4 Burst results for "Joseph Brusuelas"

"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To have your long, everybody. It is kind of a choose your own adventure in this economy right now. What? You see what you predict? Kind of depends on what you choose to look at. Do you choose to look at the politics of this economy, Georgia and the run offs tomorrow Wednesday and the counting of electoral votes, phone calls and representative democracy? Uncertainty in a word. Do you choose to look at the pandemic in vaccines and how very, very slowly things seem to be going a problem? Because the virus is still in charge of this economy, or do you look at the nuts and bolts of what's going to be a long, slow slog to a full economic recovery, of which One of the toughest parts is going to be rebuilding the income of a whole lot of Americans come Friday. We're going to get the latest snapshot on average hourly earnings in this economy, and it is expected to show continued strong wage gains. But our guy on economic statistics Mitchell Harmon, he says, best to ignore that and focus instead. On the trouble yet to come. So a crazy thing happened on the way to the pandemic Recession after the economy shut down and 20 million people lost their jobs Workers. Average hourly earnings went up. Skyrocketed actually of 8% year over year, but what that was was noise, not signal. Joseph Brusuelas is chief economist at RS. I'm consulting Will be our guide through this thicket of wage data, And when he says, noise, not signal, he means fast. Rising wages have been a statistical anomaly of the pandemic economy. High paid professionals kept working from home and mostly held onto their paychecks. But millions of mostly low paid service workers lost their jobs when you've got 40% of households, making 40,000 or less seen a job loss or loss in wages That explains that had think if you will on wages 40 year old cinnamon Deutsch is an example of what Bruce Willis is talking about. She was teaching at a child care center in Ashtabula, Ohio. When it closed and she got laid off in March, Her $350 a week paycheck disappeared from the average hourly earnings calculation. But she got on unemployment, which included $600 a week in extra federal pandemic pay until she was hired back three months later. I made twice as much on unemployment with the extra $600 as I do now, but I am glad to be back to work. I mean, I like, you know, going to work. So, Like many Americans, judges income actually went up for a while because of additional unemployment benefits and relief checks. But those temporary effects are fading. And just a free swell US says we're in for a rude awakening. What I think we're going to see is in very by Frick Ated wage market this idea of a case shaped economy separation between the haves and the have nots. Bruce Willis says the haves those who work in what he calls the zoom economy will have it made goes with the upper end those who are already thriving. There's going to be competition for those workers in a premium placed on their wages. But for lower wage service workers even as theater Khanna me reopens and employers start staffing up again, those in the middle to the lower end of the market where the damage occurred. They're not going to see a lot of wage growth. That's due in part to supply and demand lots of unemployed workers looking for jobs, not enough job openings to give them leverage to demand higher pay. Then there's something economists call downward nominal wage rigidity. Firms during hard times tend not to reduce the wages of the employees that they keep on the books. But when the times get better Wage games or restrained That is pretty much what cinnamon joy Ches seeing in her job. She's back at work full time at her previous salary of $350 a week. The extra unemployment income she banked back in the spring has run out. My credit card is back up to, you know, almost maxed out trying to pay 5 10 bucks extra so that I can pay that down. Make enough money to pay my bills and have McDonald's once in a while, but I know that you know if my car breaks down or if I have an emergency, I'm just at a look. I have to borrow from somebody. Deutsche doesn't expect she'll get a raise until she hits 10 years of service in 2023. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, you might have heard it was an ugly session and it was But context we believe on this program is everything and even after the drop today Major indices or where they were. You know, two weeks ago, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. The latest report on consumer spending in this consumer driven economy comes out next week, and we will, of course, let you know what it says. But in the meanwhile How retailers looking from the other side of the sales counter our last checking with three small businesses we've been following this past holiday season. First up is Irene Kesselman. She runs a toy store in car, Bro, North Carolina. I'm just looked at December and we were down a little bit. Not as much as I thought we would be. And I think compared to other stores, I am I consider myself very fortunate. I think it could have been a lot worse. I think one of our saving grace is were our personal shopping.

