17 Burst results for "Joseph Ellis"

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:35 min | 3 months ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"W. CBM Baltimore range taking over the mid week forecast as a front sweeps in from the west or what can I. fifty degrees increasing rain chances for the late night and Wednesday quarter inch plus totals tomorrow looks like fifty high tomorrow fifty three Thursday with the previous day the week with some sunshine at sixty six and then another blast of cold coming in with the front on Friday rain showers high sixty degrees colder for the weekend find out more and more the weather channel on talk radio six eighty W. CBM the W. C. B. M. studios are brought to you by safe retirement solutions call rob burrow we four one zero two six six eleven twenty save for retirement solutions dot com hi this is state every Saturday morning from eight to ten AM the show was called you oughta know expert information on the repair of vehicles flea market and your phone calls the most powerful names and talk you want to know talk radio six eighty WCBS am the following program has been pre recorded no broadcasting both from the files of the hidden somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again made contact without a leader the end hello America I'm mark live in our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one before we jump in and we're gonna jump in full ma'am both feeder ready when the title story about something that happened on this date how may fifth seventeen eighty seven is written by Joseph Ellis at the American heritage great historian how may five seventeen eighty seven James Madison arrived in Philadelphia it's important remember this because your liberties are being destroyed particularly by iron fisted blue state megalomania X. he was a diminutive young Virginian about five feet three inches tall hundred thirty pounds in thirty six years old who it so happened had thought more deeply about the political problems posed by the current government under the orders of confederation than any other American.

W. C. B. M. studios Joseph Ellis James Madison Philadelphia Baltimore
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WTVN

"Tonight just cold and damp out there the low down to forty degrees on Wednesday showers in the morning but once we get into the afternoon some of those clouds will break up and you see some sunshine fifty five for the high but the breeze will make it feel chillier then on Thursday some sunshine little breezy and slightly warmer highs sixty three degrees I'm A. B. C. six first morning chief meteorologist Marshall my peak on your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN no broadcasting from the underground command post from the files of the heaven somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again make contact without a leader the end mark Livin our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one before we jump in and we're gonna jump in old man both feeder ready when the title story that's something that happened on this date how may fifth seventeen eighty seven is written by Joseph Ellis at the American heritage great historian how may five seventeen eighty seven James Madison arrived in Philadelphia it's important remember this because your liberties are being destroyed particularly by iron fisted blue state megalomania X. he was a diminutive young Virginian about five feet three inches tall hundred thirty pounds in thirty six years old it so happened had thought more deeply about the political problems posed by the current government under the orders of confederation than any other American Madison.

chief meteorologist Joseph Ellis James Madison Philadelphia Madison Marshall
"joseph ellis" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on KNSS

"And Starbucks shares also advanced after the coffee chain said it will re open eighty five percent of its U. S. stores by the end of the week in New York I'm Laurin seminary fox news mostly sunny and breezy today we will be in the mid seventies for the highest strong northwest winds gusts up to thirty miles per hour it's going to be clear tonight Tarlow forty eight and a chilly start to the morning on Wednesday sunny and not as windy with a high seventy one rain chances increase early on Thursday our high sixty five I'm K. and SS meteorologist Dan Holliday it's mostly sunny seventy five with a news update from ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty K. and SS I'm Dan o'neill stay tuned for mark live in your first choice for news ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty K. and as **** no broadcasting live from the underground command post the files of a hidden somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we've once again made contact without a leader the end hello America I'm mark live in our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one before we jump in and we're gonna jump in old man both feeder ready when the title story about something that happened on this date how may fifth seventeen eighty seven is written by Joseph Ellis at the American heritage great historian how may five seventeen eighty seven James Madison arrived in Philadelphia it's important remember this because your liberties are being destroyed particularly by iron fisted blue state megalomania X. he was a diminutive young Virginian about five feet three inches tall hundred thirty pounds in thirty six years old it so happened had thought more deeply about the political problems posed by the current government under the orders of confederation than any other American Madison.

New York Dan Holliday Joseph Ellis James Madison Philadelphia Madison Starbucks Laurin seminary Dan o'neill
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WRVA

