17 Burst results for "Josh Wall Street Journal"

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Groups are pressing democratic presidential candidates to back proposals. For changing the supreme court, a move that could draw protests from voters who don't want to up end, the state institution pack the courts a recently formed group led by San Francisco state university. Professor Aaron Belkin is trying to pressure candidates to support an expansion of the high court's membership. So far, he's been unsuccessful. More from Wall Street Journal, political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. Josh what's up here? Borne out of frustration on the less with the way to superior court has made a turn for the right over the last three years. Five four Janice decision for the court set that public sector, please. Of being forced to pay visas unconstitutional in there. Also, they've been in three straight nominations fight the girl except a miracle and fight the courses fighting Cavanaugh fight working crap coming on the side. And so since that station on the left with that in. So they're groups that are pushing twenty candidates aback changing the fundamental makeup of the court. What about right now? I mean in theory, Senate Republicans would love that with nice they could probably easily nominate anybody they wanted if they decided to expand to eleven or fifteen. Progresses. Getting a credit event. Hacked the courts with. You know, and they point to, you know, a lot of polling that shows that they come down on the right side of issues with the public and therefore courts, it reflects public since it oughta range of issues from abortion to workers rights. So the goal here is to tactic fifty with the goal of making it in a more progressive ideology, if they get a democrat elected president at twenty twenty exactly and they wouldn't. Then they wouldn't feel so strongly about expanding. The course exactly Trump said that and we'll publicans of Republicans as well that this is a democrat who can't win at about box and therefore trying to change the rules to the court favor. Can't imagine this is an issue that's top of mind for voters as it. They're very interested in but in the credit candidates, so far have been hesitant in embracing everything from expanding the court to eleven fifteen people feeding term limits for justices or making them of here to some sort of ethical such faking tax returns public even things that the candidates have set open to the stuffing, but they haven't been quick to embrace them. Because they know they could be risky, and you know, the four at the are tried and it was one of the biggest setbacks that heat furious industry. Why risk being with Joshua Jamerson political reporter at the Wall Street Journal? His piece is called democratic candidates urged toback supreme court overhaul. So how much weight I guess are progressives going to push their candidates to embrace this versus say other issue. Question. I we're going to have to wait and see already. Promise to wait into primary with ads that would let voters know that candidate eight support saints court whereas other candidate will be on your ballot for the democratic nomination. So this could be an issue where progressive tried to to meet out candidates that they feel are liberal issue. But for so wage lay on the first, FOX sexy. Josh Wall Street Journal political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. It's twenty one.

Wall Street Journal Joshua Jamerson reporter Professor Aaron Belkin San Francisco Senate Josh Cavanaugh Janice FOX Trump president twenty twenty three years
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Are pressing democratic presidential candidates to back proposals. For changing the supreme court, a move that could draw protests from voters who don't want to up end, the state institution pack the courts a recently formed group led by San Francisco state university. Professor Aaron Belkin is trying to pressure candidates to support an expansion of the high court's membership. So far, he's been unsuccessful. More from Wall Street Journal, political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. Josh what's up here? Really borne out of frustration on the bus with the way to superior court has made sense for the right over the last three years and they point to such as five four, Janice. This is for the court said that public sets, please. Of being forced to pay pieces in. They're also they've been in three straight nominations, the garlic miracle inside the courses in that cabin working crap on the side. And so there's a stray shit on the left with that. And so they're these groups that are pushing twenty twenty candidates aback changing fun. I'm gonna make the court. What about right now? I mean in theory, Senate Republicans would love that with Mason's. They could probably easily nominate anybody they wanted if they decided to expand to eleven or fifteen. Well, the way that it would work in the mind progresses is that a critic of the boys hack the courts with progressive, and they point to, you know, a lot of polling that shows that they they come down on the right side of issues with the public, and therefore the court should reflect public sensit- oughta range of issues from abortion to workers rights. So the goal here is to pack the courts with the goal of making it in a more progressive ideology, if they get a democrat elected president at twenty twenty exactly and then they would then they wouldn't feel so strongly about expanding the fourth exactly in Pesident Trump to set that Republicans other publican that as well. This is Democrats who can't win at about box and therefore trying to change the rules too. The court favor. Get imagine this is an issue. That's top of mind for voters is it there. To very interested in the idea. But democrat candidates so far have been hesitant in invoicing. Somebody's proposals. Everything from expanding the court to eleven fifteen people creating term limits. The justices or making them and here to some sort of ethical guy. When such faking tax returns public even things that the candidate have set open to the specimen, but they haven't been quick to embrace them because they know they could be with and, you know, the four at the are tried and it was one of the biggest setbacks that he's just reach white. Receiving with Joshua Jamerson political reporter at the Wall Street Journal, his piece is called democratic candidates urged toback supreme court overhaul. So how much weight I guess are progressive going to push their candidates to embrace this versus say other issue. The question. I think we're gonna have to wait and see already at least one progress ochre promise to Wade into benefited five Mary with ads that would let voters know that candidate a support saints in court where the candidate will be on your ballot for the democratic nomination. So this could be an issue where you know, progressive tried to to meet out candidates that they feel are liberal and issue, but for so ways away from the first. Josh Wall Street Journal political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. It's twenty one minutes now in front.

