35 Burst results for "Jordan heath Rawlings"

What does Defund The Police mean today, tomorrow and next year? What other options are there?

The Big Story

05:53 min | Last month

What does Defund The Police mean today, tomorrow and next year? What other options are there?

"I'd be willing to bet that the phrase abolish. The police gets a reaction from you. Whether it's a sarcastic, scoff or an enthusiastic cheer I don't know. But it's provocative and that's the point. It sounds total. What about De Fund the police? Maybe. That's a little more palatable, but do you know what it means? Right now Paul say that a majority in both Canada and the United States oppose it at least as a slogan. What about stuff like bias, training and body cameras? Those things have lots of port. We also have lots of research that says they don't actually reform much. So something's gotTa give move. There is vast support and energy right now for real police reform. Nearly all of us agree that police brutality and racism is a huge problem that needs meaningful action. So what happens? What would abolishing or defunding police? Departments actually look like today tomorrow next year five years from now. How can reform advocates get the proper message across to the general public who are spooked by these slogans? And is there anything else something in the middle between superficial measures and massive reform? That could help right now. What can we actually do? To start fixing this. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings? This is the big story. Monica Bell is an associate professor of law and sociology at Yale and she's going to help explain some of the concepts that are floating around right now hello Monica. Our you I'm very well. Thank you and I'm hoping to wrap my mind around some of the proposals right now for reforming police forces in America but also in Canada to. Why don't we start just by talking a little bit about what is being proposed a? How varied are some of the demands and requests and things being proposed even by mayors of cities, yeah, so the Bulls are extremely varied proposals ranging from probably. Probably the one that's gotten most air time a defunding dismantling than there are also proposals that sound a lot more like things we've heard in the past like body cameras is one that is still being opposed a new by some a mayors and police chiefs are there also reforms being proposed like additional training and Tobias Training and procedural justice, training among certain police departments, so it's really a the full, the full range of proposals. Both new and old are being discussed in this firm moment. Let's start with the most aggressive one and we'll get to de-fund the police in a minute because I gather. That's really complicated, but we've also heard calls to a rate of the police and when people say that, what do they mean and in a world like that? What would replace them? So I WANNA start by making really clear that I don't think I can speak on behalf of the Abolition Movement sure for for many reasons. I think you know I've been reading myself about The calls for prison abolition for about four years, but there are people who've been working on these topics for decades so I, just WanNa acknowledge that, so I think there is a range there's a very wide range of people who call themselves abolitionists right now and so some of those people for some of the I would wager a bear small minority that means dismantling the police right now I think most people who identifies the abolitionists. Would say something else, which is that we should be working toward a world in which we don't need. We don't imagine ourselves needing police prisons, the changing make right now on could lead toward a world in which we use the police less, or it could lead to a world in which we use the police more so as much more about what you imagine as the in point of reform in less about. What we should do. In this current moment so on, and there's a lot of writing that underpins that particular perspective and I think one of the one of the reasons, the conversation by abolitionist really complicated is. In the public discourse people here, wow, abolish the police that sounds outrageous timbre. because. Of course we don't. We're not in a situation where we can actually get rid of the police right now of everywhere. In part because. We don't have alternative institutions that do anything about the crime in safety concerns that people have and those are real right I mean there are you know. People are subjected to violence every day. We need some sort of response to that and so right now the only response we can imagine in the only response that has resources really are are the police. The prisons in the entire kind of criminal legal conflicts like that's what we have on everywhere, but actually you know a lot of the. Literature, on abolition has much has much more embrace of incremental approaches to getting to an end point,

Bulls Canada Abolition Movement De Fund Monica Bell Jordan Heath Rawlings Paul Yale Associate Professor United States America
What does the future of the U.S.-Canada border look like?

The Big Story

02:26 min | Last month

What does the future of the U.S.-Canada border look like?

"I want to turn. Our attention says that the border where the number of covert cases now tops two million. That's more than double the cases in any other to the latest ANA corona virus, emergency Arizona and Texas setting new records while over the weekend Florida reported is biggest one day increase in cases pandemic started. or That? Why is that? What we have very strong to on the southern border as you know with Mexico and we had some troops in Canada, but I'll find out about that. I guess it's equal justice to a certain extent. To how do you feel? About opening up the US Canada, border right now. I, guess would be not crate. That would put you squarely with a majority of Canadians who tell pollsters their extremely nervous as they watch our friends and neighbors to the south handling this pandemic. But while the corona virus has made the difference between our two countries obvious. Truth is that we've been drifting apart for a while now. And there's no better place to see that then at the border. And in the public sentiment for keeping shot. But what does that mean? As the week, stretch into months with crossings close to all the non essential traffic. For the communities who exist right next to one another, but on opposite sides of a line they used to cross every day barely thinking twice. How has the enforcement of the US Canada border changed over the last two hundred, years. And, what will it look like the future? Because if there's one thing, the history of this border has shown us. That when things changed, they never really go back to normal. They evolve. Just like the Kennedy US relationship, the porter is always changing. Pandemic might spark the most dramatic shift get. Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Alex, Bittermann, a professor at the Alfred State College of Technology at the State University of New York, is also the CO author of a piece in the conversation on the past present and future of the US Canada

United States Canada Pandemic Jordan Heath Rawlings Arizona Mexico Florida Texas Alfred State College Of Techno Alex State University Of New York Professor Kennedy Bittermann
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Response, so it might. Be that. Are Using a conspiracy theories which we've seen in the past two solar sort of bolster their audience Sometimes it is to change what people think or how people feel about the protests, which is why it's so important to rely on accurate information around them. it's you know it's it's tricky. There's no one goal I I've spoken to. Early on a sixteen year old boy, who spread it e- hoax about his uncle being missing. From the protests just as a way of getting social media popularity, so we are definitely seeing both nefarious means nefarious reasons for spreading false information and less various reasons for spreading false information. Great, so everybody wants to get in on it now basically. Jane. Thank you so much. I hope you get a couple of days off soon. Well I went to an island with no cell reception this past weekend, and that was a gift fair. We go all right. Stay safe and thank you very much. Thanks for having me. Jane Davidenko Senior reporter for Buzzfeed News. That was the big story. If you would like more, and there is no disinformation on our site, you can find us at the big story PODCAST DOT CA. On twitter at the big story F. P. N.. Today, we will share Jane's running list of black lives matter hoaxes for your information and preparedness. Send it to all your friends. You can, also, of course find this podcast and all of the frequency podcasts in your favorite player. If you like them, give them a rating. Give him a review. Thanks for listening Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

