21 Burst results for "Josh Mitchell"

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges and toward families. Which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price, something toe haggle over. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had Ah been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting friend that the pandemic has accelerated, But basically, schools are in a tight position. Right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to school next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses of fan businesses. Their businesses have Um, been hurt by the pandemic. And so right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens to clean family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? But we are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. At public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Uh, mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. Um this data includes, you know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what there. S a T scores are and what their high school deepa is. And then they send that data to consultants. You think crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm to determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools have have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges you know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class on DH? The schools will say, Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including what will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far are families going and deciding or not deciding to enroll? Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers, if it was beyond may want will that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years they would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining and negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I'd talk to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going And there Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty.

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Teo Archy Nitze For Bluestar Justice Department reporter
Tuition Price Resets in the Age of the COVID Recession

Rosie on the House

05:01 min | 3 months ago

Tuition Price Resets in the Age of the COVID Recession

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges and toward families. Which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price, something toe haggle over. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had Ah been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting friend that the pandemic has accelerated, But basically, schools are in a tight position. Right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to school next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses of fan businesses. Their businesses have Um, been hurt by the pandemic. And so right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens to clean family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? But we are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. At public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Uh, mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. Um this data includes, you know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what there. S a T scores are and what their high school deepa is. And then they send that data to consultants. You think crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm to determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools have have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges you know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class on DH? The schools will say, Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including what will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far are families going and deciding or not deciding to enroll? Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers, if it was beyond may want will that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years they would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining and negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I'd talk to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going And there Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty.

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Teo Archy Justice Department
"josh mitchell" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges. And toward families, which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price. Something toe haggle over Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting trend that the pandemic has accelerated. But basically, schools are in a tight position right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to schools next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses. Fan businesses their businesses have Been hurt by the pandemic. And right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens between family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for rig reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? We are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. That public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much, Uh parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. This data includes You know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what their s A T scores are and what their high school g p A is. And then they send that data to consultant to thank, crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm. To determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools, have, um, have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges You know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class? Um and the schools will say Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including What will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far our family's going in deciding or not deciding to enroll. Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers. If it was beyond may want well, that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years I would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining in negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I've talked to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going on there. Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty. That is a Wall Street Journal reporter Josh Mitchell with this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka 21 minutes after the hour on this weekend, coming up next tech products to add life to your home office. If baby could talk, she say a lot. You know what she's thinking? And what makes her happy. But unfortunately, baby can't talk or remind you. You were the one taking her to daycare today, and she won't speak up..

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka consultant Teo Archy Justice Department reporter
"josh mitchell" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Mitchell about his piece entitled shutdown pinches economic growth how the lift driver from Maryland. In Maryland, just outside of DC. There was a slip tribe. Cocteau? We've actually heard a lot about this in DC where they are. Uber drivers who are just not getting nearly as much business as they used to. And that when they suspect that that had a lot to do with the fact that towards song going downtown to the Smithsonian museums which are closed they have seen a decline in business. Also, you know, there are workers who are not having to go to work. There are fewer people fewer people taking you know, with to to work. I talked to this lift driver. He says he's making about fifty to eighty dollars a day, which he says half of what he was making last month. And he says he's going to have trouble making ran planning it talk to the landlord the other thing he said, which this is what he told me it. He's not quite sure why. But that when he went to Reagan airport, which is just outside of DC. There was a very very long queue of Lubar and lift drivers waiting to pick people up and he suspects that. The reason why from one of the reasons why more and more of those driving showing up at the airport is is because they're maybe there are some federal workers who were on furlough picking up side jobs. Does that loss growth catch up later on? So that's a good question. First of all, I should say, you know, a dozen, you know, that's all these effects that I described they're kind of like small cuts, you know, that are occurring across the US, and they're scattered and they're spread out. So the overall effect on the economy is gonna be a small one. I mean, it will have an impact the right now. Economists are saying they expect the economy to grow at around two percent pace in the first quarter. Whereas if the shutdown wasn't going to occur had not occurred. They would say that that it would have grown at about a point two two two point three percent pay. So basically saying this could shave about a quarter percentage point of growth in the first quarter. But there is a there is an expectation that if we if if some of that output, his loss of the first quarter, it'll be made up in the second quarter, not not all of it. But, but a lot of it will be for for example, you know, a lot of these agencies where I described they're.

