8 Burst results for "Joseph Deangelo"

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:32 min | 5 months ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

"His new book is unmasked. My life solving America's cold cases. Paul holtz, welcome to fresh air. Thank you for having me. You know, I think we should begin by just telling our listeners that we are going to be talking about some horrific crimes on the show today. And while we won't be giving graphic descriptions of crimes or crime, scenes, we will be talking about cases that involve murders and sexual assaults, so it may not be appropriate for all listeners. Paula want to start with a scene that's kind of at the end of the story of this quest for the Golden State killer. And this is at a point when you and other investigators have identified the guy you think is going to be him, a 72 year old guy named Joe Deangelo. You're nearing retirement from government service. And you do an unusual thing you take a visit to his house when he has so far had had no contact with investigators. Tell us why you went, what happened? Well, after 24 years of pursuing this Golden State killer, utilizing new technology, this genetic genealogy technology about a week prior I had been made aware that this Joseph Deangelo was possibly related to the Golden State killer, and after investigating him for a week, and realizing I was going to be retiring the following week, I decided he was a prime suspect, and every time I had a prime suspect in this case, I have to go see you. Where are they living? What are they driving? What is the neighborhood they're living in like? And so on a Monday, I drove up to Citrus Heights, California, which is in the Sacramento area, and parked in front of his house. His car was in the driveway. I knew he was home. But I have been here with prime suspects before, was he really the guy. And so I started debating. Well, I'm retiring tomorrow, actually just hurting my badge and gun in the next day. I'm not sure he really is the Golden State killer, so I started to debate. Should I just go knock on this guy's door? He's a former law enforcement officer. Maybe I can establish a bond saying, hey, you're a former cop. You understand how this goes. I'm looking into an old case. Chuckle chuckle, and let's just get this over with, give me a sample of DNA and you'll never be contacted by an investigator on this case again. If you're not the guy, but as I sat there, I realized the various aspects

Paul holtz Joe Deangelo Joseph Deangelo Paula America Citrus Heights Sacramento California
"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:01 min | 6 months ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Who is this guy? Where was he located at in terms of his residence? Where is he purchasing firearms? And eventually there is an article, a newspaper article found where he had been fired from auburn PD for shoplifting, dog repellent and a hammer. And he had been fired by this chief of auburn, this Nick willock. So I end up talking to Nick. And Nick, during that conversation, he doesn't know I'm looking at the east area rapist slash Golden State killer case. He talks about when Deangelo was on admin leave during the termination process, Nick's a home, sleep in his bed, and his daughter comes into his room and says, dad, there's a man standing outside my bedroom window shining a flashlight into it. And nicks as Paul, I knew that was Deangelo. I jumped up, I ran outside, I saw shoe impressions all around the perimeter of the back of my house, but I knew that was Joe. And that's when the hairs on the back of my neck stood up because I go, that's exactly what the Golden State killer was doing. And it was really, that was really the turning point where I'm going, okay, this Joseph Deangelo, in addition to other aspects about him, that right there is where we need to get this guy's DNA and see if he is the Golden State killer. Right, he's 72 years old living, I guess, married in a middle class community in the Sacramento county. And eventually, you know, you get a people managed to grab some, I guess a tissue from his trash and get a solid confirmation that it's him and a crew goes out arrests him without incident. And although at this point, by the time the arrest happened, you were no longer in government service, right? You'd retired? I had retired. In fact, when he was under surveillance, I was out in Colorado with my wife shopping for a house, and then I'm getting updates about the surveillance, and then

