36 Burst results for "Joseph"

Fresh update on "joseph" discussed on Doctor Health Radio Show

Doctor Health Radio Show

01:26 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "joseph" discussed on Doctor Health Radio Show

"The Russia investigation. Plans to admit that he altered an email from the CIA that investigators relied on to secret New court permission in 2017 for a secret wiretap on former Trump Campaign manager Carter Page that is correspondent Keith Peters reporting American Airlines may now drop dozens of flights to smaller cities as a result of the impact of the Koven 19 pandemic. Here's correspondent Kenmore American Airlines plans to drop flights to about 30 smaller cities if a federal requirement to continue those flights expired. There's at the end of September, the Carrie agreed to keep serving smaller cities as a condition of receiving $5.8 billion in federal payroll help earlier this year. That report from correspondent Kid'll Ormond. More of these stories at townhall dot com. Now, the O'Reilly update brings you something you might not know. Seven years ago, a jury found a notorious Boston crime boss guilty of murder, racketeering and drug dealing after a 16 year manhunt. To bring him to justice. Most Americans had never heard of him. But the suspect was long considered one of the FBI's 10 most wanted his name Whitey Bolger. James Joseph soldier ran the Winter Hill Gang in Boston and suburbs. He ordered two dozen murders while running the States drug pipeline between Boston and New York City. In his prime, Bulger had more than 75 Mafia soldiers at his disposal. Why do you manage to evade local police? By cooperating with the FBI, He worked as a snitch, using the Department of Justice to arrest his heroin dealing rivals. An amazing story of corruption. On December 23rd 1994 Bulger fled Boston after learning he was going to be arrested for Siri's of homicides and FBI agent tipped him off if you can believe it. It took two fed 16 years to find Bulger. Then 81 year old was ultimately arrested in a tiny apartment in Santa Monica, California. Despite having about $10 million hidden Bulger was found guilty on August 12th 2013. But the story does not end there. Why do you stay in prison would not last very long. In October 2018. About three months after his conviction, the then 89 year old wheel chair bound Bulger Was beaten to death in a federal prison. A group of men. Kill the gang leader with padlocks wrapped in socks. The FBI believes the Boston Mafia ordered the hit four members of that crime family were in the same prison at the time of bulges murder yet no one Has been charged. And here's something else you might not know. Despite being an informant. The FBI added Whitey Bulger to its 10 most wanted list in 1999. The on ly Target above bulge. Was Osama bin Laden. Back after this. Are you sick of not being able to fall asleep? Are you struggling to be productive? Because your sleep is suffering MBA has developed a science back solution that targets the cause of sleeplessness, racing thoughts. This drug free, clinically validated solution has changed lives across the country where the new EB.

Whitey Bulger FBI Boston Kenmore American Airlines CIA Russia Murder Whitey Bolger Osama Bin Laden Carrie American Airlines MBA James Joseph Santa Monica O'reilly Department Of Justice Boston Mafia Keith Peters
18-Year-Old Dead After Being Stabbed, Set On Fire In The Bronx, New York City

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

18-Year-Old Dead After Being Stabbed, Set On Fire In The Bronx, New York City

"Died. After he was stabbed, doused with gasoline and set on fire. Yesterday in an apartment building in the Bronx. More from CBS two's Cori James Joseph Romero says it's a noise. He will never forget. One that forced him out of his apartment, not knowing what was going on, and I checked to see what was happening on the first floor. So confused with sound was coming from the the police police say say it it was was coming coming from from four four storeys storeys above, above, where where investigators investigators tell tell us us an an 18 18 year year old old in in the the hallway hallway on on the the fifth fifth floor, floor, was was stabbed stabbed three three times times doused doused with with gasoline. gasoline. Dean Dean and and then then set set on on fire. fire. The The young young man man who who died died has has been been identified identified as as 18 18 year year old old Winston Winston Ortiz Ortiz of of the the Bronx. Bronx. The The suspect suspect got got away away through through a a hallway hallway that that did did not not have have working working surveillance cameras. Tech

Bronx Winston Winston Ortiz Ortiz Cori James Joseph Romero Dean Dean CBS
Wauwatosa PD denies claims Officer Mensah provoked protesters

Mark Belling

05:56 min | 3 d ago

Wauwatosa PD denies claims Officer Mensah provoked protesters

"Background because most of you know the story. There's been ongoing protests in Wauwatosa even before the George Floyd situation over this, that and the other thing and They have focused locally on the case of Officer Joseph MENSA, who is the police officer who shot and killed a man who, armed with a stolen gun was part of a group that was causing a disturbance and running toward Mayfair Mall. While armed with that stolen gun. He also had 36 rounds of ammunition and an extended magazine. And according to the police investigation, he fired a shot that officer men sub and protesters have been going after Officer men ever since The wall photos the city council. Recommended that he his employment be terminated in the fire and police Commission has suspended him. As I had predicted. This is not satisfied the protesters who have disrupted government meetings who made wild statements at a public meeting at hard Park, and then on Saturday, I took their protest directly to the home. Off officer Men's his girlfriend, who is a police officer in Milwaukee. Where Officer Benson Wass and a situation developed in which Officer MENSA says that he was shot at Before we talk to Chief Webber. I want to deal with two new developments today. The first A letter that was sent today by Congressman Jim Sense it better. Guys, you probably know this city election today to replace time is the sense of better who's been in the house for a long, long time Republican primary Today is between Clift Temple and Scott Fitzgerald and the Republican candidate for that seed is going to be determined in today's election. But sensitive writer is still there since it brothers. This thick includes portions, but not all of Wauwatosa. He sent the following letter to me, your dentist McBride of Wauwatosa today, Dear Mayor McBride. I write to you today concerning the deteriorating security and policing in Wauwatosa. The protests, which may have started peacefully have been growing ever more violent and the event Saturday night outside the residence of Officer Joseph Mintz have required a meat require immediate leadership and strong action from you. And the elected leaders of Wauwatosa first allow me to be clear that I am and always will be supportive of American citizens. First Amendment rights, having said that ever since the death of George Flight in Minneapolis and the protests and the protests the incident sparked There has been a push by community leaders throughout the country to weaken, defund and abolish police departments in several cities. Locally, Officer MENSA has become the poster child for this movement due to his three officer involved shooting incidents. Officer MENSA has dedicated his life to protecting our community and has been cleared by the Milwaukee County District attorney's office of two of the three shootings in which he has been involved. The third incident is still under review. Despite the decisions by the Milwaukee County D. A. You're common council passed a resolution calling for the termination of officer menses employment with the Wauwatosa Police Department. While I understand the common Council wants to bring reforms that the OPD the consequences of their actions are having serious repercussions for the residents of your community. Citizens of Baba Tosa are being harassed by these protests. Protesters who have now laid siege to a residence in your community where a gun was fired at a home with women and Children inside. Actions like this, and the breakdown of law and order will spread fear and force the citizens of Allah toasted to reconsider their choice to reside there. The mass emigration from your city would be devastating to the very fabric of that community. In addition to the detrimental effect it would have on your tax base schools and city sciences. As I believe we are teetering at a crisis. I am offering my assistance. I stand ready to contact federal law enforcement agencies and bring them to Wauwatosa in order to bring peace and tranquility back to the community. I look forward to hearing from you. Well, we have reached a critical tipping point in Wauwatosa. I am confident that if we work together, we can restore the rule of law. It is crucial that we strive to preserve the excellent quality of life that has drawn so many toe work. And raise their families in Wauwatosa and signed by Jim Sensenbrenner, member of Congress. His district includes portions of the city of Wauwatosa. Seconds slow. State representative David Bowie and Milwaukee who says he was part of the demonstration in protests that occurred outside this residents. That officer Benson was at on Saturday night is saying that nobody tried to kill Officer MENSA, and he's blaming MENSA for all of the developments that occurred. Quoted in the Js online today, Bowen said, and I quote from the story, Bowen said No protesters fired at MENSA during the protest. It should Bob said 50 to 60 people outside menses Wauwatosa home again. It's actually his girl friend's home. But he's residing there. Bowling and other protesters said they were provoked by MENSA before the physical altercation that took place out outside his home quote. It was clearly communicated as we were trying to figure out what happened that it was Joseph MENSA in that tussle that turned off the safety on that firearm and told the trigger. Owen said today, the Wauwatosa Police Department issued a statement saying there is a lot of false information and rumors being circulated on social media and through the news media regarding the events on Saturday night, August 8th outside the home where Wauwatosa Police officer Joseph MENSA was stag best includes an accurate information and allegations contained an official press releases from a state elected official was outside of the home. Well criminal conduct and a shooting occurred. What occurred Saturday night was not organized a peaceful protest. It was a targeted planned act of violence against one of our police officers. In our community. This is an active ongoing investigation and evidence continues to be gathered regarding the events of August 8. Investigators are looking through a large amount of high quality video footage from the scene and are working to identify suspects and vehicles involved in any illegal activity. A statement, then quotes police chief. Very Weber The welcome toast. The Police Department will not stand by and allow this type of intimidating, aggressive, dangerous illegal behavior to occur,

Wauwatosa Officer Officer Joseph Mensa Wauwatosa Police Department Mensa Officer Mensa Officer Benson Wass Officer Joseph Mintz Police Department Police Commission Milwaukee Milwaukee County Mayfair Mall George Floyd Baba Tosa Common Council Hard Park Jim Sense Bowling
NYC's De Blasio Sued by Pro-Cop Groups for Rejecting Blue Lives Matter Mural

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 4 d ago

NYC's De Blasio Sued by Pro-Cop Groups for Rejecting Blue Lives Matter Mural

"Of pro cop group suing Mayor de Blasio after they weren't allowed to put up a blue lives matter. Mural similar to the Black Lives matter Mural on Fifth Avenue outside Trump Tower. The suit says their First Amendment rights were violated when the city allowed its property to be used by private speakers, but one allow a mural supportive of police. Joseph Emperor Treece is the founder of Blue Lives matter, and I see which is one of the plaintiffs, he explains to 10 10 wins. Why this matters. He was founded off of all different people coming through Ellis Island to start a new life and have equal opportunity. And it seems like politicians nowadays are siding with certain groups important certain people and groups on a pedestal, and that's what Now what New York City is about? Not. That's not what America is about. And to have a politician come out blatantly deny you saying that another group is more important and their values more important. It's hurtful and disheartening, but we're not losing. Plaintiffs say they want a mural to honor cops and boost morale in

Joseph Emperor Treece Blue Lives Trump Tower Mayor De Blasio New York City Ellis Island Founder America
Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker

Q

06:14 min | Last week

Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker

"100 years ago, Madam C. J. Walker was the richest, self made woman in America. She battled both racism and sexism in a post abolition world. She created an empire of hair care products for black women, and she also employed an empowered thousands of black women across the country. Her story is the subject of a Netflix series called Self Made. Inspired by the Life of Madam C. J. Walker. The show stars Octavia Spencer as Thie, tenacious businesswoman, and Blair Underwood plays her husband. You see him struggle to live in the shadows of his wife's massive achievements. You might know Blair from L. A law dear white people or sex in the city. He also starred in the Broadway production of a Soldier's play. I talked to Blair right around the time. The play had to shut down early because of covert 19 back in mid March, and I started off by asking him why Madam C. J. Walker story is so important. She accomplished something that was just a monumental An extraordinary at the turn of the century in the late 18 hundreds and building this hair care empire Ah, woman. An African American woman, um, during that period of time to to earn that kind of money she did, And as you as you said, she employed and empowered thousands of African American women all over the world, So she was really you know, before Mary Kay or Avon or M Way she was creating distributors. People could have their own businesses and be their own business people at the time, So it was really extraordinary. It was amazing what she created, especially given the times in which she did it. Yeah, the early 19 hundreds. Incredible. So let's take a listen to a clip from the new Netflix series Self. This is you. Yeah, This is you and Octavia Spencer as husband and wife. New hotel downtown. The iron figure you will meet wouldn't go down. There could be a bell half you could do laundry. You don't just plant a seed and expect fruit the next day. Color women here. Just gotta get used to that idea. Somebody was doing ahead as all you know. I always love you big ideas, but I'm not going back to long enough. Now. Wait a minute. No way. Don't all made sacrifices You won't do was best for this family. Yeah, so there's definitely some tension. Attention that we hear that Cliff. How would you describe the relationship between your character CJ Walker and his wife, Madam C. J. Walker. Oh, loving but strained. I say, loving first, because I think that's the most important thing to know about. These two people is that they have great had great admiration for each other and affection. They came together and fell in love before she became successful before she became Madam C. J. Walker. Her name was Sarah. Breedlove. And my character's name is Charles Joseph Walker. So she's known in relationship to him. Mrs. CJ Welcome, Madam C. J. Walker, Um and then when she because of because for intellect and her driving her tenacity and her persistence. She as the brand became more famous, and she built. She was the driving force behind the empire that she built. And it was ah, a lot for him to swallow in tow handle into process on a day to day basis and There's alcoholism involved, and there was a womanising involved. And you know he himself was a man of his times on did not want to be defined by the woman in his life, no matter how much he loved her. It was very hard for him to just find his equilibrium in the midst of all of that. Yeah, and to figure out how to play second fiddle and still, I guess, maintain his masculinity or maintain the image of masculinity at that at that time, that's right and still feel of worth in a value. How did you get yourself into into that head space? That sounds like a really intense head space to get into. Well, you got nothing with acting you just Ah, In the simplest terms, we we played from people and we believe it A cz long as you believe more specifically that that you want this woman to win this woman that you're in love with that you want her to when you want her to succeed. And if you live in that space, and then all these other dynamics coming to play her becoming more successful, who are becoming more famous for becoming more well known, and then her ideas are the ones that really work more than your own. And then you you feel less diminished. But if it's rooted in the fact that you bonded and you came together as a team because of the respect and admiration and love for each other. Everything else kind of falls into place. You've been married yourself for 25 years. Did you draw on any of your own experiences in figuring out the power dynamics of a partnership for this role? Uh, yeah, I think you know you draw them everything you've got, because I was sorry. I should be more specific. I guess I'm wondering like you're a famous person, and I'm wondering if there's anything for you not even in terms of like gender roles. But just just just what it is to be a person who is in the limelight and and also trying to make sure that they're there. Partner comes along. With them and shines just as brightly. Wow, you know, Tommy, That's that's really great question. I I do think what What I've learned is that it's important to make. I find everybody around. You feel of value, but you're asking specifically in relationships. But I think that's important, too. You know that your spouse in that marriage or relationship that has a kind of dynamic Where one person maybe more known to the public. And it's more public facing that that person is aware Of how your mate might feel. My my wife doesn't care doesn't look for it, which is great, So it's a part of its part in parts of what I do as a professional is part of my profession. So there's no conflict in that respect, but But there is a sense of you know that it's important that she knows that she is valued in her world and heard her desires and her passions. And I think that's true for any relationship, so I definitely you know. Use that and this character just understanding that

Madam C. J. Walker Blair Underwood Octavia Spencer Netflix Charles Joseph Walker America Mary Kay Breedlove Cliff Mrs. Cj Welcome Thie Sarah Avon Partner Tommy
Bonus Meditation with Joseph Goldstein

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:40 min | Last week

Bonus Meditation with Joseph Goldstein

"One of the challenging aspects of this practice of paying attention to these quickly passing thoughts is thoughts of very slippery. They slide into the mind. and. So we need to pay particular attention to the arising of his thoughts. And to do it in a lighthearted way. As we pay more and more attention to these kinds of thoughts arising many many times during the day. And doing it with a light heart doing it from a place of interest from a place of investigation. We find ourselves abiding in much more spacious, a much more open quality of mind. That allows the thoughts to arise in pass away in a field of awareness. As, you begin the sitting. Sit comfortably in a dignified posture. But the back straight but not stiff. Leading, the is closed gently. Settle into your body. In sitting posture. And simply sit and no, you're sitting. As you're aware of yourself sitting. You might also begin to know that the body is breathing. Breathing in no, you're breathing in breathing out. No, you're breathing out. At Different Times. You may hear different sounds. Towns may be soft towns. They may be pleasant. They may be unpleasant. Simply rest in the openness. And be aware of how old sounds appear disappear.

Different Times
Lord & Taylor Is Bankrupt as Retail Rout Continues

WBBM Morning News

00:28 sec | Last week

Lord & Taylor Is Bankrupt as Retail Rout Continues

"Appears to be the best fit for a new batch of retailers in trouble during the pandemic. CBS's Debra Robbery gifts Not as Many people are buying clothing while they're working from home or not working at all. Men's Warehouse. Joseph a Bank and Lord and Taylor are the latest companies to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. A joint Neiman Marcus J. Crew, J. C. Penny Brooks Brothers in and Taylor all hoping to shed debt and get out of costly leases during the pandemic.

Neiman Marcus J. Crew Debra Robbery Taylor CBS J. C. Penny Brooks Joseph
New York City-Based Lord & Taylor Files For Bankruptcy Protection

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:09 sec | Last week

New York City-Based Lord & Taylor Files For Bankruptcy Protection

"Has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. It is the nation's oldest department store. It joins a long List of retailers filing for bankruptcy tailored brands, which owns men's Warehouse, and Joseph, A. Bank also just filed its basics.

