17 Burst results for "Josh Barrow"

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:28 min | 7 months ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"It's Josh Barrow, host of left right and center. This one's for the teenagers out there. If you're 16 or 17 years old right now, did you know you can pre register to vote in California? Just go to register to vote dot dot gov fill out the pre registration form and on your 18th birthday, you will be a registered voter in a legal adult. Congratulations until then stay informed and stay tuned to K C. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, President Trump and first Lady Melania are expected to remain in the White House for some time after each tested positive for the Corona virus. The president tweeted the news early this morning, the White House physician says the president and first lady are doing well. Vice president Pence and his wife, Karen, say they've tested negative. The president was supposed to travel to Florida tonight for a campaign event in Orlando. Also on Twitter this morning, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden wished the president and first lady a swift recovery. Unemployment in the US fell to 7.9% in September. However, NPR's Jim Joe Roly says job growth slowed during the month. The report says 661,000 jobs were created in September, fewer than expected and less than half the number created in August. The number of long term unemployed people rose by some 2.5 million. And fewer people were in the labor force. The number of government workers was down significantly, and gains in retail and temporary job slowed. The economy has now regained about half of the jobs it's lost since February. The September report is the last one to be released before next month's election. The numbers suggest that the economy continues to rebound, but the pace of the recovery is slowing. Jims AA ROLY NPR NEWS. This is NPR news from Washington. You're listening to K C R W I'm Cherry Glaser. Bob Iger, the chairman of the Walt Disney Company, has resigned from Governor Gavin Newsom's Coben 19 Economic Task force. L A Times reports. The move by Eiger is a sign of his frustration with the state's reluctance to let theme parks reopened a feeling some other business leaders say they share. KCR W's Larry PERL has more The task force was organized in April to provide some business expertise and heft to the States Recovery effort. The Sacramento Bee reports. No reason was given four Iger's departure, but The leader of a trade group representing amusement park businesses gave a little insight into the movie yesterday, she said a draft circulating of new state health guidelines for park openings expected to be released today. Doesn't do enough. She also said that Newsome should not finalize guidance for amusement parks without first collaborating with the industry and that parks need a plan that will allow for a responsible reopening while keeping the health and safety of park employees and guests a top priority. The governor responded that he wasn't feeling any pressure from Disney to get theme parks open but was quote not putting the health and safety of people visiting the state or recreating in the state at the park's at risk for K C. R w I'm Larry Peral. The Lake County district attorney's race is heating up and his case here. W's Tara entry on reports, We're getting a clearer picture of how much money has been poured into the face off between incumbent D. A Jackie Lacey and former San Francisco Diego George Gascogne. $12 million. That's how much has been spent on the Lake County district attorney race between current DEA Jackie Lacey and challenger George Gascogne and the two have staked out very different corners, which is why the campaign donors largely lineup on opposing lines of the stark ideological divide. Lacey is strongly supported by law enforcement unions in the area. In recent weeks, the L. A Police Protective League pumped $1 million into her campaign, joining other groups like the Association for L. A deputy sheriffs and California Correctional Peace officers. Yes, Gona Former cop in San Francisco, D A has a lot of support from wealthy individuals who favor criminal justice reform, a majority of which are concentrated in the Bay Area, where he has deep ties. He has had over $1 million donations from Democratic mega donors like George Soros and Patty Quillen, the wife of Netflix CEO Reed Hastings. In total, Gascogne has now edged out incumbent Lacey with $6.6 million to her $5.3 million, according to a new analysis by the Times. In recent weeks, Gascogne supporters.

president Jackie Lacey NPR Bob Iger Washington Josh Barrow Vice president California Gascogne Lake County Jim Joe Roly Governor Gavin Newsom US Joe Biden San Francisco Twitter George Soros Bay Area
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:30 min | 10 months ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"R W and this is Josh Barrow. We're socially distanced right now. But that doesn't mean we need emotional distance from our friends and loved ones Reach out and touch someone not physically fight loneliness. Make that phone call be well and stay tuned to case here. That is 3 29 here at K C. R. W Thanks for being with us on this Wednesday afternoon. Here's what's coming up on all things considered hospitality workers on the spot is government make masks mandatory in public places. A restaurant industry groups started teaching employees in ways to de escalate situations involving people who refuse to wear them. We'll check in with restaurants and some customers. In Michigan, also ahead as protests over racial injustice in the US continue Major League baseball is honoring the Negro leagues that showcased black baseball players at a time when the sport was segregated. Got state and local news coming up at 3 32 Why? Another unwelcome milestone has hit L. A county that more after this from NPR Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. The U. S. Has surpassed 150,000 deaths from the Corona virus, another unwelcome milestone and made a record spikes in the number of new infections. The U. S remains the world epicenter with nearly 4.4 million confirmed cases. The executives of the nation's most powerful tech companies testified on Capitol Hill today as NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The CEOs of Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google are facing mounting scrutiny from lawmakers who accused them of using their power to favor their own products, with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, making his much anticipated first appearance before Congress. Democrat from Ilithyia. Paul had this question is Amazon harvesting data from sellers to make its own products? Bezos replied. We have a policy against using seller specific data to aid our private label business. But I can't guarantee you that that policy has never been violated. At the heart of this hearing is whether these U. S. Tech giants abused dominant market power toe box out rivals. Amazon has been accused of scooping up data from independent sellers toe launch competing products, but until now, Amazon executives have categorically denied it was happening. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco The Pentagon says it's planning to remove nearly 12,000 U. S troops from Germany. Defense Secretary Mark Casper says the withdrawal is expected to begin within the next few weeks. This is something we want to do. We feel very good about we think it meets All the principles and objectives I outlined, so we want to get there as quickly as possible because of the importance it has to the alliance and to deterring Russia. The move has been met with bipartisan opposition amid concerns that it will weaken the U. S military's position with Russia. At the close on Wall Street, Adela 160 points. This is NPR. And on a Wednesday, July 29th. This is Casey AR W. On Larry Carol. Here's what's happening at 3 32 L. A County has announced a daily record high of 91 Corona virus death today, along with more than 4800 new cases. The 91 deaths included Six fatalities, announced yesterday by health officials in Pasadena and Long Beach County Public Health director Barbara for Rare said the elevated number of new cases was in part the result of a backlog in reporting, she said About 2000 of the new cases are results from the States Laboratory reporting system that happened between last Thursday and Sunday. The new numbers pushed the county's overall Corona virus death toll to more than 4500. A number of positive cases in the county has risen to over 183,000 California is up to an average of 9400 new covert 19 cases per day. That's led Governor Newsome to re close certain indoor business operations and delay. In person school instruction. But California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galley says if 80% of Californians wore their masks, the spread of Corona virus could be cut in half. Which is tremendous. Exactly what we need to see those case numbers start to come down, not only protect Our families and communities but help us move on the road of economic recovery. Polls show 70% of Americans say they wear their masks. Newsome has required that masks be worn in public places state why but has faced pushed back by some local officials, who said they won't enforce the order and by residents protesting the mandate, like in Orange County. Some local jurisdictions like Santa Monica and West Hollywood have begun sighting and finding or finding residents who don't comply will most if not all, school kids in Southern California are going to be attending their classes virtually this fall due to the virus, But S K. C. R. W's Terry Glacier reports. Health care officials say students still need to be up to date on their shots. California has saw the strictest immunization requirements in the country in an effort to increase vaccination rates among school kids. In 2015 state lawmakers passed a bill eliminating personal belief, says the reason parents could opt out of vaccinating their Children. Last year. The Legislature crackdown again this time increasing scrutiny of doctors who give five or more medical exemptions for vaccinations in a year. The Sacramento Bee reports, The number of vaccines being administered to kids in California dropped more than 40% between April of 2019 in April of this year. Perhaps parents are reluctant to take their kids to the doctor during the pandemic. However, the state Public Health Department says the requirements are the same, and that kid's must have their shots to be enrolled in school. That.