"Brad meltzer. Welcome. To the Glenn Beck program. Brad is number one New York Times bestseller. The inner circle the book of faith nine other bestselling thrillers including tenth just to the first council the millionaires the president shadow. In addition to fiction is one of the only authors ever to have books on the best seller list for nonfiction advice children's books and comic books. I think I'm the only one on that list with you except for comic books. You beat me with comic books. They have the love for it. So that counts. Yeah. I know you don't like didn't until my son sheriff you can give your kid that first hero. Yeah. And it's an and I think in the nineties it felt like we didn't need that hero. Oh, I think that's that's what happens is in all times. If you look historically at the time of the great depression. The heroes that we look to were heroes that were Tarzan and flash Gordon with the most popular as we were designed to take us. Elsewhere. We wanted to escape and depression and World War Two starts encroaching on our shores. And we get scared as a country don't even know how to fight we're scare we need someone to come. Save us and superman gets invented sells a million copies and nine eleven. Same thing happened. We were once gonna country America. We were scared worry that someone's coming after us and the first movie that broke through the public consciousness was Spiderman. And right now, even a decade later fifteen years later, we're still a country. That's were starving for heroes. There's no politics about it. Whatever side you're on. We are looking for here on an all times throughout history. It's not just there's a need fair. That's why they're created to. And so I actually this is as you know, my my nerds study up. It's no coincidence. Why we look to whether it's Neil Armstrong or mister Rogers this year, even George Washington where once again, a culture that starving for humility for modesty. Those all of those three have something in common is a reason why people are looking to them. Again, we have a need you've written a new book called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. You read enough history to know, for instance, Edison was not a he was a bad guy. Did some good things, but also did some bad things, and you can look at people, and you can pretty much find that with almost all of them and people say, oh, I don't believe in any of these heroes. And these people were actually really good because a lot of times the history is wrong and only tells one side, but you can find it. If you look sure I cannot find the dark side of George Washington. Yeah. No, the George Washington lives up to the hype. And I always say people will right one of the few. I mean every time I do one of the kids books. Everyone always writes me. Well, this one did this and this one did that and this one had an affair. And I said, listen, I'm just. Telling you right now, if you're looking for perfection and people the only person that's perfect perfect has God. So there's your standard, and I feel like George Washington sets that standard for us at a different level. Which is why the thought of a secret plot to kill him. Begs the craziest question of all is what happens to us. If it worked. So tell me we don't exist for I agree it, tell me about the plot. Because I I mean, I've written a book on George Washington. I love church watch. I've studied him not really familiar with this. This is a I found this story Glenn in nearly a decade ago in a footnote or all the great secrets always wind up. And I was like a secret plot to kill George Washington. Is this real is this fake as nonsense? What is it? And I was so struck by there wasn't seventeen seventy six just to be clear. Let's talk about it up from a plot to kill Washington. Some set of kidnap him some sitting kill him either way he dies because back then if you kidding. Nap someone at the lower level. We trade you back to the British. But in his levels, you got hanged, and they caught that guy. Yeah. Very quickly. And so they round them up, George Washington gets Windham. But they round them up. They build a gallows. They take one of the main co-conspirators, they hang them in front of twenty thousand people the largest public execution at that point in North American history. George Washington brings the hammer down is like do not mess with me. I'm George Washington. I'm gonna be on the money one day. That's a that's an actual historical. But but the, but what I couldn't shake why don't I know the story, and it's two reasons one I went to Pulitzer prize winning author Joseph Ellis. And I said to me, you know, this story because I never heard the story you wrote a biography on him. And he said to me this is a story about George Washington spies. That's why it's secret. That's why you don't know what he said you can find the exact number of slaves. Mount Vernon that George Washington owned. You'll never find all his spies is by its nature. Brad what you're searching for will forever. Be allusive. And the other reason why you don't know it is because of when the hanging took place June twenty eighth seventeen seventy six now guess what else is going on in the world on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six year a week away from the declaration of independence being signed June. Twenty eighth is when the first draft one of the first drafts has handed him. Correct. The British are literally coming and with headlines like that when you're studying that period this. It just becomes a footnote so his his secret. And you make this point in the book his? His spies really go on to inspire us. And we don't know anything about them or very little, but they go on to inspire even the CIA. Yeah. No. That's my one of my favorite parts is we thought we were investigating the secret plot to kill George Washington. But what we realized is we found something far bigger. Which was we found out that George Washington. One of the first things he did is he created his own secret committee and the secret committee was called because we have a secret committee. You've got to give it a name. So it was originally called the committee on intestine enemies. That's terrible name. And then they settled on the far better name the committee on conspiracies and the committee on conspiracies as you saw in the book is run eventually by John J it comes eventually at the end of the war the first supreme court Justice. But what John J does is researching this plot is he slowly, you know, they go in the middle of the night. They're pulling people out of the houses are interrogated them. There shake him down for information. What they're really doing is. They're building America's first. I counter intelligence agency. And you ask any historian say you say, you know, what's the precursor to the CIA and people say, oh, the OS S, and that's a formal one. But the real precursor to it all is this moment in seventeen seventy six in the plot to kill Washington. Because that's where it all starts, and they're using civilians, just like the CIT, they using civilians, not always military. People gathering intelligence was this was this uncommon though. I mean, we're kings doing that for but we weren't George Washington. We started he wanted to good offense wanted a good military. And he knew we needed a good offense. But what he learned in this period of time right at the end. This is seventy seventy five seventy seventy six at the start of it. We always think of the end, we think, George Washington two point. Oh as war goes on. But in the beginning is where he realizes the weight. I know I don't need a great offense. Need a great defense. People coming out as we need information to see what's coming that. We're not gonna see on a battlefield that. There is a whole other battle being fought. It's this moment that inspires his later building. The culprit. Is later expanding the committee on conspiracies, in fact, right now in Langley Virginia at TI headquarters to this day, there is a room dedicated to John Jay where they call the founding father of counter intelligence, it all starts here in this moment. And I so I I love and you see these parts of things that I and again you and I've talked about this off line and on our plenty of times. But there were so many parts, I didn't know George Washington had his own private bodyguards. Never. I'm like, how did I not know this and what he had done is. He asked all of his top regiments. He said emir four best men, and he narrowed it down he wanted what they call drilled men and drilled men were the best of the best. They were just they were actually even a certain height, a build a certain moral character, the kind of person you really want on your side you can trust George Washington personally narrows it down to about fifty people and these become what they call the generals guard, a call them the commanders Garbutt the name, that's. Sticks are the lifeguards because one of their jobs as guardian George Washington's life. It's also mainly where we come from. That's where is that where we get lifeguard. I don't know if that's the official term. I haven't tr- trust me. I thought and I gotta look it up. But that I do think it may be where the term comes from about. It comes from lifeguards. They guarded is money. They got his papers. They his life. These the ones they went home with them. These were the original secret service. But these the men who turn on him at four the men on the lifeguards accept bribes and want money, and basically decide we're going to go to the other side, you know, when you have Alexander Hamilton, you can you kind of can see why he turns you, you don't you don't necessarily agree with them. But you can see. Oh, man. What a stupid mistake that was stupid human error. Right. Yeah. Just a series of human errors where we're he turns. Yup. What is is it Washington's error? No, it's not, you know, it's not a it's not a Benedict Arnold where I feel slighted and I'm gonna do run into garnered agreement. Benedict arnold. Has this? He you see all the slights. And so, you know, it's ego and hubris and all the other things that go along with any great fall with this one. It's not that at all. It's nothing personal. You know? And I think it's you know, we in America's, you know, we take our heroes. We dip them in granite, we build statues of them, and we do them at this service because they're not human anymore. They become these lower case g gods, and which is horrible. And we're worshiping the wrong thing we do that. And these people anyone you look up to as as, you know, I've talked many times, whether it's George Washington, Rosa Parks, or Dr king had a moment any hero. You've ever loved had a moment where they were scared, and they were terrified they didn't think they could go on. And they keep going forward. They choose to go forward. And and what happens in this moment. We also do what the revolution. As you know, is we tell the story that we all gathered around democracy, we held hands. We March forward as one and we beat the greatest fighting force the British that the world had ever seen it at the time. And again, it's a great story. It's not the real story. It was so much more complex. We weren't. You know, we think we're divided. Now, we were so divided back. Then that there were nearly in New York City in seventeen seven. Thirty six there were nearly as many loyalists on the British side as there were on the patriots out on the American side. And it was the same Monaro military our military, you had all these different regimens. So one of my favorite scenes in the book. Is you have the Massachusetts regiment is meeting the Virginia regiment for the first time. It's in Harvard yard, George Washington is there, and you know, these guys from Massachusetts they look at the uniform of the of the Virginians they have some fairly thing on the uniform. You know, we don't have one uniform that we're fighting showing up and work shirts and shoes. So they're not unified a fight breaks out and George Washington comes racing him and grabs two of them by the neck, and he's shaking them basically, saying stop fighting with each other. We're on the same team. And when you have an if ever there were a metaphor for where we are today there it is. But to me what you have back. Then is you have allegiances always shifting because here's the one thing that happens is it's not a sure thing that we're going to win in those early days the war. In those early battles. We're getting crushed. And in those moments, the one thing that's true them and is true. Now is no one wants to be on the losing team. And so you have the governor of New York at the time a guy named William Tryon who basically is Maddie's lost his job as the British governor is appointed by the British. He basically starts bribing people and seeing who who can you turn. And when you have as you know, when when it looks like America's not going to do. Well, you may not pull it out. You got no gun powder. You got no shoes. Guess what they go. You know, what I might take that money to switch. And and the plot was exactly that they're big gram slam..