Bruce Willis jobs Workers Mitchell Harmon Ashtabula US Irene Kesselman Georgia North Carolina representative Frick Ated Joseph Brusuelas Mitchell Hartman theater Khanna chief economist Ohio Deutsche McDonald
"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You along, everybody. It is kind of a choose your own adventure in this economy right now what? You see what you predict? Kind of depends on what you choose to look at. Do you choose to look at the politics of this economy, Georgia and the run offs tomorrow Wednesday and the counting of electoral votes, phone calls and representative democracy? Uncertainty in a word. Do you choose to look at the pandemic in vaccines and how very, very slowly things seem to be going a problem? Because the virus is still in charge of this economy, or do you look at the nuts and bolts of what's going to be a long, slow slog to a full economic recovery, of which One of the toughest parts is going to be rebuilding the income of a whole lot of Americans. Come Friday. We're going to get the latest snapshot on average hourly earnings in this economy, and it is expected to show continued strong wage gains. But our guy on economic statistics Mitchell Hartman, He says, best to ignore that and focus instead. On the trouble yet to come. So a crazy thing happened on the way to the pandemic Recession after the economy shut down and 20 million people lost their jobs Workers. Average hourly earnings went up. Skyrocketed actually up 8% year over year, but what that was was noise, not signal. Joseph Brusuelas is chief economist at RS. I'm consulting. He'll be our guide through this thicket of wage data. And when he says, noise, not signal, he means fast. Rising wages have been a statistical anomaly of the pandemic economy. High paid professionals kept working from home and mostly held onto their paychecks. But millions of mostly low paid service workers lost their jobs. When you've got 40% of households making 40,000 or less seen a job loss or loss in wages that explains that head fake if you will on wages. 40 year old cinnamon. Deutsch is an example of what Bruce Willis is talking about. She was teaching at a child care center in Ashtabula, Ohio, when it closed and she got laid off in March. For $350 a week paycheck disappeared from the average hourly earnings calculation. But she got on unemployment, which included $600 a week in extra federal pandemic pay until she was hired back three months later. Made twice as much on unemployment with the extra $600 as I do now, But I am glad to be back to work. I mean, I like, you know, going toe work. So, like many Americans, Deutsches income actually went up for a while because of additional unemployment benefits and relief checks. But those temporary effects are fading. And just a free swell us. Says we're in for a rude awakening. What I think we're going to see is in very by Frick Ated WAGE market This idea of a case shaped economy separation between the haves and the have nots, Bruce Willis says the haves those who work in what he calls the zoom economy will have it made. Those at the upper end those who are already thriving. There's going to be competition for those workers in a premium placed on their wages, but for lower wage service workers even as theater Khanna, me reopens and employers start staffing up again. Those in the middle to the lower end of the market where the damage occurred. They're not going to see a lot of wage growth that's due in part to supply and demand lots of unemployed workers looking for jobs, not enough job openings to give them leverage to demand higher pay. Then there's something economists call downward nominal wage rigidity. Firms during hard times tend not to reduce the wages of the employees that they keep on the books. But when the times get better Wage gains or restrained That is pretty much what cinnamon Deutsches Seeing in her job. She's back at work full time at her previous salary of $350 a week. The extra unemployment income she banked back in the spring has run out. My credit card is back up to, you know, almost maxed out trying to pay 5 10 bucks extra so that I can pay that down. I make enough money to a my bills and have McDonald's once in a while, but I know that you know if my car breaks down or if I have an emergency, I'm just out of luck. Have to borrow from somebody. Deutsche doesn't expect she'll get a raise until she hits 10 years of service in 2023. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, you might have heard it was an ugly session and it was But context we believe on this program is everything and even after the drop today Major indices or where they were. You know, two weeks ago, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. The latest report on consumer spending in this consumer driven economy comes out next week, and we will, of course, let you know what it says. But in the meanwhile How retailers looking from the other side of the sales counter. Our last check in with three small businesses. We've been following this past holiday season. First up is Irene Kesselman shines a toy store in car, Bro, North Carolina. I'm just looked at December and we were down a little bit. Not as much as I thought we would be. And I think compared to other stores I am I consider myself very fortunate. I think it could have been a lot worse. I think one of our saving grace is were our.