Wall Street Journal Joshua Jamerson reporter Professor Aaron Belkin San Francisco Senate Josh Janice Pesident Trump Wade Mason president twenty twenty Mary twenty one minutes three years
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Are pressing democratic presidential candidates to back proposals. For changing the supreme court, a move that could draw protests from voters who don't want to up end, the state institution pack the courts the recently formed group led by San Francisco state university. Professor Aaron Belkin is trying to pressure candidates to support an expansion of the high court's membership. So far, he's been unsuccessful. More from Wall Street Journal, political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. Josh what's up here? Interpol was really born out of frustration. With the way to the court has made a time for the right over the last three years points such as five four Janus decision for the court said that public section please being forced to announce to tional in. Also, they've been in three straight nomination fight at garlic, Merrick garland, the courses fighting back have no working on the side. And so there's some frustration on the left with that. And so they're these groups that are pushing twenty twenty candidates. For changing before I'm gonna make the court. What about right now? I mean, in theory, Senate Republicans would love that would make sense they could probably easily nominate anybody they wanted if they decided to expand to eleven or fifteen. The way that it would work in the mind progresses that aquatic Floyd half the courts with aggressive, you know, and they point to, you know, a lot of polling that shows that they come down on the right side of issues with the public here for court should reflect public since auto range of issues from aversion to work. So I mean the goal here is to sickly with the goal of making it in a more ideology, if they get a democrat elected president in twenty twenty exactly and they wouldn't they wouldn't feel so strongly about expanding. Exactly in President Trump said that Republicans Republican that it's about this is in the cuts who can't win at about. And for trying to change the rules too. Favor. Can't imagine. This is an issue. That's top of mind for voters is it. To very interested in the idea of. But in the credit candidates so far have been having since in embracing somebody everything from expanding the court to eleven fifteen people feeding events justices or making them of accurate from sort of ethical guy when making attached to public even things that the candidates have said that they're open to the stuffing. But they haven't been quick to embrace them. Because they know they could be with you. And you know, the four at the are tried and it was one of the biggest setbacks experienced in reach. With Joshua Jamerson, political reporter at the Wall Street Journal. His piece is called democratic candidates urged toback supreme court overhaul. So how much weight I guess are progressive going to push their candidates to embrace this versus say other issue. That's the question. See already it needs pets promise to Wade into effect five Mary with ads that would let voters know that candidate a support saints court where other candidate would be on your ballot for the democratic nomination. So this Cokie an issue where progressive try to meet out candidates that they feel are liberal issue. But for so ways away on the first. Josh Wall Street Journal political reporter, Joshua Jamerson. It's twenty one minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Wall Street Journal Joshua Jamerson reporter Professor Aaron Belkin San Francisco president Merrick garland Interpol Josh Senate Janus Floyd America Wade Trump Mary twenty one minutes three years
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Stumbles over the past year have been no surprise to the world's purchasing managers and the people closely following the economic indexes that are produced from their views. Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Jeff zoom. Brin says global purchasing managers index is where PM is have come forth as a leading barometer of the health of the world's major manufacturing sectors. Josh set this up. A really interesting economic index is produced all over the world. You know, it's it started in the United States produced in the United States for over eighty years. And what these indexes do is they talked to purchasing managers, but you're really interesting people in a lot of companies, the people that are in charge of ordering supplies, the company apply managers purchasing managers procurement officers, and they get back them whether or not their orders prices. Prices are up and all these very simple question and put that together to track. How the economy is going to end up being such interesting window into the economy. Think about a CEO, and they're sitting there thinking about strategy thinking about share price new things about investors about how to manage company and all these things, and then you think about some manager. And you know, this is the guy who imagine you're a pencil company is the guy who only thing he's thinking about it. How much do I need to order? How much how much a graphite? Do. I need to order. Laser focused on getting the supplies should company. Right. And so that is a really interesting window into how trends Nikon. Amir changing part is their data from purchasing managers more relevant today than ever. That's right. This approach one is the think about a lot of economic data like the jobs report. Right. That's kind of a big one every month in the US. Is we talked about the jobs, you've only US data. No one ever kind of there's no system in place to do that same number all around the world. This is too complicated. Too expensive other countries have their own little message. You know, there's no there's no strict comparability, but purchasing managers index one of the things that so unique is performed in almost all the major Connie's. You know, no matter what the structure of your Konami is in no matter what industry Dr you have these purchasing managers. Didn't know what's going on. David is in Iraq. You know, think about how impossible it would be to put together a traditional jobs, according to country like that. But it's fairly feasible to find the biggest company managers. What's going on? Indexes all over the world. They provide a fascinating window into what's happening in the global economy. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Zumra. He covers economics, and he's written a piece entitled to gauge the health of the global economy look to purchasing managers of these guys and gals been saying, well, the message lately has been one of quite a bit of concern, you know, in the last three months of this year, four months of this year. Everyone woke up to the fact that the global economy is really kinda weak by quite a few different measures, the the global trade just slow down stock market, really wobble. Because of this in the fall, but he's purchasing managers indexes. She'd been showing signs of concern for the entire year index is really started going down in January. And so there's a lot of evidence that this wasn't going to be as strong of a year. It's twenty seventeen had been for the global economy. Twenty eighteen wasn't going to be a strongest trade seventeen. So. Do they look how far how much? I guess foreign advanced do they look, well, they cover the monks. They they cover the months. You know, the the January survey we'll come out at the very first day of February. So comes out almost real time. I mean, he doesn't want you to chair, but it, but it covers almost real time. What's happening in the month of in the month that the report happens, so the the general consensus right now for twenty nine hundred and perhaps twenty twenty would be what Josh well, the general consensus is that things are a little soft heading into the new year. You know, it's it's only January, and thanks you go any different direction, but the consensus so far from these reports things just looking a little soft at the start of the year, and how much do they weigh like geopolitical factors like you? You referenced the the pencil maker before does he consider trade with China or perhaps some military conflict and elsewhere in the world. The great thing about these index is way, these guys they have to shut all that out. So that might be the reason that things are changing, but the purchasing managers end up the guy who thinks about what's being the China trade war. This is the guy that says, I don't need to order as much would this month. And you put all that together. And you say, oh, there's less demand for this is something's going on in the economy. You know, they don't know that they don't ask them about the reasons why they act and how much demand they're seeing that quite into a great barometer is Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin twenty minutes.