George Washington Washington Brad meltzer America Glenn Beck CIA New York Times Benedict Arnold depression president Gordon Pulitzer prize Neil Armstrong Edison Joseph Ellis Mount Vernon John J
"joseph ellis" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on KTOK

"To the Glenn Beck program. Brad is number one New York Times bestseller. The inner circle the book of fate nine other bestselling thrillers including tenth just to the first council the millionaires the president's shadow. In addition to fiction, he is one of the only authors ever to have books on the bestseller list for nonfiction advice children's books and comic books. I think I'm the only one on that list with you except for comic books. You beat me with comic books. They have the love for it. So that counts. Yeah. Yeah. I know you don't like didn't until my son sheriff as you can give your kid that first hero. Yeah. And it's and I think in the nineties it felt like we didn't need that hero. Oh, I think that's that's what happens is in all times. If you look historically at the time of the great depression. The heroes that we look to were heroes that were Tarzan and flash Gordon when the most popular as they were designed to take us elsewhere we wanted to escape grading depression. And then World War Two starts encroaching on our shores. And we get scared as a country. They don't even know how to wish scare we need someone to come. Save us and superman gets invented sells a million copies and nine eleven. Same thing happened we were gonna country America. We were scared worried that someone's coming after us, and the first movie that broke through the public consciousness was Spiderman and right now even a decade later fifteen years later, we're still a country. That's were starving for heroes. There's no politics about it. Whatever side you're on. We are looking for here on an all times throughout history. It's not just there's a need for her. That's why they're created to. And so I actually this is as you know, my my nerd study up. And I think it's it's no coincidence. Why we look to whether it's Neil Armstrong or mister Rogers this year, even George Washington where once again, a culture that starving? For humility for modesty. Those all of those three have something in common is a reason why people are looking to them. Again, we have a need you've written a new book called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. You read enough history to know, for instance, Edison was not a he was a bad guy. Did some good things, but also did some bad things, and you can look at people, and you can pretty much find that with almost all of them. And people say, I don't believe in any of these heroes. And these people were, you know, actually, really good because a lot of times the history is wrong and only tells one side, but you can find it. If you look sure I cannot find the dark side of George Washington. Yeah. No, the George Washington lives up to the hype. And I always say people will always right. One of the. I mean every time I do one of the kids books. Everyone always writes me. Well, this one did this and this one did that and this one had an affair. And I said, listen, I'm just telling you right now, if you're looking for perfection and people the only person that's perfect perfect has God. So there's your standard, and I feel like George Washington sets that standard for us at a different level. Which is why the thought of a secret plot to kill him. Begs the craziest question of all is what happens to us. If it worked. So tell me we don't exist for we're I agree it, tell me. About the plot. Because I I mean, I've written a book on George Washington. I'd love church watch. I've studied him not really familiar with this. Yeah. This is a I found this story Glenn in nearly a decade ago in a footnote or all the great secrets always. And I was like a secret plot to kill George Washington. Is this real is this fake nonsense? What is it? And I was so struck by there wasn't seventeen seventy six just to be clear. Let's talk about it from a plot to kill Washington. Some set of kidnap him some sitting him either way he dies because back then if you kidnap someone at the lower level, we would trade you back to the British. But at his levels, you got hanged, and they caught that guy. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Very quickly. And so they round them up. George Washington gets wind of it. They round them up. They build a gallows. They take one of the main co-conspirators? They hang them in front of twenty thousand people the largest public execution at that point in North American history. George Washington brings the hammered down is like do not mess with me. I'm George Washington. Gonna be on the money one day. That's actual historical. But but the, but what I couldn't shake why don't I know the story, and there's two reasons one I went to pure surprise winning author Joseph Ellis. And I said some, you know, this story because I never heard the story you wrote the biography on them. And he said to me this is a story about George Washington spies. That's why it's secret. That's why you don't know what he said you can find the exact number of slaves in mount Vernon that George Washington owned. You'll never find all his spies. He some bias nature. Brad. What you're searching for will forever. Be elusive and the other prison. Why you don't know it is because of when hanging took place June twenty eighth seventeen seventy six now guess what else is going on in the world on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six year a week away from the declaration of independence being signed June. Twenty eighth is when the first draft one of the first drafts has handed him. Correct. The British are literally coming and with headlights like that. When you're studying that period this game. Riskier, it just becomes a footnote. So his his secret. And you make this point in the book, his his spies, really go on to inspire us. And we don't know anything about them or very little, but they go on to inspire even the CIA. Yeah. No. That's my one of my favorite parts is we we thought we were investigating the secret plot to kill George Washington. But what we realized is we found something far bigger. Which was we found out that George Washington. One of the first things he did is created his own secret committee and the secret committee was called because we have a secret committee. You've gotta give it a cool name. So it was originally called the committee on intestine enemies. That's a terrible name. And then they settled on the far better name the committee on conspiracies and the committee on conspiracies as you saw in the book is run eventually by John Jay becomes eventually at the end of the war, the first supreme court Justice. But what John J does is researching this plot is he slowly, you know, they go in the middle of the night there. Pulling people out of the houses are interrogated them getting shake him down for information. What they're really doing is. They're building America's first counterintelligence agency. And you ask any historian day. You say, you know, what's the precursor to the CIA and people say, oh, the OS s and that's a former one, but the real precursor to it all is this moment in seventeen seventy six in the plot to kill Washington. Because that's where it all starts, and they're using civilians, just like the CIT they used civilians, not always military. People gathering intelligence was this was this uncommon though. I mean, we're kings doing that for but we weren't George Washington. We started he wanted to good offense wanted a good military. And he knew we needed a good offense. But what he learned in this period of time right at the end. This is seventy seventy five seventeen seventy six at the start of it. We always think of the end we think George Washington to point -o as the war goes on. But in the beginning, this is where he realizes the weight. I don't need a great offense. I need a great defense. There are people coming out as we need information to see what's coming. That we're not gonna see on a battlefield that. There's a whole other battle being fought. It's this moment that inspires his later in the culprit his later expanding the committee on conspiracies, in fact, right now in Langley Virginia at TI headquarters to this day. There was a room dedicated to John Jay who they call the founding father of intelligence, it all starts here in this moment. And I so I I love and you see these parts of things that I and again you and I've talked about this offline and on our plenty of times. But there were so many parts, I didn't know George Washington had his own private bodyguards. Never. I'm like, how did I not know this and what he had done is. He asked all of his top regiments. He said emir four best men, and he narrowed it down he wanted what they call drilled men and drilled them in with the best of the best. They were just they were actually even a certain height, a build a certain moral character, the kind of person you really want on your side you can trust George Washington personally narrows it down to. About fifty people and these become what they call the generals guard. They call them the commanders Garbutt the name that sticks are the lifeguards because one of their jobs as guardian George Washington's life. It's also amazingly where we watch come from. That's where is that where we get lifeguard. I don't know if that's the official term. I haven't tr- trust me. I thought and I gotta look it up. But that I honestly do think it may be where the term comes from about eight comes from the lifeguards. They guarded his money. They got his papers. And they started his life. These are the ones that went home with them. These were the original secret service. But these the men who turn on him at four the men on the lifeguards accept bribes and want money, and basically decide we're going to go to the other side when you have Alexander Hamilton, you can you kind of can see why he turns you don't you don't necessarily agree with them. But you can see. Oh, man. What a stupid mistake that was what a stupid human error, right? Yeah. She's just a series of human errors where where he turns. What is is it Washington's error? No, it's not, you know, it's not a it's not a Benedict Arnold where I feel slighted and I'm gonna run into Garnett. Oh my God. Benedict arnold. Has this heat? You see all the slights? And so, you know, it's ego and hubris and all the other things that go along with any great fall with this one. It's not that at all. It's nothing personal. I think it's you know, we in America's, you know, we take our heroes. We dip them in granite, we build statues of them, and we do a disservice. I guess they're not human anymore. They become these lower case g gods, and which is horrible. And we're worshiping the wrong thing we do that. And these people anyone you look up to us as you know, I've talked many times, whether it's George Washington or Rosa Parks, or Dr king had a moment any hero. You've ever loved had a moment where they were scared, and they were terrified they didn't think they could go on. And they keep going forward. They choose to go forward. And and what happens in this moment, where we also do what the revolution, as you know, is we tell the story that we all gathered around democracy, we held hands. We March forward as one and we beat the greatest fighting force the British that the world had ever seen at the time. And again, it's a great story. It's not the real story was so much more complex. We weren't. You know, we think we're divided. Now, we were so divided back. Then that there were nearly in New York City in seventeen seven. Thirty six there were nearly as many loyalists on the British side as there were on the patriots out on the American side. And it was the same Monaro military our military, you had all these different regimens. So one of my favorite scenes in the book..