Nick Nick willock Deangelo auburn Joseph Deangelo nicks admin Paul Joe Sacramento county Colorado
"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Of fictional crime scene investigators over the years, applying science, experience in moxie, to track down bad guys from clues they leave behind. Our guest today, Paul holtz, is the real thing. He spent a career investigating crimes in California, specializing in cold cases. He played a critical role in identifying one of the most notorious serial predators in American history. The so called Golden State killer, who is admitted to committing 13 murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s. In a new book holds rights about that case and others and about the day to today work of examining gruesome crime scenes analyzing evidence and speaking to survivors of horrific crimes and relatives of those who didn't survive. He also writes about the emotional toll the work takes. He's experienced nightmares, panic attacks, and marital issues and says he's used plenty of bourbon to self Medicaid. Since retiring from government work in 2018, he's continued to assist investigators and families as a private citizen. And he's become a celebrated figure in the true crime world. He has appeared in the TV series America most wanted and the DNA of murder with Paul holes, and he co hosted a podcast called the murder squad. This fall he'll be co hosting a new podcast with Kate Winkler Dawson about historic crimes its titled buried bones. His new book is unmasked. My life solving America's cold cases. Paul holtz, welcome to fresh air. Thank you for having me. You know, I think we should begin by just telling our listeners that we are going to be talking about some horrific crimes on the show today, and while we won't be giving graphic descriptions of crimes or crime scenes, we will be talking about cases that involve murders and sexual assaults, so it may not be appropriate for all listeners. Paula want to start with a scene that's kind of at the end of the story of this quest for the Golden State killer. And this is at a point when you and other investigators have identified the guy you think is going to be him, a 72 year old guy named Joe Deangelo. You're nearing retirement from government service. And you do an unusual thing you take a visit to his house when he has so far had had no contact with investigators. Tell us why you went, what happened? Well, after 24 years of pursuing this Golden State killer, utilizing new technology, this genetic genealogy technology about a week prior I had been made aware that this Joseph Deangelo was possibly related to the Golden State killer, and after investigating him for a week, and realizing I was going to be retiring the following week, I decided he was a prime suspect, and every time I had a prime suspect in this case, I have to go see where are they living? What are they driving? What is the neighborhood they're living in like? And so on a Monday, I drove up to Citrus Heights, California, which is in the Sacramento area, and parked in front of his house. His car was in the driveway, I knew he was home. But I've been here with prime suspects before, was he really the guy.

Paul holtz Paul holes Kate Winkler Dawson Joe Deangelo America California Joseph Deangelo Paula Citrus Heights Sacramento
"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

05:57 min | 10 months ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

"I'm Alexis linklater. And I'm Billy Jensen. When detective Jim sharf snapped the cops on William Talbot, he knew that genetic genealogy could be a revolution in law enforcement. But he didn't anticipate what it would fully reveal. Just one month earlier, Golden State killer Joseph Deangelo had been identified using genetic genealogy. One month after talbott, it would be Raymond roe. Two of those three offenders had no serious criminal history. I started noticing that a lot of these other people that were being arrested by the use of genetic genealogy are people that only did it once or there's only DNA left at one crime scene. I'm thinking what kind of a person are we dealing with here? Our investigation of the row and Talbot cases in the previous episodes exposed an undeniable implication. Profiles can only be so useful in hunting down someone who has never killed before and then never kills again. In this final episode, we're asking the question, what is the future of profiling in light of genetic genealogy? And how can it possibly plan for this type of killer? Paul holes, who spearheaded the investigation of the Golden State killer, recognized the problem facing profilers when he heard the details of Raymond roe killing Christy marac. If I were to take a look at the crime scene, this looks like a predator, likely committed, you know, priors and possibly committed more afterwards, the characteristics are there. Therefore, this is likely a serial offender. Did profiling just not account for this species of killer. The previous models are a little bit problematic from a behavioral analysis standpoint. Now, you have the one offs who commit a similar enough crime that can fool those of us that have worked serial cases. There hasn't been a really good comprehensive study to figure out, well, what is going on with these offenders? These are professional investigators with decades of experience under their belts. And they're realizing how easily they can be fooled. Why? Because they've been taught to rely on the model that profiles have been selling for decades. When the FBI started its behavioral analysis unit in the 1970s, the focus was on serial killers. These were the headline grabbers, the real-life monsters that captured America's fear and fascination. People like Ted Bundy, Charles Manson and Dennis Rader, the BTK killer, are perfect examples. Law enforcement would call them lust murderers or something to that effect. They started to study these lust murderers, the serial offenders. There was this idea that serial killings had this sort of addictive quality. What are your thoughts on that? It became apparent that many of them had a very act of fantasy life about the violence. Prior to them ever committing the crimes. And that they would continue to fantasize, even after they had committed the crimes. So profilers in the early days felt that this fantasy was so core to the person. That that would be such an addiction to them, that they would continue to do that until they could no longer do that. You hear the phrase that serial killers never stop, and so if a series stopped, it's assumed that while they went into custody. They became disabled. They've died. The addiction theory, by definition, would not pertain to a one and done killer. But that type of offender was not being studied, or even really acknowledged. If the person wasn't caught quickly, they just weren't caught. And those crimes were then assumed to be part of a serial killer spree, yet to be identified. But even with all the attention being given to serial killers, how accurate were the conclusions..

