29 Burst results for "Josh Clark"

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"How long humans have left on earth as species go humanity has had a brief incredibly transformative right here on earth some of the same innovations ultimately become the agents of our collective demise this is the end of the world with Josh Clark this is not a hoax this is not a joke it is becoming clear that we hold in our hands the fate of the entire human race those of us alive today are part of a very small group including us in perhaps a few generations to follow who are responsible for the future of humanity and if it turns out that we are alone in the universe and even the state of intelligent life may hang in the balance no other humans have ever been in the unenviable position that we are no humans who live before we're actually capable of wiping the human race from existence know whether humans were capable of **** things up so badly in permanently in those future humans to come will be in this position either if we fail in the worst happens there won't be any future humans can if we succeed in deliver the human race to a safe future those future humans will have arrived at a place where they can easily deal with any risks that may come we will have made existential risks extinct taking all of this together everything seems to point to the coming century or two is the most dangerous period in human history it's an extremely odd thing to say but together you me and everyone we know the peer to be the most vitally important humans could ever lift and.

Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Or down whenever you hear a song and your feedback will help enhance your I heart radio listening experience will also hand out pamphlets about how the virus is spread governor Murphy says he expects beaches will be open for the Memorial Day weekend what's unclear is how many people will venture out of their homes to go down to the Jersey Shore sorry teens in Georgia you'll have to take the driving test after all governor Brian Kim said teens who got there first driver's license without taking the road test have until September thirtieth to complete it about twenty thousand teens were told there would be no road test because of the corona virus pandemic Brian should again be seen news radio this is the I heart podcast channel all the best podcast all on one channel all for free by downloading the I heart radio app right now how long humans have left on earth as species go humanity has had a brief incredibly transformative right here on earth some of those same innovations ultimately become the agents of our collective demise this is the end of the world with Josh Clark this is not a hoax this is not a joke it is becoming clear that we hold in our hands the fate of the entire human race those of us alive today are part of a very small group including us in perhaps a few generations to follow who are responsible for the future of humanity and if it turns out that we are alone in the universe and even the state of intelligent life may hang in the balance no other humans have ever been in the unenviable position that we are no humans who live before we're actually capable of wiping the human race from existence no other humans were capable of **** things up so badly in permanently in those future humans to come will be in this position either if we fail in the worst happens there won't be any future humans if we succeed in deliver the human race to a safe future those future humans will have arrived at a place where they can easily deal with any risks that may come we will have made existential risks extinct taking all of this together everything seems to point to the coming century or two is the most dangerous period in human history it's an extremely odd thing to say but together you me and everyone we know appear to be the most vitally important humans could ever lift and as much as is riding on this we have a lot going against us we are our own worst enemies when it comes to existential risks we come pre loaded.

governor Murphy Georgia Brian Kim Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"How long humans have left on earth S. species got humanity has had a brief incredibly transformative run here on earth some of the same innovations ultimately become the agents of our collective demise this is the end of the world with Josh Clark this is not a hoax this is not a joke it is becoming clear that we hold in our hands the fate of the entire human race those of us alive today are part of a very small group including us in perhaps a few generations to follow who are responsible for the future of humanity and if it turns out that we are alone in the universe and even the state of intelligent life may hang in the balance no other humans have ever been in the unenviable position that we are no humans who live before we're actually capable of wiping the human race from existence no other humans were capable of **** things up so badly in permanently in those future humans to come will be in this position either if we fail in the worst happens there won't be any future humans and if we succeed in deliver the human race to a safe future those future humans will have arrived at a place where they can easily deal with any risks that may come we will have made existential risks extinct taking all of this together everything seems to point to the coming century or two is the most dangerous period in human history it's an extremely odd thing to say but together you me and everyone we know the peer to be the most vitally important humans could ever lift and.

Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the podcast time Josh Clark and there's chose to be took pride in those cheery and we're about to try some physics yeah this is your body tries yeah this did not break my brain like I thought it would yeah I think it's a pretty surface level explanation but it like it gets the point across and I don't see any reason for us to try to go any deeper I don't think we very quickly spin out of control like a up down Cork or something yes so dark matter is invisible glue that holds everything together the end the we just don't know what it is now we'll get into it but you might notice dear listener a new thing in your feed popping up next week next week next Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday is we are debuting a new thing called short stuff which is just the cutest name yeah this is stuff you should know short stuff I guess is the full name probably or not who cares yeah but it's just it's a stuff you should know up so did you mean Jerry but over the years of of recording like we get these lists of topics we want to do so many looks and this one like part of the list just kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger because they're like topics out there that are really interesting but they're just not big enough for a full episode even with tangent upon tangent and we could have like we could have been like all put like three of them together randomly we thought about doing that yeah just didn't feel right so what we did was spin off like a new podcast called short stuff which is just a smaller sized episode of stuff you should know just because the topic wasn't quite big enough to warrant a full episode or large size of his own we're doing a small size upside yeah so look for like ten to fifteen minutes tops I think we're in the wheel house of about twelve minutes we seem to like magically hit twelve every time yeah and it's like it's kind of fun I think it's a it's a great idea I'm I'm really happy with them yeah same here and I think the first four we recorded we didn't know what we're going to call it yet right and I don't believe we went to the trouble of going back and changing that we have it we might do that we do in the cherry she just shrugged no she said I said that sounds like our yeah it would be just like us to just sort of while our way into this thing sure and which is exactly what we did but hopefully you guys enjoy him didn't cost anything yeah so don't complain actually because if they're way off base here they could be better we want to hear about no I think people be like oh this is just like a little bite sized stuff you should know something exactly what it is it's like a snickers manager but of stuff you should now that's right and you know our love of small things here especially snickers like tiny Tabasco bottles this is the tiny Tabasco bottle version of a ridge of those things are ice list all right so physics dark matter go let's do this all right so this wasn't as hard as I thought no it is actually pretty easy to get across yeah here's the thing so astronomers have gotten to the point is starting in about nineteen twenty on yeah a strong numbers in physicists and astrophysicists and even particle physicists got to the point where all of their combined knowledge was refined enough that they could look out into the universe and be like we can figure out how much this ways right to put it more scientifically we can figure out what the mass of the universes it's going to take a really long time but we are now at the point where our level of observation and our level of understanding of physics is is such that we can do it we're there now yeah and it's not just like oh well that way is this the end right like knowing something's mass tells you a lot about it the way it behaves and the the nature and future of the universe is we'll see yeah for sure so it's not just wait it's it's more complicated than that and what weight can tell us right the problem is you can't just like put a galaxy or star something on the scale broke the scale pretty quick it actually vaporized but the the there are ways you can infer the mass of something yeah one of the ways that you can infer the mass of a star from what I understand is to measure its luminosity how bright it is yeah I've also heard that it's a mixed bag because it seems like it could have doing this they have different different sizes in their life span yeah I I've just heard luminosity in mass is not is not just straight forward sure like it like most things in astrophysics are yeah that's the word on the street right so when they started getting to the point where they could infer the weight of a star or the galaxy or a galaxy cluster which is basically like a galaxy of galaxies yeah this Sir did notice something really weird all the matter that they could see the stars the gas clouds the cosmic dust the everything matter things that make up you in media things that everything has a a common basic unit and Adam is made up of elementary particles like protons and neutrons electrons matter every non living and living thing on in the galaxy you would think is made of matter the problem is they started finding that you know this galaxy over here in this galaxy cluster in everywhere we're looking the dim amount of matter that we're seeing is way too small for the amount of mass the thing we're looking at appears to have been a cosmological mystery was launched what the heck is going on was the question of the day yeah so all that matter that we know about the call that baryonic matter and they were like this the the calculations are offer something like there's got to be something else there to account for this well that's the two the two possibilities well sure in so way back and Jeez was at nineteen thirty two an astronomer the Dutch astronomer name Jaan Hendrik who worked mmhm because he's Dutch sure he actually I believe was the first person to use the term dark matter is that right that's what I thought so dark matter is a it is a sort of a place holder name for what they came up with for this for lack of a better word this invisible matter that has to be out there mmhm is this for like a window like you can't see wind but that doesn't mean it's not out there because you can measure it in different ways see how it reacts on other things right and so they they called start going in dark matter right this invisible well we'll talk about what ends up sort of looking like in a minute I will give that away yet right but this invisible matter that they think is there right but it doesn't it doesn't emit or absorb light or electromagnetic magnetic energy so it's it's way different it behaves differently such that the people were very confused as to as to what the heck was going on and they still are yes Sir so there isn't so this term dark better like you said it's a place holder and it's a place holder for the current point we are in our understanding of the universe which is when we look out at galaxy clusters in galaxies and all this stuff there's not enough matter to account for the amount of mass they were seeing so again that means one of two things either there's something there that we can't detect or our our understanding of physics is off in the term dark matter stands for both of those it could be a thing and yet there's covered particle or something like that or it could be a mis understanding of physics that we need to eventually correct either way there's a lot of mass that is unaccounted for throughout the universe and it seems like there's a lot more what we call dark matter yeah then there's regular matter and the more we look into it the more it seems like there's something there that we haven't discovered yet yes the right now baryonic matter all the stuff that we know about ounce for about four and a half percent twenty three percent of where they take dark matter then we have something that I don't even know if I ever wanna cover called dark energy which makes up the other seventy two percent but they know it's there because there's something out there that we can account for that has a significant gravitational force right that's where the whole the whole thing started where they first detected it right so when they first started looking out at galaxies and stuff like that there's this whole thing that Newton came up with the second law of motion yeah where and this is like a tried and true law it's a law this is a new and suggestion of motion right Newton's second what about this of motion it's a will a scientific law that it is is proven and accepted as a scientific observation can be is to be made a law in it said that when you're looking at a galaxy far far away ended the most of the matter is accumulated toward the center of the galaxy that means most of the masses accumulated toward the center okay yes okay so that means that the stars near the center are going to spin they're going to rotate around the the galaxy a lot faster than the ones on the fringes because the ones on the fringes are going to go a lot more slowly because they're further away from that center of mass so the gravitational pull is going to be weaker yeah I mean that's the easiest way to say it is in the center you have more mass more mass means things are spinning faster there's more gravitational pull right so all these strong numbers supposed like you said the stuff on the outskirts are probably hanging out there's been a lot slower right well when they look to they found that's not the case at all as a matter of fact the stars on the outsider spinning around the center of the galaxy just as fast as the stars near the center of the galaxy which makes zero sense yeah it's almost as if they're some invisible force help here right I like if you look at this if you look at this some this galaxy the situation that they started to find and it wasn't just one galaxy they they found in this galaxy to in this galaxy to an even stranger than that they found it in those clusters as galactic clusters so rather than stars that make up a galaxy this is galaxies making up a huge giant make a galaxy the same thing happened the galaxies on the outer edge of the cluster worst.

Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"The end of the world with Josh Clark it was a cold windy day in January nineteen seventy nine when the robots took their first human life it happened in flat rock Michigan about twenty miles down the interstate from Detroit at the Ford plant there Robert Williams was twenty five he was a Ford worker in one of the people who oversaw the robotic arm that was designed to retrieve parts from bins in the storage room and place them in the cart that carried them out to the humans on the assembly line the robot was malfunctioning that day in a word the slow down it was creating on the line Robert Williams went to grab the parts himself while Williams was reaching into a bin the one ton robotic arm swung into that same day the robot didn't have any alarms to warn Williams it was nearby I didn't have any sensors to tell a human was in its path it only have the intelligence to execute its commands to retrieve in place auto parts the robots struck Williams head with such force that it killed him instantly it was thirty minutes before anyone came to look for Robert Williams during that time the robot continue to slowly do its work well Williams lay dead on the park's room for the death of Robert Williams happened during a weird time for a the public at large still felt unsure about the machines that they were increasingly living and working among Hollywood could still rely on the troop of our machines running amok and ruining the future for humanity four games in the terminator will be released in the next five years both in the field that was trying to actually produce those machines that may or may not run amok in the future there is a growing crisis of confidence for decades A. I. researchers have been making grand but fruitless public pronouncements about advancements in the field as early as nineteen fifty six when a group of artificial intelligence pioneers met at Dartmouth the researchers wrote that they expected to have all the major Kinks worked out of A. I. by the end of the semester and the predictions kept up from there so you can understand how the public came to believe that robots that we're smarter than humans we're just around the corner but a I never managed to produce the results expected from them by the late nineteen eighties the field retreated into itself funding dried up candidates looks for careers in other fields the research was pushed to the fringe it was an A. I. winter the public moved on to the terminator was replaced by Johnny five in the film maximum overdrive our machines turned against us but it's the result of a magical comic not from the work of scientists recently quietly the field of A. I. has begun to move past the old barriers that once held it back under the grand pronouncements today's researchers tempered by the memory of their predecessors public failures are more likely to down play progress in the field and from this new A. I. we have a clear picture of the existential risks it poses than we ever had before the A. I. we may face in the future will be subtler and vastly more difficult to overcome then a sideboard with a shocking in hindsight it was the path toward machine learning that the early A. I. researchers chose that led them to a dead end let's say you want to build a machine that sorts red balls from green balls first you have to explain what a ball is called first really you have to have a general understanding of what makes a ball of ball which is easier said than done try explaining a ball the someone that doesn't use terms that one would have to already be familiar with like severe or round or circle once you have that figured out you then have to translate that logic in those rules in the code the language of machines ones and zeros S. and then now you have to do the same thing with the concept of the color red and then the color green so that your machine can distinguish between red balls and green balls and let's not forget that you have to program it to distinguish in the first place it's not like your machine comes pre loaded with distinguishing software.

Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on KTOK

"World with Josh Clark it was a cold windy day in January nineteen seventy nine when the robots took their first human life it happened in flat rock Michigan about twenty miles down the interstate from Detroit at the Ford plant there Robert Williams was twenty five it was a Ford worker in one of the people who oversaw the robotic arm that was designed to retrieve parts from bins in the storage room in place amid the carts that carry them out to the humans on the assembly line the robot was malfunctioning that day in a word the slow down it was creating on the line Robert Williams went to grab the parts themselves while Williams was reaching into a bin the one ton robotic arm swung into that same band the robot didn't have any alarms to warn Williams it was nearby it didn't have any sensors to tell a human was in its path it only have the intelligence to execute its commands to retrieve in place auto parts the robots struck Williams head with such force that it killed him instantly it was thirty minutes before anyone came to look for Robert Williams during that time the robot continue to slowly do its work well Williams lay dead on the park's room floor the death of Robert Williams happened during a weird time for A. I. the public at large still felt unsure about the machines that they were increasingly living and working among Hollywood could still rely on the truth of our machines running amok and ruining the future for humanity both four games in the terminator will be released in the next five years both in the field that was trying to actually produce those machines that may or may not run amok in the future there is a growing crisis of confidence for decades A. I. researchers have been making grand but fruitless public pronouncements about advancements in the field as early as nineteen fifty six when a group of artificial intelligence pioneers met at Dartmouth the researchers wrote that they expected to have all the major Kinks worked out of A. I. by the end of the semester and the predictions kept up from there so you can understand how the public came to believe that robots that we're smarter than humans we're just around the corner but a I never managed to produce the results expected from them by the late nineteen eighties the field retreated into itself funding dried up candidates look for careers in other fields the research was pushed to the fringe it was an A. I. winter the public moved on to the terminator was replaced by Johnny five in the film maximum overdrive our machines turned against us but it's the result of a magical comic not from the work of scientists recently quietly the field of A. I. has begun to move past the old barriers that once held it back Connor the grand pronouncements today's researchers tempered by the memory of their predecessors public failures are more likely to down play progress in the field and from this new A. I. we have a clear picture of the existential risks it poses than we ever had before the A. I. we may face in the future will be subtler and vastly more difficult to overcome then a sideboard with a shot gun in hindsight it was the path toward machine learning that the early A. I. researchers chose that led them to a dead end let's say you want to build a machine that sorts red balls from green balls first you have to explain what a ball is well first really you have to have a general understanding of what makes a ball a ball which is easier said than done try explaining a ball the someone that doesn't use terms that one would have to already be familiar with like severe or round or circle once you have that figured out you then have to translate that logic in those rules in the code the language of machines ones and zeros if Simonds now you have to do the same thing with the concept of the color red and then the color green so that your machine can distinguish between red balls and green balls and let's not forget that you have to program it to distinguish in the first place it's not like your machine comes pre loaded with distinguishing software you have to write that too since you're making a sorting machine we have to write code that shows and how to manipulate another machine your robot sorter to let it touch the physical world and once you have your machine up and running and working smoothly separating red balls from Greenland what happens when a yellow ball shows up things like this do happen from time to time in real life what does your machine do then despite the incredible technical difficulties I faced the field of artificial intelligence did have a lot of success in teaching machines that could think very well with a narrow domains one program called deep blue beat the reigning human chess champion Garry Kasparov in six games at a match in nineteen ninety seven to be certain the intellectual abilities required by Chesser of fast improvement over those required to select a red ball from a green one of both of those programs share a common problem they only know how to do one thing the goal of a I has never been to.

Josh Clark
"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"josh clark" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"This end of the world with Josh Clark this is not a hoax this is not a joke it is becoming clear that we hold in our hands the state of the entire human race those of us alive today are part of a very small group including us in perhaps a few generations to follow who are responsible for the future of humanity and if it turns out that we are alone in the universe then even the fate of intelligent life may hang in the balance no other humans have ever been in the unenviable position that we are no humans who live before we're actually capable of wiping the human race from existence no other humans were capable of **** things up so badly in permanently in those future humans to come will be in this position either if we fail in the worst happens there won't be any future humans and if we succeed in deliver the human race to a safe future those future humans will have arrived at a place where they can easily deal with any risks that may come we will have made existential risks extinct taking all of this together everything seems to point to the coming century or two is the most dangerous period in human history it's an extremely odd thing to say but together you me and everyone we know the peer to be the most vitally important humans could ever lift and as much as is riding on this we have a lot going against us we are our own worst enemies when it comes to existential risks we come pre loaded with a lot of biases that keep us from thinking rationally we prefer not to think about pleasant things like the sudden extinction of our species our brains aren't wired to think ahead to the degree that existential risks requires to really very little of our hundred thousand years or so of the cumulated human experience has prepared us to take on the challenge that we are coming to face and a lot of the experience that we do have can actually steer us wrong it's almost like we were dropped into a point in history we hadn't yet become equipped to deal with yet despite how utterly unbelievable the position that we find ourselves in is the evidence points to this is our reality the cosmic silence that creates the Fermi paradox tells us that we are either alone and always have been whether we are alone because no other civilization has managed to survive if the latter is true if the great filter has killed off every other civilization in the universe before they could spread out from their home planets then we will face the same impossible step that everyone else has before as we attempt to move off of earth and if the great filters real then it appears to be coming our way in the form of the powerful technology that we're beginning to create right now but even granting that the great filter hypothesis may be faulty that we aren't alone that there really is intelligent life elsewhere we still find ourselves in the same position we are in grave danger of wiping ourselves out there doesn't appear to be anyone coming to guide us through the treacherous times ahead whether we're alone in the universe or not we appear to be on our own in facing our existential risks all of our shortcomings and flaws notwithstanding there is hope we humans are smart widely ingenious creatures it is much as we like to think of ourselves as something higher than animals those hundreds of millions of years of animal evolution is still very much in our nature and when we're backed into a corner that animal ancestry comes rising to the surface we fight we rail against our demise we survive if we can manage to join that creature habits to the intelligence we've involved there really does make us different from other animals then we have a chance of making it through the existential risks that lie waiting ahead if we can do that we will deliver the entire human race to a safe place where it can thrive and flourish for billions of years it's in our ability to do this we can do this some of us are already trying and we've already shown that we can face down existential risks we've done it before we encountered the first potential human made existential risk we've ever faced in New Mexico of all places on July sixteenth nineteen forty five it just before five thirty AM the desert outside of Alamogordo was the site of the first detonation of a nuclear bomb in human history they called it the Trinity test at the moment the bomb detonated the pre dawn sky lit up brighter than the sun and the landscape is beautiful in golden gray and violet purple and blue the explosion was so bright that one of the bombs designers went blind for nearly half a minute from looking directly at by the blast site the sandy ground instantly turned into a green glass the type that it never existed on earth before that moment they call the Trinity to mark the occasion then they buried it so no one would find on this day at this moment the world was brought into the atomic age an age of paranoia among everyday people that the world could end at any moment in less than a month America would explode an atomic bomb over Hiroshima Japan in sixty five thousand people would die in an instant another fifty five thousand people die from the bomb's effects over the next year in three days after he received America would drop the second bomb over Nagasaki and another fifty thousand people would die but even before all of the death and destruction in America reached on Japan in August of nineteen forty five even before the Trinity test that day in July nuclear weapons became our first potential human made existential threats when the scientists building the bomb wondered if.

Josh Clark
How Did Clickers Save Lives on D-Day?

BrainStuff

05:39 min | 2 years ago

How Did Clickers Save Lives on D-Day?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Oregon. You know, when something goes wrong at home, and you just freak out, I have definitely had my moments especially when it comes to pests ants in the mirror. Nara, cockroaches hanging out around your bubble bath and uninvited rat, a your daughter's birthday party. Don't let pests ruin the moment, get an architect out to your house tomorrow. Bill, protect your time and your temper. Visit organ dot com slash brain to save fifty dollars on your first general pest service with the promo code pod. Fifty that's peo- d five zero Oregon home is where the bugs aren't. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here shortly after midnight in the early hours of June sixth, nineteen forty four nearly twenty thousand allied paratroopers dropped behind enemy lines to be the first soldiers on the ground on d day conditions were terrible that cloud, cover, and fog made it nearly impossible to spot their landing targets and the night sky was pierced with Nazi heavy anti aircraft rounds and Steiber fire for those paratroopers, who made it to the ground, many were separated from their units and unsure of their locations alone in enemy-held territory. They had to find their comrades in the fog, blanketed dark without tipping off the enemy good thing. They had their clicker. Hours earlier when boarding the transport aircraft back in England. Members of the United States one hundred and first division were each handed a small metal box that would serve as a low tech emergency communication device by pushing down on the list of the box with the thumb and releasing it made a sharp clicking sound their instructions were simple. If you're on the ground, and here's someone approaching click once two clicks reply means a friend. No, click could be in trouble. Twenty four hours after landing. The paratroopers were told to ditch or hide their clippers allied commanders were worried that the devices would fall into Nazi hands and be used trick allied soldiers into thinking that an approaching fo was friendly, the day clippers were only an action for twenty four hours, but who knows how many lives were saved by the simple, ingenuity. Inspired by the seventy fifth anniversary of the day invasion. This year, the British company that made those original day clicker is on a search and rescue mission of its own of the seven thousand clicker is manufactured by acme whistles during World War, Two less than a dozen have been recovered. Now. The company has launched a worldwide campaign to find the loss. Deta- clicker and learn the stories behind the brave troops, who carried them we spoke with Ben McFarland, the head of sales, and marketing at acme whistles, which still manufactures whistles in the same Birmingham England factory that took a direct hit from Nazi bombers during the war. He says that the few confirmed clippers in circulation are all held by museums and private collectors, acme whistles itself doesn't possess even one of the original clippers, although it sells an exact replica made with the original machine presses just because there have been so few recovered DJ clippers it doesn't mean that there are not more out there. Mcfarland, said it just means that people don't know that they've got them acme was those has been businesses. Eighteen seventy and is responsible for a number of important whistle. Firsts. It's founder Joseph Hudson. Invent? The first police whistle used by the London. Metropolitan police prior to that the Bobby on the beat used a wooden rattle. Hudson. Also invented the very first sports, whistle the original acme thunder before that football referees. That's soccer to Americans in the UK waved, a white handkerchief to get the players. Attention, not quite as effective. But back to the clippers since the clippers were exclusively supplied to the US, one hundred first airborne McFarland, expects that many reside in America either handed down as heirlooms from generation to generation, or in the hands of antiques collectors, who may not know the Geraldo providence of these humble looking boxes, the day, clicker, also known as the acne cricket was originally used by marching band leaders to click out the tempo of piece of music. They're made of brass and are half open rectangular boxes about the size of the top joint of thumb by half open. I mean that one short end in parts of two walls, are busy from the design the remaining short end is labeled with the acme made an England if you think you're in possession of an original day, clicker MacFarlane wants you to. Email him personally at Ben dot McFarland at acme whistles dot CO dot UK. He's already heard from at least one American woman who appears to have the real deal acne was those plans to invite all clicker owners to England take a tour of the factory receiving engraved, commemorative whistle and share the story of the brave paratrooper who carry the clicker into combat on the day. This episode was written by Dave rou and produced by Tyler Clegg, brainstorm is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more in this most of other topics designed to make a very specific ruckus. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth in Minneapolis in DC.