reporter United States Wall Street Journal Josh Brin Josh Wall Street Journal China Josh zoom Jeff zoom Josh Zumra Nikon Konami CEO Amir Connie David Iraq
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Stumbles over the past year of the no surprise to the world's purchasing managers and the people closely following the economic indexes that are produced from their views Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin says global purchasing managers indexes or PM is have come forth as a leading barometer of the health of the world's major manufacturing sectors. Josh set this up a really interesting economic index is produced all over the world. You know, it's it started in the United States. It's been produced in the United States for over thirty years. And what these indexes do is they talk to purchasing managers, but you're really interesting people in a lot of companies, the people that are in charge of ordering supplies companies apply managers purchasing managers procurement officers, and they just asked him whether or not their orders. Your prices are up. And all these very simple question and put that together to track. How the economy is going and end up being such interesting window into the economy. You know, you think about a CEO, and they're sitting there thinking about strategy and thinking about share price new things about investors about how to manage your company and all these things. Manager. And you know, this is the guy who imagine you're in a pencil company. This is the guy who only thing he's thinking about is how much would do I need to order how much how much a graphite. Do. I need to order laser focused on getting the supplies for the company, right? That ends up being a really interesting window into trends and economy are changing part is there data from purchasing managers more relevant today than ever. That's right. Advantage of this approach. One is think about a lot of economic data like the jobs report. Right. That's kind of a big one every month in the US. Is we talk about the jobs you put, but that's only US data. No one ever kind of there's no system in place to do that same number all around the world. This is too complicated. Too expensive other countries have their own little message. You know, there's no there's no strict comparability there. But you think about these purchasing managers index one of the things that still unique is performed in almost all the major economies. You know, no matter what the structure of your economy is. And no matter what industry Dr you have these purchasing managers. Didn't know what's going on. Indexes in Iraq. You know, think about how impossible it would be to put together a traditional jobs in the country like that. But it's fairly feasible to find the biggest company managers. What's going on? Did you see these indexes all over the world? They provide a fascinating window into what's happening in the global economy. Speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh zoom, Renae covers economics, and he's written a piece entitled to gauge the health of the global economy, look to purchasing managers are sort of these guys and gals been saying, well, the message lately has been one of quite a bit of concern, you know, in the last three months of this year, four months of this year. Everyone woke up to the fact that the global economy is really kinda weak by quite a few different measures, the the global trade just slowing down the stock market really because of this in the in the fall, but purchasing managers index is who'd been showing signs of concern for the entire year. These indexes really started going down in January. And so there's a lot of evidence that this wasn't going to be as strong of a year as twenty seventeen had been for the global economy. Eighteen wasn't going to be its strongest twenty seventeen. So do. They look how far how much foreign advanced do. They look. Well, they cover the month. They they covered the months. You know, the January survey will come out at the very first day of February. So come down almost in real time. But it, but it covers almost real time. What's happening in the month of in the month that the report happened? So the the general consensus right now for twenty nine to perhaps twenty twenty would be what Josh well, the general consensus is that things are a little soft heading into the new year. You know, it's it's only January and things could go any different direction, but the consensus so far from these reports that things are just looking at little soft at the start of the year, and how much do they weigh like geopolitical factors like you reference? You know, the the pencil maker before does he consider trade with China or perhaps some military conflict and elsewhere in the world. Well, the great thing about these indexes didn't way these guys have to they have to shut all that out. So that might be the reason that things are changing, but these purchasing managers, they're not the guy who thinks about what the invitations or the China trade war. This is the guy that says, I don't need to order as much would this month. And you put all that together. And you say, oh, there's less demand for word. This is something's going on in the economy. You know, they don't know that they are asked him about the reasons why they asked him how much demand they're seeing. And that's why it ended up being such a great barometer is Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin twenty minutes now in front of.