Jane Davidenko Jordan Heath Rawlings twitter reporter F. P. N
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"You've you've told US exists at the end of this. Yes, it's like it's the thing that's holding also together. I mean I thoroughly lonely I wanNA. I'm married with kids so I have my family here. But I, honestly I really miss, my colleagues I'd love to see them I miss going out. There's so many people i. Talk to remotely I would love to be back at work. He three days a week. Do three days a week. That's like enough I'm happy spending a lot of Montana home. If feel so cooped up, but I think that's where we're going to head I, think in the one of the few benefits of the covy pandemic is. We're just going to have a much better work life structure. Once this is over which. Late, twenty, twenty, one, twenty, twenty two. It's well it's. It's good to have late at the end of the tunnel, so thanks again. Thank you. Nicholas Bloom a professor of economics at Stanford University. That was the big story. If you want more big stories, they are in the same place. They always are on our website. The big story podcast dot ca and we are in the same place. We always I don't just mean at home. I mean on twitter at the Big Story F. P. N. and via email the big story podcast all one word at. At RCA DOT Rogers Dot Com and we never moved from our position in your podcast player. You can look us up in anyone you choose. If it lets you leave us a rating. Leave us a review. Let us know what you think and what we should cover because we're always looking for ideas. Thanks for listening I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings? We'll talk tomorrow..

RCA DOT Rogers Dot Com Jordan Heath Rawlings US Nicholas Bloom twitter Stanford University Montana professor of economics F. P. N.
Hannah Georgas on what its like being a pop star in the COVID-19 era

The Big Story

07:17 min | 2 months ago

Hannah Georgas on what its like being a pop star in the COVID-19 era

"I'd like you to start today's episode by doing something that you've probably done in your younger days. Maybe with the Mir a hairbrush. I want you to take a second and imagine you're a Popstar but seriously here is the scenario. You've been at it for a while. You've released a couple of well reviewed albums you've worked your way up from local indie act to nationally known. You've been nominated for awards. Your songs are on the radio. You've toured worldwide. You've been collaborating with some of your favorite artists. Some of whom play in one of the world's biggest rock bands. You're almost done your new album. You've got a European tour ready to roll. It's February of Twenty twenty. Guess what happens. Next is obviously nothing bit covid. Nineteen hasn't changed by now but the way this virus has altered the lives of musicians offers us a look inside an industry. That's already changed massively over the past two decades is changing massively again right now in real time. Will the music industry ever really be the same I mean? When will you feel comfortable going to a packed concert in a crowded bar with no room between you and your fellow fans how much of what makes one of those performances truly special can be captured in digital concerts from artists and living-rooms? What's it like to be a pop star in the COVID era while we asked one Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story? Hannah Georgia's is a fascinating songwriter. She's an alternative pop artist that has gone from a local renown in Toronto worldwide tours and festival headlines in Juno nominations and Polaris nominations and she was getting set with a new album and a new tour. When all this happened I feel like that's a lot for an intro. But Hi Hannah Hi. How's it going? It's going really well and I'm I'm really happy to talk to you and the first thing I want to ask you. Because it fascinates me is. How has the songwriting and composing been going during this? Because I know people's creative have varied just so wildly. Yeah Well for me creative Stuff has been coming in waves and and also There's Times where I haven't felt creative but I also don't say that because I think even when I am in my creative place I take a lot of time to dislike. I think a lot. I go for walks. I watch movies and I still feel like I'm getting creative. Inspiration from things so But it has been a bit of a wave for sure And I think for me. It's important to kind of just take my time with things and not feel overwhelmed if I'm having you know times where I don't feel very inspired. Yeah I guess like there's been some good stuff and then there's been some times where I've just needed to like take care of myself. I think the whole world pretty much dealing with that right now totally and I think it's okay to kind of I think it's important that we all do slowdown in a way. There's a reason why this is happening. And I travel in my everyday life to to be okay with like slowing down so I think it's a good practice for sure will endure in the midst of his. I kind of mentioned off the top Prepping for a new album and a big tour in earlier this year when we started to see the big live shows and the festivals around the country in the world Being canceled what was going through your mind. Kind of like changed every single day because everything escalated so quickly In early March and I had a I've had to definitely move timelines around because I am preparing for an album release and a tour a European tour that was scheduled in April Just kind of that was kind of getting things started with my new music and the new wave of this album cycle and yeah it just was kind of crazy Early March to like okay. We're going wait a minute okay. Let's slow down here. We've gotten a new piece of news that Seems a little bit sketchy maybe we should just put the brakes on a couple of things and make sure that we don't go full. Make sure we warn our team and let all the band members now in tour managers know that this is gonna like things are feeling a bit confusing and then all of a sudden like the next day it's like okay Flights are cancelled. Were canceling flights. And everything's over so it was just like so kind of insane to go through that and this like for as for everybody that that like just beginning of March period to to Digest that and then and then as time went on it was like okay. No may stuff now no summer stuff and now no false stuff it just like and it's a lot to like kind of wrap your head around a lot too a wrap your head around taking shows out of the picture when you're just kind of going back into Full swing of China. Put a record two so one of the things that I really WanNa know about is How this business works or doesn't work. I guess when tours are not possible I mean I think Anecdotally at least a lot of us have heard that you know with streaming taking over from straight album sales And maybe not paying as well unless you get billions of streams that you know being on the road and in front of people and selling. Merch is the way artists. Make money these days. And how is that changing? Well it's like trying to figure out how Everything will work online. There's been like a lot of interesting things that I've been seeing with. People performing chose online and charging. Yeah working through an online service to Promote your shows and you can do a lot and seems like there's a lot I just do find that there's something about being at a concert and being there in person and having the production that you need and I have like been just trying to wrap my head around you know I like. I like watching an artist. Perform intimate and interactive online to you. But I also like I don't know there's more to it when

Twenty Twenty MIR Jordan Heath Rawlings Hannah Georgia Toronto China Juno
Whats the next disaster we need to prepare for now?

