trump. Earlier today at the White House in Great Britain today. It was, the ten days ago where British Foreign Secretary had resigned his cabinet position today in the house of Commons Boris Johnson said it's not too late to. Save Brexit is he accused Prime Minister Theresa may have in his words dithering over the UK's strategy for leaving the EU We have time in these negotiations we have changed. Tack once, and we can change again the problem..

White House president United States Josh zoom Brune Europe Wall Street Journal Toyota senior vice president Toyota Sienna Trump Boris Johnson NATO Josh zoom Great Britain European Union Secretary United Kingdom UK Brexit
"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"The fallout from president trump's tariffs and china's counter tariffs which formerly went into effect on friday we'll have the greatest impact on the us counties that voted mr trump into office the us tariffs on china will initially hit about thirty four billion dollars of goods with plans in place to raise that total to fifty billion more on the fallout from wall street journal reporter josh zoom brin josh what have you found this looked at kind of county by county across the entire united states where are industries that are gonna get hit by the tariffs that china has just put into place in response to the tariffs that trump initiated and so we have kind of a map here that shows the kind of really detailed geography of how these character are hitting and what you see when you look at it the extent to which this trade war is really playing out in the american heartland i mean the places that are really going to take the economic kit from this are really going to be places the great plains where they produce so much of the crops that's us exports the industrial midwest where they kind of export you know a lot of cars and other machinery and then it's going to be kind of the energy states texas dakota in those states where the us has become a big oil producer kind of the regions that really stick out as being hit by and what does this mean politically if anything right now well it's hard to say i mean for one thing a lot of the places being hit are the places that were kind of the most in in donald trump's corner you know you're talking about places like the dakotas in nebraska and kansas went the president had a very solid majority i mean good most part beaver not state the kind of in danger of losing you know these are very safe republican states that are mostly being brunt of it so i if if someone is looking at fish and thinking thinking that maybe it means there's an opportunity for democrats that's probably not the right take away from this map okay so it's not like even necessarily he's getting a pass at this point this is just i think some i think some voters are properly getting a pass you certainly hear from some voters that they're willing to give you know they want they want the president to have a shot to try this strategy i mean certainly in places that you know were kind of very strong trump counties you're going to be more likely to hear that sentiment all right so if there's going to be pushed back i guess when does it begin well i mean we'll find out in november i mean that's when voters have the chance to let it be known if they're happier not you know voters really uh that's their opportunity is going to be the november elections that's when wall that's for sure we might see some things in polling but but really until people vote we're speaking with wall street journal reporter and he's written a piece entitled chinese tariffs hit trump counties harder what else do you think will take away from here i think i read one point since the economy is on decent footing it might take longer for some of these tariff impacts to hit yeah that's absolutely right i mean when this started the economy was really roaring i mean you know if you think about this if you think about this trade words something that's doing a little bit of damage to the economy but on the other hand economy that's been growing for nine years now has really got not feed tax cuts last year that are you know choosing some businesses that some consumers especially wealthy consumers there's a lot of strength in the economy right now from those factors and so you know that means just kind of an offset for this trade war staff and so right now if you look at your role economy is still looks pretty it's still looks pretty decent and so it's probably going to be a while before you start thinking about this trade war kind of key driver of what's going on in the economy so is there a belief then that some of these farmers are manufacturers feel that this let's call it a fight this fight with china's something that was needed because of fair practices and they're the administration that's certainly the case that the.