Josh zoom United States reporter Josh Wall Street Journal Brin Josh Wall Street Journal China CEO Iraq Renae twenty minutes thirty years three months four months
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Apparent over the past couple of years? Two three four years is that this story was really overblown. And in fact, the US labor market hasn't changed nearly as much as people feared. So where did the studies miss? There's two things one is that the. What is it? The economy was really quite weak in twenty you know, the LeBron Michael is really quite weak in the early part of this decade. And so a large number of the people who were doing gigs. We're actually doing it just because the economy was with temporarily week they weren't doing it because the nature of people with work vino was fundamentally changing it's just that when the economy's bad when people lose their jobs, or when they're not seeing the income growth that they want and need they're more likely to turn to alternative stuff. And then the economy gradually improved. They turn away from it. So, you know, I m- one reason this looked so overblown is because people didn't realize the extent to which it was a cyclical phenomenon that when the economy is really bad. It's natural that people turned to gigs. It's not a fundamental change in the US labor force. It's gonna continue after the economy kinda heels, and you know, now, you look at the labor market, and it's it's much healthier. And when you look at kind of the majors of the gig economy. Looks like they're much smaller as a result. Okay. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin has pieces called how estimates of the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll summarize in layman's terms, you turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, the a lot of the people that turned to the gig. They just kind of did it as a temporarily at a temporary stopgap, they were they'd hit a little bit hard times until they you know, they tried something out to to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen is, you know, over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job it. It's not the case in employers. Don't wanna have employees anymore. That was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just use app to temporarily stop its workforce. That wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit. Because of how the economy was what about the the lack of benefits the I mean that would that's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans were one worried about a transition to the gig economy, and you know, to why there was much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs once they had the opportunity to do it, you know, in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks. When you have, you know, the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very attractive to people. And so, you know, it makes sense that people wouldn't want the labor market to necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if you weaken year, they could do on busy weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be. Challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

Wall Street Journal Josh zoom US Brin reporter vino LeBron Michael Syria Two three four years two three years twenty minutes
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Staples, two leading experts on the gig economy now say their estimates of its impact were too high skewed by spotty data and the recession of a decade ago. Alan Krueger of Princeton and Lawrence Katz of Harvard sifted through new evidence to explain how in two thousand fifteen survey. They overestimated how people cobbling together a living from odd jobs, especially through apps like Uber would up traditional work arrangements more from Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? Josh what happened in the middle of the decade? You know, twenty fourteen twenty fifty will the gig economy went wrong. So the gig economy stuff, I'll I'll summarize in blaming terms. You turn to the gig economy when you're looking for a few extra bucks when you're in retirement and looking for something else to do things along those lines when you're when you're. Desperate for a few bucks. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, the lot of the people that turned to the gig economy. They just kind of did it as a temporarily at a temporary stopgap they'd hit a little bit of hard times. And so they, you know, they tried something out to make ends meet until they could get that traditional job. And then what we've seen over the last two three years, especially people are getting those traditional job. It's it's not the case in employers. Don't want to have employees any more that was the fear that people had that every employer was gonna wanna just us to temporarily stock up its workforce wasn't the case. It just looked that way a little bit. Because of how the economy was what about the lack of benefits the I mean that was. Yeah. That's a big reason that I think a lot of Americans, you know, were one worried about transition to the gig economy, and to why there was so much or why there was why people wanted to get away from those jobs wants to have the opportunity to do it. You know in Syria. It'd be great to earn a few bucks. When you have. You know, the free time. But when that doesn't come with health insurance doesn't come with sick leave, you know, that's not very attractive people. And so, you know, it makes sense that people wouldn't want to labor market necessarily go that direction on a on a really extensive basis. What about the fix ability of this? It's going to be very hard to fix for a lot of reasons. I mean, one is because this work by its nature can be pretty nebulous. It can be pretty temporary. You know, people can do it just on on on the weekend. They can do it if you can year they could do it on busy weekends, but not normal weekends. I mean, there's going to be real challenges measuring the extent of this activity. Josh Wall Street Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom. Brin? It's twenty minutes now in front of.

Josh zoom Wall Street Journal Brin reporter Alan Krueger Staples Harvard Lawrence Katz Princeton Syria two three years twenty minutes
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Democrats continue to lean on former President Obama who stopped at a campaign office in northern Virginia yesterday to thank Bala Nteeze. You're going out there. You're gonna make sure that people vote to start making things better. And when you do that. Spirit, America's gonna shine. All right. Democrats want check Mr. Trump's ambitions by capturing at least the house while Republicans are trying to preserve GOP congressional majorities for the duration of Mr. Trump's term. Voters said that the polls in the twenty eighteen midterm elections today. A string of east coast races could be early indicators on which party will win the battle for control of the US house all the fight for the US Senate runs through a state or rather a slate of tossup states that are in later time zones. Wall Street Journal reporter Joshua Jamerson has a guide to watching the results role in Josh paint. The broad picture. I kick the ball pitcher still is that the Democrats pretty keen to foot the house representatives while democrat as pepper time in the Senate. Think people on both sides agree that that's where we are. And that's pretty much where we were at the start of the cycle where we always meet Democrats. We're going to be holding way more seasonal pelicans than they would probably going to be harder speech, given that President Trump one pin of the state. Where Democrats running in this year? I almost feel like I could or should set. My watch to the way you broke this down in terms of what's happening in say six PM eastern till about seven thirty or nine PM eastern. How'd you do that? Well, it's just that. There's so many key races that should start to come in earlier in the night. There's a handful of races in the eastern time zone. I'm on the east coast. I should tell us where the night is going. So if you wanna follow along. Search across the country. The a lot of states are going to tell us how the nice you go pretty early states like Florida states like. Virginia. So that's really the best way to watch the results come in. Right. What about some of those other states? You have an eye on like. Michigan or Mississippi or throw in Missouri. New jersey. What I think is really interesting about around aircraft to see results come in and Minnesota now out there earlier in the cycle and people on both sides agree that therefore there and two of them are held by Democrats, but Trump won them in two thousand sixteen and the other two are held by Republicans by Hillary Clinton won them in two thousand sixteen in both parties, he knew agree that it's gonna crash can come out ahead of been three those districts three out of four that it's probably going to be a bad night for the Republicans speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Jamerson he's written a piece entitled key races in Tuesday's midterm elections. How about out west? Later in the evening. You'll start to see air Nevada results. Come in. Both of those are toxic braces and Republican seats right now, dean Heller, Nevada, most of all mobile Republicans running incentive cycle, and they're open seats. Jeff say flakes. In Arizona, and both those considered extremely close talked up racist. Busy day in California too. Right. Yeah. On california. There's a lot of house races that are tops up or leaning democratic favor. But some Democrats acknowledge that we're still waiting on from out there. Then maybe something went awry for them in places like Pennsylvania in Florida. If it's gonna come down to a handful of seats out there. What else you think we should include air anything else that that jumps out the five races? That Senate Democrats are running some of the toughest races Indiana with an intro Donald North Dakota within their Heidi Heitkamp, Missouri. Claire mccaskill and then those are really the three that I think are gonna come down to. The personal brands of those state Democrats acknowledged that it's a tough environment all three especially Heidi Heitkamp. But the thing that they say will help their candidates in those states would be their personal brand camp was elected in the state earlier mccaskill was official in the state before she became a Senator also so this'll be a test of those personal brands in such a national live in the vicinity environment. Okay. So so those states maybe two individualized to say aha the national trend is happening. Exactly that or it could be that. You know, it proves that the national environment will Trump whatever. Goodwill candidates may have had in this state. Prior makes Josh Wall Street Journal reporter Joshua Jamerson thirteen minutes now after the hour on this morning. America's First News coming up.