The Big Story

04:03 min | 2 months ago

Whats the next disaster we need to prepare for now?

"This came out of nowhere. You may not in fact be shocked when I tell you that. Lots of people predicted this from scientists to doctors to past presidents who even prepared for it to billionaire philanthropists who gave Ted talks and science fiction writers who wrote books a lot of people predicted a pandemic but the United States. And if we're being fair about a lot of countries including US still weren't ready the pandemic we're living through right. New is one of a number of scenarios that worry analysts and scientists. It's a low probability high consequence event that means it probably won't happen in any given year but over years and decades it gets far more likely and if we're not ready just like we weren't ready for this one. It can be devastating. So what exactly are the threats that we should be preparing for now as we deal with the pandemic what worries the giant intelligence apparatus to the south of US and other intelligence agencies around the world? I mean look. It's been a few months of nonstop virus anxiety so we figured we should maybe find you something new to worry about your welcome. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Garrett graff is a writer with politico who put together a very interesting list hi Garrett I think for having me no problem we uh we. We realized that had been a while since we checked in with our neighbors to the south and a as soon as we did we say you guys are fretting about a lot of things but just first of all I mean. How are you guys doing these days? I think the mood in the nation is darkening. I think there is both a sense of. This is not going to be a short crisis. Either in terms of the public health aspect or the economic aspect and that the government is not rising to the occasion in the way that we are used to as Americans seeing our government rise to the occasion that Such as we have found bright lights and hope in leadership here it has been largely at the local level and at the state level and that the federal government still seems dramatically outclass by the scale of handle. That's unfolding right now. I mean I will tell you. There is a ton of discussion amongst our political leaders up here To simply ask the federal government to please keep the border closed because I think that the general populace is is. Frankly worried about you folks. Yeah and Vermont is Where I live is actually in very good shape in that. We are one of just three states right now. That is actually has Qisas moving in the right direction and We are beginning to reopen But you know when you look at all of the states surrounding us. They they are still in the midst of really terrifying outbreaks. And the reason. We're calling you today because we wanted to kind of get a sense of what's going on the states and what you guys are thinking about. And what comes next and you put together A very interesting and somewhat depressing piece for politico about something called the domestic threat assessment. So why don't you tell me I what is it? And how did you make it ashore? So an annual tradition in the United States for the last dozen or so years is that each winter the director of national intelligence here the person who oversees the seventeen different intelligence agencies that make up the US intelligence community issues what they call basically a collective worldwide threat assessment It's twenty or thirty page.

United States Federal Government Politico Garrett Graff Jordan Heath Rawlings Vermont TED Qisas Director Writer
Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 2 months ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
A groundbreaking terrorism charge against an alleged incel