George Washington Washington Glenn Beck CIA Brad New York Times John Jay America president Gordon Joseph Ellis New York City Neil Armstrong Edison mount Vernon Benedict Arnold
"joseph ellis" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"When the light blue fuse, which you can see in my heart rate lowering so good, I also on my apple watch and or a ring both in airplane mode. My best. -tations always had the least variation in heart rate when I wasn't focused to jump around. What here's a night of sleep on the tenth night my resting heart rate was consistently below forty is as veep. Vip Asana is not for everyone. But many of this resonates with you and even the slightest I'd encourage you to give it a try. So the reason that I bring this up is because this is what Silicon Valley is in the end. It's a bunch of self aggrandizing radical leftist jerks who spend their days pretending to like meditation. So they can virtue signal to all their friends while banning people who disagree with them politically. That's what Silicon Valley has become and we're supposed to take these people seriously our moral arbiter. But that's exactly what they do. There are moral arbiter is now because they can mobilize the mob or they can be mobilized by the mob to go after people on a regular basis. It's a stonning it's astonishing. So before you think social media has the capacity to control decency. Recognized that the people who run social media are Gavin Belsen. They're not in fact saints. Okay. Meanwhile, I have to talk about a couple of stories that are just insane. You know, maybe we'll save those stories for Morrow should say the. Stories from our probably okay. So we'll do things I like, and then we'll do a couple of things that I hate. Okay. So things that I like today. There's a great book that I've been reading over the weekend called Americans Iowa by Joseph Ellis, the founders Joseph says winner of the Pulitzer prize. I and this book is basically about controversial issues from the founders perspective and from our own. So he he looks at issues like race. What did the founders think on racial issues? What were they wrong? Where were they right? When they were talking about the constitution was that supposed to be a document that enshrined racism or one that fought it. It's it's deep and useful book people who who pretend that the founders were not deep thinkers on a variety of issues, but really just protecting their own sort of property and interests ought to read this book, and a lot more history on the fact is that the founders were in fact, deep thinkers with Turner ideas. And even if they were men bound by the time, they were also people who are thinking beyond the balance of their time. And it's our job to determine what in their thought was turtle, and what was bound by the limitations of the time in which they live. Okay. Other things that I like, so this was just patacula. If I if you did not see the Miami Dolphins new. England Patriots game last night. I'm gonna show you the last seven seconds of this game. Because it was one of the best things I've ever seen an NFL football. Just amazing here is the Miami. Dolphins who are down to their last place. Seven seconds left first and ten from their own thirty yard line. And here's what happens. Sitting. Through this..