Mr. Trump Claire mccaskill reporter Wall Street Journal Joshua Jamerson Virginia President America Heidi Heitkamp Senate US Florida Josh Wall Street Journal Missouri Nevada Bala Nteeze GOP Obama
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And two of them are held by Democrats, but Trump won them in two thousand sixteen and the other two are held by Republicans play Hillary Clinton won them in two thousand sixteen in both parties, he knew agreed that it can come out head. Three those districts three out of four that it's probably going to be a bad night for the Republicans with Wall Street Journal reporter, Jess Jamerson. He's written a piece entitled key races in Tuesday's midterm elections about out west. Well, later in the evening, you'll start to see Arizona Nevada results. Come in. Both of those are toxic races and Republican dean Heller, Nevada, Muslim -able Republicans running the cycle, and they're open. Flakes. In Arizona, and both those considered extremely close. Busy day in California too. Right. Yeah. I'm california. There's a lot of house races tops up or leaning democratic favor. But from knowledge that it's still waiting on results from out there. Then maybe something went awry for them in places like Pennsylvania imported come down to handful. What else do you think we should include or anything else that jumps out the five? Senate Democrats are running some of their topics races Indiana with Donald KOTA camp. Missouri. Claire mccaskill and then those are really the three that I think are gonna come down to. The personal brands of those state Democrats acknowledged that type environment all three especially Heidi Heitkamp. But the thing that they say will help their candidate updates would be their personal brand elected in the state earlier. Ankara macaque school was official in the state before streaking in there also. So this a little bit personal Branson such a national live in an environment. Okay. So so those states maybe to individualized to say aha the national trend is happening. Exactly that or it could be that. You know, it proves that the national environment world, Trump, whatever. Goodwill candidates may have had in this states prior. Josh Wall Street Journal reporter Joshua Jamerson thirteen minutes now after the hour on.

Trump Wall Street Journal reporter California Hillary Clinton Heidi Heitkamp Arizona Nevada Jess Jamerson dean Heller Ankara macaque school Arizona Claire mccaskill Nevada Donald KOTA camp Joshua Jamerson Pennsylvania Missouri Branson Indiana
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

"United States is about States alone For about forty, three percent getting close to half of all trade deficits in the world That means we import way more than others or more. Than we export the United States imports way more. Than it, exports and it does scale it's really just unmatched anywhere else in the world I mean, the next biggest country denied kingdom only had about, one quarter decided the deficit. Is US Canada is the third-biggest did something like one eight the. Size of the US and of course they are smaller, countries which is part of it but when you just think about the sheer dollar volume they nobody in the world news. Creating this sort of imbalanced denied states, is with, the way, it imports so much more that experts speaking with Wall Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom and he's written a piece entitled. US increasingly large driver of global trade deficits at least according? To. The International, Monetary Fund so is this what President Trump is trying to to address yeah I mean this, is very much one of the things that President Trump is Talked about to be clear, like this, is a, trend that has gotten worse and worse for a number of years so I'm, not saying the I'm not saying imprint Donald. Trump hostage situation and then on yeah on the contrary this? Is. Something that, the president has talked about quite a bit I mean he has Justified some of his, trade actions by saying that their goal is to kind of bring down these deficits now there's a lot. Of skepticism in whether that approachable work because one of the things that dried it seems to drive the large trade deficit from the US is in fact. That the government has been running such enormous fiscal deficit and that's actually something that the White House is kind of taken steps. To make a little bit worse the White House is really kind of. Increased the amount of spending reduce the amount of revenue. Heading towards trillion dollar deficits every single year by their forecasts one of the only way the country can run of, government deficits that large is. By importing more than they export the country can the country can't provide all, the fuel for what they wanna do they have to reach out to other countries for it and so there's an. Expectation that although the president, has tried to target, trade deficit with his trade policies fiscal, policy. There are pushing, another direction it's not very clear whether or not the strategy is. Going to, be successful How, about Germany Japan which both. Operate at a surplus the other way right with lots of exports that's right Now, Germany and Japan Ardy two biggest surprise countries. So they, don't they, don't have, surpluses anywhere, big the US data but they are, the two really big ones now the you know with Japan in particular there's. Kind of a rationale to it which is very old country and it. Kinda needs to save up now too so it's kind of so that its population can can get, through retirement so even though Japan has a very large kind of thought to be a good reason for it but Germany's especially extreme and we know that's. Going to be a big focus actually this week, because President Trump, meeting with the head of the. European Union, he'd meeting with. Him here in Washington on Wednesday and you know it's gonna be a big focus to, fact it didn't Germany and the, European Union are one, of these places to, still have, a very, big, imbalance not. As, big as the? US, but very big amount Josh Wall Street Journal economics, reporter Josh zoom Brin fourteen. Minutes now Now after, the hour, on This, Morning, America's.