Amazon NPR NPR News California Bobby Allen Governor Newsome Jeff Bezos C. R. W U. S R W Josh Barrow Long Beach County Public Healt Russia baseball Public Health Department Windsor Johnston Michigan California Health and Human Se Orange County
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Josh Barrow, your center and business columnist in New York magazine on the right is Megan McArdle columnist Washington Post on the Left is Christine MBA, also columnist of The Washington Post. It's the third week of July and this week, Congress seems to have realized that the unemployment benefits in the cares act are running out of the end of this month. Both houses of Congress spent several weeks on recess from June into July, with no real effort to reach a bipartisan deal on continuing Corona virus related aid before they left And meanwhile, Corona virus infections have surged in the south and in southwest, especially Democrats passed their own one party relief package through the House of Representatives Back in May, which would've spent over $3 trillion including on extensive aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the time called Democrats Bill and Unserious Liberal wish list, but Senate Republicans didn't pass a plan of their own. Nor did the Trump Administration proposed one in any detail. This past week. Having gotten back in town Republicans have been negotiating with each other and almost reached an agreement on what they're opening bid to Democrats will be one thing we know is the Trump Administration has dropped its demand not to spend new money on testing or the centers for Disease Control. This was for obvious reason, a top priority for members of both parties in Congress. President also isn't looking likely to get some of his daughter ideas like a payroll tax cut during a time when so many people are out of work and not paying the payroll tax. But there is still much to be resolved both within the Republican Party and then between the parties about how much aid to give and how it should be structured. And state unemployment agencies, which are already overwhelmed by the volume of unemployment claims, will have to take time to distribute aid under any new formula that Congress ultimately agrees on, So it's likely that whatever the resolution People have been relying on unemployment benefits are going to be receiving them and significantly reduced amount for some number of weeks. So making one thing I keep hearing from Democrats is that Democrats are asking here for policies that would help President Trump get reelected policy that would keep the economy afloat would keep household finances afloat, but that officials in the Trump administration with one key exception, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Seem to be bizarrely resistant to that and are actively seeking out policies that would hurt the economy and hurt the president's reelection chances. Do you agree with that analysis? I think, yes, in a lot of ways. I mean, one thing that's just obvious is that the level of uncertainty is not helping. You know, Of course, it is true that often these things come down the last minute negotiations, but the fact that Everything has been so all over the place that it wasn't even clear that the Republicans were actually going to sit down and do this until recently. That's not good for the economy. If you believe you built a plan. Of course, there's already a high background level of uncertainty. But the administration really needed to get its act together much earlier and not insist on the ridiculous payroll tax cut, which was not going to help the people who are actually causing the economic damage. Which is the people who are unemployed and unemployable until we get covert under control on DSO, I think yes, absolutely. You know, Donald Trump needed to be more proactive on the economic side as well as on the virus control side. But I think the bigger story really is the lack of virus control, right? We should have packages Tio help people who have been thrown out of work No through no fault of their own to help them get through to tryto. You prevent this from spiraling into just a utter economic crisis. But that said economic damage repair is virus control. And if you don't do that, and that is where the administration in my opinion has fallen down in a much bigger way, then the economic package is almost beside the point. Yeah. I mean, Christine, when Megan talks about these things often come down to the wire in Washington. I think the model for that is government shutdowns where either the federal government closes much of its operation for a few days, or they almost get to a shutdown. But there's an agreement at 11:30 p.m. That pushes it out for another two weeks, at which point you have another deadline. But that stuff where we sort of gotten used to turning the government on and off it involves, you know a few 1,000,000 employees, which is significant in the economy. But those employees have a strong sense that you know that ultimately, Congress will pass a bill. To make up their back pay at the end of the government shutdown, because that's what they've done before. So government shutdowns While they're disruptive, they don't tend to affect the economy very much and they don't tend to have, you know really big, long lasting negative effects here. The issue is You have all this stuff? Words. You can't just turn it on and off like a switch. If you change the unemployment benefits formula, you have to push this down through 50 state agencies that hand out the unemployment benefits their computer systems rolled. It takes them a long time to get this stuff under control. Megan talked about the virus control. That's an even longer lead time where you finally agree on money to spend on something, and then you have to manufacture things and develop new competencies. And so it seems like you know, if we're talking about that, as businesses usually these things come down to the wire that that that was much less acceptable here than it is with some of the other things that Congress unacceptably takes down to the wire, right? Absolutely. I mean, in this moment, and in this crisis we're facing Brinksmanship is not an attractive option. It's not an option at all, because, in fact, we are on the brink. We've been on the brink. Maybe we've even fallen off the cliff. At this point. Right now. The.

Congress Trump Administration Megan McArdle President Donald Trump Christine MBA Senate President Trump The Washington Post Josh Barrow Mitch McConnell Republican Party federal government House of Representatives New York Disease Control Brinksmanship tryto
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:11 min | 10 months ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Josh Barrow, your center and business columnist in New York magazine on the right is Megan McArdle columnist Washington Post on the Left is Christine MBA, also columnist of The Washington Post. It's the third week of July and this week, Congress seems to have realized that the unemployment benefits in the cares act are running out of the end of this month. Both houses of Congress spent several weeks on recess from June into July, with no real effort to reach a bipartisan deal on continuing Corona virus related aid before they left And meanwhile, Corona virus infections have surged in the south and in southwest, especially Democrats passed their own one party relief package through the House of Representatives Back in May, which would've spent over $3 trillion including on extensive aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the time called Democrats Bill and Unserious Liberal wish list, but Senate Republicans didn't pass a plan of their own. Nor did the Trump Administration proposed one in any detail. This past week. Having gotten back in town Republicans have been negotiating with each other and almost reached an agreement on what they're opening bid to Democrats will be one thing we know is the Trump Administration has dropped its demand not to spend new money on testing or the centers for Disease Control. This was for obvious reason, a top priority for members of both parties in Congress. President also isn't looking likely to get some of his daughter ideas like a payroll tax cut during a time when so many people are out of work and not paying the payroll tax. But there's still much to be resolved both within the Republican Party and then between the parties about how much to give and how it should be structured and state unemployment agencies, which are already overwhelmed by the volume of unemployment claims, will have to take time to distribute aid under any new formula that Congress ultimately agrees on, So it's likely that whatever the resolution People have been relying on unemployment benefits are going to be receiving them and significantly reduced amount for some number of weeks. So Megan, One thing I keep hearing from Democrats is that Democrats are asking here for policies would help President Trump get reelected policy that would keep the economy afloat would keep household finances afloat, but that officials in the Trump administration with one key exception, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Seem to be bizarrely resistant to that and are actively seeking out policies that would hurt the economy and hurt the president's reelection chances. Do you agree with that analysis? I think, yes, in a lot of ways. I mean, one thing that's just obvious is that the level of uncertainty is not helping. You know, Of course, it is true that often these things come down the last minute negotiations, but the fact that Everything has been so all over the place that it wasn't even clear that the Republicans were actually going to sit down and do this until recently. That's not good for the economy. If you believe you built a plan. Of course, there's already a high background level of uncertainty. But the administration really needed to get its act together much earlier and not insist on the ridiculous payroll tax cut. Which was not going to help the people who are actually causing the economic damage, which is the people who are unemployed and unemployable until we get covert under control on DSO, I think yes, absolutely. You know, Donald Trump needed to be more proactive on the economic side as well as on the virus control side, But I think the bigger story really is the lack of virus control. Way should have packages to help people who have been thrown out of work. No through no fault of their own to help them get through to tryto. You prevent this from spiraling into just a utter economic crisis. But that said economic damage repair is virus control. And if you don't do that, and that is where the administration in my opinion has fallen down in a much bigger way, then the economic package is almost beside the point. Yeah. I mean, Christine, when Megan talks about these things often come down to the wire in Washington. I think the model for that is government shutdowns where either the federal government closes much of its operation for a few days, or they almost get to a shutdown. But there's an agreement at 11:30 p.m. That pushes it out for another two weeks, at which point you have another deadline. But that stuff where we sort of gotten used to turning the government on and off it involves, you know a few 1,000,000 employees, which is significant in the economy. But those employees have a strong sense that you know that ultimately, Congress will pass a bill. To make up their back pay at the end of a government shutdown, because that's what they've done before. So government shutdowns While they're disruptive, they don't tend to affect the economy very much and they don't tend to have, you know really big, long lasting negative effects here. The issue is you have all this stuff where it's. You can't just turn it on and off like a switch. If you change the unemployment benefits formula, you have to push this down through 50 state agencies that hand out the unemployment benefits their computer systems rolled. It takes them a long time to get this stuff under control. Megan talked about the virus control. That's an even longer lead time where you finally agree on money to spend on something, and then you have to manufacture things and develop new competencies. And so it seems like you know, if we're talking about that, as businesses usually these things come down to the wire that that that was much less acceptable here than it is with some of the other things that Congress unacceptably takes down to the water, right? Absolutely. I mean, in this moment, and in this crisis we're facing Brinksmanship is not an attractive option. It's not an option at all, because, in fact, we are on the brink. We've been on the brink. Maybe we've even fallen off the cliff. At this point. Right now. The American people I think, have no appetite for silly games played in Washington, where there's one week off in one week on the stakes are much higher here than which party gets to walk triumphantly into the room and announced that their bill one eventually. The's air people who are going hungry who are going to die of an illness?.

Congress Trump Administration Megan McArdle President Donald Trump Christine MBA Senate Washington The Washington Post Josh Barrow President Trump Republican Party Mitch McConnell federal government House of Representatives New York Disease Control tryto
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"C R W And this is Josh Barrow on left, Right and Centre. We talk About being civilized. That means being thoughtful in your words and actions, especially at the grocery store. It means being kind to one another. Looking out for the common good and fighting this virus together. Be well. Stay tuned to K C. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly for ex Minneapolis police officers charged in the killing of George Floyd are expected to appear in court this afternoon for a pretrial hearing. Matt Sepik with Minnesota public radio reports Derrick Show. Vin, who pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly eight minutes, is charged with second degree murder. J. Alexander King Thomas Layne and to Tao are charged with aiding and abetting murder. Last week, the City Council took the first steps toward replacing the Minneapolis police Department with a new public safety department. They hope to put the plan before voters this November. In Mississippi. A new state flag design is expected to go before voters in November. Lawmakers voted yesterday to remove the Confederate battle emblem. New Corona virus Infections air rising in more than 30 states in the U. S. In Florida. Many beaches will be closed during the upcoming July 4th holiday weekend and includes ones in Miami and Fort Lauderdale. California's governor is rolling back the reopening of bars in seven counties, including Los Angeles, NPR's Alison Aubrey has more. We've had about 2.5 million documented cases, though experts think that at least 20 million people in the US have had the virus for every one case documented at least 10 more probably what went undiagnosed. And we're approaching about 130,000 deaths. This is NPR news from Washington. But it's 6 31 This is K C R. W News. I'm Matt Dillon. The city of Beverly Hills faced criticism this weekend for how it handled peaceful protests, including the arrest and lengthy detention of two dozen demonstrators. The affluent city has imposed an ordinance for weeks now banning nighttime gatherings of more than 10 people in an attempt to prevent noisy protests. On Friday night, a small but organized group filled the streets, played music and blocked traffic before police declared an unlawful assembly will not be arrested. Beverly Hills Police Department then used a long range acoustic device, sometimes called a Sonic cannon cook.