Clippers Ben Mcfarland Oregon England Iheartradio Ben Dot Mcfarland Josh Clark United States Minneapolis Joseph Hudson UK Bill Lauren Vogel London Mcfarland Football DC Washington
Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

BrainStuff

05:51 min | 2 years ago

Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. Dark matter. Sounds a little mysterious because it is it stuff. We can't see with any existing telescopes but that math and physics tells us must exist based on the way that normal matter the stuff we can see babes. And there's a lot of dark matter out there astrophysicists think the twenty-seven percent of the universe is made up of dark matter. Compared with only five percent normal matter, meaning that the term normal probably isn't the most accurate dark matter is the bedrock that all galaxies are anchored to you can't get one without the other. Or so we thought until strana mors found ghostly galaxy. The doesn't appear contain any dark matter. It's as if the universe is planning trick on us by flipping the laws of physics on their head dark matter should be there. But isn't it's a game changer galaxy astronomers are saying, and it's like nothing we've ever seen before we may not be able to spot dark matter. But astronomers can measure its gravitational effects acting on normal matter. For example, they can look at how fast stars cruise around galaxy when dark matters. Isn't that galaxies gravity will be bulked up causing it starts to move faster than if just normal matter were present? But in the case of N, G C one, oh, five two dash d f to an ultra diffuse. Galaxy located sixty five million light years away. Astronomers found that it stars are moving in exactly the way that would be predicted if only the total mass of all the visible stuff is considered. In other words, dark matter doesn't seem to be exerting its gravity on normal matter in that galaxy. And that's weird. Peter von doco of Yale University, sudden statement finding a galaxy without dark matter is unexpected because this invisible mysterious substance is the most dominant aspect of any galaxy for decades without the galaxy start their lives as blobs of dark matter after that everything else, happens guests falls into the dark matter halos, the gas turns into stars. They slowly build up, then you end up with galaxies, like the Milky Way this galaxy challenges the standard ideas of how we think galaxies form ultra diffuse galaxies auditees in their own. Right. Having only been discovered in two thousand fifteen as they are very difficult to detect. However, it appears that this class of galaxy is common but none are like the one in question. The galaxy was discovered using the Dragonfly telephoto array telescope in New Mexico. That's custom made to seek out these allusive targets. Then using a set of twin ten meter optical and infrared telescopes in Hawaii, the Stromer signaled out ten bright, globular clusters, which are large combat groups of stars orbiting the galaxy's core. They let us spectra. Data to measure their motions these clusters were found to be plotting along more slowly than expected. Meaning there's far less mass in that galaxy then would be predicted. In fact, there's so little mass that the researchers have come to the astonishing conclusion that there's little if any dark matter their follow up observations were made with Gemini north telescope. Also in Hawaii. So the galaxy structure could be studied with geminis help the researchers ruled out interactions with other galaxies, as being the cause of it's weird dark matter deficit. Ben dot com said in the press. Release, if there's any dark matter at all. It's very little the stars in the galaxy can account for all of a mass, and there doesn't seem to be any room for dark matter. This finding seems to suggest the dark matter has quote its own separate existence apart from other components of galaxies, he added and this makes the very existence of this galaxy of mystery if it has no dark matter how did even Volve into a galaxy in their study published in March in the journal nature then doco teams speculates that some cataclysmic event in the galaxy. He may have cleared out all the dark matter and blasted away all the star forming gases alternatively a nearby massive, elliptical galaxy may have played a role in the current galaxies lack of dark matter, billions of years ago when it was undergoing, it's early and violent stages of evolution. Now, the researchers are pouring over Hubble space telescopes observations of similar galaxies, to perhaps find more that lack dark matter, if they find more than alternative fuels and faint galaxies might be the norm when dark matter isn't present, and that's a fascinating development in our understanding of how galaxies evolve. Then dot com concluded every galaxy we do about before has dark matter. And they all fall in familiar categories like spiral or elliptical galaxies. But what would you get if there's no dark matter at all? Maybe this is what you would get. Today's episode was written by Dr Ian O'Neill, and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other dark topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts for my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth. Minniap- in DC.

Iheartradio Josh Clark Hawaii Minneapolis DC Lauren Bogle Yale University Washington Geminis New Mexico Peter Parkway Theater Minnesota Volve Dr Ian O'neill Apple Sixty Five Million Light Years Twenty-Seven Percent Five Two Dash
What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 2 years ago

What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

"Today's episode is brought to you by gravity blankets. They make weighted blankets these blankets that contain fine grade glass. Beads to weigh them down when you curl up under one it's supposed to simulate the feeling of being gently held her hugged. They sent me want to try out. And I genuinely love this thing it is so comforting and relaxing. It puts me in the mood to sleep right away. The microphone duvet cover is incredibly soft, and has these ingenious little internal clasps to keep it in place if you'd like to try a gravity blanket for yourself. Let them know that we sent you and get fifteen percent off your order by entering the code brain stuff at checkout. It's one word. That's gravity. Blankets dot com. Promo code brain stuff. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here in December eighteen o two small sailing. Ship called the casino set sail from Peru northward along the South American coastline toward Gua quill in present-day Ecuador, a trip of about seven hundred miles or about one thousand one hundred kilometers one of the ship's. Passengers was thirty three year old Prussian aristocrat Alexander von Humboldt. A mining engineer by training Humboldt had an insatiable curiosity about nature that led him to roam the planet studying plants and animals as well as phenomena ranging from magnetic rocks to river systems in ocean currents fresh from studying the value of bat guano as minority because y'all humble used the sailing trip to investigate a powerful cold current that flowed from the tip of Chile to northern Peru ranging from just offshore to about six hundred miles off the coast. That's just under a thousand kilometers the current existence had been known for centuries to sailors and fishermen, but no scientists had ever systematically studied the flow Humboldt carefully measured the water temperature. The speed and continued on his journey, which eventually would lead him to Mexico. Humbles work was the beginning of scientific understanding of what's now known as the Humboldt current or the Peru current the current helps hold warm moist air off the coast keeping the climate cool. It also pulls plankton rich water from deep in the Pacific to the surface. Feeding a vast number and variety efficient birds and creating the richest marine ecosystem on the planet. It's fishing grounds. Provide about six percent of the world's catch and the Humboldt Kerns nutrients support the marine food chain of the Galapagos islands and influence its climate as well, it has helped make possible the archipelago's incredible bio-diversity in that sense. The Humboldt current also helped shape the development of evolutionary theory, the Galapagos provided the living laboratory for another nineteenth century scientist, Charles Darwin, who's paradigm shift and work on the origin of the species was published in eighteen fifty nine the year of humbled death. Darwin himself was inspired by the work of Humboldt who might be the most important scientists that we don't care much about the early to mid eighteen hundreds though, he might have been the most renowned researcher on the planet. I'm what was the first to investigate the relationship between mean temperature in elevating and came up with the concept of maps with isotherm aligns the delineate areas with the same temperature at a given time he did important early work on the origin of tropical storms. Most importantly Humboldt altered the way that scientists see the natural world by finding interconnections. This scientists invented the concept of a web of life. What he called this great chain of causes and effects some consider him to be the first to college issed. He was a head of the curve on understanding environmental problems such as deforestation and its effect upon climate, which he I observed around lake Lancia in Venezuela back in eighteen hundred Humboldt was also predecessor to Albert Einstein as a scientist with a strong interest in social Justice. He was a critic of colonialism and supported revolution. Mary movements in South America. And also criticized the US a country, he otherwise admired for its institution of slavery. We spoke by Email with Aaron Sachs history, professor at Cornell University and author of the Humboldt current nineteenth century exploration. And the roots of American environmentalism he thinks that rather than focusing on humbled scientific discoveries. It's more important to look the insights and approaches to the work that we're based upon his research and observations he said to me his version of ecology was significant not just because he stressed interconnection. But because he combined it with a social and ethical perspective. The fact of interconnection had certain implications with regard to human responsibilities toward each other and the environment. It was a cosmopolitan open minded ecology. Today's episode was written by Patrick j tiger and participate. Tyler claim brain stuff is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other interconnected, topics? Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. In for more podcast, my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. It's me Josh Clark. And if you love the beautiful musical score that point Lobo created for the end of the world of Josh Clark. Then you can rejoice. It's now available as the original soundtrack album sixteen tracks selected and remastered by point logo capture the highs the imagination and the far out of the series, and they all come together to make really great album. It's like the spirit of the series now in a convenient capsule. You can get the end of the world with Josh Clark original soundtrack album everywhere. You get music online apple music, I tunes iheartradio Spotify. Amazon everywhere. Could check it out today.

Humboldt Scientist Alexander Von Humboldt Humboldt Kerns Josh Clark Peru Iheartradio Galapagos Apple Lauren Vogel South America Ecuador Charles Darwin United States Aaron Sachs Gua Quill Mexico
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Have you have incomplete geek street cred? Oh, yeah. No, gaps shooters. And there's things that I need to learn gap. That's okay. We still have you. So what was I talking about? So you said are we are we are we out of a rhino? Are we? University science somebody else's thumb Claire. Right. So let me answer that in a slightly different way. Okay. When we first probe the Adam. And we found the Adam has a nucleus, and it's got electrons orbit the nucleus. That's just like this always system. It's seems just like the galaxy with stars orbiting the center of the galaxy. We have planets orbiting a star who have orbiting. So maybe it's that all the way down. Right. Maybe that's the theme. Maybe that's how all this works. And when you start probing the atom on that scale, the laws of physics manifest in completely different ways. Right. So it's not just a scaling phenomenon. Right. So for us to have these laws of physics manifest the way we do and claim that it's the microscopic physics in someone else's collider. It's just not a realistic extension of how things work, although it was deeply attractive because it was philosophically pleasing to imagine that you just had nested because. Just nesting just keep going so because things manifest differently on these scales. You can't just get for example. Okay. There's something called a water strider, which is a an insect the construction on the water. Yeah. It's a surface tension of the water if that were any bigger, it would just fall through you. Can't you can't scale things because the forces operating have different manifestations on different scales. Right. That's why. And so that's why what what's the movie them. Remember, the movies them with the aunt dance? Oh, he's got one. I have seen that gallon. It's giant ants. I nuclear thing and the got big nice answer come in. Okay. Answer creepy anyway. And now they're bigger than you, you freak out that can never happen. Do you? I love because aunts have these tiny spindly little eggs, right? If you scale up the size of the ant. It's weight outstrips the ability of these spindly legs to hold him up. Have you done this on Twitter? Have you have you done a Twitter ran, but I could I totally ran. So the point is as you get bigger I can say this mathematically, right as you get bigger the strength of your legs. Your limbs only go. Up as the cross sectional area. But your weight goes up as the cube of your dimensions. Ooh. So what happens is because as you get bigger, you grow all dimensions. But your legs if it's wider, the strength is only the cross section of your land right at crowd crush. That's why hippopotami don't have skinny legs right there sort that the subtle leg stump p fifty elephants have stumped leg, right? Okay. Draft has long slender late draft and not all that much. It's slanted and the distribution is distribution. So it's so it's a fascinating cottage industry studying the relationship between size and life of how things scale. Wasn't a lightly cares. That was really cool, man. It's why if you take a bucket of water and emptied on your car, it doesn't stay as a big ball of water. But if the make the border smaller and smaller and smaller, it just becomes Trump drop in the dribble. Stay on because surface tension holds it. Strong to hold big things. Hold a little thing. Right. The world of insects is completely service driven their physics courses in insects. One was all about service, right? Yeah. Because you get trapped inside of a little bubble. Do I get out with? Physics everybody even every. We had a after that was that was cool wrap this. Oh, yeah. Yes. All right. We did get a bunch in there that was that was like the longest lightning round we've ever good. Good good. So Josh, thanks. Thanks for coming on. I think you so much again. I will do it. Anytime you want Eddie time just before we sign off tells exactly where to find your work. Oh, you can find the end of the world. Josh Clark, anywhere. You find podcasts including the iheartradio app.