Joseph A. Bank
Aboard the Diamond Princess, a Case Study in Aerosol Transmission

KNX Evening News

04:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Aboard the Diamond Princess, a Case Study in Aerosol Transmission

"The diamond Princess cruise ship turned out to be a bit of a canary in the coal mine for the Corona virus outbreak back in late January 1 infected passenger boarded the ship. A month later, over 700 passengers were sick with covert 19. Others new research out today on how the virus spreads like wildfire across ships like this, and it serves as a major warning for how the virus transmits in everyday setting statement settings that were in like Charles and I in this office building. Dr. Joseph Allen is the director of the Healthy Buildings Program at Harvard, JJ Chan School of Public Health. Co author of the A Diamond franchise study. Dr Ellen. Thanks for joining us on connects in death First of all tell, Tell us about about your research and what we should know people like myself. People like Charles People who are are in situations where this virus can spread. Yeah. Thanks for having me on on. You described it perfectly carrying a coal mine. It caught our attention rightfully early on in this pandemic and should have been an early warning of just how easily this virus spread. If you recall, there were several 1000 people. On the cruise ship, and almost 20% of them got infected. That was even after a lock down. What we did with our study really was used that as a really A perfect experiment. Unfortunately, was an experiment in a bottle. With everything so controlled so well defined. We could really understand how this virus is transmitted and start to quantify it for the first time. With some depth and what we learned is this Airborne transmission. The longer range airborne transmission mean around a room. It is contributing a significant portion of the spread of this virus. Now. This is just trying to get some attention from one of the 239 scientists wrote a letter of the W H O a couple weeks ago. This made headlines that airborne transmission is happening despite CDC. W ll be reluctant to acknowledge its happening. This new shut study shows it's happening. It makes it a big part of the spread, and it has obvious implications for opposite schools and every other Setting. We spend our time indoors and okay, So let's talk about what that translates to in terms of what offices and schools and buildings need to do. As you know most modern buildings. You can't open windows and that was designed years ago to be more energy efficient. So you can't open the window unless you want to throw a chair through it. So what are we supposed to do? That's a good question. So first keep doing the controls that we know what working in Washington absolutely, where mask that helps us all forms of transmission as well. And social distancing is good day one that we need to do more of it. Fewer people pay attention to is bringing in more fresh outdoor air. We're bringing ventilation. So if you do have operable windows, you open him up. Facilitate the movement of air coming in there with the fan the window If you're in a building that has airconditioning on H B C system mechanical system, you want to talk to the building owner get more fresh outdoor air coming in through that system. Any air that's were circulated. Must go three. Merv 13 filter or better? MDRV. Usually they use a murdered eight U Want to murder 13? And you could think about supplementing that in schools Homes office with a portable air cleaner with HEPA filter, the kind you'd buy it, you know, Home Depot, our target or Wal Mart er online. Yeah, but here's the thing, But But But here's the thing, Doctor. Ah, Just to take. You know, Christmas talking like we're in the studio here. So you know, I'm looking. We've got all kinds of stuff. We got Purell. We've got Clorox. We've got Germany. We've got you name it. We've got all kinds of things to scrub surfaces. Uh, but for companies to come in and put in new ventilation systems and new filtering systems That's a lot more money than getting a canister of wipes. Well, look, I mean, the reality is that it's important to wash your hands. Do all that. But the majority of your exposures coming through other means you're gonna have to wear a mask that's not expensive. And the recommendations we've been giving in February not to go in and replace your system or spend $1,000,000 on some new fancy control system is really getting down to the basics here. Your existing system can bring in more air than it's doing. You have a you have a filter on the recirculated air Get a better one. A portable air cleaner's $200. You guys should have one in your studio right now. So I'm not talking about expensive multi $1,000,000 upgrades take many months. You could have your space performing a lot better. In the next 30 minutes. If you want to plug in a portable air cleaner with the mask on, get the ventilation going a bit better. So it's a misnomer that this has to be expensive or time consuming to fix being in office school dental office, you name it. Dr Joseph Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program at Harvard's Chance School of Public Health. Dr Alan Thank

Charles People Dr. Joseph Allen Healthy Buildings Program Dr Ellen Director Harvard Jj Chan School Of Public Healt Dr Alan Clorox Wal Mart Home Depot CDC Washington Murder W H O Germany Chance School Of Public Health
Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

Business Wars Daily

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

"The abandonment of the suit helps explain the struggles of one of America's most iconic fashion companies, brooks brothers, the two hundred two year old brand filed for bankruptcy protection on July eight sure blame cove nineteen, but now you'd be wrong. Suits with the three piece with Thai or skirts and high heels used to convey professionalism and competence, they served as symbols that you took your job seriously and respected your customers, the ones you were treating too expensive lunches, madman style, but even before the pandemic they'd become something of an anachronism. Most of us now see little to no relationship between the way we dress in our competence at work, think Mark Zuckerberg's hoodies. Indeed expensive suits can be viewed as a sign of elitism. Put it starkly. The corporate fashion code has gone by the wayside. Brooks brothers struggles represent a cultural shift, not just a Kobe tragedy. Brooks brothers famously dressed all but four presidents. It is the longest continuously operating fashion business in America and until this month it boasted about making its products in America the Brandon's three factories in the states in Massachusetts North, Carolina and New York. CEO Claude Delvecchio is planning to close those factories. We'll get to that in a minute. As you know, apparel sales have been decimated by pandemic closures in April nobody bought clothes whether from Brooks brothers or JC, Penney and other retail casualty, but did you know the actual numbers? Clothing sales fell almost ninety percent in April, according to retail dive, but brooks brothers began looking for a buyer about a year ago. The company operates five hundred stores two hundred of them in the US sales have been flat at about a billion dollars a year since twenty, seventeen, prior to the pandemic bankers estimated the company's value at three hundred to three hundred fifty million dollars. Figure Delvecchio disputed. As, I mentioned the company intends to close its three US factories later this month in the gritty industrial town of. Massachusetts home of its largest factory. Its largest immigrant workforce is being denied severance pay many of those workers, immigrants and refugees women from the Dominican Republic. Vietnam Burma and Nepal have made the company's fine clothing for years so far brooks isn't budging. Despite pleas from the union, and from members of Congress according to the Boston Globe in North Carolina, the factories, the only large employer in the little town of Garland closure would affect that town forever, mayor winifred. Hill, Murphy told The New York Times. In response, CEO, Del Vecchio, says for survival. We must hang onto as much cash as possible, but the globe reports that its chapter eleven filing includes plans to give compensation benefits, severance and bonuses totaling millions to other workers. Brooks brothers will transform, but unlike many of its retail brethren its survival is not in question. In fact, at least one bidder for the company believes it can earn annual revenue of three billion dollars within five years more than triple its current sales, so many buyers are vying for the brand at both the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg used the phrase the races on those making bids. Bids Include Mall Company Simon, property, group, authentic brands, group and W. H. P. Global another bidder is a group of Italian. Investors led by a company called GIO which typically helps fashion companies improve their online presences. The Wall Street Journal possibly with tongue firmly in cheek, considering the state cut of Brooks brothers clothing says Julia wants to quote introduced some European flair to the quintessential American brand. Julia's clients include Armani Maxmara and other designers. Brooks brothers is accepting bids through August fifth, so brooks will survive, but what about it's cheaper? Rival men's warehouse tailored brands which owns men's warehouse and the more upscale Joseph. A. Bank plans to close at least a third of its fifteen hundred stores. It said this month it hasn't filed for chapter eleven protection, but it came close according to CNN. That threat remains even after it stores reopened. Sales have been falling. They were down about eighty percent at Joseph A. Bank in the first week of June, as we all continue to do business in Pajama Pants as we all know nostalgia sells Joseph A. Bank doesn't have nearly the name or the history of Brooks brothers, which drips with nostalgia. Teddy Roosevelt apparently insisted his rough riders. Riders wear the Brand Abe. Lincoln was also a brooks brothers customer, one reason for the bidding war beyond what is sure to be the lowest price anyone ever imagined for the stalwart brand. Is What author Lisa Burn? Bach believes about Fashions Post. Pandemic Future Birnbaum who authored the twenty ten book true. Prep argues that the company must be saved after the pandemic finally end, she writes. There will be weddings. There will be funerals. There will be. We hope live operas and theatre and premieres in concerts and fancy dress parties. Where we can't predict the future, but we can observe the present, and what's happening to upscale apparel in the US. WHO's buying it and WHO's making it. Reveals a lot about our rapidly changing an enormously conflicted culture.

Brooks Brothers Brooks United States America Ceo Claude Delvecchio Mark Zuckerberg Julia Dominican Republic Massachusetts CEO Teddy Roosevelt The Wall Street Journal Joseph A. Bank CNN Burma Congress North Carolina Joseph
Melatonin, CBD, Creatine, and Immunity Boosts

The Keto Answers Podcast

07:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Melatonin, CBD, Creatine, and Immunity Boosts

"Chris Welcome welcome to another episode of. Ask The guys here. We have a title. So here we are. This is what I would we do. Five or six other episodes like this before it's been a while and well we've done. One and people have been asking so you are again Chris is. Chris Irvine. On that nailed it the Kitale tallest. Trying to new break out a little bit more and changes named you just name. We talk about so. Talk about what you're stuck. We'll talk about it off off off Mike. Be Out. We're GONNA. Talk about stuff. Hopefully, not everything Joseph's. Chris's our resident expert here. BIA curiosity so cuny time. This one is about supplements if we got a lot of questions about. Settlements how to use them when to use themselves. Fire him off to see. We have all right so first question we have is from Heather N. and the question is should I supplement with Melatonin? If I'm having trouble sleeping so I would say no, and we can this. This is in my newsletter couple of weeks ago I. Don't know if you read that, but tour down a little bit. MELATONIN has its place. It is a precursor to a letter to the. Is Naturally secreted by your brain anything that's naturally secreted by your brain. I'm not a huge fan of. Taking Sasha Sisley. This is actually if you look at it, it's the only hormone that you can get without a prescription. Technically. Hormone your body. It's the only way you can get without a prescription interesting, yeah! I mean I. think my thoughts with Milton I think the answers that depends because I think it depends on. If you are living a lifestyle that allows you to produce it naturally so I think if you're a night shift worker, or you're somebody who is able to. You know if you're not, it's not the first step you should take if you're having trouble sleeping so I if you if you're not checking the boxes. With you're trying to improve your sleep quality then you shouldn't be turning Melatonin, but if you are work your work, circumstances are living circumstances. Have you in a position where you aren't going to be able to produce a lot of Melatonin? Naturally then I think you prior getting good sleep is going to be important, and if Melatonin can help that I think it can be a good song. Yeah, so the question is what is melting do and how is it? Producing one is produced by the body naturally. Melatonin essentially just tell you about it activates cascade of different Newark. Chemicals screwed that basically tell you buy. It's time to go to sleep. At screened by Pinal Gland I believe. And it is. Associate with a lot of things, light is major one. So what happens is most people don't. Fall Asleep with the sunset right and so the sun normally go down in all human history, and for every other analysts happens. By starts up regulating melatonin. melatonin sort of master switched. Those tells the rest of your body's going down and shutting down for arrest. When this doesn't happen. Can Be hard to go to sleep, and only that cannot stop you from getting into different stages of sleep as fast as you normally would, so you may be unconscious, but that doesn't mean you're getting the restorative sleep that you normally would so. Why is this problem? While people are after the sun goes down, they're exposed to blue light on their screens fluorescent lights in their house. The suppresses Melatonin production. So if that's the case, you have no other option. Maybe it's a good idea to take it I would take it regularly, but it at the same exact time. You shouldn't be producing it all over the place, so it shouldn't be off the map like. If you're taking Melatonin and you taking it one eight PM. One at ten PM. One and seven PM. In place you basically telling your brand that you're traveling in time zones back and forth and back and forth so I would focus far more on this is a last resort, and for special circumstances moving which we can get into, but the number one thing that I do when I go somewhere as If I have blue light, blocking glasses I blue blocks. and. There's a bunch out there. That's the ones I prefer. If I can't control the lights on my house. I've liked that dim when the sun sets and turn red and orange, after the sun has set, so those are wavelengths that do not. Suppress, Melatonin and this why the lends them blue light blocking glasses, the sandy fill blue light. You think about it like if you're outside at a campfire. The Ladies Very. Orangish, Yellowish Reddish Hue, there's very little to no blue light in there, so that's all from the sun so. Removing that from your day to day, life in is consistently as possible so that way you're not getting these weird signals of your body that you're switching time zones against another completely natural thing for humans to go through. That would be a huge thing, but I think there's a Lotta other things why people aren't getting good sleep, and so assuming that it's because of your lack of Melatonin production is i. think a little silly I think that you could look at. Obviously light is a huge one temperature of your room and then. The ability for light the in your house from. Blue. Blue. I'm trying to your. Shades. blockers no time. Look. light-blocking shades trying to say here. Oh blackout curtains blackout. So those are a good thing, and then we have lights actually if you're in a city where there's a lot of additional light, yeah, we have then lights that turn on the sunlight. One Sunrise should be happening. So this is another. Thing that happens. Has People Get Blackout Curtains? And then they don't wake up to the sun, which is again? In the wrong direction, so we actually have lights that turn on. As the sun rises locally, so you can just do all this stuff is super easy, Philips. Hue Lights, but we have. Great and Eating Super Close about times and I WANNA. Thank people you way too close to bed. I put at least three hours before you try to shut down and mental stimulation is also too much, so people are worried about this at that looking at the news. They're watching TV. They're just in. There had even hanging out with friends like I've done last couple of nights. You know people talk. Nine nine thirty s usually go to bed then I get home and it looks super stimulated. I can't sold out for a couple of hours. There's a lot of reasons why people wouldn't be able to sleep or feeling Russ restless. Having lack of militant brushes by news worry about? Your thoughts here. Will agree with that I. Think the the two things I would add to. That I agree that like I think it's a last ditch. Thing that you need to try. There's a of other things you can get in check with your environment and with your health habits before you need to turn to that supplementation. Do things I would add for helping is. Sleeping with your phone either out of room, or at least face down or not sleeping with the television on. There's some really interesting research out there that even when your eyelids are closed in your sleeping, flashing lights can cause face shifts in your circadian rhythms that can suppress Melatonin production or ramp up cortisol in the middle of the night. Things like that so. That's can be as simple as having your phone facing up and it lighting up while you're sleeping. That can completely threw off your sleep. So I thought that was really interesting thing when I was reading that studies. That would be a big thing. To consider and then. There's there is some interesting research on Melatonin for neuro degenerative diseases where you know, it seems like as we age, our natural production of Melatonin starts to decrease in. They've done studies where supplementing with it in elderly populations really increases cognitive function. That actually just came out this year I. Think showing that so like you said I think it's either. It's either a last ditch effort, supplement or something used for very specific circumstances.

Melatonin Chris Irvine Sasha Sisley Philips Mike Joseph Heather N. Milton Newark Cortisol Russ Melatonin.
Need some good news about Covid-19?

KRLD Sunday Morning News

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Need some good news about Covid-19?

"Been been mostly mostly bad bad when when it it comes comes to to information information about about the the Corona Corona virus. virus. Harvard professor Joseph Allen at Harvard University's Th Chan's School of Public Health. Talk to Carol. These David Rankin and says there is some good news that therapeutic will be vaccine. So people may have heard of the steroid DEC. Method Stone on the antiviral disappear. These are being used to treat patients who are quite sick with Kobe 19. But there are other therapeutics that should be coming on the market, including what we call monoclonal antibodies. Normally when your body has a response to this virus of others that creates antibodies. Well, lot of clonal antibodies are just engineered and a body and they could be used for both prevention and treatment that the data they're looking really promising. On the testing front. We've seen advancement in terms of rapid saliva tests. You could think of these as a home pregnancy test. But for covert 19 and in this case is a strip of paper you put in your mouth and it gives you a test result pretty quickly, and it's cheap. And so while the test isn't perfect, the fact that it's cheap and you can take it back and at home. Even better than a better a good, accurate test, but takes seven days to get the results back. We keep seeing that these rapid tests are not as accurate does that increase the danger a little bit of if you think you are negative, and it comes up positive, it's a false positive or a false negative, really good question and the work that shows that if you get these rapid test that air cheap enough, not the expensive, rapid test. But that even if they have false negatives, the fact that you're taking them every day or even multiple times a day is better than an accurate test that you take. And then seven days later, you find out the result at which point it's too late. That you here is that even on day one. If it doesn't get it, then you catch it. The next time you took the test and worst case, you catch it on the third day, And if everybody starts doing this overall, it would really help too slow. The spread of disease, and we get a lot of people confidence about going back into stores or restaurants or even theaters. When is there going to be a vaccine? Because the vaccine seems to be the turning point whether or not we can get back to normal request. It wasn't that long ago where we weren't quite sure we could produce the vaccine for this Corona virus. On If we produce it within a year, which it looks like we'll be able to do that will be the fastest. A vaccine has never been produced by several years. But this is a remarkable scientific achievement. It looks like we will have a vaccine by the end of this year. But I want to be a caveat that that the real challenge is not just getting the vaccine. It's the distribution. Right vaccine never saved any lives on Ly a vaccination has we actually have to get the people? That's not to say it's really good news. I also think that news on therapeutic is just as important. Therapeutics will beat out vaccine this fall is what I'm seeing in terms of the science, and I think that's really important because people aren't scared of getting sick. There's getting scared of death. On. If you have therapeutic that can keep people that can prevent the worst outcomes. I think that will also helped give them confidence to people that will get through this okay. Professor Joseph Allen at Harvard's Th Chan School of Public Health. The U.