Miami Dolphins apple Joseph Ellis Miami Pulitzer prize Gavin Belsen Iowa Morrow NFL England Patriots Turner football Seven seconds seven seconds thirty yard
"joseph ellis" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"But my fourth best of the night nineteen thousand retweets later, I learned some things like this. It's official. You're an idiot Joseph Ellis or this, dude. Are you really that stupid? Exactly. What state did you receive your basic education in or Carlos who writes, it's oblivious civics was not your best study obliviously? Are you seriously moronic enough? Not to understand these vote totals. Bad math is a funny thing or you're just a liar. I could read you hundreds more thousands actually now I didn't get what the kids call ratio 'cause one point nine thousand people responded with a comment, but forty thousand people like the tweet I do have to say some of those who liked the tweet might have liked it for the wrong reason. Because a lot of people wrote the word gerrymandering damn gerrymandering. Look how the Senate goes has nothing to do with gerrymandering. You can't gerrymander estate. The word is Mel apportionment. And I was noting that the popular vote reflects that the desires of more people in America are to put Democrats in the Senate. And yet the Senate is comprised of many more Republicans. I understand I really do understand civics. I understand the rules. Just like I understand the first downs are touchdowns back. Then you didn't question my understanding. But now it's like, I don't understand how the Senate works. Okay. I got a lot of people a lot of commenters who are keen to tell me that I was wrong. And we're really intent on telling me how wrong I was turns out they were wrong in why got it wrong. Mark Willard asks are you seriously moronic enough not to understand these vote totals? These are vote totals of the elections held yesterday. The large majority of which. Oh, we're democratic incumbents. Tom Evans, writes, astonishing that ninety percent of the respondents to this tweet are missing the fundamental math problems here. Dem's won over two thirds of Senate races yesterday because they were defending more seats this cycle. And Dax hustling writes, most of the seats up for reelection were democratic seats. So no shit. The democratic vote was way higher actually. Yes shit. I'll give you a couple of counter points. Most of the seats up in the house of representatives were Republican weren't they you remember that it was Tuesday and more of them lost. So Dem's got more votes because the people who came out to vote voted for more Democrats in twenty sixteen there were twenty four Republican seats up and ten democratic seats. So according to Dax hustling, no shit. Republicans would get more turns out Democrats got eleven million more votes than Republicans even though Republicans were defending seats they held. I don't know why would be that defending seats. That people would fall into this trap. Maybe because they were thinking if Democrats control the seats, it's at least one data point to show that these were seats that Democrats wanted to vote for, but it's just it's as often untrue as it is true, or I should say, my basic point about let us see what the people would like in their Senate is at least an interesting thing to think about in schooling me on civics. A lot of people like to make the point. Hey, dummy, we're not a democracy where Republic or obviously, your dumb and don't even know how the system works. We are not a democracy and not a socialist country. So move out and get over it. Okay. Here's what Republic means Republic means we use representatives. We could use them democratically. We could use them to define one person as one vote we could use them proportionally. This is what Alexsandr Hamilton wanted. He wanted to Senate. He wanted the Senate to be smaller than the house and have longer terms in the house, and you had to be older to get elected and. Wanted to the Senate to sort of be more important, but he never wanted to send it to be for portion. We understand. There was a Connecticut compromise. That's how it got passed but Republic explaining that. We're Republic not a democracy does not get to the idea that the Senate is an undemocratic institution. And yes, I know it wasn't supposed to be which gets to the next slew of points idiot..

Senate Dax Dem Joseph Ellis Alexsandr Hamilton official Carlos Connecticut Mark Willard America Tom Evans ninety percent
"joseph ellis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

12:13 min | 1 year ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"He's the author of many wonderful books, including founding brothers. The revolutionary generation which you will recall when the Pulitzer Americans thinks the character of Thomas Jefferson, which won the national book award to the distress of students at mount holyoke kids retired is the Ford Foundation. Professor remains prolific in his brand new book American dialogue, the founders and us is as wonderful as the previous professor Alice creek, heavy on the Hugh Hewitt Show. Hewitt. Thanks so much for having me. Now, we haven't talked before. So you won't now. I've been you're a historian who writes about the constitution and its framers. I'm a law, professor, reach historians. And so this is just it for me. It's Christmas candy. And I want you to expand on teaching con law for twenty two years, and I always begin in seventeen eighty seven. Even at the Annapolis convention beforehand, but most Conlon textbook begin at eighteen o three. And that's really not the right way to go about it. Is it professor Alice? No, no. You mean they begin with Mark Davis? Judicial review. Yeah. Of course, not in fact, even beginning at eighty seven you need to understand what's happening in the early eighties. Seventeen eighty that is as to why we we are forced to do that to have a constitutional convention the first sentence and the greatest speech in American history is historically incorrect when Lincoln said four years ago our fathers brought forth misconduct. A new nation. They didn't they bought the confederation of sovereign states. Provisionally United to win the war. And then go their separate ways, which is what they proceeded to do. And so the creation of a nation a nation sized Republic was not initially what they thought they were doing, and and they they didn't do that in eighty seven and and create in that document a unified nation that's different from consideration. Well, let me tell you what my gray. Great joy is finally in condensed place. I have sometimes assigned to sign Lynn change book on James, Madison. But it's very long given the amount of reading a con law class has to do your chapter on James, Madison. And what he did a beginning with the eulogy never have. I seen so much mine in so little matter by Richmond. It is a very concise. I mean beautifully structured introduction to little Jimmy. And the fact that it was the Madison moment would you expand on what the Madison moment was especially that he wrote Washington's letter to congress and Congress's spots and what he says writing to himself by the end by the. Yeah. By the end, he's the most one of the more famous guys in America, the beginning. He's as you call it a little Jimmy Madison junior. Nobody quite knows from Virginia. Madison moment is the late seventeen eighty s roughly seventeen eighty six eighty seven when Madison makes his most dramatic contribution and creative contribution to American history. Actually, carry it onto eighty nine when he writes, the Bill of rights and it during that time I follow him to try to. Show you his thought process and how he comes to terms with the movement from a series of sovereign states to something more United and why he thinks necessary and the ships that occur in his thinking along the way begins as a devoted Virginian and becomes diverted American, and and then adjusts himself to the shifting political situations before the convention and during the convention, and after the convention, so that when judges now are attempting to divine, the original intent of the framers Madison's and interesting guy, the look at because he keeps changing and and Madison has a way of thinking that looks inconsistent on occasion because he switches positions on the issue. The crucial issue was the states are sovereign or the the the people are sovereign and how. How you structure a government that will reflect either one of those? But because he's like he sees it as a seesaw and once once the see-saw moves up to high he jumps on the other side to bring it down. And he's looking for balance and from some kind of he's he's a political thinker. If God were in the details Madison would be there to meet him upon arrival. I love that line. Yeah. That was great line. I'm talking with Joseph palaces brand new book is American dialogue. It's in bookstores everywhere, I will tweet out the Lincoln. I've already tweeted out this morning, please go to his website to also get the book, the website is Joseph Ellis dot Joseph Ellis, historian dot com. Now professor you use Jefferson to discuss race in America. Today, you use John Adams to discuss income inequality, and it's gone to massive concentrations of all you talk about George Washington as a means of discussing your views of foreign policy today. What I most liked because I teach con LA don't agree about originalism, I'm an originalist. But I like the way you laid it out what Madison went through. But I'd like to get to the thing that I think is most important eight thousand people ratified this document. I never tried to turn the founders intent I try and discern what those state delegates thought they were voting for. And that is useful federalist papers in the NFL papers. And it's a vast amount of thanks. So you're you really knock Heller pretty hard. So I went back and read Jessica Leah's decisions. I'm still persuaded by it's clear that he's right. Have you gotten into it with say Randy Barnett at Georgetown, yet talk about originalism? And how it plays out in an American dialogue. I talked to him. Yeah. In fact, I he wanted me to come into his class there. And what? Yeah. Yeah. And I talked to a Ginsburg originalist sort of moderate this. There's a spectrum of opinion within the originalist -sition and most federalists most people in the federalist society are originalists and the extreme originalists. So the ones that tend to get nominated for the supreme court and. Cavenaugh and such or such creatures. I guess what I'm saying is that. And this will you won't stop such creatures. I think they're wonderful man in extraordinary jurist do too. But, but when you say in this political environment, I like to humanize rather than dehumanized. You agree with me on that? I don't mean. I mean, I don't mean to dehumanize him at all. They're just very very firm originalists they are. Tech committed textualist to the document as it was understood at the time of the framing, right? But where will disagree is that I think that the Heller decision which I picked because the hell decision is two thousand eight it's the one on the second amendment as you well know and the Scalia called that his masterpiece. Yes. And therefore, it's the clearest articulation of originalism in a supreme court decision thus far. Yes. And and so when I look at it and look at the actual behavior and thinking of Madison in the spring of seventeen eighty nine when he's writing the second amendment and the debate in both the house and then in the Senate, and then the debate in the eleven states that ratified what's going on. There has nothing to do. With owning a gun. It has to do with whether or not the defense of the Republic will be in the hands of state militias were a federal army and great fear of the federal army as a standing army. Not just a fear of what the British army representatives. That's primary even of the continental army. You're absolutely right. That is the Justice Stevens descent, and I think American dialogue accepts and expands on your way that he did not. That might persuade people are undecided on the other hand. I persuaded by the general understanding in the states at that time considering firearms and frontier defense that even beyond the militia people, of course, had the right to carry weapons and the Stewart discussion it said, but what I wanted to get to what I really liked about American dialogue. And I want everyone on my team the originalist team to go and get is you explain how James Madison came to bitterly at first and then. Resigned himself to and then maybe even applaud equal representation in the Senate as the necessary means of getting to where he wanted to get which was dual sovereign. He didn't want to get the dual sovereignty. He wanted more. He's more Tony in than most people now, and you lay it out. There was no doubt in anyone's mind at the end that the states would forever have equal representation in the upper body. Correct. Yes, though, he regretted it. I mean, but he knew that it was absolutely essential. If the constitutional I to pass, and then be ratified because it was a gesture towards a state sovereignty, and that the the makeup of the convention, and then the makeup, the ratification conventions was filled with people who were very dubious about any federal government that created a consolidated power structure that was the recreation of the British leviathan they thought they were escaping from. And so if he had made that compromise it would've never passed. And he was as I was saying earlier committed to making those kinds of compromise decisions. And he later said, you know, that was the only thing to do. But when he first left the convention in September seventeen eighty seven and he wrote to Jefferson he said we failed. Because the Senate issue that you're describing is still gives the states a stronger. A subset of thirty and power than we thought we could allow and that that will be a problem for us, and it requires unanimous consent of the states to amend that provision. And therefore, I don't think it ever will be. I have one suggestion. I agree with the big decision. They made was the nineteen thirteen to make the Senate elected not by the state legislatures but both by the people at large, and he would have supported that too. But there does come to be a problem, Hugh. I mean, the sense that let's say north and South Dakota have four representatives with total population that's less than half the size of Los Angeles. But if you look at Rhode Island versus Virginia at the framing that sort of disparity in Vermont even worse than Vermont had the greatest disparity with Virginia at the that's true. Although Rhode Island didn't count as it didn't show up. But Vermont did let let me give you a suggestion that hold you over to the break. If I can't professor at the suggestion is I always use Irwin Shimransky. Now. Committed man of the left has a great con LA book. I would love for him to include your James Madison chapter from American dialogue in his book. Because it is. It is exactly what happened. I've been trying to communicate that the law students for twenty two years. Exactly how hard it was the the miracle. Philadelphia. Is it a miracle? It's the work of a political genius. Thirty seconds to them. We'll go to the break, right? Professor Joseph Alice's, my guest will be right back with him American dialogue, wonderful book recommended highly. When we come back. We'll talk about why you gotta read history anyway. But I if that time of the day, I can tell you about relief factor. I wish I could credit relieffactor with my coming back from laryngitis. But that's not really true. That's the z pack, but I take it any day. I don't feel bad walking up and down the stairs to get my hot, tea and get over this. Pittsburgh. Plague that I've got but. Down goes the relief factor. Nineteen dollars ninety five cents. I'm gonna spend a little extra time telling you about it today. Because in the last hour, I've got Mike Pompeo by keeping an extra minute. I'm gonna keep an extra minute somebody who's two minutes right now.