The Big Story

09:50 min | 2 months ago

A groundbreaking terrorism charge against an alleged incel

"You probably don't remember the name Ashley. Noel are Daca even if you heard about her killing when it happened police tapes around the crime scene here at the crown. Spa near Wilson and Dufferin. An active investigation is underway. One woman in her early. Twenty S is dead falling a stabbing earlier this afternoon and to others. Who are also involved in. The incident aren't hospital. The Grand Scheme of the new cycle at the time it was a small tragedy with victims and violence and a first degree murder charge and a court date to come at some point. The crime happened at the end of February. Just as newscasts were starting to be dominated by the emergence of covid nineteen so the story got lost until Tuesday when the charges against the accused were updated and two words were added right after murder terrorist activity and this is important because I the image that those two words might conjure in some minds is not even close to what police say happened here and second because certainly in Canada and quite likely around the whole world. This is the first time that charge has been used in this way. Every murder in Toronto is a tragedy. Every murder should be covered and every victim should be mourned. And we probably know that. That's not always the case. So what is it about this one? That might leave a legacy that is significant to victims and activists across the world. What might those two words at the end of the charge change in our fight against misogyny Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story? Stuart Bell is a reporter with Global News and he was part of a team of journalists. Who broke this story? Hello Stuart. Why don't you start by telling me what we know about what happened on February twenty? Four th in as much detail as you can well as about noon on a Monday and The owner of a A massage parlor in Toronto Heard some loud noises coming from a back room and she went to see what's going on and a man came out with a believable machete started attacking her. She was actually able to wrestle with a bad and eventually stabbed him as well and so the to them came outside covered in blood. Witnesses saw them. Come outside the storefront Bleeding heavily and police arrived. They found the body of a woman inside at twenty four four year old woman and they arrested the young person who was injured at the scene at the time they charged him with first degree murder and attempted murder but it was always a big question. Mark over this particular killing as to why. What was the motive for it in there were? There was some especially given Toronto's history with the in cells in the two thousand eighteen van attack. There was some speculation. No could this be but it was only yesterday when the charges were laid in court when we finally got the confirmation that in fact Police are alleging that this was an insult attack. Let's start with The victim of the attack. What do we know about her? And I guess about the place where this happened like set the scene for us a little bit so we have some context for for the charges while it's an erotic massage parlor if you read their website they certainly don't conceal the fact that You know there perhaps a little bit more than massage other certainly encouraging a certain type of Clientele. The woman was killed was twenty four years old. She was a mother. The woman who was injured was thirty years old believe she's described herself as the owner of the of the business She had some cuts honor arms. You know sort of defensive kind of wounds. We know why this particular place was targeted. We don't know for sure but certainly from other in related attacks over the years we've seen places targeted for example a Yoga Studio in Florida just because the attacker believed that was a place where he could find women which were really his target right so that may have been the case here as well. What do we know about the alleged killer? Well we don't know much in can't say of what we know. Because he's a youth he seventeen and therefore his identity is protected by the Young Offenders Act. It's just not even possible to discuss anything that would reveal his identity but we do know from our police. Sources that Following his arrest he made statements that put him in line with cell ideology. One police source told OUR CATHERINE MACDONALD A Global Toronto that he wanted to kill as many women as possible. We also heard that. He said he was familiar with the Toronto Van Attacker and the author of what is considered to be the in cell manifesto for police to come out and say outright that they believe this was inspired by ideology You can bet they must have some either from his own statements or his maybe as online usage or maybe both they probably have evidence that certainly leads them in that direction. Can you explain the significance of the way? The police have changed the charge. What does it mean? Well it significant on a bunch of levels. You know if you look back at the history of terrorist attacks just in the last couple of years There was the the van attack in Edmonson. There was The Quebec mosque shooting was the the Toronto Van Attack. In twenty eighteen in all those cases. Either certainly things that looked like textbook terrorism but in none of those cases where terrorism charges brought with the prosecutors did in those cases was basically say We're charging you with first degree murder or attempted murder and I think the the reasoning behind not pursuing terrorism aspect of that is it really doesn't add anything in the end result and it may be even makes the prosecution more difficult. Because you've got to prove the motive. The motive was somehow terrorism related. But I think you'll probably have noticed. There was a lot of push back to that. Why was the Quebec Mosque? Shooting not officially considered terrorism. Why was the the Toronto Vanak not treated as an act of terrorism? I think that caused a lot of confusion in a lot of people were upset so I think it's entirely possible that we've seen a bit of a change here Don't forget three days before this massage parlor attack. There was another attack. There was a woman in scarborough on sidewalk when she was attacked. By a man with a hammer in killed he was also arrested and charged with the same murder terrorist activity charge and he was alleged to have been a supporter of is this ideology so in that case they they did lay that terrorism charge. So I think when you look at those two cases together for probably seeing Abbot of a sea change in terms of prosecutors in police saying look I think it is it is important that when terrorism happens we treat it as terrorism that we recognize it for what it is and you know even though it not change the length of time that the person will spend in prison. It's important for the community to have it recognized for what it really is and I think there's another significance as well and I've heard this from sources over this particular case which is one of the best ways to interrupt. Terrorism is for people to recognize when individuals are going down that path of violent radicalization so for parents for example. We're talking about a seventeen year old in this case for parents or friends or people that are around our teachers people that are around someone to have a better idea of what terrorism looks like how people behave when the radicalizing in into to intervene when they see that happened to get that person help before they end up picking up a a knife for were renting a van and mowing people down and so I think by the hope is that by prosecuting. These types of things as terrorism Dell help raise awareness among people. Terrorism is not just nine eleven. It comes in different forms it can be just a young person online radicalizing attaching themselves to a cause and deciding to go in and pick up everyday objects as weapons and to do something in their mind for their cause. So I think that's the other significance is hopefully benefit in terms

Toronto First Degree Murder Murder Stuart Bell Quebec Mosque Toronto Van Attacker Toronto Van Attack Noel Ashley Wilson Jordan Heath Rawlings Global Toronto Dell Canada Florida Global News Mark Catherine Macdonald Edmonson
Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