Minneapolis police Department Beverly Hills Police Departmen George Floyd NPR second degree murder Josh Barrow Beverly Hills Matt Sepik Dave Mattingly Minneapolis J. Alexander King Thomas Layne Matt Dillon City Council Washington Mississippi US Derrick Show Florida Vin
"josh barrow" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"This is Josh Barrow and welcome to left right and center. You're civilized yet. Provocative antidote the self contained opinion shovels dominate political debate. This is the fourth week of July and this week it was muller time Robert Mueller testified before the House judiciary and intelligence committees and well. I'm not sure we learned very much that was clearly muller's intent. He already wrote the report that people could read if they felt like it. He said in May the report was his testimony and he wouldn't go beyond it so Democrats spent much of the hearing quoting from the report and asking Miller to affirm that what he had said in the report was true they also tried and failed to get him to say the president had committed acts that would get most people indicted for obstruction of justice where they not sitting presidents who are protected by a Longstanding Department of Justice memo that says you can't indict a sitting President Republicans for their part wanted him to talk about the steele dossier and the origins of the F._B._I.. Investigation into people around the trump campaign which which muller wouldn't do saying that's not as purview. We'll talk about those hearings. In a moment later in the show will be joined by two academics focused on climate policy. One of them has a provocative thesis that the green new deal is far less expensive than it appears also Evelyn Farkas will join us talk about rising tensions with Iran and the president's unusual efforts to get American rapper ASEP rocky sprung from Swedish jail but now let's bring in our left right and center panel as always. I'm your center and I'm joined by rich lowry editor of National Review on the right and on the left flee along the Roosevelt. Salt Institute Hello Hi Cash Josh Rich. What did you make of the Muller hearings well? It was obviously a fizzle and we all learned afterwards that had been an open secret in Washington that Bob Muller had lost a step step. Unfortunately we saw that demonstrated on live T._v.. For four or five hours and top Democrats must have known this but just been so desperate to try to create a T._V.. Moment that would catalyze shake something loose on the impeachment dynamic. They went through it anyway so it wasn't a game changer instead. It was a little bit sad and I think the main thing we learned is that it was very unlikely that Bob Mueller was rigorously in charge of his own investigation so Felicia. I think think to rich's point a lot of the disappointment was that Muller did not serve anybody's political goals. Certainly he didn't do what Democrats were hoping in terms of T._v.. Moments out of this hearing I also don't think he provided a great deal for Republicans. I think you know to rich's point. There's this talk about. I'm having lost a step. I didn't think he was as bad as a lot of people thought he was. I mean he's clearly hard of hearing <hes> and he's clearly you know he's seventy five. He's less energetic than he once was. I thought he got better in terms of his performance through the day <hes> but I do think that it was partly shortly that that Bob Mueller is less energetic that he once was but it was also partly he was trying not to be interesting and so he was not interesting is not necessarily a failure on his part. Now that's right we could have expected that he told us that <hes> you know well. I think the most sad and also actually alarming part of the entire set of testimonies the really want and disrespect that many elected Republicans showed to muller himself you had Sensenbrenner Johnson Brenner accusing him of fishing. You had gohmert trying to enter into the record. A piece called Robert Muller Unmasked and this just seems like an attempt to actually personally attack him <hes> you know there are real underlying issues here about what the president attempted to do to obstruct justice. I think these remain very serious issues and all of that is obstructed by these questions about Muller himself. I find that really actually quite scary. Rich to Felicia point one thing that Miller did seem interested in talking about at length was was passed an ongoing Russian threats to to U._S.. Elections <hes> which is something that is discussed somewhat in part one of his report there are also counterintelligence findings that have not been in probably we never will be made public <hes> that relate to that he clearly wanted <hes> more focus on those efforts for twenty twenty Republican congressman will heard <hes> spent his time on that in the House Intelligence Committee hearing but otherwise it wasn't a big issue. Shouldn't this be something that is a focused for for members in both parties something that that really one can learn a lot from both what's in the report we've seen and then what's in some some material that we're not privy to but that is in the government's possession yes but I don't know why we need Bob Mueller to tell us that that I think there's been this ridiculous puffing up of Bob Mueller some sort of Oracle where if you write something down and the report you know that's one thing but if you actually says it in a yes or no answer and congressional testimony then it's unassailable lead true win and now everyone has to rally around this. He's just a guy he's just a prosecutor in members of Congress can make their own judgments about all these matters and I didn't see any personal attacks on him from Republicans. I did see some Republicans very effectively raising the issue that this the new prosecutorial standard of not exonerated is exists nowhere in our law nowhere in president. It's it's impossible. I think to think of any U._S.. Attorney who's ever advanced such a standard and this was put the molar sometimes without the without giving being an option to respond but sometimes actually in a back and forth and he could do nothing to defend it because it's indefensible but on on the Russian interference operations issue. This isn't something that Muller was confining himself to yes or no answers on and it's not something where he's just some guys the former director of the F._B._i.. The eye with extensive experience and counterintelligence obviously there are other people who are also experts on this issue but this is an issue where his relevant standing is not just that he's a former prosecutor. It's his experience as a counterintelligence. We're making a huge deal like like a major moment at the hearing was when Adam Schiff said unpatriotic and wrong to welcome foreign assistance and Muller says is problematic at the least and that's supposed to be like a big moment <hes> why you know everyone can have their own judgments about these things things I think obviously is problematic and you shouldn't welcome foreign assistance in an election but the just Bob Mueller the the Democrats have been using him as a crutch. He's GonNa do the investigation. He's going to tell them what matters and the investigation and he's going to create the T._v.. Moment and that's going to create the political drive for impeachment and I just think that's been pathetic. They should step up themselves or shut up. Does this take impeachment off the table because what I was looking at here and imagining about impeachment flava is Democrats. Have this idea that impeachment hearings will be useful in some way that they will focus public attention on the president's wrongdoing more than it's already been they will change minds wouldn't impeachment hearings kind of similar to these hearings. I think there's a real reason that Democrats are conflicted on impeachment because it is a calm too confusing and almost difficult strategic question as to whether or not hearings would <hes> do more to actually attack the president or as you say <hes> look like a non issue so I think the impeachment issue remains confusing but I want to go back to the Russia question because we can talk about Bob Muller all we want but let's not forget that the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday released a report about Russia's targeting collect of our elections in two thousand sixteen. It looks like they are doing the exact same thing in twenty twenty. They're already doing it. We are seeing no additional federal attention to this worth seeing no additional federal funding for it. This is a problem that actually right and left ought to be concerned about and I think the fact that rich you dismiss it or try to make it a subset of Bob Muller's performance <hes> This Week is wrong riches there. I mean setting aside specific specific legislative solutions. Are you confident that election officials in the fifty states all of which Russia made efforts to breach <hes> election systems in two thousand sixteen. Are you confident this issues being handled appropriately. I think I've even heard Mark Warner saying on T._v.. That at the agency level the trump administration is taking this seriously. I think some Democrats folks on the left are now calling Mitch McConnell Moscow Mitch because he doesn't want to rush to pass one of these so-called election security bills that would do a a lot to federalize our elections and that's just not that's not the way the system set up to ron and it doesn't mean he welcomes <hes> foreign interference doesn't mean once foreign interference but I don't. I don't have the insight to know what's happening at every you know every every single state in the country on this but it's something people should obviously be aware of and be trying to harden our defenses against as these hearings were happening. We also got closer to finalizing the budget agreement that sets federal spending levels and raise the debt limit for the next two years. It's it's a bipartisan agreement but the deal passed the house mostly with democratic support. They're actually enough democratic votes for the deal that could have passed with no Republican support at all about two thirds of house. Republicans voted. No rich is that vote tally assigned the Democrats got the better end of this deal. Yeah I think you know will Republicans got more defense spending which they wanted but they're not enthusiastic about the overall level spending I do think though it's kind of the final nail in the coffin of the tea party Republicans are a big spending party now. They're not as as big spending thank party is the Democrats Wanna be but the deficit obsession debt obsession is all gone now and may return pending a Democrat winning the White House and wanting to spend more than even Republicans do but this was the the final nail in a stage of Republican politics that is now over Felicia to the extent that you saw objections to this on the Democratic side they tended to come from the left saying that it spends too much on defense that it doesn't impose enough restrictions on the way a the the trump administration spends money related to immigration efforts. Do you think Democrats made a good deal here. I think one really important thing happened. In this budget deal which is that we got rid of the sequester. We got rid of automatic spending cuts that were just as we saw when we talked about this earlier this year during the shutdown. Where's your so problematic and what the point that 2011 law did was every couple of years we had an environment of crisis that was sort of self manufactured because we had to undo funding levels that were artificially we created <hes> and we created a kind of brinksmanship in the meantime Congress still had to find the government and so I think getting rid of automatic spending cuts <hes> was a very important part of what happened in this last deal one criticism? I've been hearing from Democrats with this deal runs out in mid twenty twenty. One people are saying it sets up a situation you could have a Democratic president and you would give the Republican Congress power soon in that president's term to pull basically what happened in twenty eleven with Barack Obama threaten a debt that ceiling crisis and try to force some big spending cuts related to that you talk about getting rid of the sequester you're getting rid of the lever that has forced Republicans to the table over and over again since two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen which is Republicans are focused on undoing the automatic spending cuts in the military and you've seen relatively smooth dealmaking in most cases starting with Paul Ryan and Patty Murray in two thousand fourteen. Do you worry about setting up that twenty twenty one crisis. I do worry about setting up other kinds of of spending crises but I think what we have to do which I think we're gonNA talk about. Later in the show is really rethink what it means to fund the Federal Government and to actually use public investment spending so I was obviously I wasn't there. I don't know why they couldn't go get past sort of June twenty twenty one <hes> I actually we've seen very many short term deals that were far less than two years so I I expect that this was really the best that the speaker could get and I think that pushing it out this long actually gives us time to start talking about what the what the debt-to-gdp ratio really ought to be <hes> I have some confidence that actually we can <hes> both get more revenue <hes> and increase our understanding of what that ceiling ought to be so we can actually really start funding government Felicia. What do you WanNa talk about? Well what I really want to talk about. Was this recent polling we've seen that has us looking very hard at how important independence are in the twenty twenty presidential race. You know you've seen trump's approval rating about ten percent higher in must win states like Wisconsin and Florida and most of this is with white non college voters so I think it's really important to look at these independence to ask what do they actually think about the economy and why might they vote on what basis might they vote. <hes> and there's there's a couple of things that democrats should really focus on <hes> first of all many of these white working class voters are economically distressed and that could actually affect their twenty twenty vote away from trump just did a study <hes> for the Voter Study Group with my co-authors Lee Hay Drummond and Vanessa Williamson and we found that not only one in five Republicans think more like a Democrat on economic policies. They WANNA tax the rich they WANNA raise minimum wage. They're actually they say they're more likely to vote against president trump because of that <hes> the second thing is that when you go right to the ultimate swing voter independence who are economically progressive these people are seven percent of the electorate and they've already started switching their votes. They pulled the lever for congressional Democrats by sixteen pain points more in two thousand eighteen than they voted for Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen so you have correctly I think this focus on <hes> independence and white working class voters but let's not forget that these folks are actually economically progressive progressive so rich it feels to me like there are hazards and opportunities for for both parties in in these areas that Felicia describing. I think that these observations actually do significant extent informed Donald Trump's two thousand sixteen campaign with his emphasis on on the needs of of workers rather than entrepreneurs on trade and being in favour of Tariffs de Emphasizing entitlement cuts that previous Republicans had been more enthusiastic about.