James Madison Professor Jimmy Madison Senate Madison Thomas Jefferson Professor Joseph Alice Hugh Hewitt Virginia America national book award Heller George Washington Annapolis Ford Foundation Joseph Ellis continental army British army
"joseph ellis" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Do you buy into that? Yeah. Now, listen, let let's be very clear one when we went, I am. You'll I'm sure when our book came out, I immediately got a call from the screenwriter of that movie because you said, I say what you're doing and I really liked pretty sure what you're doing. You really have the spirit of Neil Armstrong here and I asked him about it. I was like, I know one seen the movie, huge controversy. No one scene and I said, is in there. He's absolutely in there like make no mistake it's in there is like, and, but I will also say that there is no question that Neil Armstrong planting flag being on that moon is a profoundly American. Achievement? It is why I chose to write this book about this amazing American. It was a rates, right? It wasn't right the human endeavor. It was a race against the Russians and America one. That's why we have to. You have to feature that you have to talk about that. That's what the space race was by definition. What I will say though is I do trust the alarm, strong sons, and I think what got lost as you know, all these kind of controversies. They, you know, boil up on Twitter and on social media, and then we have to kind of stop and say, okay, what's the real truth here? Or is it just people who are designed trying to make me mad because when people get mad and the only ones that winner the people in power, right, that's win. Whatever side you rooting for. That's who wins when we fight. And when you looked at this Neil Armstrong sons, we're like, we're the consultants on the movie. We like what the stands, where we love how it was done and I have to have faith in his family that they know exactly what they're doing. But make no mistake. This is an American achievement. We're talking with the author, Brad Meltzer of. Of the children's book. I am Neil Armstrong and it's such a great series for kids of the entire IM series, Brad, we, we've loved him for many years now that you've been writing these. Now I understand in January, you have a book about the murder plot against George Washington. Can you give us a little teaser about that? Crazy people know me from decoded where we used to on the history channel. And I said, this is book is like an episode of the coded, but in a book format. And what happened was I was looking for this story. I was reading this. I just love it in history about George Washington Glennon. I talk about that. You and I talk about it and I found in the footnotes, a secret plot, real one. This is true kill George, Washington, and I was like, is this true? The real? Is this internet met? What is this? I've never heard of digging into, right. No, I'd never heard of it and I've read, you know how many books on George Washington. It's always enjoyed mentioned for like a sensor to or para reference to, and then they just go past it. And I went to Joseph Ellis who at one of the great George Washington biographies, and I said, is this story true? And he said, listen, you gotta look into it. He's like, I know the story, but I've no no one's ever written a modern book on it. There's no book on it, and I looked at started looking into it. Here's the story is George Washington the of the revolutionary war. This is all. Taking place. I'll tell you when you tell me what else is happening that day. And there's a plot by George Washington's own men as inner circle of of the heroes that are taking care almost like his private secret service to turn on him and some set of kidnap from something, killing the results, the same. They're gonna kill him either way. But what George Washington finds out about it. He rounds up one of the people responsible. He builds the Gallo. He hangs the man in front of twenty thousand people, the largest public execution at that point in North American history, Pap. And while reason, nobody, he brings the hammer down. He's like, do not mess with me..