Bruce Willis Mitchell Hartman jobs Workers Ashtabula Georgia Irene Kesselman representative Joseph Brusuelas theater Khanna chief economist North Carolina Ohio Deutsche McDonald
"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"January. Good as always to have you along, everybody. It is kind of a choose your own adventure in this economy right now. What? You see what you predict? Kind of depends on what you choose to look at. Do you choose to look at the politics of this economy, Georgia and the run offs tomorrow Wednesday and the counting of electoral votes, phone calls and representative democracy uncertainty in a word? Do you choose to look at the pandemic in vaccines and how very, very slowly things seem to be going a problem? Because the virus is still in charge of this economy, or do you look at the nuts and bolts of what's going to be a long, slow slog to a full economic recovery, of which One of the toughest parts is going to be rebuilding the income of a whole lot of Americans. Come Friday. We're going to get the latest snapshot on average hourly earnings in this economy, and it is expected to show continued strong wage gains. But our guy on economic statistics Mitchell Harmon, he says, best to ignore that and focus instead. On the trouble yet to come. So a crazy thing happened on the way to the pandemic Recession after the economy shut down and 20 million people lost their jobs Workers. Average hourly earnings went up. Skyrocketed actually up 8% year over year, but what that was was noise, not signal. Joseph Brusuelas is chief economist at RS. I'm consulting. He'll be our guide through this thicket of wage data. And when he says, noise, not signal, he means fast. Rising wages have been a statistical anomaly of the pandemic economy. High paid professionals kept working from home and mostly held onto their paychecks. But millions of mostly low paid service workers lost their jobs. When you've got 40% of households making 40,000 or less seen a job loss or loss in wages that explains that head take if you will on wages. 40 year old cinnamon. Deutsch is an example of what Bruce well asses talking about. She was teaching at a child care center in Ashtabula, Ohio. When it closed and she got laid off in March, Her $350 a week paycheck disappeared from the average hourly earnings calculation. But she got on unemployment, which included $600 a week in extra federal pandemic pay until she was hired back three months later. I made twice as much on unemployment with the extra $600, as I do now. But I am glad to be back to work. I mean, I like, you know, going to work. So, like many Americans, Deutsches income actually went up for a while because of additional unemployment benefits and relief checks. But those temporary effects are fading. And just a free swell us. Says we're in for a rude awakening. What I think we're going to see is a very by Frick Ated wage market. This idea of a case shaped economy separation between the haves and the have nots, Bruce Willis says the haves those who work in what he calls the zoom economy will have it made. Those at the upper end those who are already thriving. There's going to be competition for those workers in a premium placed on their wages, but for lower wage service workers, even as the economy reopens, and employers start staffing up again. Those in the middle to the lower end of the market where the damage occurred. They're not going to see a lot of wage growth that's due in part to supply and demand lots of unemployed workers looking for jobs, not enough job openings to give them leverage to demand higher pay. Then there's something economists call downward nominal wage rigidity. Firms during hard times tend not to reduce the wages of the employees that they keep on the books. But when the times get better Wage gains or restrained That is pretty much what cinnamon Deutsches Seeing in her job. She's back at work full time at her previous salary of $350 a week. The extra unemployment income she banked back in the spring has run out. My credit card is back up to, you know, almost maxed out trying to pay 5 10 bucks extra so that I can pay that down. I make enough money to tame my bills and have McDonald's once in a while, but I know that you know if my car breaks down or if I have an emergency, I'm just at a look. I have to borrow from somebody. Deutsche doesn't expect she'll get a raise until she hits 10 years of service in 2023. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, you might have heard it was an ugly session and it was But context we believe on this program is everything and even after the drop today Major indices or where they were. You know, two weeks ago, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. The latest report.