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The world I mean the next biggest country, denied kingdom only had about one quarter decided the deficit. Is the US Canada is the third-biggest it's something like one eight decides of the. Smaller countries which is part of it but when you, just think about the sheer dollar volume they nobody in the world news creating this sort of imbalanced at the United States is with the way it imports so much more, than experts, speaking with Wall, Street Journal economics reporter Josh zoom Brin and he's written a piece entitled US, increasingly large driver of global trade deficits at. Least according to the International Monetary Fund so is this what? President. Trump is, trying to to address yeah I mean this is very much one of the things that President Trump is Talked about and you know to be clear like this, is a, trend that, has, gotten kinda worse and worse for a number of years so I'm not saying, the map is not saying that President Donald. Trump caused a situation and then yeah on the contrary this? Is. Something that, the president has talked about quite a bit I mean he has Justified some of his trade actions by saying that their goal is to kind of bring down these. Deficits now there's, a lot of skepticism in whether that approach will work because one of the things that dried it seems to drive the large trade. Deficit from the US is in fact that the government has been running such enormous fiscal deficit and that's actually something that. The White House is kind of taken steps to make a little bit. Worse the White House you really kind of. Increased amount of spending reduce the amount of revenue heading towards trillion dollar deficits every single year by their forecasts one, of the only, ways that country can run government deficits that large is by importing more than they export to country can the. Country can't provide all the fuel for what they wanna do they have to reach out countries for it, and so there's, an expectation that although the president has tried to target trade deficit. With his, trade policies Fiscal policies. Are pushing in another direction it's not very clear whether or not the strategy is going to be successful How, about Germany and. Japan which both operate at. A surplus the other way Ray with lots of exports that's right, now Germany and Japan Ardy two biggest surprise. Countries, they don't, have surpluses that are, anywhere as big the US deficit but, they are the two really big ones now you know with Japan in particular. There's kind of a rationale to it which is a. Very old country and it kind of needs to save up now to kind of population can can get, through retirement, so even though Japan has a very large plus kind of thought to be a good reason for it but Germany especially extreme and we know. That's going to be a big focus actually this, week because President, Trump meeting with the head of the. European Union he's meeting with him here in Washington on Wednesday and you know it's. Going to be a big focus the fact it didn't Germany in the year European Union the places to still have a very big imbalance not as big. As the US big amount thanks Josh Wall Street, Journal economics reporter, Josh zoom Brin fourteen minutes now after. The hour on This Morning.

President Trump US President Josh zoom Brin Germany Japan White House President Donald reporter International Monetary Fund European Union Street Journal Japan Ardy Canada Washington Ray fourteen minutes trillion dollar one quarter
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Does this mean politically if anything right now well it's hard to say i mean for one thing a lot of the places being hit are the places that were kind of the most in in donald trump's corner you know you're talking about places like the dakotas in the brassica and kansas went the president had a very solid majority i mean good most part beat not state kind of endanger of losing you know these are very safe republican states through mostly being the brunt of it so you know i if someone is looking at this and thinking thinking oh maybe it means there's an opportunity for democrats that's probably not the right take away from this map okay so it's not like even necessarily he's getting a pass at this point this is just i think some i think some voters are properly getting past you know you certainly hear from some voters that they're willing to give you know they want they want the president to have a shot try this strategy certainly in places that you know were kind of very strong trump counties you're going to be more likely to hear that sentiment all right so if there's going to be pushed back i guess when does it begin well i mean we'll find out in november i mean that's when voters have the chance to let it be known if if they're happy or not you know voters really uh that that's their opportunity is going to be the november elections that's when wall that's for sure i mean we might see some things in polling but but really until people vote we're speaking with wall street journal reporter justice who brin he's written a piece entitled chinese tariffs hit trump counties harder what else do you think will take away from here is i think i read one point since the economy is on decent footing it might take longer for some of these tariff impacts to hit yeah that's absolutely right i mean when this started was really roaring i mean you know if you think about this if you think about this trade war something that's doing a little bit of damage to the economy but on the other hand economy that's been growing for nine years now has really gotten on its feet there would be a tax cuts that are juicing some businesses that use some consumers especially wealthy consumers a lot of strength in the economy right now from those factors and so you know that means just kind of an offset for this trade war staff and so you know right now if you look at your role economy is still looks pretty it's still looks pretty decent so it's probably going to be a while before you start thinking about this trade war the kind of key driver what's going on in the economy so is there a belief leaf then that some of these farmers are manufacturers feel that this let's call it a fight fight with china's something that was needed because of unfair practices and there the administration that's certainly the case that the administration has been making i mean you know the people that are exporting in the us or the ones that have heard pretty well with the current system that we have you know farmers benefited quite a lot from being able to having having that chinese market be open and being able to export to the chinese market so i i don't know but i mean you know there is a deep sense especially held by the president that this was an unfair trade relationship and that we needed to do something really dramatic in the united states to shake it up and so we're we're seeing that play out now thanks josh wall street journal reporter josh zoom brin it is twenty minutes now in front of the.