Twitter Josh Clark Adam iheartradio Eddie Trump fifty elephants
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Have you have incomplete geek street cred? Oh, yeah. No, gaps shooters. And there's things that I need to learn gap. That's okay. We still have you. So what was I talking about? So you said are we are we are we out of a rhino? Are we? University science somebody else's thumb Claire. Right. So let me answer that in a slightly different way. Okay. When we first probe the Adam. And we found the Adam has a nucleus, and it's got electrons orbit the nucleus. That's just like this always system. It's seems just like the galaxy with stars orbiting the center of the galaxy. We have planets orbiting a star who have orbiting. So maybe it's that all the way down. Right. Maybe that's the theme. Maybe that's how all this works. And when you start probing the atom on that scale, the laws of physics manifest in completely different ways. Right. So it's not just a scaling phenomenon. Right. So for us to have these laws of physics manifest the way we do and claim that it's the microscopic physics in someone else's collider. It's just not a realistic extension of how things work, although it was deeply attractive because it was philosophically pleasing to imagine that you just had nested because. Just nesting just keep going so because things manifest differently on these scales. You can't just get for example. Okay. There's something called a water strider, which is a an insect the construction on the water. Yeah. It's a surface tension of the water if that were any bigger, it would just fall through you. Can't you can't scale things because the forces operating have different manifestations on different scales. Right. That's why. And so that's why what what's the movie them. Remember, the movies them with the aunt dance? Oh, he's got one. I have seen that gallon. It's giant ants. I nuclear thing and the got big nice answer come in. Okay. Answer creepy anyway. And now they're bigger than you, you freak out that can never happen. Do you? I love because aunts have these tiny spindly little eggs, right? If you scale up the size of the ant. It's weight outstrips the ability of these spindly legs to hold him up. Have you done this on Twitter? Have you have you done a Twitter ran, but I could I totally ran. So the point is as you get bigger I can say this mathematically, right as you get bigger the strength of your legs. Your limbs only go. Up as the cross sectional area. But your weight goes up as the cube of your dimensions. Ooh. So what happens is because as you get bigger, you grow all dimensions. But your legs if it's wider, the strength is only the cross section of your land right at crowd crush. That's why hippopotami don't have skinny legs right there sort that the subtle leg stump p fifty elephants have stumped leg, right? Okay. Draft has long slender late draft and not all that much. It's slanted and the distribution is distribution. So it's so it's a fascinating cottage industry studying the relationship between size and life of how things scale. Wasn't a lightly cares. That was really cool, man. It's why if you take a bucket of water and emptied on your car, it doesn't stay as a big ball of water. But if the make the border smaller and smaller and smaller, it just becomes Trump drop in the dribble. Stay on because surface tension holds it. Strong to hold big things. Hold a little thing. Right. The world of insects is completely service driven their physics courses in insects. One was all about service, right? Yeah. Because you get trapped inside of a little bubble. Do I get out with? Physics everybody even every. We had a after that was that was cool wrap this. Oh, yeah. Yes. All right. We did get a bunch in there that was that was like the longest lightning round we've ever good. Good good. So Josh, thanks. Thanks for coming on. I think you so much again. I will do it. Anytime you want Eddie time just before we sign off tells exactly where to find your work. Oh, you can find the end of the world. Josh Clark, anywhere. You find podcasts including the iheartradio app.

Twitter Josh Clark Adam iheartradio Eddie Trump fifty elephants
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Start talking back. I got Josh Clark. With me is as a new podcast on end of the world because he wasn't happy with a billion downloads of stuff, you should know. He still added. So glad you have you on the show. Thank you. So we're we're doing it's a Kuzma query edition, and Chuck we spent so much time answering only a few questions. Yes. We got to make this wholesale lightning round. So let's just do it. We have never done this before the. Which means that you have to answer the question as concisely poss- soundbite. The sound bite. If you don't sound bite. I will sound bite. You. Okay. Sure. Nico Blat two four seven on Instagram says when we find life off of the earth, would you expect? How would you expect religious groups to react with the change? Thanks from Illinois go they would freak out. I think. I. Some religious groups would freak out because life on earth human life on earth. Intelligent, human life on earth is believed to be the sole creation of God. But so many other religious groups will be totally down with it. And just see it as a greater part of God's creation. All right, Bing, bang land. Move on this is Liam Beckett on Instagram who says this do you think as society, we will ever get past biased news from both sides or only become more divided. Speaking of the end of the world. Yeah. Totally. I think this is kind of like a temporary problem that we have and we are going to continue to advance as we advance. We will be less divided. I that's my hope at least Neil that was beautiful. Thank you. That was unrealistically beautiful. Phase we're going through the beginning of the end of civilization. My my issue is people tried to beat each other on the head to convince them of your own opinion. And try to get you to vote in ways that align with your opinion when there's so much so many things out there that are objectively true that we should all agree on what is objectively true. And then Basil's ation on that. And then after that celebrate each other's diverse opinions rather than beat each other over the head for them being different. But I think that's a point that we're we're we can conceivably get to when we do we will be less divided. So really, you just the same thing. I did. All right town to Milan. All right. West rose Joan. Oh, wow. This is Frencesco Sundays says as long as humans have existed. I assume we have looked up and felt a connection with the universe. Even if we didn't have the insights of astrophysics and cosmology do our Adams. No, okay. It's that they came from there. No. Next quick. So so John Kennedy. I think before president Kennedy before he was president as you may know, he. Hound a home in Hyannis Port. So the ocean coastline is not unfamiliar to him. They own boats. This sort of thing he spoke often about the allure of the ocean and wondered openly whether we are drawn to the ocean shore because our genetic profile may remember that in fact became vertebrate history is open to the fishes in the sea. And that we're somehow pulled back to it. So I can I can poetically agree with that. But there is no way we could have known that. We are stardust of modern Astro physics telling us this. I think we'll look up in wonder, but I don't think it's because there's a genetic connection. I think it's because we just wanna know if someone up they're gonna eat us. Dangerous. We'll look at the universe. The way you look in the brush is something they're going to harm me. If it's not then otherwise, it's a beautiful thing to look at. Yeah. Interesting. Okay. Next alihundra have once from Twitter says this with some AI nearly capable of passing the turing test. Do you believe the technological singularity will occur in the near future?.

John Kennedy Josh Clark Instagram Liam Beckett Chuck Nico Blat Twitter Milan Illinois Neil Hyannis Port Basil Adams president
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Start talking back. I got Josh Clark. With me is as a new podcast on end of the world because he wasn't happy with a billion downloads of stuff, you should know. He still added. So glad you have you on the show. Thank you. So we're we're doing it's a Kuzma query edition, and Chuck we spent so much time answering only a few questions. Yes. We got to make this wholesale lightning round. So let's just do it. We have never done this before the. Which means that you have to answer the question as concisely poss- soundbite. The sound bite. If you don't sound bite. I will sound bite. You. Okay. Sure. Nico Blat two four seven on Instagram says when we find life off of the earth, would you expect? How would you expect religious groups to react with the change? Thanks from Illinois go they would freak out. I think. I. Some religious groups would freak out because life on earth human life on earth. Intelligent, human life on earth is believed to be the sole creation of God. But so many other religious groups will be totally down with it. And just see it as a greater part of God's creation. All right, Bing, bang land. Move on this is Liam Beckett on Instagram who says this do you think as society, we will ever get past biased news from both sides or only become more divided. Speaking of the end of the world. Yeah. Totally. I think this is kind of like a temporary problem that we have and we are going to continue to advance as we advance. We will be less divided. I that's my hope at least Neil that was beautiful. Thank you. That was unrealistically beautiful. Phase we're going through the beginning of the end of civilization. My my issue is people tried to beat each other on the head to convince them of your own opinion. And try to get you to vote in ways that align with your opinion when there's so much so many things out there that are objectively true that we should all agree on what is objectively true. And then Basil's ation on that. And then after that celebrate each other's diverse opinions rather than beat each other over the head for them being different. But I think that's a point that we're we're we can conceivably get to when we do we will be less divided. So really, you just the same thing. I did. All right town to Milan. All right. West rose Joan. Oh, wow. This is Frencesco Sundays says as long as humans have existed. I assume we have looked up and felt a connection with the universe. Even if we didn't have the insights of astrophysics and cosmology do our Adams. No, okay. It's that they came from there. No. Next quick. So so John Kennedy. I think before president Kennedy before he was president as you may know, he. Hound a home in Hyannis Port. So the ocean coastline is not unfamiliar to him. They own boats. This sort of thing he spoke often about the allure of the ocean and wondered openly whether we are drawn to the ocean shore because our genetic profile may remember that in fact became vertebrate history is open to the fishes in the sea. And that we're somehow pulled back to it..

John Kennedy Instagram Josh Clark Liam Beckett Nico Blat Chuck Hyannis Port Illinois president Neil Basil Milan Adams
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"If we take our intelligence Cucaracha, which are you actually? Have have a cockroach circus when I see caucus saying she that's intelligent, really not thinking that. I'm sorry. You're not as dumb as. No, you can be so intelligent that you have devise ways of destroying your own genetic lineage that is the entire point of the podcast that I made the end of the world Josh Clark that we could possibly have become so intelligent that. We might accidentally wipe ourselves out with that intelligence. This is my point. So therefore, intelligent copy Bara might not be wherever she takes it. Right. Okay. So let's say that that is that that we're following not a predetermined or prescribed process, but just want instead is probably going to follow within a certain boundary and that we're kind of in the middle of that boundary. And that the capybaras that came behind us would follow the same path. Right. There's every reason to believe that if we out the capybaras will wipe themselves out to and that goes to inform and other thing that I go into in the podcast what's called the great filter. That idea that it's possible that there is some barrier between the. Origin of life growing into intelligent life and that intelligent life spreading out into the universe. And that that is why we seem to be alone in the universe because the humans and the Kappa bars will always inevitably destroy themselves probably because of their intelligence because they gain as Sagan put it they became more powerful for they became wise, and that's a very precarious position being, and that's the physician that we're in right now, it's called adolescence. The energy to act but without the wisdom to to constrain it. So there's a version of what you said which surely know about because it would have been in that same world of research that you did it has to do with. All right. Let's say we want to colonize. That's a bad word today. Settle another plan. Show show. Let's say we wanna take a big case. One way. Right where we have actually build a place to live. All right. So what happens? So you go after the plan and then okay? What's the urge the major wanna do that? Well, it's an urge to explore okay? Or to conquer either. It's the same effect. Now, the people there who want to do the same thing bread this into your genetic line because you you haven't babies, and you're the one who wanted to do this. So then they get to planets and that babies and they get to go one two four eight sixteen. It is suggested that you can reach a point where the very urge to explore. Necessarily is the urge. To conquer thereby preventing the full exploration of the galaxy. Because you're gonna run into somebody. What into your own people people? Correct. Right. Correct. And that is a self limiting arc. That's that's the board. I mean, you know, but the thing is the the great filter in particular, which is an economist physicist. Turned economist, Robin Hanson, you're I'm sure you're okay. Well, Robin Hanson came up with this idea that there's there's something that stops life from expanding out into the planet. And the reason why it would seem to to stop before the expand out from their players because we would see evidence of them otherwise by now, let's the Fermi paradox. Right. Yeah. Which is episode one. Telling you, Neil you love. Right up your. Another question. Here we go. Let's fast because we're almost out of the segment. All right. Someone answer these questions because no, it's good. Deep dive DJ mass two thousand six from Instagram says, how do you want to die chug knows how I wanna fall into a black hole. That's it. Oh, that's a good one. Good one. Totally good. Good. Lord. Can I can I follow up with the question? Okay. Would you know that you have fallen into a black hole? That's what I wanna do. Then I'd fall in right? And then I would watch what happened in report back until my signal never gets out of the black hole. And I get ripped. Is if you're in them black hole, it is it is it a process that would allow you some consciousness at a at a level where you'll be like, oh my. Blackhall until you ripped apart. But your conscious of everything as you fall, even through the Harare even through the event horizon. You would still be oh, yes, you'll see the whole thing. Wow. Totally. How about you?.