Harvard University Professor Joseph Allen School Of Public Health David Rankin Th Chan School Of Public Healt Carol Professor Kobe Stone LY
Man splits $22 million jackpot win with friend, keeping nearly 30-year-old promise

Our American Stories with Lee Habeeb

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Man splits $22 million jackpot win with friend, keeping nearly 30-year-old promise

"R L D talk about making good on an old promise of Western Wisconsin man will share the millions he won in the lottery with a longtime friend because he promised to do so. 28 years ago. Back in 1992 Tom Cook and Joseph Finney made a hand shake shake promise that if either of them ever won the Powerball jackpot, they'd split the money. Usually, that's the kind of thing people would forget about. But cook didn't and when he bought A winning ticket for a $22 million jackpot. He called to tell me that he'd won big and would be sharing with him. Feeney really didn't believe it, but he does. Now he's in line to get about $5.7 million under the

Tom Cook Joseph Finney Feeney Wisconsin
Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

PRI's The World

05:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

"Moving onto Saudi Arabia. King Salman is spending some time in the hospital there this week Saudi state media report he had surgery to remove his gallbladder, and it was successful nothing life threatening, but whenever an eighty four year old national leader is hospitalized for whatever reason it raises questions for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Those questions about what a possible succession might look like the World Sharon Jafari reports the modern day kingdom of Saudi. Arabia was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, two, and since. Since, then it's been ruled by the same royal family succession has mostly gone from father to son or brother to brother eighty four year old King Solomon took over from his brother into fifteen. Joseph Russell was the US ambassador to Saudi Arabia back then. Oh, yes, I got to know him very while this describes Kim Samoan as educated Matt. It says the king loves to read to his grandchildren so whenever he went back to New York while says he would buy books as gifts for some on. In the old culture of Saudi culture books never had pictures. That's because the ultra conservatives in the kingdom considered images to be un-islamic, so made sure I brought books a lot pictures. One time was false, as he brought by another bound copy of one thousand and One Nights, a collection of middle. Eastern folktales, and the king loved it. At the opportunity to work with online, I grew very fond of him, but while Kingston Mon- might be the most powerful official in Saudi Arabia. It's his son. Crown Prince Mohammad Bin, Salman who runs the kingdom on a day to day basis. NBS known is next in line to the throne. Nowadays, the process of succession is overseen by a special group of authorities yes-men. Faruk is with Carnegie in. For International, peace in Washington, the previous king had established what they call the allegiance council, which is basically a counseled from the surviving sons of the funder for NPS to become kings. She says this council would initiate a process for members of the royal family to pledge allegiance to the new king, but right now there's a problem. The Allegiance Council doesn't have had the last one died, and I think the position has been vacant for over two years now and one member at least of the allegiance council is under arrest Prince Amit faulk says NBA has been controversial figure since they want his made it his mission to consolidate power and supply line any potential competitor. Nabil Nura an expert on Gulf affairs says MP's has arrested an intimidate viable members of the royal family also rounded up hundreds of businessmen and activists. He was to show that he is the guy for the position, and he wants to make sure that there are no challenges in his way to the throne occupied. Was it all after. that. The king went to the hospital state TV showed him holding a cabinet meeting from there. That's to show that the king is alive and well, and still in charge, but nobody says it's an open secret that MBA's is actively pushing to become king while his father is still around. Why well a number of things one of them is related to the US actually Hamad bin. Salman wants to make sure that he ascends the throne while president. Trump is personally that states trump has been supportive of the crown. Prince says it's not clear if joe. Biden would do the same besides the American election does also the G. Twenty summit in November. It could be a critical moment for MBA's to show that he is in charge. And some people from the Royal Family might not be happy with Hamad bin Salman, being king, so hammered. This might ascend the throne while his father is still alive to make sure that everything goes smoothly. So where does all this leave the US? Saudi relations Yes menfolk says NBA is a controversial figure in Washington DC. She says it's not internal policies that have raised eyebrows NBA has has been the war in Yemen and according to the CIA or did. Did the kidding of Washington Post columnist Jamal and unfortunately like many things inside Washington there is polarization and the debate is very much politicized, but let me tell you that the concern, the uncertainty about the rule of Mohammad Bin, Salman is certainly bipartisan. People differ on what to do about it, folks. Some things have not changed Saudi Arabia remains a key player in the global oil market and president. Trump has boasted about selling weapons to the king. Now with the possibility of political transition in both countries on the horizon, there are big questions about the future of the relationship between the two longtime allies.

Saudi Arabia King Salman Crown Prince Mohammad Bin NBA King Solomon Royal Family Allegiance Council Donald Trump United States Nabil Nura Washington Dc Joseph Russell President Trump Sharon Jafari Prince Amit Faulk Washington Post Hamad Bin Mohammad Bin NBS Washington
Starbucks employee spat in drinks served to police officers

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Starbucks employee spat in drinks served to police officers

"Tips leave tips that Starbucks all the time. But it was a tip about a Starbucks that led to an arrest in Park Ridge, New Jersey yesterday. Somebody told police that one of the workers have been spitting in drinks ordered by cops know he didn't mark raids. Police Captain Joseph Rumpole is his 3rd 21 year old Kevin Tray holds on arrests, but we were just shocked. Andi. I think a lot of people Um, who have found out about it from the public in a lot of different residents were also very shocked that this would take place, and, uh, when you start thinking about the whole cove it crisis and in this situation, the last thing you would expect is that somebody would spit into your coffee, he says. Now they're working on getting the officer tested for Corona virus just in case. Starbuck says, three Ho has been fired the company apologizing to the Park Ridge PG and says it's fully cooperating with the investigation.

Starbucks Kevin Tray Park Ridge Pg Park Ridge Captain Joseph Rumpole New Jersey Starbuck Officer HO
UN chief: World 'at the breaking point' due to inequalities

Get Well Naturally with Dr. Joseph Honigman, Dr. Gideon Orbach and Jeffrey Niznik

00:47 sec | Last month

UN chief: World 'at the breaking point' due to inequalities

"U N Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez, delivering the Nelson Mandela annual lecture where he made a sweeping call to end the global inequalities that sparked this year's a massive anti racism protests and have been further exposed by the Corona virus pandemic. Gutierrez says that Cove in 19 has been likened to an X ray revealing fractures in the fragile skeleton of the societies We have built. The speech took aim at racism, as well as the vast inequality of wealth. Gutierrez says the world's 26 26 richest people hold as much wealth as half the global population. He also says developing countries and especially African nations are underrepresented underrepresented. At the levels of power at places like the World Bank and the U. N. Security

Antonio Gutierrez Nelson Mandela World Bank Cove U. N. Security
Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

Your Brain on Facts

06:10 min | Last month

Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

"Dating back at least the seventeen hundreds people of Europe drank natural mineral water believed to cure of variety of illnesses like gallstones scurvy. Even bathing from these natural springs was seen as therapeutic. People literally went for the waters, though that freezes only hanging on its fingernails through the expression I'm not here for the water's usually set of someplace. You don't want to be like work. Many people tried to sell the water off site, but packaging and transportation at the time were prohibitively difficult and expensive, so they went with the next best thing. They'd manufacture their own water. Fine I'll make my own mineral water with blackjack and hookers. Most y'all are confused, but one person just snorted coffee through their nose. Mark my words. In seventeen sixty seven British chemist Joseph priestley tried carbonated water as you would beer by fermentation with yeast. The results were weak, but they worked in seventeen, seventy two. He published a paper entitled impregnating water with Fixed Air. priestley's apparatus, which featured a bladder between the generator and the absorption tank to regulate the flow of carbon dioxide was soon joined by a wide range of variants. However, it wasn't until seventeen eighty one that carbonated water could be produced on a large enough scale with the establishment of companies specializing in producing artificial mineral water. Others improved on Priestley's work, and while he did get respect from the scientific community, he didn't make anything for the invention that made possible a four hundred billion dollar a year industry. American, Inventor John Matthews designed a Soda Fountain that Could Produce Enough carbonated water for all his customers all day in eighteen, thirty, two, leading to the opening of the First Soda Fountain. In Their Heyday Soda Fountains were elaborately decorated places for rejuvenation more like a walk-through health retreat a snack counter and they were usually found in pharmacies. Pharmacists already used sweet tasting flavor syrups like lemon lime to mask the taste of bitter medicines like Quinine, an iron liquid medicine, being the standard form time rather than pills. At some sparkling water and you've got something new on your hands. Sas Parrilla for example was used to treat syphilis, supposedly and phosphoric acid and ingredient in most colas was thought to help with hypertension. The oldest major soft drink America Dr Pepper was created by Pharmacist Charles Alderson in eighteen, eighty, five and marketed as an energy, drink and brain tonic. Soda, the Effervescent News Hadn't medicine. We might be frustrated by. It takes a new medication to get to the market or top of mine a new vaccine, but it beats the old way of doing things at least from the consumer side from the manufacturer's side. The late nineteenth century, the era of the patent medicine was the best time to be alive. You could put anything you wanted in a bottle and call it medicine. You could still go around calling yourself doctor without having to prove it. Mix Up some tap water. Whatever's handy something bitter to make? It tastes like medicine, and then something sweet, so it's not too bitter, and of course if you can booze and hard drugs. Have Pretty printed with filigree and vague, sometimes contradictory claims and watch the money roll in. Behold the age of the patent medicine. Patent medicines are named after the letters patent probably letters patent since it was granted by the English crown. The first letters patent given to an inventor of a secret remedy was issued in the late seventeenth century. The patent granted the medicine maker a monopoly on his particular formula. The term patient medicine came to describe all prepackaged medicine sold over the counter without a doctor's prescription early English patent medicines sold like Jordan's in the colonies like dice Dr Bateman drops, whose original patent was granted by King George, the I in seventeen, twenty six, and was still available into the twentieth century. Not About to let the Brits make off with all the Lucre America began to cultivate their own patent medicines, an industry that boomed in the decades leading up to the civil war in the US very few patent medicines actually had a patent. You could get yourself a bottle. Love hosters celebrated stomach. Bidders Phero China John cleese Kella CEO. Bark and iron tonic reaches embrocations Emerson's Rheumatic Cure. Brooks's Barefoot Appointment SP Goff's magic oil, ligament or something just called salvation oil patent medicine actually played its own small part in the war. The government tax their sale along with the sales of matches, playing cards perfumes at L. to fund the war effort and repay military debt. Just like cigarettes today, patent medicines had to have a tax stamp on them for decades. Thirty years after the civil war, the government returned to Patent Medicine Taxation to fund the Spanish American war, which ran from eighteen, ninety eight to nineteen o two using a distinctive battleship stamp. The second half of the nineteenth century with the rapid growth of industrialization and populations in American cities was a high point for such hokum. Literacy was also improving with meant that they were more magazines and newspapers for patent medicine makers to advertise in and more people who could actually read the ads. There was also a pervasive and widespread distrust for medicine of the day. This was the era of heroic, medicine. Doctors went to extremes like bloodletting and purgatory gives to cure disease. We. Know now that making it already sick person poop their brains out or cutting them with a blade that you didn't know you needed to wash between. Patience is a bad idea, but back then it was no pun intended cutting edge stuff.

Joseph Priestley Patent Medicine Taxation Europe John Matthews Quinine John Cleese Rheumatic Cure Mark Syphilis Lucre America United States Dr Pepper Hosters Pharmacist Charles Alderson Dr Bateman Brooks Jordan
Trump threatens to cut federal aid if schools don't reopen

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

Trump threatens to cut federal aid if schools don't reopen

"Texas president trump is seeing is a surge threatening in the to number cut of people federal testing aid positive to schools for the corona that do virus not since reopen it began this fall aggressively the president loosening says nations restrictions like Germany in and may Denmark have opened schools with no problem he's accusing at Democrats United memorial of wanting Medical to keep Center them closed in Houston for that political cases grow reasons and so and tweets do the death he may he cut might even off think funding that this is a hoax if they do we not should come open and spend the day he with gave no chief details medical officer but vice Dr president Joseph pence Barone later has to suggested break the news future to another virus family relief their loved bills one may didn't be tied survive to school corona re opening virus we're we have gonna seen be looking for the ways exponential to increase give states in the number of cases he says they started at forty a strong six incentive New York eighty governor eight Andrew vets Cuomo and says you know I'm states I would don't even need though an incentive it sounds like a lot of school it is re not openings enough Texas are state has decision recorded more than twenty period six New York hundred City mayor deaths bill de according Blasio to health says officials eat schools I'm will Julie reopen Walker with kids in class two or three days a week they can't all be there at the same time with social distancing Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump Germany Houston Medical Officer Cuomo Texas Julie Walker President Trump Denmark Democrats United Memorial Of W Dr President Joseph Pence Baro New York Sager Ani Washington
Window into virus surge: Death, recovery at Houston hospital

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Window into virus surge: Death, recovery at Houston hospital

"Texas is seeing a surge in the number of people testing positive for the corona virus since it began aggressively loosening restrictions in may at United memorial Medical Center in Houston that cases grow and so do the death he might even think that this is a hoax we should come and spend the day with chief medical officer Dr Joseph Barone has to break the news to another family their loved one didn't survive corona virus we have seen the exponential increase in the number of cases he says they started at forty six eighty eight vets and you know I'm I would even though it sounds like a lot of it is not enough Texas has recorded more than twenty six hundred deaths according to health officials I'm Julie Walker

Texas United Memorial Medical Center Houston Dr Joseph Barone Julie Walker Medical Officer
"joseph" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