DC Cocteau Maryland Wall Street Journal Josh Mitchell reporter Lubar US Reagan eighty dollars three percent two percent
"josh mitchell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Their beer makers that can't get approval for label on their bottle, or maybe they have a new form formula for beer that they need approved from the agency that does that stuff. They can't get that right now. And so therefore they have to put on hold making that beer, and then I would say the third the third way that the economy is being affected is that there's three hundred eight thousand workers on furlough there's another four hundred thousand or so who are considered essential are working, but those eight hundred thousand combined or not getting paychecks right now. That therefore translates in some cases into lower consumption. Meaning if those workers don't have money to go out and spend the either have to charge those expenses on their credit cards, or in a lot of cases, they're cutting back. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Mitchell about his piece entitled shutdown pinches economic growth. How about the lift driver from Maryland in Maryland, just outside of DC? There was a flip Dr Kaku. We've actually heard a lot about this in DC where they are Uber lift drivers who are just not getting nearly as much business as they used to. And that when they suspect that that has a lot to do with the fact that tourists aren't going downtown to the Smithsonian museums which are closed they have seen a decline in business. You know, you know, there are workers who are not having to go to work there or people fewer people taking know lift to to work. I talked to this lift driver. He says he's making about fifty to eighty dollars a day, which he said. Half of what he was making last month. And he says he's going to have trouble making Randy's planning to talk to the landlord the other thing he said, which.

Dr Kaku DC Maryland Wall Street Journal Josh Mitchell reporter Randy eighty dollars
"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTOK

"Border that Democrats used to support in past congresses. And the Obama administration have not somehow become radical right wing positions. Neither house Bill by the way is expected to advance in the Senate since Mr. McConnell says he will only bring up spending bills that have the support of President Trump. The partial federal government shutdown. That's now the longest in modern history is Kerr tailing infrastructure projects. Food-processing inspections and economic data used by Wall Street, but on a more micro level Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Mitchell says it showing signs of disrupting commerce has hundreds of thousands of federal workers missed out on their first payday of the closure late last week. Josh take us through this three ways. I would say that the shutdown. It's starting to affect the economy and economic activity across the US one is that it's just a lot of the stuff that that that the federal workers who are furloughed. Do they aren't doing it to that output, for example? He would normally go to this. Known in damn in DC. You can't do that. Now, and that service that the and provide not happening to the economy is losing output by the loss of of those workers, not not doing their job. Number two. You have a lot of private sector businesses. You are indirectly affected by the fact that a lot it's furloughed workers are not working and that, and that's due to the fact that a lot of workers provide a service that businesses rely on to conduct their business, for example, there their beer makers that can't get approval for our label on their bottle, or maybe they have a new form formula for beer that they need approved from the agency that does that stuff. They can't get that right now. And so therefore they have to put on hold making that beer, and then I would say the third the third way that the economy is being affected is that there's three hundred eight thousand workers on furlough.

Josh Mitchell Wall Street Journal Obama administration Mr. McConnell President Trump US Kerr Senate reporter
"josh mitchell" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"Next week on spark. We're going to devote an entire episode to some of the technologies used by law enforcement, some of the benefits of these tools and how they can improve police work and also some of their limitations and the issues they raise. For example, some of the vulnerabilities of our hyper connected world that Bruce Schneier just described in his book can also apply to technologies used by the police such as body cams, Josh Mitchell is a consultant with the security firm new IX. He tested five body cameras from five different companies and found that all of those cameras were vulnerable to hacking. Some of those vulnerabilities could allow a hacker to do location tracking, spread malware, download footage and modify and re upload that footage remotely. But why is there this problem? I would say that it's it's a rush to market with the minimum viable product. It's a market that's exploding. And lots of companies and manufacturers want to get in on that. And that's, that's the don't do security or if they do it at all, it's an afterthought. And because of that, we have all these problems as a consultant. What would you advise law enforcement around? Insuring that the cameras are are more secure. Right now, there's a limited response that people using these devices can actually do, and that would be to really ensure that the wireless networks are are disabled or off. Now that's not always an option in every device. The other main issues are are going to take that one included are gonna take purchasing new devices. There's no real other way around it. We have to get the manufacturers on board with fixing these problems and the way that they have to fix them as they have to make a new one. Josh Mitchell a consultant with the security firm new IX at interviews,.