twenty minutes nine years
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Crops that affects sports the industrial midwest where they kind of export you know a lot of cars and other machinery and then it's going to be kind of the energy states texas dakota in those states the us has become a big oil producer you kind of the regions that really stick out as being hit by and what does this mean politically if anything right now well it's hard to say i mean for one thing a lot of the places being hit are the places that were the most in in donald trump's corner you know you're talking about places like the dakotas in the brassica and kansas with the president head of jerry solid majority i mean for the most part even not he kind of in danger of losing you know these are very kind of safe republican states they're mostly being run of it so you know if someone is looking at fishing thinking thinking that maybe it means there's an opportunity for democrat that's probably not the right take away from this map okay so it's not like even necessarily he's getting a pass at this point this is just i think some i think some voters are probably getting a pass you know you hear from some voters that they're willing to give you know they want they want the president to have a shot to try this strategy certainly in places you know we're kind of very strong trump counties you're going to be more likely to hear that sentiment all right so if there's going to be pushed back i guess when does it begin well i mean we'll find out in november voters have the chance to let it be known if they're happy or not you know voters really that that's their opportunity is going to be the november election wall that's for sure i mean we might see some things in polling but but really until people vote we're speaking with wall street journal reporter justice zukerman he's written a piece entitled chinese tariffs hit trump counties harder what else do you think will take away from here is i think i read one point since the economy is on decent footing it might take longer for some of these tariff impacts to hit yeah that's absolutely right i mean when this started economy was really roaring i mean you know so if you think about this if you think about this trade something doing a little bit of damage to the economy but on the other hand economy that's been growing for nine years now has really got not cheat the tax cuts last year that are choosing some businesses consumers especially wealthy consumers there's a lot of strength in the economy right now from those factors and so you know that means just kind of an offset for this trade war staff and so you know right now if you look at your role economy is still looks pretty it's still looks pretty decent and so it's probably going to be a while before you start thinking about this trade war the kind of key driver what's going on in the economy so is there a belief then that some of these farmers are manufacturers feel that this let's call it a fight this fight with china's something that was needed because of unfair practices and there the administration that's certainly the case with the administration has been making i mean you know the people that are exploring in the us the ones that have fared pretty well with the current system that we have you know farmers benefited quite a lot from being able to having having that chinese market be opened and being able to export to the chinese market so i i don't know but i mean you know there is a deep sense especially held by the president that this was an unfair trade relationship and that we needed to do something really dramatic in the united states to shake it up and so we're we're seeing that play out now thanks josh wall street journal reporter josh zoom brin it is twenty minutes now in front of the.

twenty minutes nine years
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The irs comes calling we're talking about a couple hundred a billion dollars in total here of the amount of debt that's odor could be required to be right so right now there's about there's more than three hundred billion dollars enrolled in income trigger where payment so that's just the amount of money that's in these plans to now keep in mind some people will pay off their debt before it reaches the twenty year mark and therefore they will they will not face a tax bill and i should also clarify that if you're you know in this program called public service loan forgiveness there is no tax if if you if you're in that plan but if you're a private sector workers you know yeah i mean there's three dollars of this one estimate was that about one hundred and eight billion just in principle will be forgiven for all of the loans that were issued through the past year so that doesn't include perspective lines but we're talking about a lot of cashier and here's here's the thing that i should point out you know people don't have the money the irs might not be able to might be forced to cut you a deal or just might not be able to come after you if you can show the actually don't have the wealth to pay off these bills the irs might just be forced to write off that debt so it's really a big problem because some people will be forced to pay you know even if if if they have those the cash saved up they might have to pay a lot but then you have the issue of if the irs forgive some of this that you know it's some people might get a bigger subsidy than than than than others and there's a fairness issue here anybody from another planet josh would look at this and go this is insane so you can't afford to pay for college so you borrow then you can't really afford to pay it back so you postpone it and just pay a little bit and then you can't afford to pay what you owe from the government and that all might go away too yeah was talking with someone one of the higher education trade groups this what i was talking with someone who is who is the head of this trade group and he was around when they passed this law and you know they he said that people did not pay attention to this idea that the forgiven mount would be taxed it would just kind of something was it was like they over it was it was an oversight and so i think what's happening now as we get closer to the people you know reaching the twenty year mark we aren't there yet but you know as things get get closer to that point people are starting to realize there's gonna be a big problem thanks josh wall street journal reporter josh mitchell who's based in washington twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend.