08:12 min | Last month

"joseph" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"When I finished with recliner, we wrapped it in butcher paper and loaded it into a van to keep it in the property room until trial. I went upstairs to survey the loft bedroom. There was no indication that any violence took place in the loft, but the area needed to be searched clothing with scattered all over the floor, the bed clothes were rumpled, and the bathroom looked normal contained the usual variety of personal hygiene stuff. There was a single dried blood drop on the top of the bedpost at the foot of the bed I scraped it off with a scalpel into a glassy envelope with the hope that belonged to Joseph. Picked up each item of clothing and looked for evidence of cleanup or blood, and there was a White Basketball Jersey. It had been wanted up between the bed, and the dresser, and I picked it up. There were red stains all over the front one stain in particular, stood out a transfer pattern consistent with the front and back of a knife, as if the wearer took the blade and pulled it across the fabric to wipe it off. Aubrey Joseph could have been wearing this Jersey when he committed. The murder kept one of the bloody knives in his hand, and wiped it off on this Jersey or he just used it as a cleaning cloth, but this was another detail that would help disprove his quote. Unquote panic defense. The additional spatters cast off and transfer patterns were documented, photographed and diagrammed and released the scene at about nine o'clock that night. Nearly two years went by, and the case went to trial in February of two thousand eleven. All Joseph's defense was crime of passion as he alleged during the interrogation. He said that he recalled cutting Trina. He didn't remember his actions as being severe enough to kill her. The Defense Counsels Opening Statement to the jury mitigated Aubrey's involvement and instead focused on his lack of faith in their relationship and a suicide attempt he made by drinking bleach and taking pills several months before the murder. The prosecutor countered that argument in her opening statement. The prosecutor said Trina Joseph is dead. Because this defendant wanted her dead, she was killed in a most horrific and brutal manner at the hands of her own husband. This defendant useful knives, a large butcher knife. He thrusted into her body so hard that the blade snapped from the handle, but that didn't stop him. He just went back to their kitchen to get more knives. He continued his brutal attacks, stabbing her numerous times in the forehead above her ear by her lip in her belly in her cheek in her jaw in the top of her head in her clavicle in her hand. She sustained stab wounds to her thumb, her ring finger her middle finger wounds that she would have sustained while trying to protect herself. This defendant stabbed her with such force that the neighbor awoke to the brutal screams of Trina Joseph as she struggled for her life. This defendant stabbed her with such force that her ribs were fractured. Her lung was pierced. Her liver was perforated and her voice box was cut. But what could Trina Joseph have done to deserve this? The answer. Absolutely nothing. According to the defendants own mouth. He thought that Trina Joseph had disrespected him earlier that night. He thought she was going to leave him. So in his words. He stabbed her up. He killed her and when he had completed the task he set out to do. He drove himself down to the jail turned himself in, as as could be no emotion, no regret. You'll learn that on July thirty first Trina Joseph the defendant and some friends when out to have some fun. They went to Jim's place a place they usually went to, but once they're. The defendant started getting upset at Trina, Joseph Trina was sitting at the bar, talking to another man and this defendant didn't like it when he went up to Trina Joseph to confront her in the man Trina Joseph tried to calm the situation down. Chill everything out. But the defendant took this as Trina. Joseph picking the other men over him and disrespecting him. After opening arguments, the medical examiner took the stand. She testified that Trina Joseph likely bled to death after living through each and every stab wound and fought back until she just couldn't anymore. The doctor described each injury and detail and photographs were shown to the jury. I was called to testify on the second day to detail. The line required to leave the various stains and altered patterns behind. The photographs of her injuries flashed up on the big screen in the courtroom. Trina Joseph's father was seated in the front row of the gallery and he was unprepared to see them. The victim's advocate gently escorted him out of the courtroom after he cried out, and the judge took a short recess. It was heartbreaking. The father remained in the hallway for the rest of the trial. After the prosecution was finished and I, explained everything that I had to say about the blood same patterns, the knives, and how I conducted my investigation, the defense attorney took the podium, and asked me questions about the cleanup of the bloodstains on her body, and why Aubrey Joseph would leave the rest of the evidence to be found if his intent was to hide evidence of the murder, the defense attorney asked me a couple of innocuous questions about my experience, and then she moved to talk about the knives collected from the crime scene. Now, you collected a couple of knives, a blade and a handle right that's correct and several of those items. They appeared to still have red stains, perhaps blood on them. That's correct. They didn't appear to have been wiped clean or wiped off or cleaned off and I, said it would be difficult for me to make that determination, but if they had red stains or were anywhere in the apartment, they were collected. It wouldn't appear through your experience and your view of the scene that the assailant in this case had tried to mask the crime scene. The woman's body was still there correct, correct and knives right there next to the recliner. That's correct and there's blood on the wall and clothes and other parts of the apartment. Is that correct? That's correct, so it didn't look like somebody had done a thorough job in trying to hide or mask, scene and I said the only thing I saw with the altered bloodstains that we discussed earlier, and that was basically it, and you wouldn't be in a position to speculate as to why a stain a drying stain may have been wiped off of her left cheek. And I said I can't tell you why I can just tell you that somebody or somehow it was wiped off after it began to dry. She dropped it at that point, but she moved forward to the blood splatter on the wall and surrounding areas, and she said I believed you use the term medium velocity, blood, splatter correct, and you're not able to give an opinion as to the force or thrust. You know the speed of the blood moving or anything like that, are you? And, I said for this particular scene. It would be difficult because I didn't do a full reconstruction. It was unnecessary. However I can tell you that medium velocity spider in general travels at a distance of five feet to twenty five feet per second. That's how fast it's traveling. which is indicative of either Blunt Force Trauma or in this case, a multiple stabbing? Would it be fair to say that it would be slower than a gunshot, but faster than just dripping and I said that's correct. I have no further questions your honor. When I finished my testimony the DNA analyst took the stand. The analyst was to testify about the results of the swabs taken from the knives the scene she said that there was a mixture of both Trina and Aubrey Joseph's blood on three of the four nine and a one in a quad.

Trina Joseph Aubrey Joseph Joseph Trina murder White Basketball Jersey prosecutor DNA analyst Jim attorney
"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

"Separatist crazy because he thought he could take over from way stolen was, but from his grave, it was absolutely chaos and Chris finally took over and started that these storm as Asian process well. May Have done a destalinisation, but when Brezhnev came in, he started a restart nuys, ation, and even today you know Putin is loathe to criticize Stalin. There are obviously things that are now indisputable about just how? Much of terror. He was that they dig him up. The name moved him because he was originally in the mausoleum with Lennon and eventually just put him next to the wool under a little best, and his legacy is very much like his actual visage puck mocked and difficult to interpret entirely. We don't know much about his personality. Because he was a political creature, but he beloved his friends, he liked having his friends around. He set me seems to have been affectionate with his daughter. We know about his scruffy appearance in the kind of clothing he used to wear. The apparently had a very soft voice and rid furiously at like a library of twenty thousand books. I could read five hundred pages a day or something crazy like that. Yeah, and he publicly condemned things like anti Semitism, and didn't necessarily like the idea of discrimination, although he practiced that in various ways, shapes and forms as a dictator, and ultimately his legacy has to be seen as one of just immense power accumulation, and no respect whatsoever for the individual. It was all about what could collectively be done. He sold people as units within a massive machine and. And didn't care how many of those units had to be. Either lost in war executed for disagreeing with him and I think overwhelmingly totalitarianism has had its purest expression in the character of Joseph Stalin. The on Gareth that he needed a forum and he had.

Joseph Stalin Brezhnev Putin Chris Lennon Gareth
"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

05:52 min | 2 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

"Could you position installing start to feel it, but I think the timing was incredible because Lennon started I think he had three strokes, and you'd really had his first stroke and linens wafts started to speak out against Arslan. And installing phoned her and colder syphilitic whole a to. The phone. And Linen heard about this, and they basically said to him. Look if you do not apologize and make things clear. I think it's the end of the line between you and me and the next day he basically at the worst stroke, and died just off of it and I think stolen spent a bit of Tom. Making Shea squashed that discussion, it's famously been recorded that Stalin and crew Skyer who is linens? Wife were not best of friends, and she actually released a whole lot of linens letters, which purport to say that Stalin is not a great guys got bad manners to coast. He's too rough. He's vulgar. He's rude and that he shouldn't lead. But a lot of people say that she might have written these letters I think in the end they have lost and unfortunately. If you didn't have a good relationship with Stalin, you're dead and nothing gets. You ended up like that, so he took over then often linen, but it was by no means an easy job because he had to make alliances with some dodgy people, and then break those alliances later on ultimately with the goal of establishing himself at the center of things he was not interested in. You know a communal decision making body. He wanted to make the. You're one hundred percent. A dictators, what is the was and I think it was quite easy. Because Trotsky was looking at the mocks collective in the whole world, it started with sanctity supporters. Look, we're looking at. It decided union and say he got strong. Support Trotsky didn't get the support that he thought he would get him in Lenin's wife Tipper Party and try to go against Stalin. And that was the ultimate demise of Trotsky. He was sent into exile later on Stalin Sin Somebody to met him with. Another famous death but I do WANNA breeze quickly through the years before World War Two, because that's what's stunning, really came to aggregate immense power around himself, but he went through a number of crises I mean the one that's most well known as that feminine and the collectivization of farming where he murdered the cool lax and the great terror as it's cold also. Also, which was the execution of some seven hundred thousand people who we know about? There are many more that we don't know about. Their mass graves all over Russia of people who he called detractors need liberals..

Stalin Trotsky Lennon Shea Arslan Russia Tipper Party Lenin
"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Blind History

"In this some for stolen by real scheme, the lyrics go. We will all rush to the talk. With the sunshine our is by the Eagles Solo flight. Leader gives us the true site. Top is reached by climbing the mountain of millions of buddies. Sunshine is the promise of nuclear war. And the flight, dangerous social engineering experiments, which spread poverty and misery all over the world. The leader was Joseph Stalin. The man of steel. Russia's totalitarian dictator. Yosif.

Joseph Stalin Russia
"joseph" Discussed on Modern Woodworkers Association

Modern Woodworkers Association

01:38 min | 2 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Modern Woodworkers Association

"Yeah. Oh, what would that sad, so Joseph working? folks find interwebs. They can find me on instagram. At J. Wbz, and on the Internet is Joseph Thomson, Woodwork and NJ. WTI Woodwork whatever you put in that'll. That'll send you to my website. Yeah, that's you know most everything right now. As much on I mean, that's so easy to update and Yep Yeah I. Just that's. That's really kind of where. You been putting these. These livestream so oh! Yeah Cross out to look for y'all. Reaching Development, and for the you know when we'd been doing these livestream. Katie it had made me a Coun- and we were. We'd posted some of my steam. Bidding videos and things like that wasn't something we. Added to into until these lobster, so so so is, it is a J.. Wt would work on Youtube. Yes, okay, fantastic, Hey! We'll. If if a search for Joseph Thompson and woodworking, I'm sure they'll come come by. Happy about me, not knowing that but. That's okay. That's okay. I can't I can't remember at all all right. So Sean working folks fired you. I'm I'm on most social media's as Shawn W. Seventy eight. You can find me there. I, would you kyle? And you can always find me at Barton. Dot Kyle on Instagram the only social media platform it matters, and with that just about wraps it up for this show, so if you haven't already please subscribe.

Joseph Shawn W. Seventy Dot Kyle Joseph Thomson WTI Woodwork Joseph Thompson J. Wbz NJ Youtube Katie Coun Sean Barton
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

07:20 min | 6 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"You mean to be in that context where it's like figuring out how what platform you want to provide your infrastructure and it doesn't have to be this new plan for like the oldest half forum of suffering station in the world already exists. It's called cities right. The Mayor City doesn't actually tell it's resins where to where to live or what to do. And if you look at Manhattan. There's something like three days of food supply for all of Manhattan but there's no central hierarchical your food supply manager and it's amazingly resilient. Manhattan never runs out of food. There could be a natural disaster or or bridge can go out and these different food consumers and suppliers and so on just interacting and there's actually whole area of research about this Complex adaptive systems is what the technical term is and almost by definition. You can't actually predict the outcome of things but what we do know is if you look at companies. They don't stand. The test is time I think the fortune five hundred was first came out in one thousand nine hundred fifty five. I forget it's one hundred hundred. Whatever the number is eighty nine percent of those are no longer around on the list. And so the default future for companies as death or if you look at the S. and p. five hundred I think average life span. Making me feel optimistic about my company man. Well not if you try to do the same thing that other companies have done which is why we're trying to take a different path. That's Africa's trying to build a company. That does Dan this hesitant. And not only is around one hundred years from now but a thousand years from now and cities are the best example of human organizations that stand. The test of time are resilient and then the other thing is from the research every time the size of a city doubles innovation productivity per resident increases by fifteen percent but you get the oxyde affecting companies as they get bigger they become more bureaucratic less innovative or employees. And so on and so. That's a huge part of the reason why we're in the middle of restructuring ZAPPA's to be more like a city unless you know typical bureaucratic organization. I like the idea of a city as a platform when I think of a platform I think of facebook youtube etc and these platforms right now while undoubtedly there's lots of value generated and there's lots of positive things going on. There's lots of beautiful videos on YouTube. There's lots of fantastic human connection on facebook. I think there's an argument to be made that they're kind of net negative as far as the impact that they're having on the world and on each of the individual users or at least the users on average and those are very much decentralized platforms and I mean I could hazard a hypothesis of why that is but I'm curious if just a he get your take on that. Like how is a platform like youtube or facebook different from the kind of decentralize platform that you're describing that you would want to model after a city? Things just comes down to does. The platform actually enabled self organization. And so I'm not sure that I'm actually not really on social media ads but wise and I'm guessing that facebook only allows us much oranization as make sense for them. The company that form not what maximizes the creativity of its users rape whereas a city is I think less constrained and if someone wants to be creative than they can in a city environment also even if technically something they do might be illegal. If it's say an underground some of our projects that maybe it doesn't fully meet the ventilation codes of their painting or the experimented with fire stuff or whatever right but at a small scale that rightly or wrongly is enabled by. Because that's what kind of fringe. Artis stew right okay. So we've talked about what creativity turns into in the future. What creativity is today? I'm curious as sort of a last thought if you're speaking to somebody listening. Who has that urging them to do? Something creative whether it's to build a business or to write a novel art entrepreneurship whatever kind of creativity and they're wondering. How the fuck do I do this? I know it. I can feel it in my body that I'm supposed to be making something but it's a confusing world right now to figure out how I can fit in to how my creativity can actually be valuable. What would you say to somebody? Who's trying to figure that out for themselves? I start with because I think you I forget your exact wording but what happens if you are creative person to WanNa to do and I would put out there. That everyone is creative. Person in everyone is actually probably born creative and then that desire to e creative or the confidence to do something creative with your time gets kinda beaten out of them by Society. The school system where it's all about. Make sure that you do these things on time. You pass these standardized tests and so on and anything. That's about coloring outside. The lines is actively discouraged by most of our modern school systems. And Yeah and parenting in and so on and so part of it is more. I guess learning. What's kind of into you? I would say in general and not just for if you want to have more confidence being treated really if you want to do anything in life. There's that thing of like you're the average of the five. You spend the most time with so if you WANNA be more creative life hanging out with people that inspire you and our trading life. You want to be a professional tennis player. Go make sure the FI- beaulieu hang out with are like really serious about tennis. In that you wanted becoming their average will raise the bar for you. That's great all right. I think we're just about out of time. Thank you guys for listening. Thanks Tony Thanks Talk House. There's been great. Thanks very much. Thank you guys so much for listening again. This was a very special episode of creative processing. We really want to fine tune. This potentially release more episodes. But we want to hear your feedback. Yes so listen email at creative processing at hit record dot org or send Joe a message just Gordon Levitt on facebook twitter instagram with the Hashtag creative processing and then also be sure to check out the Talk House podcast. To which is a really cool podcast. They have a bunch of really cool interviews. Uh is like every industry and in Field. It's really actually a cooling so check it out. Talk House podcast. Thanks so much again for listening and we hope to hear from you guys soon thanks..

facebook Manhattan YouTube tennis Africa WanNa rape ZAPPA Dan Society Tony Joe Gordon Levitt
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

11:06 min | 6 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Time this year. Okay tell that story. What was it like my Momma thought? We were going camping. Enjoyed a burning men in many ways is sort of a stab at trying to imagine a future that sort of Utopian where everyone's getting to really express themselves and everyone's sharing and getting to be creative and having a lot of fun and it's a fantastic experience because you do get to have that I think the issue of course is that it's not really you Topi a because you had to pay for expensive tickets in order to get into burning man and so it's it's really more of a walled garden if you will. But it's nice as a as a north star of wouldn't it be nice if the whole world got to live this way? What do you think it would take? If we're talking about the far future. What would it take to have a world where everyone were sharing and everybody had enough and everybody were able to make crazy art if they wanted to or hang around and sleep or stretch or whatever they want to all the different things people do burning? What would it take? I mean you're you're in the process of turning the real world into something that feels like burning man like the downtown Las Vegas Culture that that you and your teams of people are driving is clearly taking some amount of inspiration from burning men both aesthetically as well as it seems ideologically. And I'm curious what what you think. Do you have an idea of like? What might it take for this to not just be a walled garden but for this to be something that can be shared in a more equitable way by everybody? I don't know if you necessarily and this is A. I haven't thought that much about I don't know if you necessarily want a year round Bernie man or like or a week is I guess for me and lots of people that we the what I get out of is just that inspiration of like seeing. What's possible and it's so hard to describe for people that have not been there because it's just characterized as this crazy thing by the by the media just word of mouth and so on but when you're actually there it's just this unique thing especially if it's your first time there. I know the people that I brought there then come back and it just raises their bar for what's possible in terms of creativity and so on and I think for me that's the biggest benefit of it. Sorry I totally forgot your original question. How could we spread that out and more of the world I mean I I see it on saying is I? Don't think the answer is. Let's have burning man twenty four seven three sixty minutes not get like incredibly wasted on acid everyday like but I guess the parts of burning man where like for example a Berryman. You're not allowed that money. If you want to give somebody something you. Can You bring that if you want to? It's a gifting economy. So the expectation is everyone provides some sort of get some people might be you know art camp week gave out free case it is and others will give out other types of food or do free performances and so on and so. I bring a guitar when people asked me to sing. I do which they don't usually ask but sometimes they do sing them something and they're like. I Want my money back. Oh it didn't pay. You never mind. So there's the individual you know stuff like Oh like look at what these are cars. Look like when they're throwing spitting out fire and the lighting is amazing right. So there's that inspiration for me. I think about it on kind of one metal level which actually I think is a little bit with hit record in our downtown projects. And what we're doing at Sophos is really. There's actually a New York Times article that came out. I think a week or two ago. That was talking about burning man. And how much work actually goes into. That's mostly invisible to the participants into the infrastructure of bathrooms laying out the roads and so on like basic especially that no one thinks of but it's that infrastructure impact farm that enables all this creativity and for me. That's actually the most interesting thing though because there is no. It's not like the festival here where Justin in his teen say okay. We're going to have this music and dance music and this music and participants are having things done to them that they enjoy I can be. They enjoy being entertained or or are pieces that we created what happens. Running man is. Here's this infrastructure that allows self organization to happen and all the things that are giving away and so unlike all that is from the participants themselves and so from a record perspective. That's what you guys are evolving to. His Creation Platform that enables collaboration collaborative creators around the world and from downtown project perspective. Most I think revitalization projects are real estate. Projects depend on having this say top down master-plan thing whereas we were we were anti that and instead we really wanted to see what entrepreneurs are passionate about and and so if someone say they're lifelong dream was to retire ten years around and started cupcake bakery. It's not us saying. Oh there needs to be a cupcake bakery them being passed about. And we say well if you're passionate about it if we believe in your ability execute if you're the actual business owner running not a chain doing corporate type of stuff and if it's first unique or best because we wanted to have our own identity and down Vegas then that's something that we will consider funding and then similarly at Zappa's were making the transition from this kind of we actually just had our twenty year anniversary and so historically we've been the we're at fifteen hundred employees in about three hundred teams or we call them. Circles and employees can belong multiple teens in traditionally they've been arranged hierarchically and now we're transitioning so that instead of of hierarchy it's more like a network Or more like a city where each of those teams think of them as their own independent small business and as long as they can meet just three criteria it's is it in line with ZAPPA's culture and core values and she was a customer service or customer experience focused as a differentiator in three each circle. Has Its own bank account. Will you not run out of money? Like needs to be bank account positive balance like everyone needs in real life for their own personal bank accounts. Then do whatever you want and so. I think it's thinking this one metal layer that that I get inspiration from whether it's Bernie sanders seeing what's happening around downtown like this was not a master plan. These didn't we're not businesses that we master plan but it's more Trying to create the context environment so that it allows people to flourish and thrive. Because if you take burning men and I forget how many people let's say it's sixty or seventy thousand people if you take any one of them or even ten of them and pretend the others exists they probably would not have created whatever amazing thing they created because they're part of this thing that at any one time has made six seventy thousand people in the community but if you look at it over time line they all iterative on each other to me. The magic of Bernie Sanders really in the infrastructure that enables that self-organisation happen and there was a quote. I'm trying to see if I can remember from that. New York Times article about which was that freedom requires structured. Creativity requires constraints. And I think that's true in all of those contexts as we just talked about. I definitely agree. That creativity requires constraints. It's a funny thing because you think about. Oh I'm creative. That means I'm free to do whatever I want. But if you just say and I've I've experienced this a lot personally. We also see this a lot actually on hit record because on record. It's all about these creative prompts or challenges and people do projects and then break them down into the steps of the project and of those steps sort of form a creative challenge. And when you give somebody a creative challenge it we've seen it over and over again. You see every day on record people coming and doing creative challenges whether it's a writing challenge or photography challenge or a animation music. Whatever when you have something specific which is in essence a constraint. It's inspiring because if you just say to somebody you say to me right something right something. Good like fuck. What do I write? Write anything but if you say to somebody like if you give them a ton of constraints that's actually when you get the most contributions. The most contributed to create challenges on hit record are the ones that are like write a sad story in four words. You're incredibly constraint. But those are the ones that people can treat you the most. It is sort of like the infrastructure. It's the roads it's the it's the boundaries. It's like the constraints it really doesn't buy. It just helps. Focus your efforts. You should try this in your spare time at home or literally. You give someone challenge you have sixty seconds and write down anything and everything that you can think of that is normally white and just make a list and see how you come up with and then after sixty seconds are up come up with maybe ten or fifteen things and then you ask them. Okay now think of sixty seconds and think of endless everything that is normally waiting. That might be in a refrigerator. Freezer and then what normally happens is they can actually come up with much longer list even though we all know that smaller than the world of all things right yeah constraints really true so I mean if we if we get back to our question then of how this impacts creativity moving into the future. Do you think this sort of these sort of decentralized platforms you're describing whether it's burning men downtown Las Vegas in a certain way hit record. Obviously all three of those things are very different platforms but their platforms. That are not making the art themselves but trying to sit down and infrastructure and allow people to come and do it would you? Would you say then that sort of becomes the future of what it means to be a creative person?.