Josh Mitchell consultant Bruce Schneier
"josh mitchell" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Will inflation caused the next stock market crash. That's a definite possibility. But we know one thing it is doing right now. This is the Wall Street Journal, Josh Mitchell, stronger inflation eats into paychecks. The article says a humming US academy is pushing inflation up to levels that the central Bank considers healthy, but there's a downside American. Paychecks are barely keeping up are you working harder than ever before making more money than ever before. And being able to do less. How many in this audience? I work in a second job. How many are doing contract work that could go away? Let me ask you a question. And then you think about the answer in you take action if you could get a second income without a second job. Would you do it? Because people all over metro Detroit are doing and they're doing it. Now, they've been doing it since two thousand eight with Online Trading Academy. That's the reality of what we do. Here's a call to action for you, folks. Take control of your financial future by learning. How to invest in these markets. Why would you wanna pay fees or commissions to a financial planner who's not performing are underperforming? How about learning how to make money, regardless if the markets go up or go down because professional traders and investors, do they don't leave the industry when the market goes down. They don't become house painters applying the appropriate tactics for that market. So if you're serious about learning how to invest in these markets, and I mean, really.

Online Trading Academy Wall Street Journal Josh Mitchell US Detroit
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Mitchell joins us with more in just a moment. I, these news headlines President Trump says the US and the EU have reach. A new phase in their relationship and will work together to resolve trade disputes. He made those comments from the White House on Wednesday alongside European Commission, president Jean-Claude Yonker calling it quote a very big day for free and fair trade for the latest head to our website wsj.com or the WSJ app. Facebook reported slower than expected revenue growth in the second quarter. Its first full quarter since the Cambridge analytic scandal, despite greater scrutiny of the social networks handling of user data, the number of Facebook's daily, active users held steady in the US and Canada at one hundred eighty five million. It fell slightly in Europe to two hundred seventy nine million that drop may be due in part new privacy laws overseas. The makers of an experimental Alzheimer's drug say it's shown progress in slowing the worsening of the disease. As I am Biogen say, patients who received the highest dose of the drug exhibited thirty percent less decline than those taking a placebo over the course of eighteen months. But outside experts, say, additional testing of the drug is still needed. Mattel says it's cutting a quarter of its manufacturing workforce about twenty two hundred jobs amid greater losses and slower sales in its earnings report on Wednesday. Mattel, reported more than two hundred forty million dollars in losses and a fourteen percent sales declined from the previous year. The company like its rival Hasbro also took a hit from the liquidation of toys r. us. Mattel is also planning to sell its manufacturing sites in Mexico to help cut costs..

Mattel Facebook US Wall Street Journal Trump president Jean-Claude Yonker Josh Mitchell President Hasbro EU Alzheimer reporter Europe wsj.com White House Mexico Cambridge European Commission Canada
Mattel, Facebook and US discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Mattel, Facebook and US discussed on WSJ What's News