Robin Hanson Bara Josh Clark Harare Sagan physicist Neil
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"If we take our intelligence Cucaracha, which are you actually? Have have a cockroach circus when I see caucus saying she that's intelligent, really not thinking that. I'm sorry. You're not as dumb as. No, you can be so intelligent that you have devise ways of destroying your own genetic lineage that is the entire point of the podcast that I made the end of the world Josh Clark that we could possibly have become so intelligent that. We might accidentally wipe ourselves out with that intelligence. This is my point. So therefore, intelligent copy Bara might not be wherever she takes it. Right. Okay. So let's say that that is that that we're following not a predetermined or prescribed process, but just want instead is probably going to follow within a certain boundary and that we're kind of in the middle of that boundary. And that the capybaras that came behind us would follow the same path. Right. There's every reason to believe that if we out the capybaras will wipe themselves out to and that goes to inform and other thing that I go into in the podcast what's called the great filter. That idea that it's possible that there is some barrier between the. Origin of life growing into intelligent life and that intelligent life spreading out into the universe. And that that is why we seem to be alone in the universe because the humans and the Kappa bars will always inevitably destroy themselves probably because of their intelligence because they gain as Sagan put it they became more powerful for they became wise, and that's a very precarious position being, and that's the physician that we're in right now, it's called adolescence. The energy to act but without the wisdom to to constrain it. So there's a version of what you said which surely know about because it would have been in that same world of research that you did it has to do with. All right. Let's say we want to colonize. That's a bad word today. Settle another plan. Show show. Let's say we wanna take a big case. One way. Right where we have actually build a place to live. All right. So what happens? So you go after the plan and then okay? What's the urge the major wanna do that? Well, it's an urge to explore okay? Or to conquer either. It's the same effect. Now, the people there who want to do the same thing bread this into your genetic line because you you haven't babies, and you're the one who wanted to do this. So then they get to planets and that babies and they get to go one two four eight sixteen. It is suggested that you can reach a point where the very urge to explore. Necessarily is the urge. To conquer thereby preventing the full exploration of the galaxy. Because you're gonna run into somebody. What into your own people people? Correct. Right. Correct. And that is a self limiting arc. That's that's the board. I mean, you know, but the thing is the the great filter in particular, which is an economist physicist. Turned economist, Robin Hanson, you're I'm sure you're okay. Well, Robin Hanson came up with this idea that there's there's something that stops life from expanding out into the planet. And the reason why it would seem to to stop before the expand out from their players because we would see evidence of them otherwise by now, let's the Fermi paradox. Right. Yeah. Which is episode one. Telling you, Neil you love. Right up your. Another question. Here we go. Let's fast because we're almost out of the segment. All right. Someone answer these questions because no, it's good. Deep dive DJ mass two thousand six from Instagram says, how do you want to die chug knows how I wanna fall into a black hole. That's it. Oh, that's a good one. Good one. Totally good. Good. Lord. Can I can I follow up with the question? Okay. Would you know that you have fallen into a black hole? That's what I wanna do. Then I'd fall in right? And then I would watch what happened in report back until my signal never gets out of the black hole. And I get ripped. Is if you're in them black hole, it is it is it a process that would allow you some consciousness at a at a level where you'll be like, oh my. Blackhall until you ripped apart. But your conscious of everything as you fall, even through the Harare even through the event horizon. You would still be oh, yes, you'll see the whole thing. Wow. Totally. How about you?.

Robin Hanson Bara Josh Clark Harare Sagan physicist Neil
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Cosmic queries edition on the ends of the word. And we've got Josh Clark with us job. Hey, welcome. Thank think, you're the stuff, you should know guy. Yes. That's right with a new podcast ends of the world. Yeah. The end of the world with Josh Clark appropriately and really associate your name with that concept. Tyler Perry of science podcast pretty much. Yeah. That's what I was going for a smart thing. Everyone who worked on it. I made sign a contract. So they would not look me in the eider in production. But it's a it's all about existential risks, and it's largely based on the work of a guy named Nick Bostrom who is Oxford basically been warning people about existential risks for twenty years in his really kind of giving us our understanding of what existential risks are why they're different and why they're worth paying attention. I said, I know him, I know his work. I've not met him. Yeah. References work many times talks. I got to speak to him a few times for the podcast like three times. And then the third time. His his assistant was like, you know, Dr Bostrom like puts every request for like a media appearance or an interview or project or whatever through a cost benefit analysis, and I made it through that grinder like three times, and I felt pretty good about that billion. Download has something to do with that. It's going. Yeah. I just came. You're saying billion heavy number. I think the reason why he he was speaking to me so frequently you're so willing to talk to me about the same thing three times is because you know, he was talking through me trying to reach more people and that kind of brought me back down to a little bit after it realize that. Good thing though. I mean, you know, it's worthwhile. So Chuck get some more questions. We're patriots. No. But I. God here it is. So this is Phil Vader Twenty-three from Instagram somewhat rhetorical. But I'm I'm I'm interested. I think I know why he asked if the world ended with the human race end, and I'll say vice versa there. There are a lot of people who feel like that. This is we're it who you know, what I mean. Like if we end that is the end. So if the world ended with human race end, and if the human race ends, we we know the world wouldn't end. But would it make a difference? Earth is going to be here with or without us the earth here before during and after asteroid strikes it's here before during and after viral attacks. So we are a blip in the history of the earth. So when people say, oh, save earth. Usually means save ourselves on earth. In almost every case. Somebody says save earth. That's implicitly what they mean save humans on earth. Save the other animals, they might say that. But I don't mean. That what they mean is. What we are doing is affecting other animals, and ultimately that might affect us because we're in we're gonna eco system that has balanced in and interconnectivity. So it's the shortsightedness of decisions we make. Let me not call shortsighted. Let me say not fully researched. No. Because I think people think they're doing what's okay right thought, let's make a smokestack plucked pump smoke into the air. So that goes into the air high above you rather than at ground level. That's better right and known as thinking, well, this is still in the air and is wrapping around the earth. You know, so air pollution was not imagined that it would ever be a worldwide problem. Right. And so we had to learn that. And when we did we'd made great progress. Right air is cleaner this ever been right. All around the world. Thank you L gore. Invented clean air. So yeah. This end of the earth thing do talk much about the end of the I do it was it's a it's a big point that I make that if we if we screw up, and we like wipe ourselves out whether it's through a or some biotech accident or maybe something going awry with nanotech or physics experiment, even potentially. If we do this drink my people into. I was waiting for global thermonuclear..

Nick Bostrom Josh Clark Tyler Perry Instagram Phil Vader Oxford Chuck twenty years
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Cosmic queries edition on the ends of the word. And we've got Josh Clark with us job. Hey, welcome. Thank think, you're the stuff, you should know guy. Yes. That's right with a new podcast ends of the world. Yeah. The end of the world with Josh Clark appropriately and really associate your name with that concept. Tyler Perry of science podcast pretty much. Yeah. That's what I was going for a smart thing. Everyone who worked on it. I made sign a contract. So they would not look me in the eider in production. But it's a it's all about existential risks, and it's largely based on the work of a guy named Nick Bostrom who is Oxford basically been warning people about existential risks for twenty years in his really kind of giving us our understanding of what existential risks are why they're different and why they're worth paying attention. I said, I know him, I know his work. I've not met him. Yeah. References work many times talks. I got to speak to him a few times for the podcast like three times. And then the third time. His his assistant was like, you know, Dr Bostrom like puts every request for like a media appearance or an interview or project or whatever through a cost benefit analysis, and I made it through that grinder like three times, and I felt pretty good about that billion. Download has something to do with that. It's going. Yeah. I just came. You're saying billion heavy number. I think the reason why he he was speaking to me so frequently you're so willing to talk to me about the same thing three times is because you know, he was talking through me trying to reach more people and that kind of brought me back down to a little bit after it realize that. Good thing though. I mean, you know, it's worthwhile. So Chuck get some more questions. We're patriots. No. But I. God here it is. So this is Phil Vader Twenty-three from Instagram somewhat rhetorical. But I'm I'm I'm interested. I think I know why he asked if the world ended with the human race end, and I'll say vice versa there. There are a lot of people who feel like that. This is we're it who you know, what I mean. Like if we end that is the end. So if the world ended with human race end, and if the human race ends, we we know the world wouldn't end. But would it make a difference? Earth is going to be here with or without us the earth here before during and after asteroid strikes it's here before during and after viral attacks. So we are a blip in the history of the earth. So when people say, oh, save earth. Usually means save ourselves on earth. In almost every case. Somebody says save earth. That's implicitly what they mean save humans on earth. Save the other animals, they might say that. But I don't mean. That what they mean is. What we are doing is affecting other animals, and ultimately that might affect us because we're in we're gonna eco system that has balanced in and interconnectivity. So it's the shortsightedness of decisions we make. Let me not call shortsighted. Let me say not fully researched. No. Because I think people think they're doing what's okay right thought, let's make a smokestack plucked pump smoke into the air. So that goes into the air high above you rather than at ground level. That's better right and known as thinking, well, this is still in the air and is wrapping around the earth. You know, so air pollution was not imagined that it would ever be a worldwide problem. Right. And so we had to learn that. And when we did we'd made great progress. Right air is cleaner this ever been right. All around the world. Thank you L gore. Invented clean air. So yeah. This end of the earth thing do talk much about the end of the I do it was it's a it's a big point that I make that if we if we screw up, and we like wipe ourselves out whether it's through a or some biotech accident or maybe something going awry with nanotech or physics experiment, even potentially. If we do this drink my people into. I was waiting for global thermonuclear..

Nick Bostrom Josh Clark Tyler Perry Instagram Phil Vader Oxford Chuck twenty years
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"This is star talk. Cosmic queries dishes today. I got Josh Clark in the house, and you know, him from stuff, you should know. And a newly emergent podcast called the end of the world. Josh welcome to start talk. Thank you very much for having me here. I mean, like, I'm really thrilled to be sitting here. Excellent. Excellent. And my co host Chuck nice. Hey, how are you? Welcome. And so I'm your host Neal grass Tyson. So Josh just stuff, you should know hugely popular yet. You know, we just hit one billion downloads. We've been around for almost eleven years. I think from what we understand where the first podcast ever hit a billion down. So now we have to teach you how to say that. Okay. All right. You had a billion? Eventually, we'll get billions. To billions, then we'll teach say. Well, congratulations. Excellent. Excellent. So that's a testament to not only how good the show is. But also that you've tapped into. The fact that people still wanna learn. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Yeah. When we started doing it in two thousand eight like learning was actually popular. I don't know if you remember back then, but like being smart geeky was. Yeah. Yeah. It's kind of changed a little bit recently. But overall, I think the fact that we are still popular shows that there always has been always will be people who want to keep learning people who leave college, and they're like, well, wait a minute. That was pretty cool hundred. Right. Exactly. And they definitely are fan base. And we there there's a lot of them out there. We can we can tell you, and you weren't satisfied with just stuff, you should know. Now, you got to end the world, right? All right. So Chuck we solicited questions from our fan base. Our social media platform, and we knew Josh what's coming on the show. Yeah. And so they they came they came at us. They did. Indeed. And of course, we have we gleaned these questions from every star talk incarnation on the interwebs, and we always start with a patriotic patron because so crass why I am. Indeed. I have no sane the man. Yes. That and you know, the patriot patriots give us money. And so therefore, we give them get question. Precedent and and privilege because we're look we're like we're like government people. Government. Oh, wow. God. Do I really wanna start off with such a heavy note line, not let's do it. This is Luke meadows from patriotic. He says this sounds like a soap opera name it ties. You know, what that's kind of cool. Dr Lu Dr excuse me. Dr. Only with me. Go. All right here, we go. What does Josh and meal? Think is our biggest existential risk. Wow. We're starting off with like bam the through heaviest bat in the rack. What is our biggest existentialism Rhys? You got a podcast with the name end of the world. Go for it. Okay. From what I found the across the board. Everybody who thinks about existential risks in warns other people about existential risks say that AI is probably our biggest existential risk. And the reason let me follow up with an explanation. Okay. The reason why is because we are putting onto the table right now the pieces for a machine to become superintendent. Right. It's out there. It's possible. It's not necessarily right there. But it's it's possible. Right. The problem is we haven't figured out how to create what's called. Cleaness into a so beings. Well, it's a really good point though. Right. Like how we don't even know how to define like morality and friendliness and in as far as goes friendliness in is in that cares about humans as much as a machine can care. It takes. I that doesn't kill you basically would count as a friendly. The problem is the pitfall with a is an existential risk is we make this assumption that if in became super intelligent friendliness or would be an emergent property of that superintendent is not necessarily true or that the friendliness that we instill into that would supersede the emergent property of overcoming friendliness in lieu of you guys. You guys gotta go, right? You guys are the problem. I've seen what you do to livestock, right? So yeah wins. Yes. I. That was good. That's agent hold on agent. Under all named Smith. Smith, not get. They're all Smith. Our awesome. Miss under soon. My name is Nieto. Okay. Was a different those apply. Now that was the end of the matrix for..