Raymond roe Alexis linklater Billy Jensen Jim sharf William Talbot Joseph Deangelo Paul holes Christy marac talbott Talbot Dennis Rader Ted Bundy Charles Manson FBI America
"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

07:21 min | 10 months ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

"Episode who embraced genetic genealogy to help solve the 1987 murders of Tanya van kuhnen Borg in Jay cook. In Jed match was a major part of that breakthrough. Jed match was the hub that first made genetic genealogy a widely accessible tool. By allowing users to upload their DNA profile from different ancestry sites into one common database. People could make far more connections than ever before. Paul holes, the investigator who spearheaded the capture of the Golden State killer, and it was also my partner on Jensen and holes, the murder squad, was always impressed with how easy the process is. Jet match is at the Tower of Babel for genealogy. You have these different genealogy testing companies like ancestry dot com, 23andMe, my heritage, family tree DNA. And they have their own proprietary DNA testing that they do. That can't be searched. If I get tested and ancestry dot com, I can not directly search 23andMe. What jet match allows a search across multiple genealogy testing laboratories. Walk me through the process of uploading a sample. Like how long does it take and how expensive was it? This profile, even though it's huge, is a simple text file. So the process of uploading this DNA profile is the same as if you were to upload a photograph into a social media account. It's that easy. To upload into jet match, it was free. You know, and that's one of the amazing things about the website is it was a free service to anybody who wanted to use it. Even better, the testing itself was superior to traditional forensic DNA databases that could only identify very close kin. Like a parent or sibling. Genetic genealogy is based on a completely different type of DNA testing than what we have done traditionally within crime laboratories. They generate a DNA profile that looks at single points. Hundreds of thousands of single points across all the chromosomes within a person's DNA sample. And the more points that an individual shares with another person within a database, the more closely related they are. Initially, genetic genealogy was used to help adoptees connect with their biological parents. But that application soon presented a chance to help law enforcement solve a decades old mystery. What were the uses of genetic genealogy for law enforcement prior to using it to catch killers? The first case that I'm aware of was related to identifying a little girl by the name that we knew as Lisa Jensen. And this was a girl that was abandoned in 1986 down in Santa Cruz, California by an individual who professed to be Larry vanner. Larry vanner, who would later be connected to multiple other aliases, had been raising Lisa Jensen as a single dad when he abandoned her with a couple in a trailer park, and fled when she was just 5 years old. 17 years later, in 2003, he would be convicted of murdering his girlfriend on soon June. It was later confirmed that he wasn't Lisa's biological father. So who then was Lisa Jensen? And where did she come from? Vanner never revealed the truth, and he died in prison in 2010. It would not be until the rise of ancestry technology in the early 2010s that authorities would find an answer with the help of Jed match. Doctor Barbara Rae Venter ended up doing this triangulation method. To identify Lisa Jensen as Don boden, who was a missing girl out of New Hampshire. And that ultimately kind of spiraled into a huge case and huge connections with the bear brook murders, as well as who Larry van or was. Larry vanner was identified eventually as Terry Rasmussen. And he was connected to multiple murders of women and children. It was also confirmed that he had disappeared with Lisa and her mom when Lisa was only 5 months old. To date, her mom has not yet been found. That part of the mystery is yet to be solved. But genetic technology had proven its usefulness in connection with criminal cases. It had rebuilt the biological history of a child who had been abducted and abandoned by a serial killer. Paul holes wanted to know if doctor Barbara ray Venter could use it to find a serial killer who was still on the loose. I reached out and asked, could this tool be used to identify an unknown offender? And she basically said, I see no reason why I couldn't. So Golden State killer was the first time to identify an unknown offender. And the dam broke for law enforcement to utilize the genetic genealogy tool in these unsolved cases. It was like dominoes. Some of the most horrific cases out there start getting solved, utilizing this tool. The identification of Joseph Deangelo as the Golden State killer. Set off a gold rush of investigators hoping to solve other cold cases with this new technique. And it paid immediate dividends. Starting in the spring of 2018 and using Jed match, authorities closed more than 40 cases in the first year alone. And they were barely scratching the surface. Can you walk us through why there were so many solved right at the beginning? They were going after the low hanging fruit. They just focused on those cases that had close enough matches that they could work very quickly. Parabon ended up being in a prime position. To be able to utilize this tool because pair bond had generated this special type of DNA profile in order to do the phenotyping. You know, predict eye color predict hair color. So they reached out to agencies and said, we can do this. You don't even have to send us any more sample. We've already got the profile. We can just convert it and get it uploaded into Jed match. And so that's what they did as they just rapidly started working case after case, tons of cases got solved very, very quickly. Police expected to find the bulk of these crimes, connected to serial offenders that had yet to be identified. The reality was very different. How often was a serial killer presumed responsible for a case that had gone cold that was of a sexual homicide nature. You have a cluster of cases and the assumption is one person's committing all these cases. So when that person's caught and he's convicted of, let's say, one out of the 5 cases. Investigation into the other cases stops because they just assume that person was responsible. And it turns out, well, no. You don't DNA testing has shown. Actually, there is multiple predators at work in this particular area at that moment.