"Wall Street Journal reporter, Josh Mitchell joins us with more in just a moment. I, these news headlines President Trump says the US and the EU have reach. A new phase in their relationship and will work together to resolve trade disputes. He made those comments from the White House on Wednesday alongside European Commission, president Jean-Claude Yonker calling it quote a very big day for free and fair trade for the latest head to our website wsj.com or the WSJ app. Facebook reported slower than expected revenue growth in the second quarter. Its first full quarter since the Cambridge analytic scandal, despite greater scrutiny of the social networks handling of user data, the number of Facebook's daily, active users held steady in the US and Canada at one hundred eighty five million. It fell slightly in Europe to two hundred seventy nine million that drop may be due in part new privacy laws overseas. The makers of an experimental Alzheimer's drug say it's shown progress in slowing the worsening of the disease. As I am Biogen say, patients who received the highest dose of the drug exhibited thirty percent less decline than those taking a placebo over the course of eighteen months. But outside experts, say, additional testing of the drug is still needed. Mattel says it's cutting a quarter of its manufacturing workforce about twenty two hundred jobs amid greater losses and slower sales in its earnings report on Wednesday. Mattel, reported more than two hundred forty million dollars in losses and a fourteen percent sales declined from the previous year. The company like its rival Hasbro also took a hit from the liquidation of toys r. us. Mattel is also planning to sell its manufacturing sites in Mexico to help cut costs..

Mattel Facebook United States Wall Street Journal Donald Trump President Jean-Claude Yonker Josh Mitchell President Trump Hasbro EU Alzheimer Reporter Europe Wsj.Com White House Mexico Cambridge European Commission Canada
What to expect this week from the Fed

WSJ What's News

01:15 min | 2 years ago

What to expect this week from the Fed

"This week the fed also releases the beige book plus we'll see retail sales and industrial production data joining us now from washington with

United States Josh Mitchell Anne Marie New York Wall Street Journal Reporter Washington
"josh mitchell" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

NewsRadio WHAM 1180

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

"That the your debt will be for for forgiven under these plans but the problem is that way any any amount that is taxed as income and so what's what's happening is you you pay just a little bit each month for the next twenty years but then you'll have this huge bill at the end at the end of the plan so i think what's happening is a lot of people are enrolling in these plans and it's good for now but down down the road they'll face a pretty big bill from the irs what's the average tax bill anybody begin to calculate that for an individual now it's it's really hard to to know because you know this law the plans only really came into effect in two thousand seven or so so we won't really know until two thousand twenty seven by the the i can tell you that the obama administration estimated the that you know the the the average person would have about forty one thousand dollars forgiven at the end of this so if you think about that if you're twenty five percent tax bracket that's about ten thousand dollars and there's gonna be some people with a lot more than that you know some people could save thousands of dollars on a tax for hundreds of thousands so this could be a problem down the road we're speaking with wall street journal reporter josh mitchell he's written a fascinating story entitled student debt forgiveness is a wonderful boon until the irs comes calling a couple hundred eight billion dollars in total here.

obama administration josh mitchell irs wall street journal reporter hundred eight billion dollars forty one thousand dollars ten thousand dollars twenty five percent twenty years
"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Students can get so we're investing in and you know new new tech try and keep them ahead of industry trends where we're hiring the best dentists to teach these students and they say we have our own rising costs you know our job is to provide the best experience and if the students thinks think it's too expensive then good and they can go to other schools that are less expensive you know usc is one of the most prestigious schools to get into and so the dean there says you know most of these students if not them are getting into other schools so they're actively choosing to go to school i think what you know one of the issues is obviously the tuition is very high i think the other issue is at least in the case with this person that profile that the interest rates they jumped after he got into school and those interest rates are set by congress in washington and and you know students often don't really pay attention to what's going on in washington and so the kind of caught by surprise when they go to the financial aid or elephant and are told you know guess what your interest rate last year was two point seven seven percent this year when you take out one it's not going to be six point eight percent or seven point four percent there's not really you know sometimes the interest rates are you know they're they're they are a shock to the students and what what are you gonna do thanks josh wall street journal reporter josh mitchell again i think that's status worth repeating a hundred one people in the us who owe at least a million dollars in federal student loans that is insanity twenty minutes now in front.