Bob Muller president Republicans Robert Mueller muller rich lowry Felicia Robert Muller Donald Trump Josh Barrow Miller prosecutor Congress Washington Federal Government House judiciary Josh Rich Longstanding Department of Jus
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Back again with left right and center. I'm Josh barrow of New York magazine on the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on the left is Elizabeth brunette columnist at the Washington Post, the story of this week's terror attack in New Zealand has implications for at least two of the world's largest technology companies video of the attack appeared in spread on Facebook and YouTube which is a unit of Google has struggled to keep copies of it off their site. And this feeds into a broader argument that we've been hearing that these companies are two powerful, and that they're not using that power in responsible ways to protect the interests of the public to discuss that we're joined by Tony Fratto, Tony is just leaving south by southwest conference in Austin where the relationship between government and technology has been a major focus this year. Tony's a managing partner at Hamilton place strategies in Washington DC, he was a spokesperson on economic matters at the White House and the treasury department during the Bush administration. Hello, Tony reassuring south by south west. Yes, thank you for calling in. So isn't this? Another example, this is the sort of failure that people look at and it creates a groundswell for the idea that. The tech companies are not handling these responsibilities as they need to in that therefore we need to find a way for the government to step in. I think it definitely raises questions but a little bit. Little bit of considerations for the tech companies control. You want the companies to have over all of the content on the internet. Problem we've been dealing with for you pretend years now where there have been concerns that have been about what people are self publishing on these platforms, and and whatever. Do something about it. And the someone's are usually government why the tech companies them selves and others concerned about having the government. Make those decisions come from many quarters. Concern that you know, if you're tech companies are a certain kind of people in certain parts of the country. A lot of people are red states who don't want people in blue states making those decisions, and you have a lot of people in blue states want people states making this isn't so where to draw the line and how they can establish policies and principles that satisfy everyone concerns, especially in areas of public safety are difficult. And I think they're struggling with it. Liz, obviously content moderations just one of many areas of concern that we have in in policy regarding technology. And specifically these large companies Elizabeth Warren has come out with with an increasingly detailed proposal about how she intends to restrict these companies, including forcing many of them to break up into pieces in order to reduce their power. What do you make of this plan? I think it's completely reasonable. And it gets very in keeping with what Warren's approach has been all along to sort of regulating the excesses of capitalism away. I think that you know, one of the biggest barriers between these sort of big companies and the Justice that we'd like to see is that they're under prosecuted. Ralph Nader wrote an open letter in the wake of this Boeing crisis where he pointed out that there are just regulations that aren't being enforced and that oftentimes these huge companies just aren't held to the same level of stability is smaller companies individuals. And so I think the just enforcing the existing laws along with, you know, potentially break. These giant firms would definitely do a lot to reduce the exorbitant amount of power. They wield. Yeah. So rich, this this is not something that the government has never done before. It's essentially an urge to return to an era of stronger antitrust enforcement when the government broke up companies like AT and T and standard oil way back in the day. Is there merit to that idea? That sort of these companies they end up with too much market power their dominant in one space, and they can use that to squeeze their competitors. And another space, and that we would have a more dynamic economy. If these companies were in smaller pieces, no I don't think. So I think this is a completely insane proposal. It's the justifications for full of errors and misapprehensions Warren contends, for instance, that the antitrust case against Microsoft in the nine hundred ninety somehow opened up the space for Facebook and Google that's completely untrue. Microsoft would just left totally to his own devices wouldn't have invented Facebook or Google and the idea like Amazon buying whole foods is some threat. Get to the competitive balance in this country is also crazy what it's done is prompted the rest of the retail food industry to invest more to upgrade its technology. Great example, this is Kroger's which has been around since the eighteen eighty s and in two thousand eighteen spent twenty two hundred million dollars on investment to develop self check checkout counters in robot delivery, and this is how the economy should work. And to the extent there are sharp practices that need to be cracked down on deal with it specifically the contact conduct rather than this, this massive politically imposed reorganization of everything these companies do with with no apparent justification, and certainly not with the consumer in mind because he's companies are so big in the first place because there's demand because consumers enjoy the products and the idea that you would, you know, buy an iphone that wouldn't have apple apps on it. Because Elizabeth Warren thinks it's a bad idea is crazy. No, that's not gonna prove anyone's experience or life. So I think that the point that I would raise in favor of Warren's plan and an herb stick more. Generally is that there's monopoly power in the market that we are concerned about or Warren is concerned about just as an antitrust figure who believes there should be sort of broad varied and fair competition in a free market, and that's warrants position. And I think the other side of that concern is the political concern, which is that when you have these monopolists they're able to basically control politics, not only because they amass huge amounts of wealth that they can use to influence politics in the sort of direct and traditional way, but because they can just sort of control the way that cities are laid out the way that people live their lives, the regions that people have to live in to work. So you can starve out through small communities rural areas entire regions. If you move your headquarters or your manufacturing bases around. And if you're the only game in town, then you can pull people out of their zones and relocate them do. All sorts of activities that we would think of as exerting political power just because of the awesome size of your of your business. If you're firm, and the fact that they are competitor. So I think that's the other major concern, especially the sort of left leaning folks have with the lack of antitrust enforcement at this point. Let's turn and talk about another big technology company. That's been in the news this week for the way, it is intertwined with the government and that is Boeing after having it hiring for a few days. The Trump administration has grounded all Boeing seven thirty-seven max, eight max nine airplanes, this new Boeing type has had two fatal crashes in the last six months one in Indonesia and one in Ethiopia and data from both crashes, which is very preliminary. At least in the case of the recent Ethiopian crash shows, the planes rising and descending back and forth in a pattern that has raised concerns that there's a problem with the plane's anti-stalking system. So if a plane's nose gets pointed to far up the engines can stall out and lose power in an antisocial system is designed to prevent that from happening by automatically pushing the plane's nose down. But obviously if the plane is trying to push its own nose down when it's not already too high that could lead to it crashing into the ground internally administrators at the FAA had expressed confidence that the max planes are safe, but they were overruled by the president. And honestly since most of the rest of the world had already grounded the planes. The FAA position was looking increasingly difficult to maintain. Tony George Bush's line was that other people in his administration did the analysis in agencies in staff jobs in the decisions were too hard to make it a lower level came across his desk. And then he was the decider who made those decisions. And so clearly Donald Trump was the decider he decided that these planes would be grounded. But I don't think people trust Donald Trump to be a decider. How should we feel about the process that has led to this decision? I long belted situations like this, especially with respect to air incidents. Actually, don't want anybody making decisions this way. Right. I think what you really want. There's a standard operating procedure that can put a halt or maybe an automatic grounding, the spectacle that we saw this week where you have the company having to consider. The FA FAA are trying to make decisions or president making decisions innocent in some of this is replicated in other countries, as well, they all they're all coming from different places with imperfect information, there's one thing that we accepted some rare circumstances that after an incident within a day or two the information is always imperfect. You don't actually know what is really the cause. And it takes a little bit of time to figure it out. Now, they're they're able to determine in a couple of days here, they think that it's a software problem, and I'll take them at their word at that. But what I would rather see is an agreement that when there is an incident. The the grounding is is presumed automatic in a country four day or two while they collect that information being a position where we're saying. We don't know what the problem is. We think it's safe. Go ahead and keep flying. That's not great as I sit here in an airport ready to get on a flight. That's not the way I wanna think about it. I want some certainty. So now, if the FAA has come out immediately within a day and say, we know that this was a weather related incident not having to do with the mechanics of the plane and you can restart flying. Again. I think that would give people a lot more comfort. So I would rather see a standard operating procedure that everyone can agree to before you're in the hours and days after incident Richon, I'm not sure how workable that sounds. I mean, it's because it's trying to take the discretion out of it. But you're not taking the discretion out of it. You still have to have that discretionary decision after a day or two in order to figure out whether to let the planes back in the air. And Furthermore, I mean, you know, most play. In crashes are not related to specific systemic technological problems with the plane in the way that we are worried that these might be so it seems like you'd you'd basically be grounding a lot of planes for for. No good reason. If you did that. Yeah. It it seems to me. And I know nothing about aviation that it's sort of decision that you want made by the experts at the FAA based on the data. But just it's plane crashes get so much attention. And in this case as you pointed out at the beginning every other country is going other way. And you have senators banging on you and other folks banging on you. It was just politically unsustainable. Because there's a there's a public confidence question and just having to to these planes. Go down in short order. It just makes that concern very hard to address by saying, okay, FAA has no data that this. This is a problem. So the the ideals the experts do it, but in something of such high public concern, there's going to be a political element inevitably. Well, there's a couple of other issues. I see there without one is that the president has not named a permanent head for the FAA more than two years into his administration. So you don't have the authority there that you would. Family have. And then the other thing is that Boeing sort of the closest thing the United States has to a national manufacturing champion company. You know, when when we talk about US exports, Boeing it self a really large fraction of that. And so I think people always worry about the extent to which regulators who are trying to regulate safety also have to keep in mind economic importance of Boeing, and then you see the same thing with other foreign regulators. You know, do the European regulators have a preference for Airbus over Boeing and does that influence the decisions that they make in these sorts of situations. Right. And I would think that for American industry highly regulating Boeing and making sure that there aren't crises if public trust like this, which pose a real threat to Boeing's ongoing productivity in the market would be a top priority. So appointing head of the FAA, making sure the regulations on the books are workable that they're up to date and that they're well enforced by the FAA airline industry, the pilot unions and so forth, making sure that whistleblowing is paid close. Attention to is the best thing we could possibly do for Boeing so regulation is something that we can use to ensure that you know, sort of great American industry, if you wanna look at it that way.