George Washington Neil Armstrong George Washington Glennon Joseph Ellis George Brad Meltzer Twitter America murder Gallo
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Four years thomas jefferson's home has symbolized america's aspirations and its original sin like walker and lucian they are deeply and permanently entangled they are all descendants of monticello if you want to understand this country and its people and what it means to be optimistic and complex and tragic and wrong and courageous you need to go to monticello vets the illustration and artists myra hellman her book and the pursuit of happiness is a very personal look at american democracy she chronicles president obama's inauguration walks the halls of congress and visits monticello visiting places visiting sites is the strongest way to relate to history going to mount vernon all of these homes i mean you miss that ben franklin doesn't have a home and it's felt the loss of that is felt because you need the center of gravity of somebody's life and then you can input all of your feelings and and questions about somebody's life in their home philosopher astronomer musician legislator after visiting monticello a contemporary of jefferson's listed some of the great man's occupations and he also remarked that he quote had placed his mind as he has done his house on an elevated situation from which he might contemplate the universe jefferson is not like ordinary people that are dead white males pulitzer prize winning historian joseph ellis wrote american sphinx abaya graffiti of jefferson ordinary americans have opinions about jefferson furnace repairman told me as he saw my books of jefferson on my desk you better know that jefferson is an evangelical christian and a little old lady in richmond told me that i was all wrong about jefferson and she knew i was wrong because he came and spoke to her in her bedroom the night before jefferson's body teams to come to life for people they still think he's with us in some sense and going to monaco is a way of communing with that spirit.

america walker obama congress ben franklin monticello jefferson pulitzer prize joseph ellis thomas jefferson myra hellman president mount vernon richmond monaco Four years
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Eight i think it's a much more nuanced and enriched experience today than it was thirty years ago but that's the way it ought to be i mean things of all amazing really they didn't say slavery no that was not very long ago the early nineteen eighties have our perceptions of the founding fathers changed so much that we can now accept them slaves and all i took my question to one of today's most important american commentators monticello was built and operated mainly by slaves ugly word slaves slave stephen colbert the nice thing that the founders have is status do you know what i mean and so so few things have status to us anymore everything can be torn down but they're stuck like like a fly in amber the constitution being the great amber of their status so they're always good for a laugh because i've through his undercut the statue like quality of them of course the big get for any interviewer would be our third president thomas jefferson who just happens to be the subject of the second part in our continuing series better founder one of our greatest presidents our greatest founding father is also the one we've got the goods on in terms of being a jerk in the declaration of independence jefferson declared almanzan alienable rights to life liberty and the pursuit of sally hemmings sweet apple cheek booty i don't think there's anything sort of sacred about his relationship with sally hemmings it still seems like an an abusive power relationship especially when he talk so much about power relationships in what he wrote about whether the power of the state to the church or one state to another state government over man thing about selma hemmings as well is that she was his late wife's half sister what yes oh so it runs in the family has his his wife's father also also had sex with a sleigh wow that's very interesting well that's almost a sweet story then there you go you really really opened my eyes to how a master having sex with the slave really can be a very lovely story it's much more complicated thank you think i think most of the scholarly community now regards it as pretty much of a clear thing again jefferson biographer joseph ellis what kind of relationship jefferson had with hemmings was it love was lost was it rape impossible to know that people that want to write about that are going to have to write fiction right sarah sally a year of our lord seventeen hundred and seventy three and there has been a lot of fiction including the inevitable made for tv movie i was blown to slavery destined to scandal if you think about it jefferson argued that one of the reasons that he couldn't for your slaves was that once freed the blacks would intermarry with.

president thomas jefferson selma hemmings rape stephen colbert founder sally hemmings joseph ellis sarah sally thirty years
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Biographer joseph ellis it's an eccentric house it's designed to look the way he wants it look in a way that at times is not very functional the staircase is to the top tiny the really it's very difficult to get up and down this these are this is this is it there's one on the other two feet wide and it's a very very stairmaster operation so shall we jefferson had thing about stairs he didn't want some grand now we present mister jefferson kind of staircase in his house he thought they were a waste of space go you're very conscious of climbing yes it's very climbing the stairway up to the top of the house is so narrow that it's not normally open to visitors but of course exceptions are made dan jordan and his wife liu ran monticello for many years and they took president's embassador 's mick jagger yes we're so fond of those memories of mick jagger of course he is a epic abilities stare he started up the steps i've been up these steps with hundreds of people used to only person ever seen without holding onto the banister touching the wall he absolutely blew up the steps so we couldn't have been more impressed by i don't blame you also and engaging and no hard feelings on her british american basis either we certainly won't bring it up yeah.

dan jordan liu president mick jagger joseph ellis mister jefferson two feet
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Four years thomas jefferson's home has symbolized america's aspirations and its original sins like walker and lucian they are deeply and permanently entangled they are all descendants of monticello if you want to understand this country and its people and what it means to be optimistic and complex and tragic and wrong and courageous you need to go to monticello versus the illustrator and artist meyrick helmet her book and the pursuit of happiness is a very personal look at american democracy she chronicles president obama's inauguration walks the halls of congress and visits monticello visiting places visiting sites is the strongest way to relate to history going to mount vernon all of these homes i mean you miss that ben franklin doesn't have a home and it's felt the loss of that is felt because you need the center of gravity of somebody's life and then you can input all of your feelings and and questions about somebody's life in their home philosopher astronomer musician legislator after visiting monticello a contemporary of jefferson's listed some of the great man's occupations and he also remarked that he quote had placed his mind as he has done his house on an elevated situation from which he might contemplate the universe jefferson is not like ordinary people that are dead white males pulitzer prize winning historian joseph ellis wrote american sphinx abaya griffey of jefferson ordinary americans have opinions about jefferson furnished repairman told me as he saw my books of jefferson on my desk you better not jefferson is an evangelical christian and a little old radian richmond told me that i was all wrong about jefferson and she knew i was wrong because he came and spoke to her and her bedroom the night before jefferson's body kingston come to life for people they still think he's with us in some sense and going to monaco is way of communing with that spirit.