usc congress washington josh mitchell us reporter seven seven percent million dollars twenty minutes eight percent four percent
"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"So if you if you have a high amount of debt if your interest rate is pretty high and then you go along time without making payments it starts that up goodness i mean is this some kind of norm for for dental students so it's not it's certainly not the norm but i think it's happening more and more actually talked with several other dental students who went to nyu for example you know these private schools the private nonprofit ones are very expensive like i said for usc it's about ninety one thousand just intuition and then you have living thirty thousand that you have to borrow for so we're talking about over you know in some cases one hundred thirty thousand dollars a year to go to dental school sometimes they get they get a break on that the schools like give them a discount but if they don't that's a pretty hefty bill and i think it's happening more and more and again you know these the prices have risen so i think even though it's it's an outlier for someone to that much i think we're going to see it more and more especially as the students out of school what's happening now is they're they're taking advantage of this option called forbearance where basically the education department says if you don't make a lot of money you can put the payments on hold you know you don't have to pay for a year or so and guess what the interest is still accruing and so and then they might go into income driven repayment which is this repayment plan we're basically they're setting their their monthly payment as a share of their income oftentimes as is the case with this guy that payment doesn't even cover the interest so even though they're not the norm i think it's it's going to happen more and more where you just seeing people with really big debt burdens we're speaking with wall street journal staff reporter josh mitchell he's written a piece about a guy named mike mirro who has a million dollars in student loans.

josh mitchell mike mirro nyu usc wall street journal reporter one hundred thirty thousand do million dollars
Mustang, Focus crossover will be only Ford cars on the market in North America by 2020

WSJ What's News

08:31 min | 2 years ago

Mustang, Focus crossover will be only Ford cars on the market in North America by 2020