Bernie sanders Las Vegas New York Times Sophos Berryman ZAPPA business owner Justin Zappa
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

09:04 min | 6 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Pay their creative processing listeners. Surprise surprise it's not Joe. Gordon love it. Sorry it's ray one of the producers of creative processing and I am joined by another producer of creative processing also now so we thought it was going to be jealous. Not Sorry but Joe will be here in a second after this quick intro but as you mentioned we're the producers on career processing We had an time making the first season we spoke with some awesome guests like Jessica Alba Incredible Seth Rogan. Evan Goldberg also Awesome Episode Ryan Johnson So many people would probably just gonna saying all just kicked. It was really great. Really great first season like had a really good time Producing and just being able to sit in with all the conversations was just a really cool experience. And I'm happy you know. Seemed like a lot of you guys out. There really enjoyed to. It was great to talk about creative processing through every different angle. Like even talking with Jessica Alba. She's someone who I always grow up thinking that you know. She seems perfect and basically she is even after. Tushes. That's it but Yeah it was interesting to hear a she even struggles with the same things. Creatively that we do and it really humanized a lot of these people that we grew up. I know for me like hearing from smaller artists that you might not know of Madison Ward and hearing about his relationship with his mom was really awesome. So so touching that one is actually one of the most touching episodes and I think I teared up during during that one full full. Lexi was sobbing. Taught me to check it out so a lot of really great stuff really cool moments and at this point in the season or I guess now that we're done with the first season we're trying to figure out what to do nice how we want to continue it so at this point we'd love to hear what you guys thought all the listeners out there as you know every episode we started with the question from one when you guys do we wanna keep kind of that conversation going. So We'd love to hear from you guys any sort of feedback like what you've found helpful. Where your favorite episode was. What would you want more or less or did you buy the ending question? Knew ANYTHING ABOUT. What would you think about the music? You know anything about it. Just please let us know send us an email shoot us an email creative processing at a record or Dot. Org Hashtag created processing on twitter facebook or any social media dash creative processing creative and then Processing Piero C. S. S. I. N. G. I. N. G. Two okay so anyway so as previously we do have a really cool thing that Joe recorded actually back in September that we thought would be kind of interesting for listeners of creative processing that Joe is talking about with his guest I think is just super applicable to a lot of the things that creatives face nowadays. It was actually a live episode of creative processing in collaboration with talk. House at the life is beautiful. Festival was really cool to hear people kind of experience. That kind of bantered. That Joe does with his guests and the room for this one Joe talked with Tony. Shay Tony Shays. Ceo of ZAPPA's and actually does is a really interesting company because What are the what is it? They say they don't sell their company. That just happens association. They have some really cool Values and things and actually hit record. we've been doing a lot of stuff with them and it was really cool to to hear. Joe And Tony. Time just talking about how Technology and the Internet is just kind of changing creativity and how a lot of people Experience creativity and how they can be creative and get that creativity out there. So take a listen. I think this is GonNa be a really cool one. This is Tony Shay Life is beautiful. How you fill Vegas. I'm your host. Elliott. Einhorn hosts. The Talk House podcasts. Were out of Brooklyn New York. We are so absolutely thrilled to be a part of the life is beautiful ideas series here in Las Vegas. Did any of you happen to be at the show yesterday that we did with Fred? Arniston Chris read and Portugal. The Man Punch you repeat customers. I'm glad you came back. We have a very different format from most shows what we do on the talk houses. We pair artists and creatives repair thinkers in long form on moderated conversation. The IDEA BEING. Let's get the journalists out of the way let's get the host out of the way and let them share on moderated unfiltered. The show is seen guests from quest to Guillermo del Toro. Carrie Brownstein Barry Jenkins Brian. Wilson Carly Rae Jepsen Darren Aronovski and so many many more our guest today are changing. The face of what large scale collaborations can look like and what they can accomplish Tony. Shay is a game changing entrepreneur and corporate leader. He founded link exchange and sold it to Microsoft. He then founded venture frogs and investment firm. That got behind the idea that became zepos which he famously sold to Amazon. He is still ZAPPA's CEO. Tony wrote the New York. Times bestseller delivering happiness where he explores the concept of combining prophets passion and purpose and perhaps most importantly here in Las Vegas. He's a leader in the revitalization of downtown amazing. Were our other guests today. Joseph Gordon Levitt you may have heard of because he joined at four years old a local musical theater group and played the scarecrow in their production of wizard of Oz. I hate to say his career's been on a downhill slide. Ever since third rock from the sun five hundred days of summer inception the Dark Knight Rises Snowden and so many more has seen him become one of the most versatile and important actors of our time now on top of acting Joe's written for film directed and produced. He's also formed a company. Hit record a community for creative. Collaboration Life is beautiful. Help me welcome Joseph Gordon Levitt and Tony shared the stage word. Drink and you guys the few that worked when he said hit record that honestly like I motioned really sweet and it means a lot to make. Thanks everybody here. Going to the life is beautiful. Festival bans and things like that so this man is in large part. I won't say one hundred percent or because it's a huge team of people that put it on but enlarge responsible for it. Do you WanNa talk a bit about. The origins of life is beautiful. And what? We're all doing here just to kick us off and I'm definitely not the person running life issues but it wouldn't be without you. I only tell you that I'm running late so About seven or eight years ago started downtown project which was a myself and a bunch of other friends that decides to help revitalize downtown Vegas and at the time I think there were maybe two and a half bars in the area but great culture ZAPPA's had just announced that it was taking over the former city hall which is just a few blocks. Actually the parking lot for the main stage is the parking lot for ZAPPA's and it was to help create a place where you have everything you need to live. Work play within walking distance and so we set aside funds to invest in small businesses local restaurants and bars and container park is inside the footprint and so that's one of the parts of the downtown project and then for life is beautiful. It was under that umbrella where we wanted to invest in something to help due to down Vegas what South by Southwest Austin Texas. That that was kind of the original idea and it's kind of just taken a life of its own justin who we met backstage is CEO and has done an amazing job of growing. And I think one of the things that makes it different whether it's life is beautiful or the other restaurants and bars and small businesses that we invested. We're really focused on local in community and I think that's something that I think that's part of the reason why we liked each other. And how many people here are from Las Vegas? So there you go. I want to turn the conversation.

Joe Times Las Vegas Tony Joseph Gordon Levitt Tony Shay Ceo Jessica Alba Vegas ZAPPA producer Evan Goldberg Tony Shays New York Guillermo del Toro Processing Piero C. S. S. I. N Wilson Carly Rae Jepsen Seth Rogan
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

10:23 min | 10 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Just thanks for doing this thank you for having me absolutely all right so the idea here is I'm GonNa ask a question do you usually go to people's houses or like do you have Recording Studio I have a place in my house we done a bunch of them they're Nice thank and then we did one actually Switzerland in the carnot Switzerland because there's a film festival there that's fine it was fun in a actually a surprisingly beautiful studio in this one hundred year old building that had been restored into learning studio so is your best one now this is going to be my best tank of course in caches man cave this is the last one by the way I'll realize what we're GONNA do we set out to do ten but this is the one St online this is the year the closer of season one ace so ask a question that I think you'll be suited to answer and then we'll go from there and questions from Rochelle Connery from Anchorage Alaska and she asked any hints on how to push myself to achieve more than just good enough so I thought you'd be good at answering this because from what I know of you and I you know we were not like super fast friends but I've gotten to know you over the years and you push yourself you you like to get a lot done so I'm GonNa just let you take the first crack at this how to push yourself to achieve more than good enough and then we'll go from there I feel like a lot of that has to do do with I think there's a combination of nature nurture like I don't know if you can teach someone to be ambitious or forty major nurture keeps coming enough of these conversations yeah and I think that you have to kind of look at how comfortable your life is and your quality of life life and if you're fine being comfortable then great you know I feel like I'm never comfortable and so I only really function well when I'm under an unusual amount of pressure and stress that's when I find my sort of like my personal balance that's where my equilibrium lives so I think it's just different for everyone does have that income and to a degree Zad apply in particular when you're creating something whether it's or relationships we can talk about the process that we'll do the love seizing people's what's about creativity so like whether it's our you're acting producing a movie or it's building a business so I don't even know if I answered the question so for Anchorage what's her name Michelle so Rachelle from Anchorage good enough I think it's just you looking in the mirror every day and are you happy with who you're looking at and if something inside of you feels like there's more there there then you have to push yourself outside of your comfort zone and I think you Half to allow yourself to fail and I think that once you get over the fear of failure then you I'll start to find what your happiness or where your happiness lies and if good enough is sufficient or not the words good enough can mean a lot of different things I want to ask in terms of both sort of you have your artists side and your entrepreneur side how do you think of good enough in terms of specifically rt do you ever feel like I said yeah okay so then when it Paul now now applying to so in business we call it the eighty twenty rule so it's like eighty percent they're twenty percent is just not but it's no no this rule really you always teach me focus on so this is like it's like there's never the idea of perfection like if you if you wait for perfection then you'll never create anything and nothing will ever happen you know you'll just constantly tweak tweak tweak tweak so US really we try to launch with you know we're launching a new web platform it's been a beast but it's like eighty twenty it's like not under percents everything that I want it to be but it's good enough to launch and then once you launch you learn and then as you learn you can modify as you go and what's Nice about being a smaller scrap your business is you can quickly make those types of changes you don't have to go through all this bureaucracy to to move in and improve so then how do you set your goals of what you think okay this is what I want achieve this will be good enough you sit that out before so when it comes to like acting and producing I just got into producing 'em it's funny like producing I feel like it's so nice because at least you can set yourself up to have a more successful outcome because you have your hands in many different buckets whereas when you're just an actor for higher you know your Lake Gumby I mean you know they manipulate and mold and shift in shape you however the editor of the day feels like doing that or the producer or the director or whoever is in the editing room giving notes like because so little of what you can control ends up on screening I had to let go of any the idea of any of my ideas of what I wanted to be because there's also just like people's exception on who how they want to see you and if they don't if they WANNA see with certain way they're just going to turn you into that so as long as the check cleared I was like gray good enough good enough okay and I you know it's a lot better than any other job that I could ever imagine doing and that wasn't enough for you to do in totality might be good enough but I know that's what I mean a and then now I know that like as a producer you can set yourself up for first success because you can have say in the final cut and the edits and the casting and choosing directors and writers and and also having input on you know where the characters go and develop and storylines and stuff and so it's it's a for me it's a as a creative person it's much more empowering and I feel more secure I also feel like you just have to be in the moment completely and make the most of that moment and let go also of what you think this could be or even have any attachment to the final outcome and that is where I found that I get the most out of the creative process like I'm never I used to only think about the opening weekend and now all I think about is in this moment right now for lunch I have two hours to say these words where can we go yeah let's play house you're gonNa feel to do let's let's find it it let's let's play let's do something let's just be open to what can happen that's interesting so that almost to the heart of this question push yourself past good enough is almost taking your focus off of the end result and focusing more on the the process yeah I don't care how do you not care it's hard not to care it's hard not to care and I think I've you're right and I have a very very privileged edged reality which is I'm comfortable enough financially where I don't have to care and I also feel oh good enough about my life choices that my identity isn't tied up and and so I can walk through the world and I feel good every day when you wake up and look in the mirror and I feel like I've made choices that with conviction that are you know good or bad I'm okay with me and financially if it doesn't open or if it does open it's not GonNa Rock my world right agree with no money and when you have no money you realize how how much fucking sucks to have no money and how stressful it is and how all consuming coming it can be to just live paycheck to paycheck it is a horrible feeling the majority of people in this country and that's how I grew up in I hate it so much now maybe I just have a different I had a different experience with it that it it was hard for me relax or be okay without the security having that financial security so I needed the financial security just to like just to have a solid foundation so then I can dream and create and become whatever it is that I wanted to so that was always my goal always lived below Oh sort.