Lisa Jensen Larry vanner Jed Tanya van kuhnen Borg Jay cook Paul holes Vanner Lisa Barbara Rae Venter Don boden Larry van Terry Rasmussen Jensen Barbara ray Venter Joseph Deangelo Santa Cruz New Hampshire Parabon California Paul
"joseph deangelo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"joseph deangelo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Hosting the show all morning KFI news correspondent Laura Ingle, who was a fantastic reporter here at K F I, before she was hired away. By the Big corporation stole you. But it does mean you get to get into a broader array of stories. Than you ever could. At KFC. Just because you're now with a national news network show your following one of the most fascinating and chilling true crime stories going on, just Go tell us about it. Well, you know, a lot of people may have heard of this recently because of the amount of podcast movies books that are out there. The Long Island serial killer. Some call Lisk happened years ago. I mean, we're talking about over a decade of one bodies started to be found. And, um, we are taking a very deep dive. I was given the story. We started talking about some unsolved cases. And this is one of these great mysteries that has been going on out here in our jurisdiction. The Long Island serial killer, and we are doing a multi part investigation that's going to be streaming on our Fox Nation website. And also we're going to do a fox audio podcast. So if you've heard some of the other podcast before we have brand new content. We have been talking with victims families. We have been going to the scene. We have been talking to law enforcement, former law enforcement and we are going to be talking about new investigative tools. That are being used right now. To uncover this mystery of more than 10 people, many of them sex workers who were found on Long Island and, you know, weighing the really unfortunate thing about all these women were found along Ocean Parkway and as more and more bodies, uh, were discovered Unfortunately, a lot of people said Well, they were in a high risk job. They were just sex workers they were, you know, they advertised on Craigslist. But you know, these are people. Nobody wakes up one day and says I'm going to go be a sex worker. Um, these are women who were daughters, friends, aunts, sisters who came right into The cross hairs of what many believe to be one serial killer. There's been a lot of talk about is that one is it too, is that multiple? A lot of people do believe it is one person and a lot of people believe that this person is still out there and one of the things that we have been looking at. Is one of the center cases is the 24 year old Shannan Gilbert, who was discovered near Oak Beach not far from what has become known as the Gilgo four. These are four women who were found wrapped in burlap that were tossed into the bramble and that is like this really six thorny bushes off of the side of the highway. And at first glance, you think, well, gosh, how could so many bodies be? Discarded of in the same area around this same general time, and nobody has seen anything. But when you get out there at night, which we have what you is so desolate. There's no lights, and it's right in the backdrop of this community called Oak Beach, which is extremely private high end in some case, some of them are beach cottages. But I'll tell you what these people that live there have been very private. About anybody coming around and digging around and asking questions and talking to them about what some of the women that have been in that area that had been servicing John's or going out on calls, And then they went missing. Shan Gilbert is really the main one who was in Oak Beach. So we are taking a deep dive in this and you know one of the things when When I first got into this story, um, which is so complicated because there are so many victims and you really have to take each murder victim as it should be in an individual investigation, But they are all tied together because there's so many similarities they advertised on Craigslist. They met somebody, and then they disappeared. They weren't found right away. Then they were found in similar Ways in similar means. So one of the things when we started this, I said, you know, being from California from Sacramento. Specifically, I want to talk to the guy that solved the Golden State killer. I want to talk to the people that were involved in that because you remember when that was solved. And we heard that there was an arrest and we Oh, my God. You know, everybody remembers where they were. For many of us. That was the boogie amount of our childhood. And so I was able to go. I went to Colorado and I spoke to, um Paul holes who has since retired Cold case expert and spoke to him about what his thoughts are, and a lot of this revolves around You know, DNA technology, the ever changing ways that people are finding what we just talked about with 9 11 and how they're still working to identify some of those bodies. Um, so you know, one of the things that you got to think about, too, is just that. If this person is still alive and hasn't died, he's still out there. And, like Joseph DeAngelo, the Golden State killer, he's somebody's neighbor. He's somebody that might be working out right next to you in the gym. He's going to the grocery store. You probably might have a family. Um, and serial killers as we know, evolve, they change and some people over the years have said Well, this person was found and one person was found dismembered and there were body parts in different jurisdictions, and that's different than the way the the four girls were found. Women were found wrapped in burlap. But as some of our experts have told us Serial killers can evolve. They can mature, You know they grow up, so to speak, and they can change their methodology and, uh, just stop and go dormant for a while. So We're taking a deep look into this, and a lot of people will be hearing me talking about this. Now they say, Well, wait a minute wasn't at the cop, wasn't it? The doctor that lived in the neighborhood? There's been a lot of speculation that, um, the former police chief in Suffolk County, James Burke was involved. His name has been out there a lot. I've been trying to get him to talk to us. I spoke to his attorney just yesterday, again, asking for Him to speak with us. The the answer's No. As of right now, we're still working on that. Peter Hackett was a doctor that lived in this community who The the mother of Shannan, Gilbert says, You know, he called her after her daughter disappeared and said, Oh, I saw your daughter, Um, you know, I would just wanna let you know that she's okay. And then, of course, months later, she's found in. Everyone's like, Well, wait. Peter Hackett. You saw her and there's just there's It's a crazy crazy story. It's been something that we've been digging into for a long time. So I can't wait to share more of it with you one. We come to completion to this. Hunting the Long Island serial killer podcast and special that we're doing. We will be all over that when that comes out, Laura. Thank you. Now, are you ready to talk to Dean Sharp? Of course. Yeah, Let's go Kitchen. It's got about what to do in your kitchen. So your kitchen does not suck in your house. I need to send him a picture of mine. Go on, but first Oh, man, I'm sure you'll have a figure to to say first a news update from Jennifer Jones leads if I am 6 40 live everywhere on the I heart radio app. LAPD chief Morris says 13 people have been shot over the weekend, which he says is consistent with what he's been seeing over the last few weeks where the shooting violence is occurring. Five of those homicides are victims shot occurred in those four geographic areas of southwest Newton southeast and 77. Moore says. While major crimes and assaults are trending down, he's concerned about the recent spike in gun violence, he says..