"What's news from the Wall Street Journal top stories and timely insights. I'm Charlie Turner in New York. The number of Americans applying for first time. Jobless benefits is at its lowest level in almost fifty years. We'll have more on this in a moment. I hear some top news headlines a Senate panel overwhelmingly approved a Bill that would protect special counsel Robert Muller from being fired without cause the proposal which passed the Senate Judiciary committee fourteen to seven represented a bipartisan show of support for the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election, but serious political and legal hurdle stand in the way of the Bill becoming law with some questioning, whether it's constitutional or even necessary President. Donald Trump said he has decided not to interfere with the Justice department, which is conducting an investigation of his associates alleged ties to Russia. But he suggested there was a point at which he might saying in an interview with Fox News, FOX and friends. I may. Change my mind at some point. Mr. Trump has publicly criticised top officials in the Justice department and the F B I over the Russia probe and earlier this month privately mulled taking steps to remove them. Dr. Ronnie, Jackson President Trump's nominee to run the veterans affairs department withdrew his candidacy Thursday morning. It followed the release of allegations that erect a government vehicle while drunk and freely gave out prescription drugs without paperwork. Dr. Jackson, who is Mr. Trump's White House physician took himself out of the running after Democrats on the Senate veterans affairs committee released a summary of allegations. They had compiled through interviews with about two dozen people who've worked with them in a statement, distributed by the White House. Doctor, Jackson said, the charges were completely false and fabricated. More trouble for Wells Fargo which has been dealing with numerous regulatory issues over the past two years sources tell the Wall Street Journal that the Labor Department is examining whether Wells Fargo has been pushing participate. It's in low cost corporate 401K plans to roll their holdings into more expensive individual retirement accounts. At the Bank Labor Department investigators also are interested in whether Wells Fargo's, retirement plan services unit, pressed account holders to buy in-house funds, generating more revenue to the Bank. Ford is shifting the focus further away from sedans and more toward crossover vehicles and pickup trucks. The carmaker will stop the sale of slow selling sedans in North America, and concentrate on just two cars, the best-selling muscle car Ford Mustang, and an all-new focus, active crossover coming out next year for added that by twenty twenty. Almost ninety percent of its portfolio in North America will be the stronger selling trucks, utilities, and commercial vehicles coming up. Another sign of a strong job market. Jobless claims are at their lowest level since the late sixties. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal is your 401K on track. Bloom with three os is the. And smart way to grow your 401K. Go online to bloom, 401K dot com to get your truly free 401K audit, simply grab your employer held 401K account log in info, and in a matter of minutes, bloom performs an unbiased analysis of your 401K right before your eyes showing you the best fund mix to meet your goals while minimizing investment fees bloom, does all the work for you. The hardest part for you is remembering there are three os and bloom, and her promo code W S J for your first month, free visit bloom, 401K dot com, and try it for free. Now. Thanks for listening everyone. It's something that hasn't happened for nearly half a century. The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to the lowest level since December nineteen sixty nine. The Labor Department says initial jobless claims fell twenty four thousand last week to a seasonally adjusted. Two hundred nine thousand joining us from Washington to talk about falling jobless claims is Josh Mitchell, economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal, Josh two hundred. Nine thousand claims is the lowest level since early in the Nixon administration. This is yet another sign of a tight labor market, isn't it? Yeah, it means employers are laying off few workers that has been declining this year and two hundred. Nine thousand is an exceptionally low level of the number of workers being laid off. And that's basically what jobless claims are. It's a proxy for layoffs and this is just one of many signs that the labor market is pretty tight. It's as strong as it's been in years, and it bodes well for the jobs report that is set to come out next week and the latest figure was also considerably lower than expected. Yeah, the projection. I think was about two hundred twenty eight thousand among economists. And I should mention these numbers go up and down each week so it could be, you know this latest number could be revised later on next week. You know, the government tries to estimate these things pretty well, but sometimes they get it wrong. It's, you know it can be pretty imprecise. But whether it's two hundred nine thousand or whether it's two hundred, twenty thousand still very low level. And it's just another another sign that the labor market just pretty strong right now, do econ. Honest and other observers. Take a closer look at the broader trend, the four week moving average of claims? Yeah. And again, if you look at that, the trend is still the same planes have been falling. I think they were down by a couple thousand. If you look at the four week trend, which is basically just looking at what they've done over the past month. So the level again is very, is very low. And I guess the question is, what does this mean for wage growth? For example, what does this mean for the the fed? The fed looks at a lot of different aspects of the jobs market to determine whether we're at what they would consider full employment, which means they might have to start raising interest rates. If if it appears that we're there or for even, you know a above that level that something the feds trying to see right now where exactly are well, does the fed talk about something like jobless claims as much as they talk about the unemployment rate, which is been at four point, one percent for a long time or job growth to do. They talk about jobless claims as much. I guess they figure everything into it, right? They're just trying to. Look at all the pieces to the puzzle jobless claims I would imagine is not nearly as big of an indicator of the labor market, for example, the unemployment rate, but it is something they look at it and you know the, the unemployment rate comes out once a month basically. So these jobless claims data kind of gives you a preview week week to week. It's one of those indicators. It's one of the few indicators that comes out each week. And so one good thing about it is you don't have to wait a whole month to to get some type of PICO with the jobs market is doing. Could a report like this, make it more likely that the fed would raise interest rates. Additionally, this year, I know they're on scheduled for three, right? And you know, again, I don't think they would ever base their their decision just on jobless claims. In fact, I know they want it. They are looking at a lot of different things. The main ones are inflation and the unemployment rate, how tight is labor market. Again, I think the big question now is if we are at this maximum level of employment, are we gonna start seeing higher wage where we have seen signs of higher. H growth and we've seen signs of higher inflation. That's kind of the theory that if the labor market gets tighter, if employers are finding a hard time to find workers, they will start paying more and bidding up the wages of workers. And if that is happening in their signs that it is then that'll keep the fed on track to raise interest rates. They wanna make sure that the labor market continues to expand at a healthy pace, but that you don't have this skyrocketing inflation that that would cripple the economy. And so this is just another indication that we, we are, you know, either there or or approaching that point where we are to healthy level of expansion. And so the economy is strong enough to withstand additional interest rate increases Wall Street Journal, economics reporter, Josh Mitchell, joining us from Washington. Thanks, Josh. Sure. Thank you. And that's what's news. I'm Charlie Turner at the Wall Street Journal. The Wall Street Journal invites you to attend our I ever future of everything festival taking place may through the tenth in New York City. This three day ideas exchange will bring together. Experts innovators and the ambitious leaders, entrepreneurs and students who are shaping the future to learn more and buy tickets. Visit us at F O E festival dot J dot com. Get a special offer of one hundred dollars off on tickets. Using promo code F O E F one hundred.