Boeing Elizabeth Warren FAA president Facebook Google Tony Tony Fratto Donald Trump Josh barrow White House rich Lowry Austin Tony George Bush Washington Post New Zealand New York
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:44 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Josh barrow of New York magazine on the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on the left is Elizabeth brunette columnist at the Washington Post, and our special guest is Kelly Gough columnist at the Daily Beast. Paul Manafort was sentenced on Thursday in one of the two criminal cases brought against him as part of a special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation Manafort was convicted of eight counts of tax and Bank fraud and the federal sentencing guidelines recommended a sentence of nineteen to twenty four years. But judge TSL's sentenced him to just forty seven months. A large downward departure in pronouncing the sentence, he remarked that Manafort had led a quote, otherwise blameless life. Of course Manafort does not otherwise blameless after all he pleaded guilty to two more felonies in another criminal proceeding related to his failure to register as a foreign agent representing Ukraine. He'll be sentenced in that case by a different judge next Wednesday, and he could get up to ten more years. Liz is this sentence sufficient, I tend to think that financial crimes are not. Prosecuted often enough. I don't really have strong opinions about sentencing. I'm not sure what the point of the sentence is. I don't think he needs to be rehabilitated. He already knew what he was doing was wrong. So in terms of just retribution it seems like you could get more out of him just by taking everything he has and redistributing it, socially. I mean, I don't have a high opinion of really high prison sentences. Anyway, so I found that kind of debate about should he have gotten more time, which he might as you say the sort of uninspiring, and I would note they have taken money from him. There's a twenty five million dollar forfeiture. Basically, Paul Manafort has been financing the Russia investigation. So thank you, Paul Manafort, rich, what are you making a sentence? I don't make much of it. I think they're a couple things going on. I don't think that the judge was overly enamored with this case from the beginning, he'd seems to have the view that metaphors basically caught up in this thing because he worked for the guy who won the presidency, and the prosecutor is after a bigger prize, you know, evidence of Russian Russia, collusion, and he. Knows that metaphor is very likely going to get absolutely slammed by the judge in the other case next week. So a lot of people want Paul Manafort to die in jail, and that will probably be the likely outcome after after he gets both of these sentences. But I just find the the blood lust over this really distasteful the whole Russia thing was supposed to be. I thought about getting to the truth. What happened the two thousand sixteen election, and it's become just this drive for vengeance. And to see people driven to the ground. None as an Admiral person, and he's guilty, and it was a serious fence, and she gets some jail time. But just just the the sheer zeal over. Seeing him die in prison. I think is is as I say is a little distasteful Kelly. Do you want to respond to that? Yeah. I don't think it's just about blood. I think it's about an overall feel about the disparities in our judicial system. I I wanna read something from Jennifer Rubin's latest column in the Washington Post where she quotes constitutional scholar Laurence tribe who said judge Ellis's assessment that Manafort leading otherwise blameless life was proof that he's unfit to serve on the federal bench. I rarely been more disgusted by judges transparently preferential treatment to a rich white guy who betrayed the laws in their nation. And I have to say that my read of this. I've written a lot about sentencing disparities and not just when it comes to race. But about the fact that they're kind of a sign of of what crimes our society treats seriously, and which ones that they don't and it's worth noting that they're pedophile. I have written about who's gotten less jail time than Paul Manafort, just dead to just let that sink in for a moment on the other hand there also African Americans who've been sentenced for drug crimes for significantly longer prison sentences. So I think. That's why the sentence for Paul Manafort struck such a chord because artificial system is not fair. And we also know fact that they are sentencing disparities that are significantly that fall significantly along racial lines. And I think that's why the such a court for everyone. I want to stick up for the idea that Paul manafort's crimes were were substantively really bad and deserving of a quite large sentence. I mean, the tax frauds were really large millions and millions of dollars of taxes. He was supposed to pay that he didn't that is stealing from the rest of us who pay our taxes, and who expects services from our government. If you're it's not just theft. It's a really large theft. And I think that's a that's a large important crime. The Bank frogs were part of a broader effort to enrich himself by selling out to interests that were adverse to the United States. And I don't mean in particular in the relationship to Donald Trump this, you know, this very sleazy, Ukrainian oligarch, and and political party whose interests were against the the foreign policy interests of the United States. He Paul Manafort became a rich man, not through any legitimate business. But by doing things that added no value in society. And actually, we're we're actively harmful to the interests of people, and he did and he engaged in these illegal schemes as a part of that the one thing I do want to note on the other hand in judge Ellis's defense and. I I didn't love judge Ellis's conduct during his trial. I thought he made a lot of editorial comments that he shouldn't have. I would note that Ellis has been abroad critic of mandatory minimum sentence laws. So his his view that sentence guidelines can can be excessive extends beyond just white collar crime. The issue is that for a lot of crimes related to drugs and violence. There are mandatory minimums which tie his hands. He cannot hand down a lower sentence. Even if he wants to wear as he's allowed by law to give Paul Manafort this break, and then there is that issue that he's going to get another sentence from the other judge, but I would push back a little bit on on riches comment about the judge is gonna slam him because what what can white who's my co host on. The presence lawyers has been saying is that these two sentences are highly interactive with each other. And it was likely that if TSL's had given a long sentence. The judge any Berman Jackson who will head on the next sentence would have made much of that sentence concurrent which is to say she'd sends him, but it wouldn't necessarily add a lot of years to the sentence. Now that TSL's went so soft on him. It's likely that she will just stack her sentence on top of that. So I think you know, the she can give him up to ten more years. I think that as a sentence in the range of a over a decade, he long sentence that that reflects the very serious crimes Paul Manafort committed. I don't think it was necessary for TSL's to go so low in order to achieve that goal. Well, I think from his perspective, it's hard. It's hard to know because he's not going I, and I think that was another thing he's kind of annoyed that he wasn't or he is going. I right sorry. He wasn't going second. I should say right Kelly today just echo to on something you decide Josh. Which is I think one of the frustrations about some of the sentencing disparities that we've seen along racial lines is the fact that the argument was often made that crack cocaine in the south selling crack cocaine has a domino affect throughout communities, but the same can be said regarding white-collar crimes of this magnitude. And so I think again, that's why people get frustrated, right? If someone sees a poor black kid who really felt like they had no other options, but to do this for a living, and they say, well, you're destroying your people. You're destroying your community someone who had every advantage and privilege in life. Like, Paul Manafort who? Really have no excuse. And yet there are there will be a domino effect for crimes like this. And yet it's not treated with that same scope magnitude. It's like some people lost some money our democracy with her little bit. And I think again, that's what causes people to not have faith in our judicial system. Liz, I feel like this issue of white collar crime is something that a lot of Democrats are turning to when they talk about crime. We've heard this from Kamla Harris in defending her record as a prosecutor talking about how you know crime does bad things to people and also drawing the connection to to white collar crimes and the need to prosecute those. And I guess the question is does that reflect a good shift in government priorities toward the white collar crimes, or does it become a talking point to defend the existing judicial system that I think a lot of people on the left would say has been too harsh in general. Well, it can go both ways. And I think that's one of the complicated things that Kelly is getting out here in the in the Manafort situation, which is that white collar crime is under prosecuted. It's not just it's sentencing is a problem in white collar crime. It's that there is so much white collar crime happening all the time that just never gets prosecuted and its decisions that are sort of made in very complex areas of the government that are sort of unaccountable to the people Ralph Nader had a really good article on this actually in Latham's quarterly called land of the lawless, and he points out there just isn't the has quantity of white collar crime going on all around us all the time. The no one's ever held accountable for and you saw that in two thousand eight you still see lingering resentment, especially among the left over the fact that a lot of bankers involved in the financial crisis never had any consequences at all in terms of being charged with anything, and then the other side of that unit sort of separately is the question of what our judicial system is for how we should be. Using our penal Carson system, whether it's working what outcomes we're looking for. And if we have even tested or have any idea, what kind of techniques we can use to actually get the outcomes we want and in that realm, the techniques and the responses we use for white collar crime may very will be different than other types of crime. But it's such a Meyer, and a mess of an issue with so little clarity that it's hard to even begin to articulate what symmetry would look like in terms of sentencing and punishment for white collar, criminals versus people who do you know, sort of ordinary workaday crime. You think about when you think about crime, I'm actually hopeful that this whole episode with regard to the specific crime of of unregistered foreign lobbying, which you know, sounds like a paperwork problem. But it really, you know, people have have a right to know established in the law the extent to which foreign governments are paying people within the US to be influential on their behalf. It's not just Manafort. We're also seeing these investigations related to two major white shoe lobbying firms on the Republican and democratic sides of the aisle. Who who were doing those sorts of operations for Ukraine, and I think that those that those efforts may actually be having an effect in discouraging sort of white collar crime which had which which had been endemic in Washington because it had been unpunished for so long speaking of crime and punishment. Let's talk about the singer or Kelly who has been indicted for ten counts of aggravated sexual abuse of four victims Kelly was acquitted over a decade ago of child pornography charges having convinced a jury quite implausibly in my view that he may not have been the person pictured in a video having sex with a minor r Kelly's outbursts in an interview with Gayle king of CBS this morning in which he denied the charges drew much attention this week Kelly. What I'm struck by here is that the public has long had good reason to believe that our Kelly had committed gravely immoral acts. But for a long time the fact of the acquittal and allowed them to go on publicly in spite of that. And I think a lot of people are asking themselves more and more what their responsibilities are as consumers of artistic content to reject that content on the basis of the artists behavior. Well, so first of all hats up to dream Hampton and her team for helping to push this issue forward with their film series surviving R Kelly and hat tip together king for doing masterclass. And what journalism looks like during her interview with him?.