Dean Sharp Joseph DeAngelo Laura Ingle Laura Peter Hackett Sacramento California Shan Gilbert Shannan Gilbert Suffolk County 13 people Oak Beach Jennifer Jones James Burke Five KFI Paul holes Ocean Parkway Moore LAPD
After decades in the shadows, Joseph DeAngelo confesses he is the Golden State Killer

John McGinness

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

After decades in the shadows, Joseph DeAngelo confesses he is the Golden State Killer

"The man known as the Golden State killer is pleading guilty in Sacramento Sacramento today today to to committing committing thirteen thirteen murders murders between between the the nineteen nineteen seventies seventies and and eighties eighties family family members members of of the the victims victims listened listened as as judge judge Michael Michael Bowman Bowman asked asked deangelo deangelo also also known known as as the the Golden State killer if he took responsibility this morning violation of penal code section one eighty seven Fresnaye murder in the first degree how do you plead the Joseph James deangelo was arrested in twenty eighteen at his home in citrus heights court officials took the unusual step of holding the trial at sac state university union ballroom to the large number of people attending the hearing to allow for social distancing

Sacramento Sacramento Michael Michael Bowman Bowman Deangelo Deangelo Murder Joseph James Deangelo Fresnaye Citrus Heights Sac State University Union
Escaping the Golden State Killer

Serial Killers

01:04 min | 3 years ago

Escaping the Golden State Killer

"The early morning of October. First Nineteen seventy nine. A terrified woman laid on the floor of her living room. Her heart beating out of her chest. Her hands were bound and her boyfriend was tied up in the bedroom. She could hear the masked robber rummaging through her kitchen. He said he was only there for money but his calm demeanor made her suspect he wanted something more. Something much worse. She feverishly wiggled her wrists trying with all her might to break the not until finally it broke her shot towards the kitchen. The robber stood eating food facing the other direction. She leapt to her feet and sprinted for the door. She burst into the open air screaming her lungs out attempting to wake the neighbors. She saw the lights flash on and the houses around her and turned her head to see the masked man fleeing in the other direction. She had done it. She had escaped from the Golden State