The Wall Street Journal FED Josh Mitchell Labor Department Justice Department Wells Fargo Charlie Turner Donald Trump Russia Bank Labor Department President Trump Senate North America Washington New York Dr. Jackson Senate Judiciary Committee
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Market and so there is this question especially with interest rates starting to rise sends the fed moving to raise interest rates how long can this last if if interest rates go up if prices continue to rise and if inventory remains low there's a big question mark hanging over the housing market right now josh will also get a report this week on november report from the government on orders to factories for durable goods how has that sector of the economy been performing as of late early this year for most of this year it's been pretty good and one of the reasons why is because business investment has picked up we've seen throughout much of this expansion that the private sector has been tepid when it comes to investing in longterm projects to to uh to to grow to expand but we saw that pick up earlier this year and it still looks pretty solid there were some weakness in october we'll have to see if that's a longer term trend the expectation is that there's going to be a solid pick up in orders to two percent as the consensus it looks like so i think overall that that looks pretty good i think businesses like consumers feel good about the economy not only do they continue to expand their payrolls but again this year they've actually meant spending more on longterm projects whether it's uh investing in equipment or the like so we'll have to see if that trend continues into the end of this year wall street journal washington reporter josh mitchell thanks a lot josh sure thank you and that's what's news i'm charlie turner at the wall street journal spend time with alexa then make what's news part of your flash briefing on the amazon echo the wall street journal listen ambitiously.

interest rates charlie turner wall street journal amazon washington reporter josh mitchell alexa two percent
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To keep the size of their tax cut to one point five trillion dollars over ten years and they have a four trillion dollar wishlist so something has to give this particular proposal handed what is a gimmick of sorts because it would have raised about one hundred million dollars in the near term because people were taking fewer debt tax deductions but it would have lowered revenue far in the future when the money came out of retirement accounts so it would get the benefits so to speak now for the deficit anyway and and cause some problems project later so this goes away the president once this to be seen as a middle class last tax break this this planned on on the whole is that true that accurate well certainly a lot of selfdescribed middleclass people take advantage of it that's for sure but the fact is that upper taxpayers get a lot more benefit from all these tax breaks to lower income tax because they have more money to put it well first of all yes but also the higher your tax bracket the more you save from every any deduction but yes upperincome people are the ones who have enough money leftover after they pay their bills to put eighteen thousand dollars in a retirement account most people don't do that a couple of census bureau researchers michael gideon and josh mitchell are their names recently figured that only about a third of all workers save in these accounts at all the rest either arnn offered them at work riff their offered they don't participate so are they actually encouraging retirement savings at a time when we're worried that millions of americans aren't saving enough for a.

president income tax michael gideon josh mitchell one hundred million dollars eighteen thousand dollars five trillion dollars four trillion dollar ten years
"josh mitchell" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"It turns out that's really unpopular with people who take advantage of this deduction and really unpopular with the money management industry that manages this money now the president as you said seems to have killed this off he tweeted quote this has always been a great impopular middle class tax break that works and it stays exclamation point well why were republicans thinking about this at all well look republicans are struggling to keep the size of their tax cut to one point five trillion dollars over ten years and they have a four trillion dollar list so something has to give this particular proposal handed what is the gimmick of sorts because it would have raised about one hundred million dollars in the near term because people were taking fewer debt tax deductions but it would have lowered revenue far in the future when the money came out of retirement accounts so it would get the benefits so to speak now for the deficit anyway and and cause some problems project later so this goes away the president wants this to be seen as a middle class tax break this this planned on on the whole is that true is that accurate well certainly a lot of selfdescribed middle class people take advantage of it that's for sure but the fact is that upper income tax payers get a lot more benefit from all these tax breaks to lower income tax oh because they have more money to put in well first of all yes but also the higher your tax bracket the more you save from every any deduction but yes upperincome people are the ones who have enough money leftover after they pay their bills to put eighteen thousand dollars in a retirement account most people don't do that a couple of census bureau researchers michael gideon and josh mitchell are their names recently figured that only about a third of all workers save in these accounts at all the rest either arnn offered them at work or if there are offered they don't participate so are they actually encouraging retirement savings at a time when we're worried that millions of americans aren't saving enough for a term.