Paul Manafort R Kelly judge Ellis Manafort TSL Kelly Gough United States Washington Post Josh barrow Russia financial crimes Liz Ukraine rich Lowry prosecutor New York Robert Mueller crack cocaine Donald Trump
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm your host Josh barrow on the right is making mcardle columnist the Washington Post on the left is Elizabeth brunette. Also, a columnist the Washington Post. French president Emmanuel Macron has had a rough week. I it's funny McColl is beloved by certain groups around the world as an anti-trump symbol of someone who stands up against populism and for the technocratic center in the Paris climate accord, this almost makes it easy for Macron is dismally unpopular in France. His approval rating is twenty three percents. According to a poll this week for Paris Match. Most recently mackerels plan to raise taxes on gasoline is sparked a sometimes violent mass protest movement. The protesters are known as the Joel the yellow vests. They're named after the emergency high vis vest that fresh drivers carry in their cars under their pressure McColl has withdrawn the fuel tax hike, but an expected fourth round of protests. This weekend has forced the closure. The Eiffel tower and other Paris landmarks. We're joined now by PASCAL. Emmanuel Gobi PASCAL is a fellow at the conservative ethics and public policy center, but he lives in Paris. And he joins us now from there on Skype. Hello. Hello. Josh. So besides not raising fuel taxes. What is it that? These protesters want out of McColl. It's it's hard to say because it's really not a structured movement. There's no union behind it or political party or anything like that. It's just. Tana's outbursts of anger from Facebook. But if you sort of take the Knicks of like, opinion polls and interviews from spokespeople and so forth. It's actually sort of interesting legs. Far left and far right demand. So they. They want macaroni to rings the wealth tax that he abolished some of them want a maximum wage, but they're also they're also not fans of immigration, and and general, and they're generally don't like taxes, obviously. Way too high and government services suck Eliza the proximate cause of these protests is carbon reduction policy. The the idea for macaroni was that. You know, if you're going to have taxes, you should have more of them on fossil fuels to discourage people from creating somebody carbon emissions. What is it safe for a left agenda on climate? If you get this big populist outbursts that seems to include elements not just from the right objecting to the idea of higher taxes on fossil fuels. I think what they're frustrated that is the tax is being placed on the end consumer instead of the oil and gas companies, for instance, like why not tax the oil and gas company profits at a higher margin. Same thing comes if polishing a wealth tax within placing a tax on people who are fritzy driving cars for a living is a little bit frustrating to a left populace, I definitely agree with carbon reduction policies in very aggressive ones. I understand that's going to mean higher prices almost certainly, but I think the anger at Mahan comes from the fact that when he does place these taxes, they seem to fall not on the very wealthy or. Or profit margins or people who have a direct involvement with oil and gas extraction direction or sales. But rather in consumers, I think that causes a lot of frustration. What do you make of that? Do you think it's possible to design a carbon tax policy green tax policy that that that the masses find acceptable because it for for the policy to work, it has to raise the end consumer price of carbon and more fundamentally it has to stop people from using so much gas like an, and that's what people object to if it's costing them more. They're going to have to use less of it or they're going to have to use lots of something else, which we hope eventually translates into less carbon used to produce whatever that was and that's hard. And it's you know, it's also especially hard. And this is something that you see in America all the time. It's especially hard on rural people. Right. They they don't live in a walk. Nice walkable neighborhood where you can just go down to the, you know, your apartment building. And and take a nice stroll down the street, they have to drive places, and it is crippling to their budgets to how to raise the carbon tax. At the same time, the planet is warming. And we have to do something about that. I think that you know, there are policies that you you can certainly support things like just hog wild research funding for green initiatives for renewable energy and so forth, but the fundamental things if we want to use less carbon quickly, which we according to the UN need to then we are going to have to force people to use less of it and not forcing is always gonna fall disproportionately on the least well off because they're the people who have the fewest resources to command alternatives. I think you you could Levy the tax at the company level rather than the consumer level. But the net effect would have to be the same. It would have to become more onerous require more sacrifice for those people to use heavy carbon bearing fuels like oil. Mccown is a particular instance, right because of the abolishing of the wealth tax and so forth. So I think it's definitely going to be the case that you're going to see some kind of response whenever prices go up for whatever. Season right on oil and gas. I think that's probably going to be an inevitability. But I do think that Makkonen particular has set himself up as someone who's been maybe overly friendly to the wealthy and is aiming policies, which are good in theory rights, reducing carbon at people who feel like they're not getting the benefit of the sort of neo-liberal administration pets, do you think that's fair has mackerel been sort of to to friendly too, generous to the rich would he be able to build a more popular agenda? If he took took some of those populist cues, and should he be agreeing to things like higher corporate taxes or reinstituting the wealth tax..