The Big Story

14:46 min | 3 months ago

Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

"You can say one thing for the current crisis. It's given us a chance to try a lot of things that we might never have had the will to do otherwise I amongst those just giving people money okay not everyone but millions and millions of people in Canada and not forever but at least for a few months and this isn't a new idea. It's been around in some form or another for decades. You probably know it as universal basic income and you might associate it with the most progressive voices come the liberal side of the spectrum and you may also associate the opposition to it with complaints of lazy people want free cash instead of working but despite having a long history as a potential way to ease poverty and improve health. This has never been tried on a large scale or for a long time. So the people arguing on either side of it have never had enough evidence to prove their point. So it's been a political football until like with so many things. These days along came the virus and now getting money to people who need it quickly is absolutely essential governments around the world even the most conservative of them have done that and those who support or oppose that kind of policy have mostly agreed on the need for it. It's what happens next. And what we learned from that will determine if we finally give a universal basic income. A real shot. So we'll explain history of the policy small tests that we've seen on it be political behind it and whether or not it will stick around when we get out of this current mass. And we'll do that as soon as Claire gives the details on this current mess cargill is dealing with the outbreak at one of its meat processing plants. This one isn't Schambori Quebec southeast of Montreal. Sixty four workers have tested positive. There cargill had another outbreak a few weeks ago at a beef packing plant in high river. Alberta in that outbreak more than nine hundred workers tested positive. It reopened last week after a two-week shutdown also in Quebec schools in the western part of the province are set to reopen today but attendance is optional. Desks will be spaced apart. And there can be no more than fifteen kids in a classroom at a time. Ontario reported the lowest number of cases of Cova nineteen for the province on Sunday since March. Two hundred ninety four new cases. And this comes. The province reopens Provincial Parks and Conservation Areas. Although camping is still not allowed and things like beaches playgrounds and public washrooms are still off limits. And lastly schedule and is suspending the sale of alcohol in the Northern Community of La Lush to help control the spread of cove in nineteen. The alcohol store will be closed for two weeks. To prevent people from gathering. There will be support for those at risk of alcohol withdrawal as of Sunday evening. Sixty eight thousand eight hundred and forty eight cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand nine hundred and seventy deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Max. Faucet is a writer and a reporter for many publications including on this project for the Walrus. Hey Max he joined our. I'm doing as well as can be expected. Which is how everybody should hopefully answer that question. These days you start by defining What is a universal basic income Broad is that term. And what does it mean? Sure so I mean you know this is an idea that's been around for some time now and and there can be competing definitions and I suspect. We'll get into that in a second but the one that I adhere to the one that you know certainly I informed Andrew Yang's campaign in the United States and that has been informing most of the conversation about UBA. Right now is It has three conditions it's automatic. It's unconditional in its non-withdrawal. So basically that means it comes every month doesn't matter who you are you get it. You could be making a lot of money or a little money and you get it. And then it's non withdraw so It's not means tested. So it doesn't get clawed back you know as you as you make more money you know. There's much conversation on you know econ twitter about various amendments and adjustments to that formula. But I think that's a good way to think about it. Can you give me a little history of it? You mentioned it's been around for a long time Has it been tried for real anywhere where to come from that? Depends on your definition of for real right. I think people look at the idea of giving people money from the government. And they think well this must be a left-wing idea but actually the first real experiments with it happened in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies and it was driven by a Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman. Who is the father of supply-side economics? Yeah they saw it as a way to replace the welfare system and so they their idea of a basic income is not quite the way I just defined it. It was something called a negative income tax. And so let me. Just get a tiny bit. Wonka share the way it worked in their conception is basically they would give people a percentage of the difference between their income and defined income cutoff or like the point where they start paying income taxes so if they set the cutoff at let's say forty thousand dollars and the negative income tax percentage was fifty percent. Someone who made twenty thousand dollars a year would get ten thousand dollars from the government. They made thirty five thousand they would get two thousand and from the government so is this sort of sliding scale where topped you up up until a certain point and then it went away right. They cancelled it in one thousand nine hundred and you know the the the Reagan era kind of buried it under under Nixon's legacy in Canada. Did something called the men come experiment? Which was the Manitoba Basic Income Experiment? That was more that was closer to the basic income that that I described earlier in the one that a lot of people are talking about right now so that says that gave thirteen hundred urban and rural families in Winnipeg and don't Fan Manitoba with incomes below. Thirteen thousand dollars a year back then money. But by the time that the data was collected in nineteen seventy eight so they ran up from seventy five to seventy eight. The Canadian government kind of lost interest in and they cancelled the project. So we've had these these aborted attempts to gather a sample and it hasn't really provided any conclusive evidence In the in the American one. There's some evidence that it that it you know Negatively impacted people's willingness to go to work in the Canadian won the data suggested otherwise. But there just wasn't enough data to conclusively determine the impact of giving people money on their both on their willingness to work and on on the outcomes that the government's wanted to test. Which is you know better. Health Outcomes Better Labor outcomes better social outcomes so you know the jury was still out right. Will what kind of a sample size and study length? Would you even need to determine that because again we had one or at least something like one here in Ontario Under Kathleen Wynne. A few years ago and the next government came to power and it was immediately phased out. So you know. I don't think we got more than two or three years out of that either. So what kind of scale are we talking about? Yeah I mean to make it work. You would needs multiple cities multiple tests populations and a long duration of study. This is this is a a bold policy intervention but you need to be able to control for extenuating circumstances and factors the Ontario project. Was it had some really promising results. As it turned out there was a study group at McMaster that basically interviewed the people that participated in the program. Some of the data they had eighty percent of of people reporting better health outcomes. They were using less tobacco drinking. Less eighty-three percent said they had better mental health. They were feeling less stressed. They had a better diet And there was even interesting. Data around better labor market outcomes people were basically using the minimum income the guaranteed income to improve their jobs to look for better job. So it's disappointing that the government scrapped it after basically what amounted to one year and left us in the same spot that we've sort of always been with these things where we just don't have enough data for either side to conclusively prove that their argument is right and you know maybe not maybe now is the opportunity to kind of walk in that that longer sample size but you know the problem here is that. It's always tempting for governments to to start these programs and then abandon them or different governments to come in and cancel them. You'd need some sort of agreement by all parties that they're going to let this run. Its course and we haven't really seen that yet. So you mentioned that it's seen mostly now at least as a left-wing idea might have begun under Nixon. But certainly I think that's how most listeners would frame it as you know Whether or not you support it About the side of the spectrum that it comes from but as we've started to see government's realizing how badly they need to help people as the economy collapses during this pandemic have seen any movement On the other side of the aisle towards this kind of idea I think we've seen much more movement on on the conservative side than we have on the progressive side the beano progressives are are are very wary of guaranteed income proposals because I think you know quite rightly they remember certainly the academics who studied this. They remember that it was originally an idea that was intended to get rid of welfare and other social supports and that is always a concern that if you bring in a guaranteed income. Is it really just an attempt to shrink? The size of the state is an attempt to get rid of targeted support programs that that make people's lives better and I think that's a totally valid concern when I when I posted my article from the wall or something twitter. I got a lot of feedback from economists about that where they basically said you know. Oh here we go again. People people don't realize that this is a an attempt to slip in through the back door reduction in social programs. That's really interesting. Yeah but you know. Over the last few months we've seen a really array of conservatives. Come out and say that this is a good idea. Hugh Seagull. Who is a former senator standing red? Tory I WOULD. I would describe him as a thought leader. He's been he's been banging the drum for for guaranteed income for quite some time now but he was always sort of out there in the wilderness as a conservative suggesting that this was a good idea and he wasn't one of the ones who was saying that it should replace social programs. He was saying it should be an augmentation to them but in the states over a matter of weeks you saw people like Mitt. Romney coup is basically the Avatar of hedge fund capitalism. Coming out and and suggesting that this was a good idea that would support. Americans during the fallout from Cova and ultimately Donald Trump's government. It's not it's not a permanent basic income. But they sent a check to every American and that is sort of one of the hallmarks of a basic income. So it's interesting the degree to which we've seen conservatives rally behind this particular policy flag. I think that it is driven by shorter. Term political objectives American politicians having election. That they're looking at in November and one of the surest ways to get defeated is to be in being government while people are losing their jobs losing their homes losing their livelihood so I think it's more self preservation than a genuine change of heart but in from a policy perspective. You take the support where you can get it and you build on it from there. So you know I think advocates of a U. UB. I should take their support and and leverage it in order to build their movement if you can may be explained to me the thought behind the benefits of this applying to absolutely everyone including people who have job because that's really And we can debate in Canada versus the US for however long. But that's that's like the primary difference between what trump's government has done and what Canada's done with the baby. Yeah that's the tricky part. That's the part that a lot of people struggle with conceptually and intellectually as is the idea of giving people who don't need money more money right. Yeah and Ken Boston cool. Who is is a former adviser to Stephen Harper and Christy Clark? He's been kind of driving the bus in Canada around the need for a UB. I you know he's he is preferred that to the more targeted approach that the government has taken with Serb. You know his idea in the short term is we just need to get money into people's hands right. Now we need we need to stimulate the economy and ultimately will tax it back next year on people's income taxes that's the thing about a guaranteed income in the context of the system. We have here is if you're making sixty seventy thousand dollars a year. This is going to a portion of this. We'll get taxed back right and so it's not. It's not really free money. It's a little bit of free money and I suspect there would be some social programs that would get pulled back a little bit to to make the numbers work but you know at the end of the day. I don't think you can let the weaknesses in the policy that that might impact a few people. Override the benefits that would impact far more people. You know there's there's all sorts of data out there that suggests that a basic income would actually stimulate economic growth. There's all kinds of data that suggested improves. Health outcomes and Lord knows improving. Health outcomes would save taxpayers and the government a lot of money. Because that's where an increasing increasingly large part of our social budget is going and we'll continue to go in the years and months to come so you know it it is It's a tough idea to get past for some people that I find working already. Why should I get more money from the government but that money's going back into the economy and it stimulating economic growth that supporting jobs? It's reducing healthcare costs. You know I think there's a pretty good case for it and and you know it's one that we should be willing to explore. I am I am more than open to criticism about the cost factor that I suppose we can get to that in a second but I think we also need to look at the benefits and look a little a little bigger in terms of where those benefits accrue it. It's not just lifting people out of poverty. Although that's that's an obvious benefit it's improving people's health outcomes improving their labor market outcomes. Let's people who have a