Switzerland one hundred year eighty percent twenty percent two hours
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

11:29 min | 10 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Mary thanks for doing this I'll it's my pleasure you don't usually get to do podcasts and stuff like interviews and things now don't always behind the scene right so you're a fantastic casting director I've worked with a number of times and you've worked with a great many incredible homemakers that I will have already detailed to our listening audience but do you WanNa just I the this show is about US discussing one question and I I wanna I wanna read the question then I think though before maybe starting to answer it it might be worth just talking a bit about what a casting director is and does do you WanNa just talk about that for a second then I'll I'll read the question sure a casting director after is someone who helps the director figure out who should be in the movie you know we our job is to know talent in into discover talent and to find people in the most unusual places you know we get a script and we make list lists and you know check people what they're doing what their schedules are sort of review those lists with the director and the producers and then also start the audition process and get people in to read and pulp asides and sort of like put the put the the faces of the movie together when you say pull the sides and the addition process for those listening that don't know anything about that can you elaborate on on what so you pick the scenes that you think are best to have the actor be able to get them to be able to have the director get a sense of what the actor can do with the role so you pull some scenes from the script and you bring them in and have them read and hopefully do a work process with director so that we can get everyone can get a sense not processes very helpful for the director because the and they can get to know their characters right this is the audition is I've done this many many times been doing it ever since I was a little kid I started auditioning it's a it's a big part of if you want to work professionally as an actor auditioning is a big big part of it is a big part and it's not always it can be a hard process I think for the actor Berry hard process actor and you know we we I really try to make it a warm place and safe appraise that's a big part of why you're so good at it is you make it not as paint some auditions are painful rainfall so some of some of the more embarrassing and just like nerve wrecking experiences in my life have auditions are hard the really hard thing because it's an artificial environment so as an artist walking into this funny room with people who are you know you don't know if they're friendly or not and it can be it's nerve wracking so you as the casting director are sort of in charge of making this process go through the people are that will come in audition and how that audition is going to work work and you do very well thank you I do try to make it a nice a nice environment do hard it is it's it's rough on the actor thank you yeah yeah okay so with that a minute ask the question and then we'll we'll see you know all the different things that that leads us to talk to okay so this question it comes from Monica Patricio from Lima Peru and just how much do contacts matter when started in a project or career I think it I mean for me I think I try not to make that matter much I think it's I think it's helpful to get in the room because it's all about how you get in the in the room to audition so if you have a good agent or a good man juror that is you know knowledgeable and has has relationships with the casting director that definitely can be helpful but I really liked to find the people who might not have those contacts and so you know it's really it's it's for me it's not as important I think it's important to for my job to I see sometimes I'll see someone on the street and just be and you know my office gets very mad at me because I make I go outside the box a lot you'll see someone you've done that you've seen someone on the street and just based on what what they look like yeah if I'm looking for that and I just like it's like an instinct that actually have I'm trying to remember when when the do it a lot with with if it's a kit of kids if I'm looking for a younger version of someone and I'll see someone and then you know we'll we'll go up and try to get them to kind of audition because especially with kids it's not necessarily they don't need be actors as much it's more close to who they're playing and I do it a lot on you know if there's some some commercial I'll see somebody in the background I'm like find out a person because for me it's just all about how they feel how how how it feels like if if you're like oh they catch your I mean something that is something that I have noticed so much in a because I grew up going on all these auditions and wondering are they gonNA pick me am I going to get the part and what's it GonNa take for me to convince these people in this room to give me this part and my my natural tendency is like well if I do the best job if I'm just the best actor that they see if I've like really invented a like a great version of this character and I know these lines inside out and I make this scene really cook like if I'm just skilled with my acting that's going to make difference and I'm not saying that it doesn't make a difference but what so eliminating for me having now been on the other side of those audition rooms like you're the casting director when I when I directed a movie I directed Don John You were the casting director and watching actors come in and getting a sense of why Doc I'm now that one I'm the on the other side like making this decision okay is it this person or is it that person and certainly the skill is important but there is something about what you just said like just how the person feels that it's hard to put your it's an essence it's an it's for what is a good match with whatever the role is and it's not just the role it's also who else is in the movie and how that all fits together is quite a puzzle and I always say to people you know go in and do the best that you can do and leave it in the room because it's not there are so many factors that contribute to if you get a partner not and it's not it's not it's it's very hard not to internalize are personalized that it really isn't it's you should definitely come in and do the best job you can do and if it's meant to be it'll be those are was honestly impossible for me to understand end until I was on the other side of it and once I was on the other side like oh wow because I watched and saw actors come in so much skill that had put in so much work and we're just clearly not gonna get the part because it wasn't it just wasn't the right like you said all the all those different variables didn't quite have that right feeling for that role combining with the actors and the material or whatever else and and I thought myself back on all these times where I had put so much work into preparing and like giving a good skilled audition and didn't get the part was like why didn't at that and then realize like oh I mean not to toot my own horn and say that I was like so so good or skilled or whatever but I just realized like even even if I were so good and skilled that might not be the only determining factor I might just not have felt right yeah it's it's it's an interesting and it really is something for me after doing this as long as I've been doing it I get I get a very strong feeling when I when you know there's there's something it's it's it's interesting you just sort of like oh I think that's the person you know and often that will happen with the first person who auditions I find which is very interesting a lot of times the first person comes in they set a bar and then you go through this whole process and a lot of times you end up where you start it which I also find very you know interested in indicate some kind of bias doesn't it there's an advantage I didn't know that I'm going to like now schedule might be the very first person on the very first day well so you're saying then Sube t to the question of how much context matter because I think a lot of people listening to this right now whether they wanna be an actor or they want to do something else creative whether it's in music or it's in who knows graphic design or writing or anything else there's a perceived gatekeeper somewhere that's like I want a career and I have to convince this person to give me the shot and I think that's real that is kind of your job and it is your job to this question of like how much do contacts matter it's your job to try to make it matter less because you're out there trying to find the people who don't necessarily have the agent who don't necessarily have the manager who haven't necessarily been able to move L. A. and do that and do that yeah but I mean you're not going to discover someone on the streets in like this question came from Lima Peru the last time you were in Lima never right so how I mean to to some degree than the context matter yeah I think it's contact for sure somebody who can give you the knowledge about the things though it's more about having the knowledge about the project and figure out how to get your way in right like I'm a big believer in really working really hard and at your dream whatever your dream is and working really hard and I think that there's a certain manifestation that happens in that process to and that like yes it's important to know some person who knows somebody but I think in the journey of your work you'll find that person because I think it's all about the are it's about your art so the contacts matter but to me that's the one of the least right and I think that like our business works on it does have look if you know someone in you know that person but I think the whole dream of becoming an actor we come to think that that dream is also the hey you know do your look great for this part so I think especially nowadays with.

director US Mary
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

11:19 min | 11 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Okay. Thanks for doing this so celebre told you each episode of the show starts with a question and I think you'll be good answer. This question good spawn a conversation around it. the question comes from someone named Megan Again Colbert. She lives in Springfield New York and our question is how do you balance the inner need to create with the practical need to bring in a paycheck so I thought this would be interesting to talk to you about because you're young guy just getting started on a career and this got to be something that's on your mind as far as a balancing creativity versus financial security ready. Do you mind talking about that. Yeah of course why not I'm just thinking already had this conversation today with posser a really the you know passer yeah of course another actor five zero zero and also this conversation with Patrick followed today no not today but six six months ago okay it was the writer and director or writer of seven zero first of all started with acting when I was fourteen fourteen yeah. I'm nineteen right now so I never really needed money. I was in school. I was with my parents. I was fine. really did it because I loved it yeah so I don't really think about it right now. But sometimes I think man I love it but I would also love to have a family right and you never know what will happen so I'm also talking gene with his about this with my parents and men I'm from a family. My parents are doctors engineers and WHO's a doctor and WHO's an engineer. My mother is doctor. My father is an engineer. They're really proud of me and I'm. I'm really proud to have the chance to Goethe's way but I'm really scared with my nineteen years because I know one day. I want to have family and I don't know what will happen Yup. Well the first thing I actually want to say while we have microphones in front of our faces is just that personally. My opinion is you're. You were extremely talented actor very very good at it the work that we got to do together on the movie some five zero zero there was always so much honesty coming from you and seeing the movie all done audiences won't be able to see it until next year. It comes out on Amazon but I've seen the movie all done now and you're just you're fantastic in it. so that's the first thing I wanted to say. How you you mentioned already. You started when you were fourteen. I actually haven't heard that whole story from you. How did it I happen. Oh okay first first of all thank you and man. It's a really really strange story so I always loved acting since I'm a kid since I'm four or five. When were you were what context acting when you were four or five I was in my room so movies yeah and imitate actress just by yourself talking yourself and your I I did that too. I still do actually but one day I was in the eighth grade. Something like this and I was bad in school because of a girl so I spend a lot of time with her and my father was a little bit disappointed and he told me we will not make all the days because normally in summer I go around to see my family and we didn't do it this this year because you got some bad grades at school you go to Iran yeah. That's my family but it's Nice Dan modern new. I love acting and she saw that. All my friends are gone. I was always at home and she wanted me to you do something to go out because I'm active person than she saw me in my room twenty four seven so my mom checked on Internet and saw acting camp for five days and I went there and was nice and I had a really really nice teacher. His name is Sebastian John Fritz Yeah. I really really love him. He's still in touch with him yeah yeah of course that's one of my best friends. So this camp you're doing like theater was at scenes scenes from plays scenes from movies improvisation what kind of stuff all ninety percent improvisation and we had the chance to choose scenes that we love L. from movies and do it with him so it was it it was awesome. You'd acted with with him exactly not with other students. No we did we. I think we were like liked ten students. I was the only man so that I'm a little bit alone so he he worked with me right so we had a very nice relationship relation from the beginning and one day he told me man you need to agency. You really need to continue and and do this. Dan then man I was was working on me on my creativity helps you to work on scripts yeah how to to become better to become an actor so it was the first time that this topic had ever been brought to you. It was your acting teacher Sebastian saying hit. You need to get an agent and once he brought that up to you then are you saying you're you're level of focus sort of reached a higher level well and you were driven by the creativity of it but also now driven by the prospect of him. Maybe this is is something I can pursue in a professional way for me. It was strange because I had this feeling in a very very young age. I mean when I was fourteen and I really wanted to be one of the best and I always wanted to be the best version of myself and it was it was really important for me. Yep It's like strange because if you're young and you you begin with acting or everything you you love. You improve very very very fast so you improve very very fast there one day you stop and it's like this yeah so you like a plateau exactly yeah and man. I was depressed about this one year ago one year ago okay. You've already done some jobs gay of course AH. I was depressed on it. I was like man. I'm not becoming better anymore. I'm just going to said and doing my stuff things already know and I'm not becoming better dirt and I was like and I am scared about not wanting to better I just I need to become better better and if I don't feel this I'm lost his business. Yeah it. It was very very difficult for me and I would really really really love to tell this to people. That's exactly the moment you have to continue to pursue your way. I think it's one of the most important in moments of through carrier and it's not important what you do there is a moment you don't know how to continue to pursue your way and that's the moment you you becoming better than but you don't realize it so it's a moment you need time for yourself to understand what you really want and draft to stop and be thankful thankful for everything you already did because human beings are not thankful for things they already have yeah we have done so much trappings. Everyone every human being has done so much incredible things but we're not painful for them. We always want more and more and more and more and and be better and better and better. I know how that feels. You know and I think you every human being who's doing art but also other things has to has to notice. I don't know if there's one year you don't know what to do. It's okay take your time you. You need time for yourself itself. and then continue one day you you will feel that you want improve again and I feel it. I felt it again. I think like two months Samsa go yeah and I'm really really happy about this because I also experienced that need other experiences. I can't always do the same things I'm also doing music or you're doing some music now. Yeah of course I think since two years because I realized man. I don't know how you feel about added but when I'm doing acting I love doing acting but when I do music that's time for me. That's how I feel about it. I've never pursued music professionally and you know if I'm totally honest. I think I probably have mixed feelings about that and sometimes I think oh I should have or or I should now but you know there's only so many hours in the day and only so many days in the week and you you have to prioritize in life can necessarily we just do everything and in the end I well. It's not the end but as of now I should say I do feel satisfied and feel like he was actually a really important important thing for me that I have a creative outlet that I've been doing my whole life music that I feel very passionate about and that's not tangled tangled up in a professional career at all doesn't it it that part of it. Just doesn't enter into the equation. I just do it because I love doing it. That's the best form of art. Critic processing is brought to you. vizquel share skill share an online learning community with thousands of amazing classes covering dozens of creative and entrepreneurial skills. You can take classes in everything from photography and creative writing design productivity and more so whether you're returning to a longtime passion project challenging yourself to get outside your comfort zone or or simply exploring something. New Skill share has classes for you. Join the millions of students already learning unskilled share today with a special offer just for listeners of creative processing officing. You can get two months of skill share for free. That's right skill shares offering creative processing listeners two months of unlimited access to thousands of classes for free to sign up go to skill share dot com slash creative again go to skill share dot com slash. C R E A T to start your two months now that skill Dell's share dot com slash creative.

Sebastian John Fritz engineer writer Megan Again Colbert Springfield New York Patrick Goethe Iran Amazon Dan Dell Samsa director one day two months one year nineteen years ninety percent six six months five days
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

05:55 min | 11 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Hey everybody welcome to the creative processing podcast. My name is Joe. Gordon Lebed Abbott the idea of the show is to have a conversation about the creative process inspired by one question that question comes from you out there asking questions on the Internet and then I find find a guest that I think is well suited to answer that question and we have conversation my guest. This week is omitted memoir. He is a fantastic fantastic young actor. I recently worked with him on a movie called seventy five hundred which is not out yet this is a movie. I'm really proud of love and the acting was very very challenging. I dare say it was as challenging as any acting. I've ever done and he's so good good in the movie. Amid is just every moment is so honest and real and heartbreaking and human. He's a young guy. He's just getting started in his career is that he was eighteen when I worked with them and I think that made him particularly well suited to answer this question question question came from Meghan Culvert from Springfield New York and she asked how do you balance the inner need to create with the practical tactical need to bring in a paycheck. There's a big question and I have to admit I'm coming from a a lucky in a privileged position to talk about it. I've been fortunate to make money as an actor since I was six years old and I'm sitting in the rare fortunate position right now of of having enough money to be comfortable title in my life so I have a particular perspective on where making money intertwines with making art or being creative. I do think though that there's sometimes oftentimes in our culture too much emphasis put onto into whether or not one makes money doing the thing that they love to do. There's almost like a condescending attitude in like western earn capitalist culture about if you do something and it's not the thing that you do for a living then you must not be as good at it or must you must. It's not take it seriously or must not be as important as if you do it professionally and honestly. I think that's really problematic attic way to think about it. You know I know plenty of people who make a lot of money or I should say I know of plenty of people who make a lot of money doing being variously creative things in the movie business or whatever who it's not something that they love. It's not something that they're getting the kind of fulfillment. Phil meant out of that. I think is I think is really the valuable part of being creative doing art and and I also know plenty of people who do their thing they draw. They make music or they writer they. They're doing their creative thing and it's not career and they don't make money doing it but it's deeply meaningful thing and they get a lot out of it and I sort of feel like one of the things I would like to accomplish with my fortunate platform to be able to like have a podcast and have you guys listening to what I have to say or the work. Did I do with my company here. Record etc like one of the things that I'd like to put forward. One of the ideas is hey. Even if if you're not making money that doesn't mean that you're not a real artist and that's not to say that you shouldn't pursue the money and that's not to say that having money involved is bad or or in any way contaminating but it's just not all there is it's not all there is the truth is oftentimes. If you'RE GONNA make it your career you'll run into circumstances where creativity has to take a back seat to your career and I've definitely found myself in situations or unlike well. This is part of being an actor. I'm having to do this today but man I don't like it. I feel not only do I feel creatively inspired. I feel like this deadening. Mike creative spirit of definitely had had plenty of days like that and I don't know I've. I've definitely had moments where I've wondered. Maybe I shouldn't be doing this professionally. Maybe I would get more out of this. If it weren't how I earn my living. If I were just doing doing my own creative thing and didn't have to worry about what impact it might or might not have on my career on my livelihood flee hood. I could see real upsides to that but it's something that I think I probably talk about less on on this podcast because I like to put more emphasis on the creative process itself and less emphasis on career building but the honest truth is that in many ways they are inextricably linked and it's you know it makes perfect sense that I think a lot of people are curious about that and so oh this is an episode where we get into talking about that and I'm talking about it with. Omid who is figuring this out for himself right right now. So why don't I take you this conversation. I think you'll like it ladies and Gentlemen Omid Memoir.