Josh Clark Chuck Luke meadows superintendent AI Smith Dr Lu Dr Neal Nieto Dr. Only eleven years
"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"josh clark" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"This is star talk. Cosmic queries dishes today. I got Josh Clark in the house, and you know, him from stuff, you should know. And a newly emergent podcast called the end of the world. Josh welcome to start talk. Thank you very much for having me here. I mean, like, I'm really thrilled to be sitting here. Excellent. Excellent. And my co host Chuck nice. Hey, how are you? Welcome. And so I'm your host Neal grass Tyson. So Josh just stuff, you should know hugely popular yet. You know, we just hit one billion downloads. We've been around for almost eleven years. I think from what we understand where the first podcast ever hit a billion down. So now we have to teach you how to say that. Okay. All right. You had a billion? Eventually, we'll get billions. To billions, then we'll teach say. Well, congratulations. Excellent. Excellent. So that's a testament to not only how good the show is. But also that you've tapped into. The fact that people still wanna learn. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Yeah. When we started doing it in two thousand eight like learning was actually popular. I don't know if you remember back then, but like being smart geeky was. Yeah. Yeah. It's kind of changed a little bit recently. But overall, I think the fact that we are still popular shows that there always has been always will be people who want to keep learning people who leave college, and they're like, well, wait a minute. That was pretty cool hundred. Right. Exactly. And they definitely are fan base. And we there there's a lot of them out there. We can we can tell you, and you weren't satisfied with just stuff, you should know. Now, you got to end the world, right? All right. So Chuck we solicited questions from our fan base. Our social media platform, and we knew Josh what's coming on the show. Yeah. And so they they came they came at us. They did. Indeed. And of course, we have we gleaned these questions from every star talk incarnation on the interwebs, and we always start with a patriotic patron because so crass why I am. Indeed. I have no sane the man. Yes. That and you know, the patriot patriots give us money. And so therefore, we give them get question. Precedent and and privilege because we're look we're like we're like government people. Government. Oh, wow. God. Do I really wanna start off with such a heavy note line, not let's do it. This is Luke meadows from patriotic. He says this sounds like a soap opera name it ties. You know, what that's kind of cool. Dr Lu Dr excuse me. Dr. Only with me. Go. All right here, we go. What does Josh and meal? Think is our biggest existential risk. Wow. We're starting off with like bam the through heaviest bat in the rack. What is our biggest existentialism Rhys? You got a podcast with the name end of the world. Go for it. Okay. From what I found the across the board. Everybody who thinks about existential risks in warns other people about existential risks say that AI is probably our biggest existential risk. And the reason let me follow up with an explanation. Okay. The reason why is because we are putting onto the table right now the pieces for a machine to become superintendent. Right. It's out there. It's possible. It's not necessarily right there. But it's it's possible. Right. The problem is we haven't figured out how to create what's called. Cleaness into a so beings. Well, it's a really good point though. Right. Like how we don't even know how to define like morality and friendliness and in as far as goes friendliness in is in that cares about humans as much as a machine can care. It takes. I that doesn't kill you basically would count as a friendly. The problem is the pitfall with a is an existential risk is we make this assumption that if in became super intelligent friendliness or would be an emergent property of that superintendent is not necessarily true or that the friendliness that we instill into that would supersede the emergent property of overcoming friendliness in lieu of you guys. You guys gotta go, right? You guys are the problem. I've seen what you do to livestock, right? So yeah wins. Yes. I. That was good. That's agent hold on agent. Under all named Smith. Smith, not get. They're all Smith. Our awesome. Miss under soon. My name is Nieto. Okay. Was a different those apply. Now that was the end of the matrix for..

Josh Clark Chuck Luke meadows superintendent AI Smith Dr Lu Dr Neal Nieto Dr. Only eleven years
Could Neanderthals Laugh?

BrainStuff

05:23 min | 3 years ago

Could Neanderthals Laugh?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here for millennia humans and Neanderthals poor Neanderthals if you prefer coexisted in Europe, and your Asia, you've probably heard about it because apparently they all had sex. And now you might have around two percent Neanderthal DNA in your genome. It's a whole thing. So we know there might have been some Neanderthal slash modern human romance. But did they have any laughs together? Well that mostly depends on whether Neanderthals could laugh it's a tricky question, though, because what would enter of laughed at we modern humans laugh at all sorts of things depending on who you are. It's equally possible to guffaw at kittens playing as it is to giggle over a pound about chemical engineering. If that's what you're into. We know even less about Neanderthal theory of mind than we do about our own, but there's evidence that the idea that they were intellectually inferior to modern humans is bogus. And though, we don't rightly know what would have tickled them research on the volition of laughter supports the. Idea that Neanderthals were most likely heir to a glorious legacy of chuckles. That's because other great apes laugh. In fact, laughter in our filer genyk corner of the world is estimated to have evolved between ten and sixteen million years ago, it most likely evolved from the labored breathing that happens when you're playing or being tickled spontaneous laughter is something we all do within the first couple months of life, even in babies born Dafur blind. The main goal of laughter seems to be to create and maintain social bonds. We Nonni under thaws lived in small family groups, so although they might not have needed to have the social smarts to, yuck. It up at a comedy club given their lifestyle laughter. Probably would have been beneficial to them just as it is to us or ape chimpanzee. But a lot goes into laughter and the question of whether or not Neanderthals could laugh has two parts the first having to do with the ability of the Neanderthal voiced produce the sound and the second with whether or not they have the cognitive ability to find things funny. According to Dr Philip Lieberman, professor emeritus in the department of cognitive linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown. College Neanderthals definitely had all the vocal equipment required. To laugh. Neanderthals had a vocal set up very similar to humans, a larynx or voice box supported by a delicate horseshoe-shaped bone called the highlighted Lieberman explained. The lyrics produces acoustic energy that causes the vocal cords of the larynx to open and close and the super laryngeal vocal. Tract the space between the lips and the larynx changes shape with movement in the lips tongue jaw to make a kind of malleable organ pipe that helps us make vowel inconstant sounds. We share all this vocal equipment with Neanderthals. So it stands to reason that they're laugh would be similar to our own. The only difference of opinion. Among researchers here centers around whether the Neanderthals speaking voice was lower or higher than that of a modern human. So with that settled the next big question is whether Nandor falls had the ability to. Things funny enough to laugh at them, according to Lieberman, and some recent research, it's very likely he said EPA genetic evidence now shows that Neanderthal brains could execute complex motor axe. This means that Neanderthals could talk and had language as long as their brains could control the complex gestures that human speech entails. They definitely could have left. Today's episode was written by Len shields and produced by Tyler Clinton for more on this and lots of other topics little tickle you. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. The end of the world with Josh Clark is a ten part podcast series about all the ways we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two and yes that sounds scary. This dangerous place other. I mean, the the universe is is the house going no care for life on earth and devastating. It brings a tremendous amount of energy with it flesh-eating, the earth surface embroiling alive, anything that can't take cover underground or new walk and mind boggling, if we accident trigger some sort of existential risk or exposed to an existential destructive event, that's sort of heat for humanity. And it definitely is all of those

Quicken Loans Dr Philip Lieberman Josh Clark Labored Breathing America Lauren Vogel Nandor Falls Europe Professor Brown EPA Len Shields Asia Tyler Clinton Sixteen Million Years Ninety Days Thirty Year Two Percent
BrainStuff Classics: Why Do You Hate the Sound of Your Own Voice?

BrainStuff

04:26 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Do You Hate the Sound of Your Own Voice?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren bomb. And today's episode is another classic from our erstwhile host Christian Sager. He's here to explain why we're all weirded out by the sound of our own voice. Hi, I'm Christian Sager and welcome to brain stuff. Have you ever heard a recording of yourself played back and thought, oh, why do I sound like that? I happened to me every time. I listen to this podcast. It is weird right? Usually our voices sound deeper. But when played back the way everyone else hears them, they're higher tenure. Why does it sound so different in? Why do we hate it so much well, the sound of your voice reaches your inner ear in two different ways, the vocal folds in your throat vibrate creating sound waves that travel through the air, but those sound vibrations. Also conduct through your body, particularly through your skull and bones are skulls lower the frequency of these later vibrations as they've bounce around inside our throat mouth neck before reaching the ear's cochlea through fleshy tissue in our heads. The surrounding bone spread out the vibrations lower their pitch in. Enhance the lower frequency vibrations. So your voice sounds fuller and deeper when we hear our voice played back on a recording. We don't get it filtered through flesh and bone what we're hearing. Then is only the air conducted sound of our voice as waves of pressure. These vibrations are caught by our outer ears and then transmitted through our ear drums where they vibrate. Three. Bony Ossika lls before reaching the cochlea in both cases. The cochlea converts these vibrations into impulses that are sent to the brain. But with the elimination of the bone conducted sound we end up hearing, our voice the way, everyone else hears it most of us have had this experience. And we hate it. We're used to the combination of the air conducted and bone conducted sounds of our voice, it's what we've lived with all of our lives. So of course, it's unsettling to hear something so different than what we're used to. But remember this. This is how your friends have been hearing. A new your whole life to them it is normal. So just relax and rest easy, knowing that everyone cringes at the sound of their own voice. Even Morgan Freeman. Well, everyone except Morgan. Episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler playing for more than lots of other topics that'll shake you to the bone. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast. But I think you might dig the end of the world with Josh Clark. It's a ten part audio podcast event. You might know Josh as the co host of stuff, you should know and for end of the world, he's launching into some even bigger questions than ever. Like are we the only intelligent life in the universe? Did something happened to all the other intelligent life. And if so are we next the common thread to these questions is exit stencil risks threats so extensive that just one single event could trigger a catastrophe that drives humankind to immediate and permanent extinction. You can binge the full season. Now. Listen subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Quicken Loans Christian Sager Josh Clark Morgan Freeman America Iheartradio Apple Tyler Brian Ninety Days Thirty Year
How Can I Donate My Brain to Science?

BrainStuff

04:15 min | 3 years ago

How Can I Donate My Brain to Science?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. I'm Lauren Bogle bomb, and you don't have to be sitting on a mountain of cash when you die to leave a little something for your loved ones and the rest of humanity. Researchers are looking for a few were lots of good men and women to donate their brains to science these gifts are key to research that may change the way a wide range of elements are treated, including Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. Of course, the idea of having your organs picked over by strangers when the sunsets on your time here among the living is enough to give some of us the willies. Here are a few things, you should know about donating your brain to science. Obviously the decision donate. Anybody part is something that you have to reach before you die. But it's also important that people know about your choice before you leave this world for whatever might come next brain donors body has to be refrigerated or the brain put on ice within six hours of death. According to researchers at Harvard University, but yes, you can still have an open casket funeral if you decide to give the gift of your brain after death a person's face and hair are not disturbed by the brain removal process. So your loved ones are still able to have that one. Last look if that's your preferred funerary practice, however, be aware that the procedure is not tax deductible. Sure. Agreeing to give up your brain or any other organ to science is one of the more charitable things a person can do. But that doesn't mean it's treated as a charitable donation for tax purposes, but you don't need to have a brain ailment to participate in a donation program. Researchers want access to healthy brain. So they can compare tissue to those with various diseases. By the way, the average adult human brain weighs about three pounds. That's one point three six kilograms or about two percent of a person's total body weight. If you decide to go ahead with brain donation. There are certain steps required to seal the deal doesn't making yourself as an organ donor on your driver's license alone. Does not give researchers the right to take your brain. But consent for brain donation can be given by next of kin immediately following death. So if it's something you want to do you should talk with your family and friends about it share your wishes and registered beforehand to donate, your brain. If you are interested renaissance for the brain donor project. It's a great starting place for information and resources. The episode was written by Chris up for and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other Brinkley, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast. But I think you might dig the end of the world with Josh Clark. It's a ten part audio podcast event. You might know Josh as the co host of stuff, you should know and for into the world, he's launching into some even bigger questions than ever. Like are we the only intelligent life in the universe? Did something happened to all the other intelligent life. And if so are we next the common thread to these questions is ex-general risks threats so extensive that just one single event could trigger Tatra v that drives humankind to immediate and permanent extinction. You can binge the full season. Now. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Quicken Loans Josh Clark America Harvard University Lauren Bogle Alzheimer's Disease Iheartradio Apple Brian Chris Brinkley Tyler Three Six Kilograms Three Pounds Ninety Days Thirty Year Two Percent Six Hours
What Can Probiotics Really Do?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 3 years ago

What Can Probiotics Really Do?