Canada Richard Nixon Ontario Cargill Cova United States Claire Schambori Quebec Provincial Parks Manitoba Mcmaster Twitter Winnipeg Jordan Heath Rawlings Quebec La Lush Alberta Kathleen Wynne
Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

The Big Story

07:06 min | 3 months ago

Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

"To Parliament Hill to get a sense of how the aid packages for Canadians have evolved. Since they were first announced. What's available now? What might or might not become available in the future and of course to see if our MP's have figured out the mute button yet. I though I will mute Claire so that she can give you everything. You need to be up to date today. Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa. Tam says the spread of Cova. Nineteen is slowing in Canada. But the number of deaths is on the rise and she says that's because of outbreaks at long term care homes more than three quarters of the deaths are linked to those facilities. She also talked about testing capacity two weeks ago. She said she believes the country could do sixty thousand tests a day but lately Canada's been averaging twenty eight thousand tests a day she says provinces can help by extending the criteria for who can get tested British Columbia's laid out some plans for easing restrictions around Kovic nineteen starting next weekend. The province is allowing group gatherings of more than six people as long as no one is showing any symptoms of the virus. Also this month. Some businesses in BC will be allowed to reopen including hair salons retail stores museums libraries and some restaurants Dr Bonnie Henry the Provinces Health Officer says BC has put the brakes on the outbreak. But they're not through it yet and Antero Premier Doug Ford says the provinces moving with cautious optimism in the reopening of garden centres nurseries and hardware stores. Ontario's still not technically in its first phase of restarting the economy which was outlined a few weeks ago and the emergency orders have been extended until may nineteenth as of Wednesday evening sixty three thousand four hundred and ninety six cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with four thousand three hundred and fifty seven deaths and I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Cormac McSweeney is the Parliament Hill reporter for city news for Rogers Radio and every once in a while for us and he's working from home and so am I so Forgive the toddler noises. But how are YOU DOING CORMAC? I'm doing all right surviving like everyone else's in isolation well and we're not the only ones doing this now so my first question is just tell me how virtual parliament for the first time ever is going. Well it's been interesting. I mean as you know there have been some troubles some growing pains as MP's and the House of Commons tries to switch to this Basically a really large zoom meeting and they're actually using a version of the zoom platform to host all of this So there have been a lot of troubles as people. Try to figure it out. There were connectivity issues where people were losing their connection and that's unfortunately just a fact of life with a lot of Mp's living in rural areas of the country and not having the same Same sort of connection as you would have. Let's say in Toronto or Ottawa? A lot of 'em. Ps You know figuring out the mute button figuring out the translation button as well because every time somebody doesn't hit the right button it seems to have to pause proceedings to try and deal with it but overall. I think it's been working out all right Aside from the technical hiccups that they've had I it seems to be rolling along smoothly in terms of having MP's MP's question The Prime Minister and different cabinet ministers and I will note as well that this is not technically a sitting of the House of Commons. It's technically a sitting of this special Cova Nineteen Committee that involves every MP and the reason why point that out is because there's there's a difference of procedure so we don't have the normal question period where Thirty SECONDS OF FOUR QUESTION. Thirty seconds for an answer instead because it's a committee. Mp's get about five minutes to question. Whatever minister or the Prime Minister And they can ask as many questions within that time period and the rule of thumb. Is You answer? Just as long as the question has gone on for and so it really does allow for a lot more of a substantial debate and a substantial questioning of the cabinet. Because if you WANNA get a lot of information out of a cabinet minister keep your question short and just squeeze as as many as you can with a five minute period. So what is the tone of those questions and this sitting been lake because to an observer it does seem Less like the. We're all in this together tone That we had six weeks ago. You know when all the aid packages were coming together. Yeah you hit it right there You know at the start of all of this. It seemed like there was going to be no criticism for the Trudeau government right away because this was an unprecedented time and unprecedented measures had to be taken but slowly over the last number of weeks. We've seen The Conservative Party. Start this off where they started questioning the programs being put forward by the government and in a very public fashion. I would say that for the virtual sitting themselves. The tone is actually quite different than what we've seen from the news conference as being held by the individual parties the tone on these Virtual sittings in and these. Qna's that are happening is actually quite different. From the grandstanding and showmanship you normally expect out of question period. In fact everyone's a little bit more toned down and there's I it's much more substantial questioning There's a lot more information coming out. And I think that's a great thing It really shows that without the theatrics that we normally get in question period There can be a good conversation to be had between opposing sides in the House of Commons. But outside of the virtual sittings exactly as we were discussing You know there's been more criticism for the Trudeau. Government people are exposing the gaps in some of the programs that have been announced. And we're really seeing the ideological differences for how we should be dealing with this pandemic at this time and the Conservatives have started raising more and more of opposition to the conservatives add to the true liberals rather as every week has gone on. So it'll be interesting to see where we go from here because up until may twenty fifth were working on a system of Just having one weekly in person a in the House of Commons and then to virtual sittings But the Conservatives for awhile now have been pushing for as many as four in-person sittings each week And so as we approach may twenty fifth Towards the end of this month there'll be more conversations between the opposition parties and the government about how we proceed from here because there's still a lot to do and You know June is when normally parliament would break towards the end of June For the summer break but With this pandemic ongoing and with it being such a fluid situation. I imagine we might see some more unprecedented changes to the procedures of parliament as we move forward and continue to deal with with this pandemic.