Omid Meghan Culvert Joe Gordon Lebed Abbott writer Phil Springfield New York six years
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

11:29 min | 11 months ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Hey everybody welcome to the creative processing podcast. My name is Joe Gordon Levitt. I'm sick today. Pardon me the idea of the shows to have a conversation about the creative process inspired by one question that question comes from you out there on the Internet asking the questions and then I find guest who I think is particularly suited to answer that question my guest this week his live Burri. She is a magnificent thinker writer speaker. she's a former professional poker player. One of the most successful poker players of all time actually she is a world series of poker and European Poker tour champions the only female in history of old both titles. She also has a degree in astrophysics. She has a fantastic youtube channel where where she talks about science and Philosophy Cetera and she's just an all around fantastic personality conversation with and I think she was particularly good at answering this question. The week's question is from Kent Wilson from Nashville Tennessee and the question that can ask is when does data backed decision-making can begin to have a negative impact on the creative process so this led us to all kinds of topics live is really good at breaking down as Kent brought up data back decision making what is analytical thinking what is science what is the difference between science and art you know how do you listen to your intuition. Your Gut your heart and balance is that with the data with the logic with the reason I think this is particularly pertinent to art and creativity because you know so much of art and creativity nowadays is further and further integrated with data you know when you make short film and you put it on Youtube. Where are you take a photograph and you put it on Instagram and make a song put it on soundcloud etcetera and you're looking at the data how many times somebody watch this swertz the views what's their hearts the likes of the subscribers what's the analytics of my creativity and I think there's you could probably tell by my Dona Voice. There's IT's questionable. How valuable that data is that said. I don't think it's completely useless and live is really good at I think parsing where data is valuable and where data should be ignored. You should just go with your gut how to make those those decisions and what it all means for for being an artist creator or just a a human being. I really enjoyed this conversation. I think you will yeah so. Let's let's get to it. Gentlemen Live Burri livery. Thanks Pioneer. Thanks so much okay so I always laugh. I'm finding I've been listening to the episodes this. This is only the what the fifth one that were recorded and been listening back and they're like Oh. I'm laughing every time I say hello and someone says to me. I'm still getting used to the fact that I'm doing a podcast but wasn't that funny but but I left okay so concept. The show is we have a conversation about the creative process inspired by one question okay. I'm originally question you can take it first crack at it and then we'll go from there and have any number of tangents about it but I think you'd be good at answering this question. This is from Kent Wilson from Nashville Tennessee. When does data backed decision-making begin to have a negative impact on the creative process. Wow is a good question so I guess the way to think about it is data is information based upon knowledge and you would think that the more information you have in order to make a decision then the better right because you want your thoughts to mirror reality because if your thoughts mirror reality then you're more likely to be able to navigate that reality therefore the outcome of your decision is going to be better so my first thing is like it doesn't it's great. It's it's just better. You're going to you know if if your goal is to make objectively good decisions than there is no such thing as too much data but I would imagine they would become a point where it starts to stifle you you in terms of you just have so much information you don't know how to sift through and navigated and you start getting sort of confused or you don't know because because of course not all data is created equal. Some bits of information are actually very worthwhile to your decision and your creative process and some bits of actually neutral might actually even be negative. You know it's it's not so yeah. I guess it depends on sort of the quality of the data sure and then I guess what you've also got to think about is like actually the creative process itself itself. We talking about sort of building something out of nothing so they sort of zero to one or are. We talking about sort of thinking outside. The box walks so sort of going from zero to one zero two X and then X. plus one and so there might be situations situations where if you're trying to just really like build some truly original thought you can't do that if you're like basing it off all the existing information so I probably sound like mathematical function out there. There's a way you can mathematically model this but it would take quite a long time to due to do that. I imagine it would okay so let's let's take it out of the abstract. Pick in and make it into a specific example. You're good at poker first of all would you consider poker playing poker creative process. Yes no so I mean ultimately. The job of a poker player is to sort of way up all these little bits of conflicting information. Because of course the name of the game is deception so there are some things which are objectively tree. I know that my two cards have an ace of hearts and King of spades that that that is locked in but I don't know what my opponent has and I. I don't know what cards are going to come. I don't my opponent is feeling what they're thinking how good they are. What level of strategy they're they're thinking on whether they're having a good day or a bad day life so there's all these like little bits that you have to weigh up and then on top of that they're trying to intentionally give out misinformation so it's creative. Tiv- in terms of what kind of strategies you want to build will the part that you just said about giving out misinformation. That sounds like very familiar to me as an actor. That's very creative. If you're going to sort of be able to tell a story that convinces the other players of something that might or might not be true. Yes so yeah you've got to. You've got to try and modal what you what what they're thinking and then go one step step above that in order to say okay they. They're expecting to see this. So how do I give them what they expect to see but actually manipulate ate them to do what I want them to do without them realizing that they're being manipulated so yes that in itself is an extensive amount of creativity art art yes that that is the and the game is is interesting dichotomy between science because the autistic bit are these like these sort of intuitive fuzzy feelings feelings that we might get like if you and I are playing and there's the you know. Usually there's like a sort of fairly straightforward mathematical solution to to a situation say you know say oh you make a bet and the amount that your betting is offering odds in order to call to to win the pot and so. I know that I need to call with a a thirty percent of the time in order to not be losing money. Zones data drew back exactly that's that's the date of different but that's the sort of hard the hard math but then say I get an intuitive feeling that she in this situation. I think you're bluffing right and I don't know why there's just something about the way that you picked up chips and put them in all the way you're breathing. The is sort of setting off my spidey senses her and but I can't put my finger on it and that's where they sort of intuitive. The creative process comes in where you're trying to weigh that up and offset it against what the matter saying sometimes your intuition and that's all the data are aligned and that's great now now. You've got an easy decision but when they're conflicting now you've got a real problem and so what I tend to do there. Is You know like so say the the the the dates has need to call thirty percent of the time but my gut is saying no no this situation actually you. You need to call much more than that because I think he's he's. I think he's bluffing well. I'M NOT GONNA go and call one hundred percent of the time. Still you know I'm not gonNA call with all you know even my worst cards so now what I might do is shift that frequency from thirty percent up to fifty percent or sixty percent based on the strength of belief in what my gut is telling me when you say frequency. Do you mean because you're playing multiple times or do you mean in this one hand you think he's bluffing and you are giving yourself a thirty percent chance of wanting to call or Kinda so what it means is that of all the range of cards that I could conceivably have in this situation. So you know just maybe the way the game is played. I wouldn't wouldn't necessarily have like the really crappy hands like seven seven to three. Those are presumably no longer in my range of hands but let's say I have everything from two seven up to two aces and king ten and better okay so out of that range. I want to be calling with at least thirty percent of those okay. Let me get math as the standard math but because I now have a strong feeling that you're bluffing actually WANNA extend that range from thirty percent to of allies cards to fifty percent of all those combinations I see okay and so then you make your final decision you you try to sort of assign a numerical value to your intuition exactly and then combine that with the other more mathematically deduced factors factors yeah so it still math in your head while you're playing yeah with with experience. You learn to do that and I. It's definitely still still low. It's it's not like exact and I think that's what really sort of sets you know great poker player apart from an average one is that ability to to to quantify their uncertainty you and and incorporate numbers quantification into their creative process right because I imagine I mean when I play poker and I imagine most people listening to this when you get together with your friends and you play poker. You're not doing any math in your head. You're drinking and like just kind of it's more of a game of chance and more emphasis on. Can I love these guys yeah but it's it's more. It's more artistic less scientific. It's it's less thinking.

Kent Wilson Tennessee Nashville Youtube Philosophy Cetera Joe Gordon Levitt Burri writer Dona Voice thirty percent fifty percent one hundred percent sixty percent one hand
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

19:15 min | 1 year ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Creativity and definitely the happiest i when my song sounds good to me for weeks. Oh that's interesting at the moment of time if it endures overtime time yes because sometimes i love the song that i just wrote and then a week later. I'm like oh what was i thinking. That's so funny. I have a similar thing in my head. Sometimes when i'm trying to make a decision a creative decision i i imagined myself as an old man and i have this like morbid ed fantasy about the end of my life. That hopefully luck willing. I'll i'll be an old man and i'll be able to look back on all the different things that i've made all of assembled. Some kind of you know imagine like a shelf of the things all the things that i worked on that. I spent my time trying to create and when i'm trying to make a decision like should i do this or how should i do it. I imagine imagine that old man is think what's he going to think when he picked this thing up off the shelf is he gonna say <hes>. This was great. This is making me happy. Be now in my last few days before i die or is he going to pick it up and be like oh. This is so lame. It's making me cringe. I've heard this quote that said live a good life so that when you remember when you're older you can leave it again with great happiness great joy and what you just said reminded me of that i do think in in the same also for example when i'm writing writing music former opera i would write like twenty ditties and let them hang out on in my computer and and then in a week week or ten days maybe the deadline's approaching <hes> some song remain in my mind and win wake wake up when i'm taking a show i hear it when i'm walking my dog here. It and those read the song that survives that great. That's a really useful way to do it. <hes> that's almost reminds me of like if we're talking about you know making stuff for yourself versus others you could almost divide like making something that feels good to yourself in the present versus making something that will still make you feel good in the future. Yeah i do wanna feel good in future yeah but do you think that there's just to argue the other side of the coin. Do you think that there's a danger of being too future oriented. Is there a value in in trying to ignore nor that for a second and just focusing on what makes you feel good right at the present moment. I'm not sure because to me futures such an arbitrary time so so i take it very lightly. I'm not really thinking like seriously like him. And i'm an old lady. I'm not that serious of uh-huh <hes> betting it. I'm really serious by betting it on the moment and i tend to be the hardest better of what i do so i reject a lot of songs and sometimes i play them to nelson nelson was like wow this is great in a go really so i never know what i'm doing really i have to go with my feeling and i use that as a raider and i use a lot of contrition and hope for the best way okay and then you get guidance from others once you've expressed your intuition yes and no. I don't really take guidance. I do see their reaction anime. Take it into account but even from my husband. I don't always because i know that we fundamentally don't agree with everything thing as just the nature of human and that's why it's interesting to be with other people so i don't always hundred percent autumn what i'm doing because of what some people said but i do take it into account and keep it in me and also she's not the only one i want to impress with respect respect my husband. There are also many other kind of people that i want to communicate so he's my definitely i measurement but i go farther and at the end of the day it's really i have to be happy and i have to be proud or at least be able to stand dan by would have done so then in terms of collaborating when you're when you're collaborating i i'm skipping around a little bit but when when when you're collaborating with someone else yeah you have to stand by what you've done and you have to like you can understand the perspective of someone else but you're always it's like you say and i think this is really strong and good. You're always going to decide for yourself how you feel about any piece of input from someone else but then when you're collaborating with someone i m annals what what happens when u._c. at one way and they see it another way. How do you resolve that well in music usually unless s you have a fifty fifty collaboration situation you usually you kind of have a leader or this is so and so's project if i'm invited to to somebody else's project and some things to happen in not the way that i believe but it's not freaking me. I didn't know whether they you leave a room or something. That doesn't happen. Usually i use it as my learning tool <hes> to something that i want to study i need so you know. There must be a way for me to learn and i have so many things to learn in life. It's everywhere so i use it kind of like as a motivation nation for me to learn other ideas or more or expand my ideas just open up. My horizon is always good. That's a really nice way to frame it too. I think saying a second ago oftentimes listening to input from the outside can be seen as <hes> as somehow being untrue to on self but framing it in terms of learning sounds nice i i can learn from someone else's input and then i can incorporate it how i see fit but but it's an opportunity to learn yeah. I'd like to think that i'm an ongoing project and not finished project when i was yang would resist because i felt i had so much insecurity that i felt hurt if my idea wasn't taken but now i understand that it's not about that. It's really about making something together. I'm interested in growing in have the most pleasure when feel like i'm growing and not when i feel like i'm finished and i can have it my way. I feel like in the last few years perhaps because because the politics of the united states as well as a lot of other places in the world yeah are are moving being in a direction that runs contrary to the politics that creative artists type folks generally old and and so there's a there seems like a heightened i mean it's always been there but there's a heightened sense of wanting art to send send a message or to make make an impact on the world which when i think of that in in terms of the question we've been asking about making for yourself. Alfred says making our for others making art in order to have an impact on the world is sort of definitively making art for others. I suppose oh is but i don't know how do you. How do you think about that about like <hes> you know. Make making an impact on the world with your art. Is that then something you do for for yourself or a is. Is it then than something. That's for others or had you think about that. I think that <hes> i don't know how if i'm making an impact but this it's definitely a prayer the goes in my art you know when i was younger i was just very strong headed the and my first instinct when encounter the things thinks that i don't agree i would fight and it would immediately fight and you know very strong head girl but <hes> you know yoko cornices imagine peace and <hes> i i think about this word more and more today because i think it's important wouldn't fight in stand up for yourself and have their kind of impact in the world but i also feel that we have to imagine where we want to arrive where i want to rive is a peaceful world in this world. I i don't imagine that everybody will be thinking like me. I think all the human still will be thinking differently and there will be many people think differently from me or have different value. My goal is to be learned to live together and be decent and use the difference as a tool to make more progress so i think about that in. I put my prayer definitely into what i do. <hes> never really really directly but i am thinking about that. I think music is great tool for me because it's about making harmonies and i also use a lot out of dissonant sound and i like to learn to combine different foreign element in and make something that's beautiful beautiful out of it. My goal is to make beauty out of weird different things so that's my prayer in my art making beauty out of a lot of different things versus trying to convince the different things that they're wrong. That's it's compelling and yet it's it's hard art. Isn't it like nowadays when certain things feel so wrong. Yes it's really difficult in. It's challenging where i think we you know just <hes> i was thinking about joseph cambell book in power miss. He talks a lot about tribal ritual and how that's missing for modern world world where he says you know in tribal ritual. When you like late teenager they do some kind of ceremony and the through the ceremony you have to become an adult. You have to leave your child behind child. You have to kill the child. You knew he says kill the child the new and you have to become an adult and face now this complex scary in sometimes they leave a child in a jungle uncle and you have to survive you have to find the way on your own to come back to your tribe or you die and i'm not suggesting it's a good thing but methodically i think the world is is insane. The crowell violent horrible place this with also great beautiful wonderful things involved and i think we have to face it as it is and easy. Easy is never going to be the answer and you think it's easy to sort of look at people we disagree with and demonize them. Yes it's easy and also i am mad. Sometimes we know sometimes one two punch my computer screen to <hes>. I'm not just saying like oh like love and you know celebrate everything. That's not what i'm saying sure. <hes> and i don't think we can fix it in our lifetime but i i think we need to be constantly building the ground and also i think people need to have goal in mind. The goal all of of this is what you mentioned a second ago imagining piece yes right. I love what you said that when we have peace it won't be the case that everyone just agrees with each other. That's not peace and i think it's not realistic yeah. It's not realistic. I think you know if we we are left with everybody. Who think like us will still find some way to disagree. You know they're still going to be online in a half off of them. And half of us we can always draw the line in. I think right now the the nine did divide is getting bigger. Yeah i think it's very dangerous and it's a weakening us and we need to fight that energy the energy of division division so when you say we need to fight that division i think a lot of folks who make art of various kinds whether it's music or writing or anything else feel a desire and urged urge to fight that division like you're talking about through our creativity somehow and maybe it's idealistic to think that we can contribute but we feel that urged on the plus. I know i feel it. I think a lot of people do do you feel that in. How do you address that that feeling. We have to take every step and every step counts but we may not upi reward it anything. That's when people get discouraged because we don't see the sign and sometimes we don't get reward. You know i think that's real life life and it's really sad and depressing. Sometimes you know but i want to be realistic about that. I think if we have a goal in mind like if you're saying and if you want to achieve somewhere you have to work with windy after work with current and sometimes you have to take really far away around to get to where you go and we need to encourage each other. I think that's it's really important because it's it's hard and not spend so much energy on hating and i don't wanna sound too. It's all about love but i do also feel that have a love and have a good community around you. Have i have good friends three things really most rewarding and then i make art and hopefully i get reward from art but i get more reward from having friends and anything i i do people do sometimes it's important but you don't get bored and i don't think we should judge etched. What we've done by the amount of reward we get sometimes they you know <hes>. I've done things that sometimes i felt like i got disproportional amount of reward yup. Sometimes i felt like oh my god. I didn't get any word for this airport both of those. I think it's not relative you know they're kinda. Coincidence yeah exactly oftentimes that reward is just about luck whereas the feeling pulling in the happiness i if you can disconnect it from that reward then you're not reliant on it and then you can you can sort of be responsible for your own happiness. I love that i <hes> i i have one more question okay. We've been getting a lot of different questions in for this podcast and ah like to try to wrap episode with a weird question because some of the questions that come in are like universal and profound and like can spot a whole hour of conversation and some of them are just weird so do you mind if i ask you a weird question yes. I like. We're at question <laughter> okay right so this question came from from adam ford from east wallingford vermont. What would you do if you're about to be run over by a truck. What would i do <hes>. That's a good thing to think about <hes>. I actually think this question ties into the first question because i think about this kind of scenario probably more often than i should of like what would i do. If i were just about to die would i would. I go into myself. Would i reach out to another. Would i think of people in my life. What i think about my past westwood. I think about my you know my wife and my kids what i think about my mom like. Would i say something. I wanna communicate something to the outside world in and my last moments or would i just go into myself and have my own internal process. Which is why i think it connects to the the episodes question in but i don't know what do you think i think i will be more practical. I think if i had a moment to stink and if i see the truck approaching and it's so fast that i don't have time to run to the side of the street then i think i would see the truck has any space below uh-huh. I can duck it. Okay wait. Wait wait. Wait hold on now. Let's say you can't say you can't say you know that like death. Breath is inevitable yeah. What's what's that last moment then. I probably would <hes>. I don't want to hit it from my fronts. Put my back but it feels less impactful yeah yeah that makes sense to try to save my brain. Yeah i think i think that something this is this is maybe beginning weird but like i actually. I really think that something happens in your brain. When you die and i want like i just hope that when i die the my brain's not like incinerated or or something so that hopefully my brain can go through whatever process it's supposed to go on when when you die because i actually think that that process might feel bill infinite. That's interesting so you think that <hes> your death is a still experienced through your brain. That's my hunch launch. This is not really based on science. I've read some stuff about you know you know they say that <hes> well whatever they say that there's certain chemicals that get released at least in your brain at the moment of death and these are the kinds of things i like reading and thinking about but probably reading way too much into this question about getting hit by a truck doc. I imagine my my my explains will be this once again cloud and i think he they will leave my body but my brain's probe's smooshed struck. You could thank you so much for doing this. Thank you.

united states nelson nelson dan rive joseph cambell Alfred crowell westwood adam ford vermont hundred percent ten days
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