"If you've ever wondered how the world might end, then my new podcast is right up. Your alley. It's called the end of the world with Josh Clark. And it's about the very real ways that humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two might it. Be artificial intelligence or a haphazard physics experiment or perhaps in altered virus that escapes from a lamp who knows the one thing that sure is ignoring the risks won't make them go away. So come listen to the end of the world with Josh Clark. You can find it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bond here. What if you could take a pill that would treat depression, constipation, diarrhea eczema, urinary tract, infections and allergies while also preventing cavities and strengthening your overall, immunity, and what if it promised to shield you from the impurities of the world and reestablish a right and correct balance in your body's ecology. First of all everybody settled down. There is no such thing as a pill that does all of that. But to hear some people talk, probiotics might just come close the popularity of products containing friendly live microorganisms has exploded over the past decade at this point. You can walk into almost any grocery store and find probiotics in capsules lozenges. Gum facial toner, and yes, even in pet products. In addition to the more traditional delivery systems, like culture, dairy products yogurt and fermented products, like sauerkraut and Khumbu. Some folks are making a lot of money on these little bacterial helpers. But what are they actually able to do for us? And are they safe? We spoke with Dr Chris Irwin, a dietitian and lecturer in nutrition and dietetic at Griffith university in Queensland Australia. He said that unless you have an extremely poor diet or drink alcohol to excess. There's not a lot of evidence that a probiotic dietary supplement will help your overall health. He said if you're taking probiotics you'll likely. You need to take them every day, and it's best to feed the healthy bacteria with prebiotics. The bottom line is that healthy people are likely to get more benefit from getting regular exercise of waiting smoking or consuming too much alcohol and having a diet rich in foods that increase fiber and natural prebiotics intake like vegetables, fruits and whole grains, rather than consuming a probiotic supplement. However, probiotics might be an effective treatment for specific cases or conditions while there's not a lot of evidence. Supporting the idea that probiotics could help with your ex allergies or dental woes. Sorry, they might actually help people looking to avoid veteran east infections or upper respiratory infections picked up from a cold virus. Other. Studies have found that probiotics can help with digestive issues like irritable bowel syndrome, and may improve the frequency and consistency of your poop. So as a consumer what should you look for in a probiotic? If you want to get the most bang for your buck. Basically, you've got some homework to do. Irwin said a different probiotics. Strains have different effects. So it's important to look for a probiotic supplement that contains the strains of bacteria most likely to match your condition, the dose of bacteria called colony forming units or CFU is also important and should be high enough to meet benefits observed in clinical trials, the short answer here is if someone is looking for probiotic to take gopher something that provides the greatest diversity in bacterial, strains and the highest CFU. Irwin also suggests getting advice from your doctor or dietician for those strains that might be right for you. And making sure you're buying probiotic strains that are refutable and have committed to transparency in scientific research. However that ladder is more easily said than done. A study published in JAMA internal medicine in two thousand eighteen pointed out that there is very little government oversight of factories that manufactured probiotics and the US food and Drug administration or FDA found that about half of the six hundred and fifty factories that manufacture probiotic supplements in the United States were cited for violations most having to do with the product not living up to what was promised on the label. The study also said the probiotics may lead to infections in people with immune deficiencies. Another study published this year in the journal cell suggests some people may be resistant to supplemented probiotic bacteria, and therefore we'll get no benefit from it at all the researchers also investigated whether probiotics can help the gut microbiome bounce back after a round of antibiotics, and they found that though probiotics might have hell. With diarrhea related to the anti-biotics. They seem to have delayed the reconstitution of gut bacteria. Of course, more research is needed to understand just how helpful probiotics are to our overall health, and it's important not to give them more credit than their do. Irwin said. It's unlikely probiotic supplements are dangerous, but I don't think that they're a magic bullet L D people are likely to get more benefit from having a diet rich in vegetables, fruits and whole grains on the other hand if someone has a poor diet and doesn't exercise regularly their digestive bacteria may benefit from probiotic supplements. But they'll likely need to keep taking them to get lasting effects. States episode was written by just windshields and produced by Tyler playing for more on this and lots of other gutsy topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hey, their brain Steph listeners, we need your help. So the ads that you listen to make this podcast possible. But we want you to listen to ones that are actually useful. We have listener survey up on our show website, brain stuff show dot com, where you can go, and let us know what you're most interested in it should take less than five minutes. Just head on over to brain stuff, show dot com. And let us know. And thank you so much for listening.

Dr Chris Irwin Josh Clark United States Lauren Bogle Diarrhea Apple Depression Steph Griffith University Bowel Syndrome Lecturer Jama Queensland Australia FDA Tyler Five Minutes
How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

BrainStuff

06:07 min | 3 years ago

How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten. Donovan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here during the bronze age the Incas built the largest pre-columbian empire in the Americas extending along the west coast of South America from Bolivia to Chile they not only thrived in the harsh climate and dry steep slopes of the high Andes. They also served up masterclass and technical road-building that would have made the Romans quake in their sandals. Thank created a twenty five thousand mile highway system that's about forty thousand kilometers complete with rope bridges across treacherous mountain chasms. They also engineered millions of acres of high altitude terraced farmland and constructed an earthquake proof citadel on top of a craggy mountain peak one point five miles that's two point four kilometers above sea level, the even figured out how to freeze dried potatoes, but unlike the neighboring Maya and as techs and the ancient Mesopotamia's Chinese Egyptians, the Incan never developed a system of writing what they did have were keep Lou or not at length of cord made from Lana oral Pakowal or cotton. They hung in rows like. A curtain from a thicker central rope, which was sometimes coiled up to resemble the string mop these bundles were often color coded, although most surviving keep who are now a uniform camel color and could contain just a few strings or hundreds when the Spanish arrived and wiped out the entire in Kosovo ization, they found keep who everywhere but destroyed many of them in the nineteen s a science historian named Leland lock studying the keep who at the American Museum of natural history in New York City discovered the knots and the key PU represented numbers and the bundles of textiles were most likely recordkeeping devices similar to Advocacy's probably used to hold census data or to keep track of the contents of storehouses or how many lamas were paid tribute. He realized that the height of a not and its position on its cord civilized units tens hundreds thousands, and so on and the position of a string off the main rope could denote things like specific people or villages, but even after lock cracked the code. He noticed that some of the key. He studied seemed. To be anomalies. He figured these were used for ceremonial purposes. There are however anecdotal clues that entire narratives could be passed along through keep Oooo a one seventeenth century Spanish conquistador reported meeting an in-command on the road. Who carried keep Oooo that he said told of all the deeds of the Spanish in Peru. Good and bad. Keep who couriers reportedly ran all over the Incan empire. The cords looped over their shoulders, but finding living people now who can help researchers unravel. The secret of the nuts has proved very difficult. If not impossible so research has made slow progress in the past century since the early nineteen nineties Harvard anthropologist named Gary Burton has been working to decipher what if anything the key booze that don't fit the normal mold of accounting devices might mean collecting database of over nine hundred keep who in the process has discovered that beyond the position and height of the nods. There are other factors to take into consideration. When reading Kiu the color of the string. The direction. The knots are twisted and the type of knots used through cross-referencing, keep Kiu in the Harvard collection with Spanish documents from the exact time and location in Peru, where they originated he has recently been able to prove that the direction. The knots are tied in could note, which clans individuals belonged to another researcher named saving Highland at Saint Andrews university in Scotland has recently found that some keep who still exist within villages in the Andes the locals there has shared. Some new information about them, for instance, that the different materials used in the strings is significant and their understanding is that the devices were used to tell stories of warfare Highland. Also reports evidence of network symbols in the strings, it could be for all their ingenuity the Incas never learned to use symbolic written language, but it looks like they may have been just a little more creative with their storytelling than any other major civilization to date. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler clang, her more on this and lots of other historical, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. The end of the world with Josh Clark is a ten part podcast series about all the ways we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two and yes that sounds scary. Dangerous place other. I mean, the the universe is is the house going to no care for life on earth and devastating that brings a tremendous amount of energy with flesh-eating the earth surface embroiling alive. Anything that can't take cover underground Newark. And mind boggling we accidentally trigger some sort of existential risk or are exposed to an existential destructive event that sort of for humanity. And it definitely is all of those things, but it's hopeful to and in need you to listen and understand. So you can help save the future of the human race. Join me stuff, you should know. Josh Clark for the end of the world an immersive podcast experience available now on apple podcasts. The iheartradio. Uh-huh app and everywhere you get your podcasts.

Josh Clark Apple Peru Andes Researcher KIU Walt Disney Donovan Strickland Vietnam South America Lauren Vogel Gary Burton Americas New York City Maya Bolivia Harvard Kosovo American Museum Of Natural
Why Does Hot Food Seem More Satisfying?

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 3 years ago

Why Does Hot Food Seem More Satisfying?

"Hello. I'm Kevin Pollak. Yes that Kevin Pollock. What's that? I did save room for pie. Thank you. And may I offer you a slice of my new comedy podcast. It's called alchemy. This. I've gathered five hilarious improvisers. And each episode. I set the scene and the comedy gold fills your life with undeniable joy, be the first yellow your friends about Kevin politics. New comedy podcasts. Alchemy this listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren Bogle von here. You know that ravenously hungry feeling you get after going swimming? It feels like you could go to an all you can eat buffet and make them rethink their business strategy, but although a salad or a granola bar or even the nice smooth. He would probably satisfy you a voice echoing out of the deepest recesses of your brain commands you to feed it something warm entire pizza perhaps or two giant Balza extra brisket. Please. There could be a lot of reasons why we crave warm foods when we're especially hungry, but one of them probably has to do with the link between smell and taste. We spoke with Dr Steven Sacher an associate professor in the university of Alabama department of biological sciences. Who studies the physiological design of digestive systems. He said hot food emanates much more airborne particles than cold foods. And since a large part of our taste sensation. Also involves smell hot food would therefore provide positive reinforcement and its selection. Just consider how quickly the smell of smoke from a barbecue can make you feel hungry or how no matter how tasty it will be a cold spot show. Simply doesn't stimulate the senses like a warm chilly. So even though we intellectually know that cold soup is going to be good in phila-. Sup are olfactory apparatus hasn't yet been appraised of the situation making it hard to get all the parts of the brain on the same Gus Baccio bandwagon, but smell may not be the only reason we crave a hot meal more than a cold one. Or rather it may signal a deeper reason since heating food on locks calories and nutrients, we wouldn't be able to get eating the food raw. And since our big brains are very calorie needy. Our preference for hot meals might have something to do with our brains steering us towards the most potential calories possible in the moment of hunger. According to Richard Wrangham, a biological anthropology at Harvard and author of catching fire how cooking made us human the important comparison is between foods that are cooked and differ. Only in temperature. He said. Hot food, very likely yields more net energy gain than cold food, partly because of changes in digest ability. One example is that starch becomes increasingly refractory after hot bread than cools. Which could be one reason why we like hot toast in the case of lipid, rich foods, the closer of fat is to its melting point when eaten probably the easier. It is digested however, Secker clarifies that chewing and the digestive process are both pretty good at unlocking nutrients. He said that once you've cooked hamburger, for example, eating it. Hot or cold would provide a negligible difference in calories consumed and digestion effort, but there's also the nostalgia factor. Smell is the most nostalgia triggering sense, researchers aren't entirely sure why this is. But they think it has to do with the physical way. Our brains handle information in the parts known as the limbic system. The limbic system includes the amid Dula which helps us process emotions the hippocampus which processes and stores memories and the olfactory bulb which. Passes sent input from our nasal cavity. There are direct connections. Among these three brain bits. Studies have shown that sense create more positive and more emotional senses of nostalgia than other triggers. And scientists think that's because of these close connections among sent emotion and memory in our brains while there might be some selected Dr hidden in our behavior to crave cooked food for nutritional gains are cravings and susceptibility to a rich sent in the air is very likely driven by a nice memory of the taste and smell of food right off the grill or the chicken soup that comforted you when you were sick a child, however, even small changes in temperature can make a big difference in how satisfaction food is perceived. It's important to remember that the texture foods and especially fats, like those cheese and cheese. Substitutes changes drastically within a relatively small temperature range, for example, cold pizza, delight or horror discuss. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler playing for more on this and lots of other savory topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hi there. I'm Josh Clark of stuff, you should know. And I've just released a new ten part podcast series called the end of the world with Josh Clark. It's about existential risks all the ways that we humans my exit wipe ourselves out with the amazing new technology were beginning to develop today, like artificial intelligence. Sure, it's heavy stuff. But it's also enormously. Interesting stuff and surprisingly the series turns out to be kind of inspiring to search for it on apple podcasts. And check out the reviews from people who are already listening. It also has a lavish soundtrack with sound design by Kevin sends Ocoee and a beautiful original score by point Lobo. If you're curious person in a fan of the deep dive, check out my new series the end of the world with Josh Clark. You can find it on apple podcasts