McColl Paris Josh barrow Washington Post Emmanuel Macron Paris Match Macron France Eiffel tower Elizabeth brunette Knicks Facebook mcardle Mccown proximate cause
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Josh barrow who is off this week later in the show. We'll talk about Stacey Abrams Mia love, and what the future holds for black women candidates after mixed results in the midterms all that and more on left right and center. We'll be right back. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. A major new government report out says that climate change is already hurting communities in the US is NPR's. Rebecca hersher reports the outlook for the future is also dire. The new national climate assessment is the most comprehensive climate report to date and includes analysis by leading climate scientists around the country it unequivocally says that humans are causing global climate change, and that sea level rise and more frequent and intense storms droughts and wildfires are already destroying infrastructure and costing American lives. Furthermore, as temperatures continue to rise. The air will get more polluted agricultural will be severely disrupted and water shortages will threaten big chunks of the west the authors conclude that the US must immediately cut back on greenhouse gas emissions and spend more money to help communities. Adapt Rebecca hersher, NPR news House, Democrats are laying out a road map for their. Incoming majority status included the party's agenda plans for more spending on public works lowering health care costs and increasing government oversight Virginia congressman Gerry Connolly, laid out some of the specifics during this week's democratic address Democrats campaign on a clear vision deliver congress that works for the people to make healthcare more accessible prescription drugs. More formidable a protect those with pre existing conditions to invest and priorities like infrastructure and education that will grow our economy and raise wages in America and the clean up corruption here in Washington. Some of the more left-leaning Democrats who were eager to use their majority confront the president. Whoever democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has made it clear she wants to strike a balance the European Union and the United Kingdom are still trying to work out conditions for their split before Sunday summit scheduled to finalize the deal. Teri Schultz reports a last minute hang up between Britain and Spain over the future status of Gibraltar sent negotiations into overdrive with e you heads of state schedule. To arrive in Brussels Sunday morning to approve the Brexit agreement pressure is on to iron out the final wrinkles. One of those obstacles is the status of Gibraltar. The territory has been under British rule since seventeen thirteen with Spain continuing to claim it. The long running dispute now threatens to hold up the entire Brexit agreement as the Spanish government is demanding Britain share control over Gibraltar and put that in writing as part of a Brexit deal. Spain says without better arrangement spelled out in public. It won't approve the Brexit agreements Sunday that's not the only disagreement remaining between the two sides. It's still possible. The planned summit could be called off for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz. Chinese trade officials say Beijing will go along with World Trade Organization reforms that are meant to update. Global trade rules over they say the rules must also protect China. An interview with the company's deputy commerce minister was ruled out the changes to the GAO rules need to address protectionism and security reviews. On Wall Street today. The Dow is up one hundred seventy or down rather hundred seventy eight points, you're. Listening to NPR, and this is KCRW on parole in for Steve take us on a Friday, November twenty third very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening at three. Oh, four the campfire in northern California is nearing full containment, but not before killing at least eighty four people and destroying more than nineteen thousand buildings. Most of those homes officials say recent rains are making recovery efforts difficult. There are still hundreds of people unaccounted for the fire now at least ninety five percent contained. It's burned more than one hundred and fifty thousand acres with the Wolsey fire now fully contained residence in Malibu are hoping to get back to normal and for many students parents and teachers that means getting the schools reopened KCRW's Jonathan best has the latest time line. The good news is that schools in Malibu survived the Wolsey fire. The bad news is that they got extremely dirty with all the smoke and ash. So cleanup efforts have been extensive between this and of course, the mandatory evacuation orders Malibu's four schools have been closed since November ninth that should change though relatively soon the first school to open we'll. Be Webster elementary on November twenty eighth point Dume marine. Science school and Juan Cabrillo elementary her scheduled to open around December third Malibu high school should be open between December fourth and December tenth district. Spokeswoman Gail Pinsker said they had planned on a swifter reopening. But scaled back to air on the side of caution has for those cleaning efforts crew of two hundred has been working for several days. And the district has brought in three hundred air scrubbers and deodorizers and black Friday is in full swing and one of the spots in the area. Swamped with deal seeking shoppers is the citadel outlets and commerce stores in the shopping mecca have been reportedly packed with wise out the door at several stores. ABC's seven says the mall was expecting about one hundred thousand people with shoppers lining up as early as eight o'clock last night support for NPR comes from dream wave maker of luxury massage cheers from Japan with shiatsu point detection and sixteen programs massages, including morning night and stretch sessions retailers nationwide more it's relief chair dot.

NPR Spain Gibraltar Malibu Rebecca hersher Teri Schultz Washington US KCRW Josh barrow Britain Jack Speer Malibu high school Stacey Abrams Democrats Juan Cabrillo elementary
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm your host Josh barrow on the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on the left is Ana Marie Cox, political columnist and host of the crooked media podcast with friends like these ever joined now by Riaan Salaam, who is executive editor at national review and is a contributing editor at the Atlantic. Hello, ryan. Thanks for joining us. Josh, thanks for having me psoriatic. You had what I thought was a really interesting piece in the Atlantic this week, which argued essentially that Republicans have a working class voter base now, and they need to change their policies to match it, for example, you propose that they should raise taxes on what I might call the lower tier rich families making between two hundred thousand and half a million dollars a year and use the revenue from that to expand the earned income tax credit and give a tax break to working seniors. I get your logic here, which is basically the Greenwich and Beverly Hills of abandoned the GOP, and it might as well abandon them back. But my my question is who do you see as the target market for this because this is about appealing not just the white working class, but to the whole working class, and because the white working class is already spun really hard to the GOP. But it feels to me like what? It's holding Republicans back with low and middle income, non white voters isn't tax policy. So basically is you know, you you can do an economic revamp. Like, this does it really address the problem that the Republican party faces with this big part of the electric. Oh, as I tried to make clear on the piece the problems run much deeper. They're much larger when it comes to Republicans and non white voters. I think that's absolutely true. I also think however that you have a bunch of Republicans who are essentially sitting ducks you have a variety of lawmakers who have not tried to strike out some kind of distinctive policy pass what they do basically is live in fear of Donald Trump and in fear of their voters rather than actually trying to think about what comes next because Donald Trump will be there for some time, but he won't be there forever. And if they don't actually try striking out, new and distinctive policy paths. They're gonna find himself in a very tough position. What they've done is embraced Trump's rhetorical style. Without actually embracing the central insight, which is that a lot of Republican voters are in fact, blue collar, and that there are duck there there are voters they could potentially reach. If they had a message that with less divisive in ethnic, terms and racial terms. But that was more populist when it comes to economic. Policy and domestic policy it rich. You actually, you wrote something quite similar this week, basically saying that Trump isn't populist enough, which sounds counter intuitive. But you're basically saying that, you know, he talks populist. He hasn't had a true populist agenda, which voters do you see that as being something that that Republicans can connect with because it seems to me that Republic that Donald Trump's populace talk in the sort of inflammatory stuff, it does appeal to a certain kind of white voter at has worked in a certain way. I'm trying to figure out who these additional people are the Republicans might pick up if they followed through with these policy changes. Yeah. I don't think he'd necessarily pick up any anymore among the the white working class. But he he might lessen at least a little bit the opposition to him in the suburbs. And this is the problem with the inflammatory stylistic populism that he's made his signature it lights up his base in his voters noth- to win at twenty sixteen might be enough to win in twenty twenty. But we saw this time around really just repulses suburbanites, especially suburban women. So. If that's the steady state going into twenty twenty as I say, you might be able to win again, that's a really really narrow pass. So you'd think the rational thing to do would be to try to come up with an agenda that has some crossover appeal both of the working class and both suburbanites which would be kind of a cost of living agenda. Now, the problem here is I I can sketch one out Ryan can write it in much greater detail. But destroyed have any interest in it one probably not too is it as effective with his working class basis. We'd like to hope because you know, Ryan Ryan and others did a lot of work on this as their so called reform cons, you know, prior to twenty sixteen Marco Rubio picked up part of their agenda. Donald Trump basically picked up none of their agenda and went around saying that they're bunch of globalists' have come in stolen, your wealth. And that turned out to be the message that really resonated more than you know, IT reform, and I fear. That's that's probably still the case. I feel there's actually a parallel conversation happening right now on on both the left and the right about you. What do we do? Now that more and more of these affluent suburbanites are Democrats. I hear some leftists worrying that like the sort of, you know, the the affluent suburbs are going to hijack the party and prevent leftward moves on economics. And then you have this conversation on the right about well, can we pick up more of the working class? If we're losing more of the upper class, but I feel like, you know, in in a lot of ways, you have the these affluent suburbanites, and these minority communities up and down the income spectrum are going to be stuck together in a political coalition for wild like it or not because of the race based appeal that Trump has built for the for the Republican party that really turns off both of those groups, and so they're going to have to find a way to live together with a policy agenda. They can all live with. I am hopeful for the conversation on the left being a little more productive than whatever conversation. They're going to have on the right? I think that those fluent liberals in the suburbs. I mean, they have kind of been running the Democratic Party already like with the neoliberal with. Cendant for a long time. I think the influx of more activist base a base that is more colorful. The basic includes LTV to people is going to create a conversation where you know, the effluent liberals are going to have to listen.

Donald Trump Ryan Ryan Republican party Josh barrow national review rich Lowry GOP Trump Ana Marie Cox Atlantic contributing editor executive editor Riaan Salaam Cendant Democratic Party editor Beverly Hills
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Josh barrow your center and business columnist at New York magazine on the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on the left is Elizabeth runic columnist at the Washington Post, and our first special guests this week is your Rosenberg who is a senior writer at tablet magazine on Saturday. The morning of the Sabbath gunman entered a synagogue in the squirrel hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh and killed eleven congress. He exchanged gunfire with police wounding several and was arrested. The shooter's postings on gab, which is the social network of choice for white supremacists. Made clear he was motivated by hatred of Jews, and particularly by Jewish led efforts to resettle refugees who viewed as invading the country. Unlike last week's mail bomber the synagogue shooter was not a Donald Trump superfan. He had posted on gab to complain. The president was failing to oppose Jews, and that he'd abandoned white supremacists. Who rioted in Charlottesville last year, Trump visited Pittsburgh on Tuesday to pay his respects, but local officials declined to accompany him and Trump complained afterwards that the media had overstated the magnitude of protests of his visit. Yeah. You're I feel like people tend to think about antisemitic violence is a major theme in world history. And as a major global problem, but not as widespread problem in the United States does this shooting signal a change in aberration. Or is it a problem that was here all along that we weren't paying enough attention to? So I think it's a problem that was here all along. I think that periodically we've had these spasms of violence during Obama's presidency. Another neo-nazi-type who actually yelled Heil Hitler from the police car after he was apprehended shot up a Kansas City Jewish center. And sometimes it's just a matter of luck that fewer people aren't killed that said, the reason this is, you know, animated a lot of people is that President Trump has trafficking conspiratorial rhetoric and sometimes more martial or violent type rhetoric that has led people to believe that he is stoking these sorts of things and the people who are attracted to them. And so you have some people noticing I think for the first time that this stuff is out there pot probably because they noticed what Trump is doing. Now. That's a good thing. People should be aware of these prejudices are out there, and that they can be spoken certain ways. But we shouldn't kid ourselves that if you got rid of Trump tomorrow that this would go away because it was here before Trump, and it'll be are after him. Rich, would what do you make of that does the president bear some responsibility here for for rhetoric and for feelings that he's stoked in the country..