Bruce Willis Joseph Brusuelas jobs Workers Mitchell Harmon Ashtabula Mitchell Hartman Georgia representative Frick Ated Deutsche McDonald chief economist Ohio
"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"joseph brusuelas" Discussed on KCRW

"Good as always, to have you along, everybody. It is kind of a choose your own adventure in this economy right now. What? You see what you predict? Kind of depends on what you choose to look at. Do you choose to look at the politics of this economy, Georgia and the run offs tomorrow Wednesday and the counting of electoral votes, phone calls and representative democracy? Uncertainty in a word. Do you choose to look at the pandemic in vaccines and how very, very slowly things seem to be going a problem? Because the virus is still in charge of this economy, or do you look at the nuts and bolts of what's going to be a long, slow slog to a full economic recovery, of which One of the toughest parts is going to be rebuilding the income of a whole lot of Americans. Come Friday. We're going to get the latest snapshot on average hourly earnings in this economy, and it is expected to show continued strong wage gains. But our guy on economic statistics Mitchell Harmon, He says, best to ignore that and focus instead. On the trouble yet to come. So a crazy thing happened on the way to the pandemic Recession after the economy shut down and 20 million people lost their jobs Workers. Average hourly earnings went up. Skyrocketed actually up 8% year over year, but what that was was noise, not signal. Joseph Brusuelas is chief economist at RS. I'm consulting. He'll be our guide through this thicket of wage data. And when he says, noise, not signal, he means fast. Rising wages have been a statistical anomaly of the pandemic economy. High paid professionals kept working from home and mostly held onto their paychecks. But millions of mostly low paid service workers lost their jobs. When you've got 40% of households making 40,000 or less seen a job loss or loss in wages, that explains that head think if you will on wages. 40 year old cinnamon. Deutsch is an example of what Bruce Willis is talking about. She was teaching at a child care center in Ashtabula, Ohio, when it closed and she got laid off in March. For $350 a week paycheck disappeared from the average hourly earnings calculation. But she got on unemployment, which included $600 a week in extra federal pandemic pay until she was hired back three months later. I made twice as much on unemployment with the extra $600 as I do now, But I am glad to be back to work. I mean, I like, you know, going toe work. So, like many Americans, Deutsches income actually went up for a while because of additional unemployment benefits and relief checks. But those temporary effects are fading. And just a free swell us. Says we're in for a rude awakening. What I think we're going to see is in very Pfeiffer created wage market. This idea that case shaped economy separation between the haves and the have nots, Bruce Willis says the haves those who work in what he calls the zoom economy will have it made. Those at the upper end those who are already thriving. There's going to be competition for those workers in a premium placed on their wages, but for lower wage service workers, even as the economy reopens, and employers start staffing up again. Those in the middle to the lower end of the market where the damage occurred. They're not going to see a lot of wage growth that's due in part to supply and demand lots of unemployed workers looking for jobs, not enough job openings to give them leverage to demand higher pay. Then there's something economists call downward nominal wage rigidity. Firms during hard times tend not to reduce the wages of the employees that they keep on the books. But when the times get better Wage gains or restrained That is pretty much what cinnamon Deutsches Seeing in her job. She's back at work full time at her previous salary of $350 a week. The extra unemployment income she banked back in the spring has run out. My credit card is back up to, you know, almost maxed out trying to pay 5 10 bucks extra so that I can pay that down. Make enough money to a my bills and have McDonald's once in a while, but I know that you know if my car breaks down or if I have an emergency, I'm just at a look. I have to borrow from somebody. Deutsche doesn't expect she'll get a raise until she hits 10 years of service in 2023. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, you might have heard it was an ugly session and it was But context we believe on this program is everything and even after the drop today Major indices or where they were. You know, two weeks ago, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. The latest report on consumer spending in this consumer driven economy comes out next week, and we will, of course, let you know what it says. But in the meanwhile How retailers looking from the other side of the sales counter Our last check in with three small businesses We've been following this past holiday season. First up is Irene Kesselman churns the toy store in car, Bro, North Carolina. I'm just looked at December and we were down a little bit. Not as much as I thought we would be. And I think compared to other stores, I am I consider myself very fortunate. I think it could have been a lot worse. I think one of our saving grace is were.

Bruce Willis jobs Workers Mitchell Harmon Ashtabula Georgia Irene Kesselman representative Joseph Brusuelas Mitchell Hartman chief economist North Carolina Ohio Pfeiffer Deutsche McDonald