Josh Clark Apple Kevin Kevin Pollak Kevin Pollock Olfactory Bulb Richard Wrangham Lauren Bogle Dr Steven Sacher Phila Iheartradio Gus Baccio Harvard Associate Professor University Of Alabama Departme Secker Lobo Jesulin
BrainStuff Classics: What Causes Chapped Lips?

BrainStuff

05:07 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: What Causes Chapped Lips?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Pay rain stuff on Bogle bomb. And today's episode is another classic from our former host Christian Sager. He's talking about a topic that is increasingly relevant to my life. As winter sets in. Why do lips get chapped? Hey, I'm Christian Sager in this is brain stuff. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say you've probably had chapped lips at some point. Well, here's what's happening. Your lips are pretty delicate things in the one at the top. That's your labia m- surprise Auras. And the one on the bottom is your labia m- inferiors, or is collectively they form an enormously sensitive incredibly flexible part of your body, and it's tough to picture life without them. However, they also have some vulnerabilities, for instance, the skin of your lips is different from the rest of your face. Let's take a closer. Look. The outer layer is called the epidermis, and it has a protective covering called the stratum Cornelia underneath your epicure miss is another layer of skin the Durmus like the rest of your skin, your lips have all three of these layers. The difference is that the stratum m- on your lips is way thinner than it is anywhere else on your body. In fact, it's part of the reason people. Lips? Have that alluring red or pink pigment? It comes from underlying blood vessels red colored. Blood-filled capillaries close to the thin skin. On your lips next. Your lips. Also, don't have the oil and sweat glands that protect other parts of your body. Their only source of moisture is your saliva, and that's why they can easily become dry and chapped. And that's usually the culprit here hydration we often experienced chapped lips in cold weather, not because our lips are allergic to winter or anything. But instead because the outside air tends to be drier. And this also dries out the lips and this drying out is the leading cause of chapped lips also known as common Khayelitsha's. Luckily, there are some pretty simple ways to prevent this. I in no matter what the cause of your chapped lips might be stopped licking them. I know I know it can be difficult habit to break. But licking your lips can contribute significantly to dry cracked skin, the saliva evaporates quickly. Taking with it any moisture that was already on your lips and leaving them even drier, especially in winter air and speaking of amazing segues, let's tackle weather related Chapman. If you have very dry air in your house, consider investing in a humidifier. If you're outside them, protect your lips with the product that contains beeswax or Petra labrum, which will help maintain your lips hydration. If you plan to be out in the sun for awhile help prevent dryness by using a sunscreen on your lips as well a lip balm with SPF in it could help address both of these issues at once and as always drinking plenty of fluids is a great move for your entire body. Not just your lips. And that's it. Well, well, almost we didn't talk about the multiple other causes of chapped lips or lip balm addiction, or whether some of the ingredients in those things actually caused chapped lips which is an interesting little conspiracy theory. Today's episode was written by Ben bolan and produced by Tyler playing to hear more about fringe theories. But probably not too many involving chapstick tune into bends show stuff. They don't want you to know available wherever you get your podcasts. And of course, for more on this and lots of other protective topics isn't our home planet has stuff. Works dot com. The end of the world with Josh Clark is a ten part audio podcast series. Coming November, seven hosted by me stuff. You should know. Josh Clark the series explores existential risks threats to human existence that are so big so sweeping so utterly catastrophic. That they could bring about the sudden impermanent end to the human race. We're not used to these kinds of risks climate change nuclear war. These are terrible things, but they don't even register in the

Quicken Loans Josh Clark Christian Sager America Bogle Petra Labrum Chapman Ben Bolan Tyler Ninety Days Thirty Year
The End of the World with Josh Clark Series Preview

BrainStuff

04:48 min | 3 years ago

The End of the World with Josh Clark Series Preview

"Hey, brain stuff listeners as a bonus for you today. I want share with you a preview for my compatriot. Josh clark. You may know him from a little show called stuff. You should know. He's got a new podcast series out on existential risks threats that could bring humanity to a sudden and untimely end in the near future. So here's a preview, featuring a clip about our potential to spread from earth. I'm stuff, you should know. Josh clark. I'm launching a ten part podcast series about all the ways humanity. My accidentally wipe ourselves right out of existence. It covers everything from whether we're alone in the universe to the evolution of life on earth from artificial intelligence to what goes on inside a particle collider. It is an immensely. Interesting deep dive into the world of existential risks, and I hope that you enjoy listening to it as much as I have making. I wanna share a preview of the series with you this clip comes from episode four and it features economist, Robin Hanson, creator of the great filter hypothesis, which is something we may have to contend with in the near future. When we settled down our cities developed agriculture can support more people than hunting and gathering and the more people. There are the more, brilliant ideas. There are two so our civilization began to advance by leaps and bounds in the last nine or ten thousand year ideas, spread more quickly among those people who live together in those new cities. So innovations were able to develop over the span of a handful of years rather than millennia almost everything we have in the world today can be traced back to our collective decision to settle down and raise crops. It was to say the least a sweeping change for us. Humans. With our next. Great leap spreading out into space. We are effectively doing the opposite of when we settled down into cities rather than contracting. We will be expanding from that huge coming together. We will spread out over time humans will begin to colonize other planets and generations of little human babies will be born on planets other than earth. They will be shaped by forces in experiences that no earthbound human will of ever encountered. And they will learn to adapt to their home planet. Just like, we did we are quite capable of becoming all the things that it's possible to become life that starts from us and radiates out cannot only spread to different places it can create different styles. Techniques and cultures and approaches all the life that you see on earth started out from a much smaller amount of Asian with time. It could explore lots of different niches and ways of living. And that's probably what would happen to us too. If we're the. Life around. We can survive we will radiate we will die become diverse and different and Phil thousand million billion different niches of different ways of being over time. Perhaps their physical connection to humans on earth will become distant enough that new species of humans will form and the universe will be home to more than one species of human again, just as it was fifty thousand years ago, we will become the aliens we seek and later on. They might be surprised to learn that they came from something that was simple and not as very it's odd to think of, but humans are inevitably -ciary bottleneck of our own right now, there's only one species of us, and with the exception of maybe half a dozen astronauts on the international space station at any given time we are all stranded on this island earth. Those astronauts aboard the ISS show just the famous beginnings of our future. If we become a spacefaring species. All of humanity's eggs will no longer be in just a one basket of earth should some catastrophe befall those of us here on earth. There will be other humans living elsewhere to carry on. We will begin to trickle from our bottleneck in spread throughout the universe. And when we do we will have made it through the great filter. Colonizing beyond earth is something we should begin working on as soon as we can because earth is vulnerable to a wide variety of catastrophes that are pretty hostile to life things. Like exploding stars the death of our son even earth zone systems going haywire. Please join me for the end of the world with Josh Clark. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or listen wherever you get your podcasts.

Josh Clark Robin Hanson Iheartradio ISS Apple Fifty Thousand Years Ten Thousand Year
Why Do We Carve Pumpkins Around Halloween?

BrainStuff

04:30 min | 3 years ago

Why Do We Carve Pumpkins Around Halloween?

"Remember when you were a kid, and everyone told you your special they were right? You me and everyone alive on earth. Today are the most special group of humans who've ever lived. We're the ones who will have to save the human race from extinction. I'm stephie should knows. Josh clark. Join me for the end of the world the ten part podcast series. That looks at the existential threats that are coming our way. If you Manitou come together like we never have before we might just be able to survive the end of the world with Josh Clark coming to the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts. Google play music Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. And look for hashtag e OT w Josh Clark on social. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren Boko bomb here traditions have always played a big part in what defines any holiday, but how weans traditions are some of my favorites, the costumes the trick or treaters the horror flicks in the Macab decor, including Jack lanterns grinning and glowing next to front doors all across America like most folklore the history of the Jack lantern varies a bit. Depending on who's telling the story, but all stories involve a clever drunkard who pulls one over on the devil legend has it in seventeenth or eighteenth century Ireland a foul mouthed and disreputable Nizer named stingy Jack asked the devil to go have a drink with him. Jack was the generic name for the common man at the time. Hence jack-of-all-trades every man, Jack, Jack the ripper at cetera but back to stingy Jack and his request for a drink the devil obliged. And when the Bill came there was that awkward moment that we're also familiar with Jack expected, the devil to take care of things and the devil thought. Jack should pony up seeing how Jack had no money anyway, he can. Vinced the devil to turn himself into a sixpence coin to pay the Bill the devil fell for it. Injects skipped on the Bill, but slipped the coin into his pocket where he had a secret weapon a silver cross the devil was stuck in Jack's pocket trapped by the cross. But Jack struck a deal and let the devil. Go provided the devil wouldn't come after Jack for a period of one year or ten years, depending on who you ask the devil had no choice, but to agree Jack took out the coin and the devil returns to his normal form and went on his not so merry way. At the end of the agreed upon timeframe the devil found Jack for a little payback. But somehow Jack convinced him to climb a tree in search of an apple Jack before they set off for hell the horned one. Once again obliged only to see Jack carve cross into the trunk leaving the beast stranded. Again, Jack had a sites on a higher prize this time, he said, let the devil down only if he promised to never claim Jack soul for hell. The devil had nothing to do. But agree when Jack died Saint Peter rejected him at the pearly. Gates because of his suspect credentials, the devil, wouldn't and couldn't let Jack into hell. They're agreement at the tree in the end the devil gave Jack Olympic burning coal to light has way through purgatory. Jack carried the coal inside of a hollowed out turnip Irish families told the tale and began to put carved out turnips their windows to prevent stingy, Jack and other ghouls from entering the home. Some had scary faces carved into them to frighten such ghosts away. The tail spread to Scotland in England where folks might use potatoes or beets when those families immigrated to America, they realized that the pumpkin native to the area was more ideal for carving, and that is why you see Jack lanterns unfortunate around Halloween. Episode was written by Emily, Senna, Bogan and produced by Tyler clang, her Moyen this and lots of other glowing topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Father is Keith hunter just Persson. He's known as the happy face serial killer. On one side of the coin is a loving family, man. And then on the other side of the coin he is everything that could hurt you. He goes from protected or predator. Have you face a new series from house to forks new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get gassed?

Jack Olympic Jack Josh Clark Apple Google America Iheartradio Lauren Boko Persson Macab Ireland Gates Nizer Keith Hunter Scotland Emily Saint Peter Tyler Clang