irs twenty year three hundred billion dollars billion dollars twelve minutes three dollars
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The irs comes calling a couple hundred billion dollars in total here of the amount of of debt that's owed or could be required to ask the right now there's about there's more than three hundred billion dollars enrolled in income driven repayment so that's just the amount of money that's in these plans now keep in mind some people will pay off their debt before reaches the twenty year mark and therefore they will they will not face a tax bill and i should also clarify that if you're in this program called public service loan forgiveness there is no tax it if you if you're not plan but if you're a private sector worker you know yeah i mean there's three dollars of this one estimate was that about one hundred eight billion just in principle will be forgiven just for all of the loans that were issued for the past year so that doesn't include perspective ones but we're talking about a lot of cash here and but you but here's here's the thing that i should point out you know people don't have the money the irs might not be able to might be forced to cut you a deal are just might not be able to come after you if you can show the actually don't have the wealth to pay off these bills the irs might just be forced to write off that debt so it's really a big problem because some people will be forced to pay you know even if if if they have the cash saved up they you know might have to pay a lot but then you have this issue of if the irs forgive some of this you know it's some people might get a bigger subsidy than than than than others and there's a fairness issue here anybody from another planet josh would look at this and go this is insane so you can't afford to pay for college so you borrow then you can't really afford to pay it back so you postpone it and just pay a little bit and then you can't afford to pay what you owe from the government and that all might go away too yeah you know i was talking with someone one of the higher education trade groups this what i was talking with someone who is who is the head of this trade group and he was around when they passed this law and you know they he said that people do not pay attention to this idea that forgiven mouth would be taxed it would just kind of something was it was like they were it was it was never site and so i think what's happening now is as we get closer to be two people you know reaching the twenty year mark we aren't there yet but you know as things get get closer to that point people are starting to realize this is going to be a big problem next josh wall street journal reporter josh mitchell who spaced in washington twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend.

irs twenty year three hundred billion dollars hundred billion dollars twelve minutes three dollars
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The irs comes calling a couple hundred billion dollars in total here of the amount of debt that's odor could be required to be hey adam right now there's about there's more than three hundred billion dollars enrolled in income driven repayment so that's just the amount of money that's in these plan now keep in mind some people will pay off their debt before it reaches the twenty year mark and therefore they will they will not face a tax bill and i should clarify that if you're you know in that program called public service loan forgiveness there is no tax if if you if you're in that plan but if you're a private sector worker you know yeah i mean there's three hundred billion dollars of this one estimate was that about one hundred eight billion just in principle will be forgiven just for all of the loans that were issued through the past year so that doesn't include perspective ones but we're talking about a lot of cashier and but you but here's here's the thing that i should point out you know people don't have the money the irs might not be able to might be forced to cut you a deal or just might not be able to come after you if you can show the actually don't have the wealth to pay off these bills you know the the irs might just be forced to write off that debt so it's really a big problem because some people will be forced to pay you know even if if if they have the cash saved up they might have to pay a lot but then you have this issue of if the irs forgive some of this that you know it's some people might get a bigger subsidy than than than than others and there's a fair fairness issue here anybody from another planet josh would look at this and go this is insane so you can't afford to pay for college so you borrow then you can't really afford to pay it back so you post ponant and just pay a little bit and then you can't afford to pay what you owe from the government and that all might go away too yeah i was talking with someone one of the higher education trade groups this what i was talking with someone who is who is the head of this trade group and he was around when they passed this law and they he said that people did not pay attention to this idea that the forgiven mouth would be taxed it would just kind of something was it was like they they over it was it was never site and so i think what's happening now is as we get closer to the people you know reaching the twenty year mark we aren't there yet but you know as things could get closer to that point people are starting to realize there's gonna be a big problem thanks josh wall street journal reporter josh mitchell who's based in washington twelve minutes now after the hour on this.

irs adam three hundred billion dollars twenty year hundred billion dollars twelve minutes
"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"josh wall street journal" Discussed on WLAC

"The irs comes calling a couple hundred billion dollars in total here of the amount of debt that's owed or could be required to be though right now there's about there's more than three hundred billion dollars enrolled an income driven repayment so that's just the amount of money that's in these plant now keep in mind some people will pay off their debt before it reaches the twenty year mark and therefore they won't they will not based attacks i should clarify that if you're you know in this program called public service loan forgiveness there is no tax if you if you're in that plan but if you're a private sector worker you know yeah three hundred billion dollars of this one estimate was that about one hundred eight billion just in principle will be forgiven just for all of the ones that were issued through the past year so that doesn't include perspective ones but we're talking about a lot of cashier and but you but here's here's the thing that i should point out you know people don't have the money the irs might not be able to might be forced to cut you a deal or just might not be able to come after you if you can show the actually don't have the wealth to pay off these bills you know the the irs might just be forced to write off that debt so it's really a big problem because some people will be forced to pay you know even if if they have the cash saved up they might have to pay a lot but then you have this issue of if the irs forgive some of this that you know it's some people might get a bigger subsidy than than than than others and there's a fairness issue here anybody from another planet josh would look at this and go this is insane so you can't afford to pay for college so you borrow then you can't really afford to pay it back so you postpone it and just pay a little bit and then you can't afford to pay what you owe from the government and that all might go away too yeah he was talking with someone one of the higher education trade groups this i was talking with someone who is who is the head of this trade group and he was around when they passed this law and you know they he said that people do not pay attention to this idea that forgiven mouth would be taxed it would just kind of something was it was like they they over it was never site and so i think what's happening now is as we get closer to the people you know reaching the twenty year mark we aren't there yet but you know as things could get closer to that point people are starting to realize there's gonna be a big problem josh wall street journal reporter josh mitchell who's based in washington twelve minutes now after the hour on this.

irs three hundred billion dollars twenty year hundred billion dollars twelve minutes