Donald Trump president rich Lowry Pittsburgh Josh barrow squirrel hill congress New York magazine Washington Post tablet magazine United States Obama Heil Hitler Rosenberg Kansas City Jewish center editor writer Charlottesville
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Josh barrow your center and business columnist at New York magazine. On the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on the left is Elizabeth runic columnist to the Washington Post, and our first special guest this week is your Rosenberg whose a senior writer at tablet magazine on Saturday. The morning of the Sabbath a gunman entered a synagogue in the squirrel hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh and killed eleven congregants. He exchanged gunfire with police wounding several and was arrested. The shooter's postings on gab, which is the social network of choice for white supremacists. Made clear he was motivated by hatred of Jews, and particularly by Jewish led efforts to resettle refugees, whom he viewed as invading the country. Unlike last week's mail bomber the synagogue shooter was not Donald Trump superfan. He had posted on gab to complain. The president was failing to oppose Jews, and that he'd abandoned white supremacists. Who rioted in Charlottesville last year, Trump visited Pittsburgh on Tuesday to pays respects, but local officials declined to accompany him and Trump complained afterwards that the media had overstated the magnitude of protests of its visit your I feel like people tend to think about antisemitic violence is a major theme in world history. And as a major global. Problem, but not as widespread problem in the United States does this shooting signal a change in aberration. Or is it a problem that was here all along and that we weren't paying enough attention to? So I think it's a problem that was here all along. I think that periodically we've had these spasms of violence during Obama's presidency. Another neo-nazi-type who actually yelled Heil Hitler from the police car after he was apprehended shot up a Kansas City Jewish center. And sometimes it's just a matter of lock that fewer people aren't killed that said, the reason this is, you know, animated a lot of people is that President Trump has trafficking conspiratorial rhetoric and sometimes more martial or violent type rhetoric that has led people to believe that he is stoking these sorts of things and the people who are attracted to them. And so you have some people noticing I think for the first time that this stuff is out there pot probably because they are notice what Trump is doing. That's a good thing. People should be aware that these prejudices are out there and that they can be so concern ways. But we shouldn't kid ourselves that if you got rid of Trump tomorrow that this would go away because it was here before Trump, and it'll be are after him rich. What do you make of that does the president bear some responsibility here for for rhetoric and for feeling that he's stoked in the country? I don't think. So I really don't get this one. Add awe, first of all. I've just horrific heartbreaking.

Donald Trump president Pittsburgh rich Lowry Josh barrow squirrel hill New York magazine Elizabeth runic Washington Post tablet magazine United States Obama Heil Hitler Rosenberg Kansas City Jewish center editor writer Charlottesville
"josh barrow" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"Back again with left right and center i'm your host josh barrow on the right is rich lowry editor of national review on the left is michelle goldberg columnist the new york times and jonathan adler is with us he's a professor at case western reserve university school of law jonathan i wanna ask you about this case wayfair versus south dakota this is the internet sales tax case the people may have heard about the court overturned some of its old precedents and said states may impose sales tax on sales by out of state sellers even if those sellers are not physically located in the taxing states if you've been enjoying this loophole where you don't pay sales tax on some of your online purchases you may be about to lose that jonathan i thought the dissent was interesting here this case was a five four split and not the usual five four along ideological lines chief justice roberts wrote the dissent in which he aknowledged that the precedent cases where the courts had said before states couldn't collect taxes on these sorts of things he knowledged those cases have been wrongly decided but he basically said those decisions are really old and if congress i thought they were such a problem they could have fixed the my passing a law and since congress didn't act and since we've had this rule for such a long time that we should just let it stand for the sake of consistency how common is that kind of reasoning at the court roberts didn't care the day with that but he got three other justices to go along with him on that argument hey it's a very common argument and it's one that is particularly important to the chief as a general matter of the supreme court will not reconsider a prior precedent unless it's explicitly asked to do so so we get decisions that come down all the time that simply assume that precedents on the books mo hold them of guy with the court does in this particular case of the statute that south dakota ed adopted was designed to force the court to reconsider its decision and five justices were willing to do so but as a general matter this court does stick to try to stick to its older decisions and i would note contrary to the way the court has talked about under chief justice roberts the supreme court has overturned its own prior precedents at a much lower rate than the rehnquist court then the burger court or the warren court this is the current court is a much more status quo stick to precedent court than his recent predecessors original though they they didn't stick the status quo here and donald trump tweeted that this is a big victory for consumers and retailers yeah i disagree with them on that agree on the policy and i disagreed legally as well i think this should have required a congressional enactment and it's just a bad idea for states to build apply sales tax to businesses that don't actually have physical presence in the state do you do you think that might have a little bit to do with jeff bezos owning a very large online retailer maybe zest jonathan i i want to ask you about an oped that you co authored in the new york times regarding some litigation regarding the affordable care act now you were one of the sort of key thinkers making some of the arguments that the affordable care act ought to be overturned in some previous cases regarding the constitutionality of the individual mandate and some stuff related to to who can get which subsidies under the law but you say that this case now which has been brought by texas variety of other states and where the trump administration has made the unusual decision not to try to defend the law in federal court to say texas is right the law should be overturned that their argument is basically the individual mandate was upheld back in twenty twelve under the theory that it was a tax and it was within the federal government's power to levy taxes now the mandate penalty has been reduced to zero by the congress as part of the tax law that just passed since the mandate penalty is zero it's not a tax any more and therefore it must be unconstitutional and you have to throw at the law what is so wrong with this argument in your view well i mean the problem with the argument is not that a statement in the us code telling you.

josh barrow
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Back again with left right and center i'm josh barrow on tuesday for the first time since 1992 democrats want a senate race in alabama roy moore was a damaged candidate even before several women came forward to accuse him of making sexual advances on them when they were minors he had twice been removed from the state supreme court and when he ran for state supreme court justice in 2012 he put up one of the weakest performances of any republican candidates statewide in less decade in fact as president trump reminded his twitter followers on wednesday trump had warned alabama republicans they'd better vote for luther strange in the primary because more was at risk of losing the general election we're joined by john archibald columnist for the alabama mediagroup that's company that owns several major papers in alabama including the birmingham news john how did doug jones when this thing well as sort of a perfect storm of for doug does number one and the one that cannot be overlooked is the fact that he was running against one more and as you say he has a long long history a quartercentury at three three decades of of history with alabama ends which of course uh included those things being kicked off the court twice which included uh really kind of voice in the most extreme elements of the state uh saying uh just countless things that people have taken as outlandish i including you know the every everybody's heard them by now the the get rid of the amendments after the first ten and uh uh gay people should be jail than and it's just a it kind of built into a ball and that was very large but doug jones uh was able.

josh barrow roy moore supreme court trump twitter luther doug jones senate alabama president john archibald birmingham news three three decades
"josh barrow" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"Back again with left right and center i'm josh barrow on leftist katrina vanden heuvel of the nation magazine on the right as rich lowry editor of national review and our special guest is molly ball she is the newly named national political correspondent a time magazine on thursday president trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency and he spoke emotionally about his late older brothers struggles with alcohol i had somebody that guided me and he had a very very very tough life because of alcohol believe me very very tough tough life he was a strong guy but it was a tough tough thing that he was going through but i learned because of fred i learned and that's what i think is so important this was an idea that i had where if we can teach young people not to take drugs just not to take them when i see friends of mine that are having difficulty with not having that drink at dinner where it's literally almost impossible for them to stop i say to myself i can't even understand it why would that be difficult but we on we understand why it is difficult the fact is if we can teach young people and people generally not to start it's really really easy not to take them and i think that's going to end up being our most important thing katrina what did you think of his announcement inadequate um i you know instead of following the pleas of his own opioids commission trump uh didn't declare fullon national emergency national public health emergency sounds urgent but it doesn't free any significant new funds to fight.

josh barrow katrina vanden heuvel editor national review national political corresponde trump katrina rich lowry president public health fred i
"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"josh barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"Back again with left right and center i'm josh barrow on leftist vicky differences go soto professor at the university of texas on the right is rich lowry editor of national review and our special guest as juliette kayem former assistant secretary at the department of homeland security on tuesday president donald trump traveled to puerto rico amid criticism that he's been a turns inattentive in hostile toward the island in the aftermath of hurricane maria he toward damaging why nagano a relatively affluent suburb where the mayor has been a lot nicer to him than the mayor of san juan trump was trump he threw paper towels into a crowd he remarked that the need to help puerto rico recover was really throwing the budget out of whack and then twelve hours later he told geraldo rivera that the islands substantial debts would need to be wiped away even if that upset goldman sachs trump's budget director later said not to take the president to literally about debt relief vicky did the president make things better with this trip now he did apt to add to start it was too little too late and and this comes into a bigger picture of their relationship that trump was has had with latinos i mean to to be honest it's not been a good relationship remember how we launched his campaign in two thousand fifteen attacking mexican so i think a lot of this in the latino community are seeing this as another example uh but what we can't forget is what the electoral implication of this can be so puerto rico is um uh a commonwealth but you do have the citizens of puerto rico who if on the mainland can vote and i am seeing estimates josh of up to a million people leaving the island keep in mind that the the island's population is only about three million but because of the devastating effects of maria or probably gonna see anywhere from about half a million to a million puerto ricans coming to the united states and where they can end up they're gonna end up in florida they're going to end up in philadelphia they're going to end up in new york and they're going to have a substantial impact in the 2018 election and then and the 2020 election so president trump needs to to think about the long view of this that yes they they may seem distant on the island.

puerto rico nagano donald trump juliette kayem university of texas vicky new york philadelphia florida united states josh barrow trump budget director goldman sachs geraldo rivera president assistant secretary national review editor professor twelve hours