china us mr trump president thirty four billion dollars nine years
"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The fallout from president trump's tariffs and china's counter tariffs which formerly went into effect on friday we'll have the greatest impact on the us counties that voted mr trump into office the us tariffs on china will initially hit about thirty four billion dollars of goods with plans in place to raise that total to fifty billion more on the fallout from wall street journal reporter josh zoom brin josh what have you found this looked at kind of county by county across the entire united states where are industries that are gonna get hit by the tariffs that china has just put into place in response to the tariffs that trump initiated and so we have kind of a map here that shows the kind of really detailed geography of how these terrorists are hitting and what you see when you look at it this trade war is really playing out in the american heart i mean the places that are really going to take the economic kit from this are really going to be places the great plains where they produce you know so much of the crops that affect the industrial midwest where they kind of export you know a lot of cars and other machinery and then it'd be kind of the energy states texas dakota in those states the us has become a big oil producer regions that really stick out has been hit by and what does this mean politically if anything right now well it's hard to say i mean for one thing a lot of the places being hit are the places that were the most in in donald trump's corner you know you're talking about places like the dakotas in nebraska and kansas wake the president head of jerry solid majority i mean good moves part bs are not state the kind of in danger of losing you know these are very of republican states there must be run it so you know i if someone is looking at this and thinking oh maybe it means there's an opportunity for democrats that's probably not the right take away from this map okay so it's not like even necessarily he's getting a pass at this point this is just i think i think some i think some voters copy getting a pass you know you certainly hear from some voters that they're willing to give you know they want it they went to president to have a shot to try this strategy certainly in places that you know we're kind of very strong from counties you're going to be more likely to hear that sentiment all right so if there's going to be pushed back i guess when does it begin well i mean we'll find out in november voters have the chance to let it be known if they're happier not you know voters really that that's their opportunity is going to be the november election that's when wall that's for sure we might see some things in polling but really until people vote we're speaking with wall street journal reporter justice newborn he's written a piece entitled chinese tariffs hit trump counties harder what else do you think will take away from here i i think i read one point since the economy is on decent footing it might take longer for some of these tariff impacts to hit yeah that's absolutely right i mean when this started the economy was really roaring i mean you know so if you think about this if you think about this trade war something that's doing a little bit of image for the economy but on the other hand you happen to konami that's been growing for nine years now has really got feet tax cuts last year that are juicing some businesses that use some consumers especially wealthy consumers a lot of strength in the economy right now from those factors and so you know that means just kind of an offset for this trade war staff and so you know right now if you look at your role economy is still looks pretty it's still looks pretty decent and so it's probably going to be a while before you start thinking about this trade war the kind of key driver what's going on in the economy so is there a belief then that some of these farmers are manufacturers feel that this let's call it a fight this fight with china is something that was needed because of unfair practices and they're ministration that's certainly the case that the administration has been making i mean he know.

china us mr trump president thirty four billion dollars nine years
"josh zoom" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"josh zoom" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"A little early to really it could be a little early to really cow what the longrun back could it be and i mean that's ethically something that i think most professional economist could agree with to david they would say we can even longer view and they look you really need to step back and look at look for a look over the years and years for your able to a that he no kind of what a president thrill infected bad and so the day might kinda professional economist and women at derby make kind of agree that a little bit and to be giving credit one way or the other for for what we came to far did one thing that i think is bingeeating air you know i after the story ran i got some some questions from the reader and on twitter and up like that where they federal what about you know how much of it deep they asked me it about the stock market and nam kadena stockmarket up quite a bit from the election i have to say i don't think it's a very compelling explanation because we're really thing did split the develop gift in the past to come on the stock market had been on a care for for eight years i mean that's not a sixmonth nominate here and in factor and the stock market you know you should have been pretty happy about things that turned around really guy philippe by 2013 echoing stocks had already kinda double header almost tripled from their bottom at that point mieno 2014 2015 stock market kept setting new record 2016 kept hitting new records go i don't think that the idea that did the dhaka market explained paid i mean yet stock markets up to the election but the dock markets been up for years and years here and i think did you know the idea that maybe mineral became more doc than women are and i'll take it makes a lot of these josh wall street journal economics reporter josh zoom bring it is twenty minutes now after the hour on this.

derby twitter stock market philippe stock markets josh zoom david president dhaka reporter twenty minutes eight years sixmonth