MP Cova Canada House Of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Parliament Hill Cormac Mcsweeney Claire Doug Ford BC Provinces Health Officer Chief Public Health Officer TAM Rogers Radio Dr Teresa
Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

The Big Story

02:51 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

"The the first thing you should know about our guest today is that. He's got flower like in his house and he just bought it in a store. Really all kidding aside. He is living proof that despite what I might see at my local grocery stores Canada's food supply chain is working even for flower but if it is and why can't I find flour. And why can't my friend who lives up in the country? Get fresh bread in order to answer that you have to start with the basics of how Canada's food supply chains operate. I say chains because when you start to have it explained first thing you learn is that there are two of them and those two supply. Chains are very different so from a beginner's guide to those chains to the impact of cove in nineteen breaks and meat packing plants on them to why you should really think about eating fries while you're on lockdown and how much more you might pay for groceries this fall. We're going to walk you through with the past couple of months have done to the journey. Your food takes between farm and table. And we'll do that as soon as Claire tells you what you need to know today. The federal government is pledging two hundred and fifty two million dollars to ease pressures on the country's agriculture industry. Last month the Canadian Federation of Agriculture asked for two point six billion dollars but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the amount being given now is a point. We will continue to work with farmers with a stakeholders and industry representatives with provinces and territories to ensure that food food capacity in this country. And those people who worked so incredibly hard every single day to feed Canadians get the support that they need through this crisis and beyond Alberta plans to double its capacity to test for the current a virus four point five million dollars will be spent on new equipment and technology right now. The province is doing about seven thousand tests day and they want that number at sixteen thousand Quebec. The hardest hit province in candidate is lifting some of the restrictions on private seniors homes for nearly two months. Now residents have not been allowed to have visitors and they've not been allowed to go out and accompanied the premier says now some residents will be allowed to go out on their own and they can have visitors but they have to be outside as of Tuesday evening. Sixty two thousand forty six cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand one hundred and sixty six deaths Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Michael von Maso is an associate professor of food agriculture and resource economics at the University of wealth where he also hosts their food focus. Podcast

Canada Michael Von Maso Canadian Federation Of Agricul Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Trudeau Federal Government Claire Prime Minister Associate Professor University Of Wealth Quebec Alberta
Inside the strange world of designing psychoactive drugs