13:55 min | 1 year ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Here's a here's the intersection of where where art meets politics shepherd sherri the shepherd ferries show. Thanks for being here in. Thanks you see here okay so as it tells you before the idea is to have one on question about the creative process and then spun a litany of tangents around a conversation from that one question by thought you'd be good for <music> this question it comes from mumbai india the guy's name <hes> she she raj kamal carmel car <hes> here's a question how do you wrestle with the statement that artists are selfish since they're off worrying about their art and not devoting more energy to political rebellion in troubled times. I'll just give you first crack at that and then we'll go from there. I mean luckily this is something i've considered quite right a bit so <hes> i feel prepared at this question and i do agree that artists are very fortunate that they have the luxury of <hes> dabbling in what a lot of people would consider to be maybe superficial or self-absorbed and but what i think is that art has the ability to connect with people and everyone gets to connect with an in their own way. That's very special that it's <hes> <hes> it's got a very personal thing and a universal thing to it but you can also address things that matter in the world with art and that's my strategy. I don't speak for all artists but i i understand how fortunate i am to get to make pictures for a living so i treat i treat it like <hes> i've seen other artists admire treated and a lot of those artists come from the music space. Not the visual arts base people like bob marley or or <hes> bob dylan joe stromer from the clash <hes> chuck d from public enemy using their medium to say something ding end create enjoyable content entertainment however you wanna put it. That's what i'm trying to do with with my visual art and not only am i trying a to highlight social and political topics with my art that i think need to be addressed. I'm also using the revenue from art to contribute to the people people who are doing the work on the ground that moves the needle on an issue. What i've tried to do is take my self absorbed artists nature and find find a way to channel that constructively because i acknowledged that the thing about artists i can spend hours and hours and like no one else this matters. I might eventually realize i'm hungrier have to go to the bathroom but time just disappears when i'm in zone trying to solve a problem and it's it's amazing therapy for me. I'm lucky to have it. Do you think when you follow those selfish one could use the word selfish urges that that it actually makes the work more impactful in one sense which is that. I don't think <music>. I'm that different or special and so if it's giving me a feeling a a a a good feeling feeling that i've achieved something that it's <hes> it's something i would want to look at which isn't very selfish <hes> then. I think that's a feeling i can trust that other. People might get the same reaction from it now. Not everyone's it's the same so obviously that's not going to be perfectly consistent but in a weird way my gut which nothing could really be more selfish than your god right a lot of things. <hes> has served me well in creating things that other people can connect with so then. Do you think that artists are. You're a necessary part of how it all works. How society works how democracy you could say words like. Do you think that art needs to be there in order for it to function right. I really can't imagine a world without it so i guess i'd say it's pretty important but to me creativity you in the arts space and there's so many different realms where i think there's creativity. There's a lot of creativity and science yes but creativity through the arts. I think a lot of people see it as a way to sort of <hes> manifested the human condition which humans are social. We wanna have sometimes not vulnerable conversations directly but we want to have conversations that share what we feel feel in who we are and art is a way to do that without having to say man i need. I need therapy. My life's not great. Let me go. I mean you know it's yeah. Well you know the psychology. There's their science and maybe some art. Maybe actually i'm keying in on you mentioning janeiro that there's creativity in science and because the difference between art and science is something that fascinates me and when i think of this question of is it selfish for an artist to do art <hes> especially in times of political polarization etc i do think about the role of art in kind of where we've arrived at today and it kind of pains me to say it sometimes because i consider myself an artist most days and love creativity loves storytelling and yet right now. Sometimes i feel like doc. That's the problem like our politics is too influenced by art and storytelling and not influenced enough off by logic reason science. You know the kind of the cold hard facts that is not really the domain of artists. If you will like nick i think our current president is probably a really incompetent government leader but he's an effective storyteller color at least to his audience such that he was able to win an election and like sh- are we paying too much attention. Are we giving too much power to artists. I guess in in our in our politics and our government. I hadn't really thought of it that way. Trump the picasso of hate fear. I mean hitler there was a failed artist <hes> yeah and and like actually i mean hitler the nazi regime had an incredible propaganda department and pioneered all kinds of filmmaking techniques techniques like if you go back and watch the have you ever seen from dogs. They're incredible films especially time beautiful yeah the celebration abrasion the human form and perfection writing lighting and every i mean yeah you i do think that people are <hes> people are seduced by things like that. Now i may be wrongly believe that most artists in creating half to connect with aside of their humanity that makes them more compassionate more empathetic because there's something in share in sharing a part of yourself that it i think makes you relate to others now. There is propaganda. That's coming from a more clinical standpoint. We've analyzed what humans trigger points are this. This is how we manipulate them but i don't think that most art is is about vat. Wha what i'm trying to do with a lot of my art is actually you know combat the easy tactics of creating a narrative around <hes> scapegoating immigrants or fearing people that don't have the same religion you do or whatever and trying to find something to to say this is. This is shared humanity. We have a lot more in common than than what divides set us apart and <hes> and you know in push back but i acknowledge that what i'm doing in a way is what i would consider positive propaganda versus negative propaganda propaganda word you use a lot in your work yeah i do and it's because i want to be transparent apparent that any image with an agenda which is actually most images is a form of propaganda. It's just whether you try to hi that factor. Whether you're honest about it i want to say. This is where i'm coming from. This is to start a conversation about this and you make up your own mind. We're a lotta propaganda is like your mind is made up for you and this should seal the deal and it does exactly the opposite of admitting to be propaganda exactly when you have <hes> what so riley thing the no spin zone yeah okay you're not everything is spun everything coming from a perspective from an agenda but yeah the calling something or what is it fair and balanced five calls itself fair and balanced like oh no this is this is just objective truth. There's no art hear it's not propaganda wars. What you're saying is be up front about the fact that you're communicating agenda exactly and <hes> i hadn't unheard the term until i guess maybe twenty fifteen or so but <hes> really the the rise of trump's rhetoric and every his his elk but <hes> how they figured out that through social media research the phenomenon of confirmation bias that people end up wanting to curate their their news and their you know their opinions based on backing up what they already believe like lawyers lawyers for themselves yeah but you know i think what's happened is that there are a lot of people who figured out how to harness that tendency within people with my art. I'm i'm trying trying to do something different. That's all i can say yeah so. Do you have a different definition for art versus propaganda. What's what's the difference <hes> things very muddy. Actually <hes> people ask me they say will what's your you know your definition between design and art while design. A lot of people think is an aesthetic that something is not painfully. It's crispin graphic and that makes it design fine but robert indiana's work <hes> a lot of andy. Warhol's work a lot of jasper johns work. A lot of you know barbara kruger. They're all considered artists artists but their work is very design aesthetic heavy and i think intent is what makes something art rather rather than design and and something that could be considered propaganda in a sense and design in a sense can also be art if the creator's intention is for it to have latitude latitude for interpretation that gives some freedom and respect and you know interpretive abilities to the viewer that it's work that creates a conversation station rather than saying this is the end of the conversation agree with me or you're wrong rise. You're you're almost inviting the audience of the are to participate in a creative process and make their own meaning out of the art that that's that's art versus propaganda. You're trying to just manipulate them into <hes> okay so here's the desired in results in terms of how it's going to shift their views and get them to behave the way you want <hes> uh-huh with my with my work what i view all the time. Is that okay somehow. They've been told look over here. Don't look over here and and i'm like please please take a second to look over here and then from there. It's up to you okay so can you can you apply that then to see your your iconic nick signature sort of logo. If you will the obey andre the giant thing you talk about that because what you you just said invoked the whole obey image to me like take a second to look over here not only in the image itself but also in where you put the image the fact that it's not hung in galleries or i guess maybe nowadays it is but that it didn't start as it was hung in galleries and even today even even though you do galleries i still see the fucking andre the giant is all over this city so can you just talk about <unk> out like what are the politics. What is your the agenda or the propaganda or the intent behind that obey image sure well. I started in one thousand nine hundred nine thirty years ago. Can you believe it now with this. <hes> sticker andre the giant that i just made aide was trying to teach a friend how to make a stencil and he got frustrated so i finished it and i said no. This is going to be our new crew. Our new policy the andre posse a non. I went and i made some stickers and gave them to my skateboard friends and put some around at some spots in providence rhode island where i was living and next thing you know people were asking me like hey man the guy with the stickers can i can i get some andre like a secret handshake and <hes> and then beyond that i was really only putting them in the places where i thought my peers the people that thought like me that were part of my culture would notice them so at skate spots on stop signs ends at on some of the music venues but it was resonating with other people and what i.

andre nick signature mumbai bob marley hitler bob dylan barbara kruger scapegoating providence rhode island joe stromer robert indiana president trump Warhol riley andy one thousand nine hundred nine
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Go to pursue the american dream. I mean golden globe nominee kirsten done stars as crystal steps a young mother who gets involved with and ultimately becomes victim of a multibillion dollar pyramid scheme known as founders american merchandise or fam- damn decked out in denim and dayglo. This minimum wage waterpark employee is determined to make a better life for herself and her family crystal climbs ranks until she is face to face with their diabolical diabolical leader o._b. Garbo the second and schemes her way to the top by outsmarting the organizations fanatic followers on becoming a god also stars alexander skarsgard theodore pellerin mel rodriguez beth ditto and ted levine. I'm becoming a god and central florida premiers on sunday august twenty fifth at ten pm with new episodes every sunday only on showtime. Okay another another question about originality when you're watching a movie just as an audience member as a fan as someone who's looking to enjoy a movie. How much does the originality of that movie matter to you and how much you'll enjoy it <hes> ooh. I'm trying to think like pick apart that question because i feel like if i walk out the movie feeling feeling like i didn't dig that because it wasn't original it wasn't it was just copying other movies. What that really means is. The movie didn't have an impact on me. It didn't work work on its own terms so it's not so much that i object to it taking from other movies. It's that it did so in a way that that did not impact me that did not satisfy me right at the end right and i think with that in and would you take that essential winning the chess game move out <hes> the thing that you're left staring at is just stuffy recognized mother film so it's a very easy criticism to make got it but i don't think there's ever been example. I can't point to any movie where <hes> where i loved it or had likened the thrilling experience at the ends and i walked on saint god that was great but it was just a bunch of over and over if you i loved it doesn't then it's brilliant that they took stuff from other in may that we're in right so <hes>. What about the members of that. Have you ever have you ever. We're seeing a movie and been like. I've never seen anything like that before. I'm not even sure if i liked it but yeah. It's really original yeah absolutely yeah yeah yeah and would you say say that adds to your enjoyment or not necessarily it. I mean i don't know again if it's all about the emotional impact for me. It's all about how you feel. When you you know at the end of the movie ended up you know <hes> whether whether it hits you in the gut and if it does then and it's done something thing that i've never seen before. I don't know like those are kind of like sorry to bother. You is a great example still have to see that oh my god yes you do. I'm so behind him. I know sorry to bother is a great example of something where i mean. I can draw parallels l._l._c. like for me. I draw a parallel to brazil until i you know costa rica's movies. You know movies that kinda go whole hog but but sorry to bother you did not feel l. Exactly like any of those other movies me like saying oh my experience of it was similar to these but coming out of it the fact that a it totally worked for me as a movie and completely by just totally satisfied me by the ends and the fact that it was unlike anything i've ever seen before that combination is something really powerful right right and something i really respect when the movie pulls that off yeah <hes> yeah there's there's nothing quite like the impact of that i mean and <hes> i guess under the skin weird way. Also it's a very different type but even though it has sci fi elements. It's got meaning to watch. I don't have the same excuse hang on the rest of the afternoon. Maybe not under the skin in front of the kids. Yeah yeah it it. Even though it's got familiar elements of the way the movie was actually you know played out on the screen was something that i had to adjust to. It was something that i didn't know how to parse while i was watching it the first time <hes> but it had such an emotional impact on me i ended up going back to it over and over and kind of learning how to watch this movie you know right <hes> and that's extraordinarily when the movie can do that yeah. It's something that i think is probably beyond my skill set and that's maybe why i admire it so much because y i love it so much. It's like wow no idea. That's like a magic trick to me. I don't know how that's done and you don't feel driven to try to do that. <hes> i don't no i don't feel like know weirdly. I don't know why even though even though the way i express it sounds like that should be the ultimate creative artistic goal role for me. The most satisfying thing in terms of the actual act of creation doesn't lie there i i also i feel like i would probably get myself into a finger anger trap if i started thinking in terms of how though i think if something that's never been done like. I don't think that's a good road to anywhere. I know it's not for me that just late leads to a spiral of <hes> beating yourself up and not really getting to anything the matters and i don't think that's how those movies were developed. I think that was the starting point. You know pro- yeah probably not. I think that's the thing i think ultimately this is. This is the ultimate thing. I think it <hes>. This is the ultimate the only thing i'm never going to pay off ultimately. I feel like everyone who makes anything makes what they make. Those are really dumb but what i mean by that is i think the reason that you know under the skin is the so it is not because jonathan glazer sat down and said i'm gonna do something no one seen before what he did was he had a book that he took inspiration from me at something he cared the by. Somebody wanted to express an in his voice. He expressed that same thing with boots riley with sorry to bother you. What you're seeing is his natural voice of how the story came amount that he cared about that he wanted to tell and i think that's the only thing any of us can do. I feel like it <hes> in other words. It's not like they reached for a bigger artistic ambition than i'm reaching for and got it. It's that we're both kind of doing the same thing which is creating stuff that in the way that we can create stuff and maybe this sounds like limiting and bad but i do feel like there's there's a way that people make the stuff that they make you know that old thing. After a filmmaker makes a movie they break it apart and make the next movie. Uh those you know what i mean. He's making the same thing in. I really really. There's something encouraging about that because once you don't have to worry about how can i do something. That's never been done before. If you go off what you're saying that everyone is going to make what they're going to make exactly then you can also take comfort in knowing that everyone is is unique because every single person is a unique individual person with their unique life under percent and i feel yeah the kind of the one of the extreme examples the value look at wes anderson's movies who is one of my favorite filmmakers working. Today i think he's a genius and all of his movies just devastate me and i remember when he was making his films films after like two or three films a point where in the press all these stories started getting rid end of only gonna make another wes anderson movie again. You know what i mean like they recognize his style like his voice and talked about as if there was something he had to break out of and because he's a he's a real artist he didn't you know it's a damn pay attention attention to that stuff he kept doing his thing and making as many as movies got richer and more beautiful and i feel like he's at the top of his game now and just making these masterpieces. They're just emotionally devastating works of incredible art and they're still in his voice there anderson yeah. It's not like he's doing but you make is very you know all of us. I think embracing that as part of your power as opposed to something something that is a limiting factor is is something that's really important <hes> to to make good stuff. I think so i i wonder if like so the the person who harassed this question. Alexandra is her name. I wonder if she's you know alexandra calming off-key if she saying like yeah but no one wants to see a movie that's alexandra coleman off-key e they it wasn't that what are you talking about and i'll see ya. I know you got to or maybe they don't you gotta make it and then they'll you know and i mean it's not that's the thing and i feel like the notion of and that's the other thing we have to draw a really clear distinction from with this as i feel like the insidious notion of a brand has taken so much hold of our unconsciousness at this point 'cause what she's talking about right there is my brand isn't established in so why would anyone want to see and my thing and that's not what we're talking. I'm not talking about that that you establish your your thing your brand and so it has you know <hes> and so it has a following on social and so it's now a franchise no oh i i mean in in in. I think you have to first of all you. It's a process of you discovering what your thing is. You put out there and also once you put out there. I'll bet there's people who are gonna love it. You know it was. It's great and it's so yeah. I think you have to make a really clear distinction there. While i'm talking about is not developing a style that is then you're stamp or whatever i think if you're thinking about about it in those terms put all these words into poor alexandra's mouth right now. I'm sure she's not thinking but <hes> she's like a <hes> yeah but <hes> i feel like thinking about it in those terms is equally at trap in we'll because it sounds to me like what you're saying is what you're drawn to you. Both from the creator side as well as from the fan audience member side is is not the particular brand or style or we're gonna or box. It's someone honestly expressing themselves. That's what all wills down to chill out. If you're thinking about <hes> whether you're being original or not you're thinking about the wrong thing. She'll out until the truth. Tells us dismantle something that you care about until it in a way that excites you and if you're doing that it'll be original in a way away and unoriginal ah okay. I think we answered that question. I i. I have an idea to wrap up these episodes <hes> since it's all based on a question from someone out there on the internet to ask one more question. That's weird ready to answer. The weird courses terrified. We it's not that we're now so i i liked it. <hes> okay this comes from stephen ricketts from rochester new york. His question is is serial soup. Why or why not <hes> this is the hardest question we've answered all originality easy cereal soup this kind of like they is a hotdog a sandwich question. Oh that's.

alexandra coleman wes anderson florida ted levine Garbo kirsten jonathan glazer brazil stephen ricketts costa rica rochester new york twenty fifth
"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"joseph" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Hello everybody so welcome to the creative processing podcast my name's Joseph Gordon Levitt. I'm I'm really excited to be doing this. I've always wanted to start a podcast and now I've finally am. I have headphones on talking walking into this microphone. This is like shit they use on M._p._R.. Feel I feel important and sophisticated. <hes> thought I'd start out with the thought <hes> I once had the very fortunate opportunity to work with the after Daniel day-lewis on the movie Lincoln he was playing Abraham Lincoln outlining his son and Daniels extremely dreamily lovely and warm and respectful and.

Joseph Gordon Levitt Abraham Lincoln Daniel day-lewis Daniels