president income tax michael gideon josh mitchell one hundred million dollars eighteen thousand dollars five trillion dollars four trillion dollar ten years
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"In floored we have a place for you not only do we understand your aspirations we are ready for them for all the amazing things your future holds we hold the key floored the future is here what's news from the wall street journal top stories and timely insights i'm charlie turner in new york it's a light week for major economic reports the most closely watched event is likely to be the annual jackson hole wyoming symposium hosted by the federal reserve bank of kansas city fed chair janet yellen will speak friday in jackson hole about financial stability and we'll be looking for any hints on when or if interest rates will rise again also a couple of home sales reports joining us from washington to preview the upcoming week his wall street journal reporter josh mitchell josh and the fed policy minutes released last week the fomc appeared split about when the next interest rate hike might occur this could be janet yellen last appearances fed chair at the jackson hole retreat are we hoping against hope churchill say something to clarify the possible direction of interest rates well as reporters railways have she's gonna say something to clarify sell about it yet it's yet to be seen whether she will but yes there is a big debate going on which is inflation is low but unemployment slow and neil usually don't see that at least economic models suggest that you know you should be seeing inflation going up within with unemployment the slow we haven't seen that and so as such low inflation is is posing a hurdle for the fed and there's a debate going on right now uh you know when to raise interest rates and how concerned should we be about.

wall street journal charlie turner new york kansas janet yellen interest rates washington jackson hole retreat churchill fed wyoming reporter josh mitchell neil
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To a discontinuation of tuition rising it at the same level is lifted inflation so this trend has been going on for several years now if you take a look at a charter of tuition flation it has gone down i think the expectation as they ask for another few years we are going to see these mater price increases i i have to say one factor here is that public schools are actually getting more direct funding from states that state budgets have improved states are renewing their funding directly to colleges which relieves pressure on them to charge more for students i think there is a storm on the horizon that when it comes to state budgets and that's as the workforce ages and as people retire are these healthcare costs and these public pension costs are gonna hit the state hardening the next few years you're going to see more and more budget crises within these states and when that happens higher education is among the first things that are cut so i think a lot of people expect a budget crunch and the next fears and a lot of these states in that may mean colleges are going to have to start raising tuition at a quicker pace again that's josh mitchell economics reporter for the wall street journal who writes about higher education thanks for talking with ish thank you the for kids who are serious about playing sports there's increasing pressure to pick one sport and specialized net beckoning year round intensive training it can make kids better but a.

healthcare costs reporter wall street journal josh mitchell
"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"josh mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To happen and while speculative it's not science fiction but do you think congressional reaction would be and would it be bipartisan i certainly hope it would be vigorous and bipartisan and let me just say this the trump administration the president himself liked jame that they're very transparent often that word has a very different meaning a women the trump uh lexicon but here i think the president is being transparent his intentions are quite transparent and that is he wants to force jeff sessions to resign he wants jeff sessions to resign rather than ever before uh so that the president doesn't have his finger quite so vigorously applied his removal but nonetheless he wants him gone and i think it's quite clear why he wants some gone should go pretty go well not if this is so out of a desire for the president to rein in the scope obamas' investigation by appointing a new attorney general who would do that and if that's what the president has in mind i would hope the reaction on a bipartisan basis in the senate would be to reject any nominee that will be anything less than deferential to the special counsel and commit to not interfering in the breath or depth of the special counsel's investigation i would also hope that if this were to to culminate in the firing of bob mower for some reason in the sense that the president gets a new ag who will do that for him that we would immediately pass a new independent counsel law that would allow for the reappointment of bob moeller position that is beyond the reach of the president congressman adam schiff of california ranking democrat on the house intelligence committee thanks for talking with his once again thank you you're listening to all things considered on wnyc here's some welcome news to anyone planning to attend college soon or to their parents perhaps tuition is growing at the slowest pace in decades we're going to talk with josh mitchell of the wall street journal who has been reporting on that trend plus a new study finds kids who specialize in one sport are more likely to be invert the sport.

president jame obamas senate special counsel bob mower congressman adam schiff california josh mitchell wall street journal trump jeff attorney bob moeller the house