america walker obama congress ben franklin monticello jefferson pulitzer prize joseph ellis thomas jefferson president mount vernon Four years
"joseph ellis" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"America's aspirations and its original sins like walker lucien they are deeply and permanently entangled they are all descendants of monticello if you want to understand this country and its people and what it means to be optimistic and complex and tragic and wrong and courageous you need to go to monticello verse the illustrator and artist myrick hellman her book and the pursuit of happiness is a very personal look at american democracy she chronicles president obama's inauguration walks the halls of congress and visits monticello visiting places visiting sites is the strongest way to relate to history going to mount vernon all of these homes i mean you miss that ben franklin doesn't have a home and it's felt the loss of that is felt because you need the center of gravity of somebody's life and then you can input all of your feelings and and questions about somebody's life in their home philosopher astronomer musician legislator after visiting monticello a contemporary gary of jefferson's listed some of the great man's occupations and he also remarked that he quote had placed his mind as he has done his house on an elevated situation from which he might contemplate the universe jefferson is not like ordinary people that are dead white males pulitzer prize winning historian joseph ellis wrote americans finks abaya griffey of jefferson ordinary americans have opinions about jefferson my furnished repairman told me as he saw my books of jefferson on my desk you better know that jefferson is an evangelical christian and a little old radian richmond told me that i was all wrong about josephson and she knew i was wrong because he came and spoke to her and her bedroom the night before jefferson's body teams to come to life for people they still think he's with us in some sense and going to monaco is a way of communing with that spirit.

America myrick hellman obama congress ben franklin monticello jefferson pulitzer prize joseph ellis abaya griffey president mount vernon josephson monaco
"joseph ellis" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on KGO 810

"It may impact even our grandchildren but that said you know i mean i'm still waiting for trump to your i could actually pick out one thing that trump is set and if he can actually find a way to pay forward rebuilding our infrastructure huge will absolutely you know i mean that's how roosevelt got the country going again you know we said we're gonna create with the what was it the wpa the work project administration was added roosevelt thing yeah hanks and i'm doing this for memory but so i just were members is a kid not really care much about it until after nine eleven i had a renewed interest and into who we are and i think a lot of people did all these big selling books walter isaacson wrote the his his his benjamin franklin joseph ellis won the pulitzer prize ripple called founding brothers which is amazing it starts out with a aaron burr hamilton tool oh and it's it's a short book and i i really highly recommend it founding brothers has a really good read and it's told in such a way that it's it's like a story i mean it's not just like a history you know you say you talk about this and how people are like their eyes are on back in their head in a right now but that it all out of the history is still affecting us james madison the second amendment what's going on in florida i mean you can go back and look at madison madison and jefferson hated hamilton right in hamilton was a federalist he wanted a strong fit in a strong central government those guys didn't they were all about their guns in so hamilton when did the militia thing couldn't have been thinking about bumps stocks in arv teens negative but i think he really was concerned about the federal government coming out into the the places of virginia or or kentucky or the carolinas georgia wherever and telling people were going to take your goncz like and that's why not giving them the ability to protect themselves like my friend of the joke about he said the that southerners always say the civil war one far over slavery was far over economics yeah you don't want to pay the hell but it's a.

hanks florida madison madison jefferson hamilton georgia roosevelt walter isaacson benjamin franklin joseph ellis pulitzer prize aaron burr james madison virginia kentucky
"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A letter that madison wrote to thomas jefferson he's like come on fine he's very disappointed he thinks the documents going to fail and the country's going to fail he doesn't think this is going to last but then joe says in his writings you start to see a shift each start to think differently he starts to say oh yeah we dissect this this could work precisely because it's unclear and we found what he calls a middle station where everyone can see what they wanna see bring people come out of the convention go back to their stage the guy in south carolina says don't worry about slavery the ten commandments gonna tell us that they can't do that the guy in pennsylvania and says it's just a matter of time before we enslave the constitution become successful because the people don't agree on what it means that coinage was madison's epiphany the constitution is on the set of answers it's a framework for argument to us is a document which allows us to continue to discuss and debate the core issues that we face the powers of the presidency the sovereignty question the real resolution of the sovereignty question is never is never achieved and um and it it eventually leads to the civil war what i find kennedy but this is it like that argument that happens in modern politics all the time about states writer the size the government by which can feel like a random argument for me it times suddenly to know this by joe saying it's not random and all this is an argument that was actually literally written in to our founding document in some sense we as a country are the product of that argument kush not everybody agrees with joseph ellis there are people who who think that the founding fathers had a very specific thing in mind and if you just go back to their debates and to what they said to each other that you can find the real only deep logic for the constitution should be deputy the fact that they disagree with joe in some sense isn't that kind of make chose point collecting his document of ten different ways if these ruin all always argues always it just pick up the thread amine after the civil war the argument changes it gets centered bought the union is still an experiment and the jostling between.

madison thomas jefferson joe south carolina pennsylvania civil war kennedy joseph ellis writer
"joseph ellis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"joseph ellis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That manson wrote to thomas jefferson he's like come on on he's very disappointed he thinks the documents going to fail and the country's going to fail he doesn't think this is going to last but then joe says in his writings you start to see a shift each start to think differently he starts to say oh yeah way to say this this could work precisely because it's unclear and we found what he calls a middle station where everyone can see what they wanna see being people come out of conveyed go back to their stage the guy in south carolina says don't worry about slavery the tenth amendment going to tell us that they can't do that the guy in pennsylvania and says it's just a matter of time before we enslave the constitution become successful because the people don't agree on what it means that according to joe was madison's epiphany the constitution is on the set of answers it's a framework for argument this is a document which allows us to continue to discuss and debate the core issues that we face the powers of the presidency the sovereignty question the real resolution of the sovereignty question is never is never achieved and um and civil war who i find kind of need but this is it like that argument that happens in modern politics about states writer decides the government which can feel like a random argument for me at times suddenly to know this by joe saying it's not random and all this is an argument that was actually literally written in to our founding document some sense we as a country are the product of that argument kush not everybody agrees with joseph ellis there are people who who the founding fathers had a very specific thing in mind and if you just go back to their debates and to what they said to each other that you can find the real name only deoggyun picked for the constitution predict the fact that they disagree with joe in some sense isn't that kind of paul's point namely document of ten different ways for everyone all always argues always in have just to pick up the threat of mean after the civil war the argument changes it gets centered bought the union is still an experiment and the jostling between.

manson thomas jefferson joe south carolina pennsylvania civil war writer joseph ellis paul madison