The Big Story

06:12 min | 3 months ago

Inside the strange world of designing psychoactive drugs

"I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Joe Bruni is a writer at the Walrus. I promise he is not tripping right now Joan I Jordan. Why don't you start by telling me what is pace and just tell me about the drug? Never heard of it before well paces essentially just water and the substance called Mea I which is the active ingredient an emmy. I is It's a new drug. It was created in two thousand fifteen And it was marketed last year as an alcohol. Substitute and Binge. Drinking litigator so essentially. It's an effort to replace alcohol with the substance that at certain doses has similar Or was simply saying better effects. And how would that actually work in practice like by better effects you get drunker oddest drunk no hangover? What so. This is difficult for me to imagine. Because I actually haven't tried substance myself right by the time I started working on the story it It was illegal but from what I've heard from people who have tried it. It's a stronger drunk. And it's a feeling that you're more in control You're not slurring your speech as You're not getting like the spins. You're not falling over and that's at certain doses And then of course there are people who have exceeded those doses and at that point they report effects that are similar to things. Like ecstasy and Indiana okay. So you mentioned that it's illegal but At what point did it become illegal because it was for sale right right So it's a little tricky. It was technically never legal for sale right. The Way Canadian drug was work and struggles in a lot of the world's Are there essentially just lists of banned substances so until substance is on that list? It's not illegal to have or to us. But in order to sell a psychoactive substance you Bam you have to go through all sorts of licensing and applications to submit kind of a laundry list of studies to prove that it's safe and things like that for pace none of that took place so it was really never legal for sale. And now it's since been added to the list of controlled substances So now it's is definitely illegal. So how does the process for creating something like that work like? Where did MEA I come from? So there's a bit of a historical precedent for MEA. I it's in this family of drugs called Amino Indians. And they were first synthesized in the seventies as a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease and that didn't pan out and the pharmaceutical cook community sort of lost interest in them decades later Along comes Ezekiel Golan. Who's an Israeli chemist Sort of a career drug discoverer And he becomes interested in I mean Indians and an emmy a specifically For it's sort of pleasant effects. Okay so tell me about our career drug discover who is Zeki Golan? And what's he done so Golan he's trained as a mathematician actually his PhD in that he worked for a time. It's more accurate to say. Could he consulted for a number of major pharmaceutical companies? But then he kind of went his own way and for about two decades now. He's been creating new drugs. And sort of licensing the patents to the more or against the less scrupulous people who then synthesize and sell them on the black market. Soglo has been doing this for a while now. He only recently settled in. Canada was featured in a few BBC documentaries back in what was kind of his heyday in the EU He had a lab in Amsterdam. So he's sort of this infamous figure in the world of underground designer drugs. Okay so you're GonNa have to explain something to me Like I'm that kid who barely scrape by and science. How does a guy like that go about making a new designer drug? Like what do you do so there are these computer programs? It's called Kevin from addicts software. It's essentially like a three d blueprint of the molecular structure. That you have on your screen and that you can alter and make adjustments to and then you can analyze these new structures eve created. You can get some idea of what their effects might be. And then once he has a blueprint that he feels his promising he would export that and send it to a lab elsewhere where the actual chemists would synthesize it and sent him back samples. And what does he do with the samples so what? He Does the samples is he. He takes them he test them on himself. He's a little more responsible than I'm probably making it sound. But he does test everything on himself. He he'll start from a very small dose and he'll ramp it up carefully serve recording any effects. He experiences an of course stopping at the first sign of of anything miss. What is the process? Let's let's say you know He. He sends off this molecule and he gets back the substance and he starts trying it and he thinks lake with Ma. I that he's onto something if he's not doing it for like pharmaceutical corporations that create new medicines. What's the purpose behind doing this? He can't sell it. What's the process behind China? Make it legal or capitalize on it. Glenn is the theory Libertarian Mindset. When it comes to drugs he believes that you know free free adults consenting adults should be able to try what they want And so that's I think. Part of what motivates his crusade almost is. He he's excited by substances and the ones he enjoys and he just wants to

Emmy Zeki Golan Jordan Heath Rawlings Joan I Jordan Joe Bruni Ezekiel Golan Writer Indiana Parkinson's Disease EU Glenn BBC Soglo China Canada Kevin Amsterdam MA
How did BC successfully flatten the curve?

The Big Story

05:24 min | 3 months ago

How did BC successfully flatten the curve?

"Columbia and Ontario where the two provinces had I by Kofi Nineteen. They recorded their first cases just a day apart back at the end of January and BC. In fact was the first place but evidence was found of the virus spreading in the community that was march fifth at looked like BC might have just as much trouble as Ontario at that point. But it hasn't since then. British Columbia has been a model of how to control a pandemic and in the past couple of weeks. The province seems to have successfully flattened the curve and in the process. It has made a star out of its provincial health officer as of Monday British Columbia had less than two thousand cases of cove in nineteen four comparison Ontario had more than fourteen thousand and Quebec was closing in on twenty five thousand. Yes the Central. Canadian provinces are two and three times the size of BC but those numbers are much lower than the population would suggest what happened and British Columbia that didn't happen and Ontario and Quebec. What can other provinces learn from? Bc's approach how much of this was preparation. How much was response? How much was luck and will it stay that way because the curve flat for good and BC or is a new spike? Bending it back up right now. We'll ask somebody who's been covering the provincial government and public health response every day during this crisis the soon as Claire takes us around the whole country for everything you need to know about this virus today. Worldwide the number of Kovic nineteen cases has now topped three million. The head of the World Health Organization says though some places are starting to ease restrictions. The pandemic is far from her and they're still a lot of work to be done. The organization is mainly concerned about trends in Africa Eastern Europe Latin America and some Asian countries. Here at Home Quebec Ontario. Have both released plans for easing restrictions around Cova Nineteen in Quebec elementary schools and daycares? We'll start reopening mid-may while high schools colleges and universities will not reopen until late August in Ontario. Three stage process was announced at will start with reopening select workplaces and allowing small gatherings stage. Two will involve opening more workplaces and outdoor spaces and allow some larger gatherings and the final stage would be to open all workplaces and allow pretty much all public gatherings each of these stages will last between two to four weeks. And it's not known yet when this will all start that all depends on when the province sees a steady decrease in the number of cases. Prince Edward Island is expected to release a plan as well this week on Monday. The province had reported no new cases for twelve straight days as of Monday evening. Forty eight thousand five hundred cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with two thousand eight hundred and seventeen deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story we used is the legislative reporter for news. Eleven thirty which is a Vancouver radio station but she is based in Victoria at the legislature. I Lisa Hi and not at the legislature right now working out of my my living room in my bedroom. Yes well these are the Times. There's windows here. There is a windows at the legislature. Where I work. So that's a big upside for me. Well why don't you I for those of US outside the province? Can you explain how he's doing? And where the experts think. You guys are in terms of flattening the curve. All we hear about outside of the provinces praise right now well I think is had a few things that have made life a little better for us. Though we've still had one hundred people die and I think any amount of death is not is not ideal so we started early. I I think there was a few things that helped us out. People seem to have bought into the restrictions that we've had here we started because we had our case. I case early we also had Washington state to our South King County. There in the Seattle area was really hard. Hit at a care home. So those numbers skyrocket quickly which I think raised the alarm and we have the benefit of having a provincial health officer who has been on the front lines the situations like this before Dr Buddy. Henry was part of the SARS response in Toronto. She worked for the WHO. She was in the front lines of battling Bulla in Africa so she has a lot of experience which I think has held this province in a very solid position in the way that she's approach this but there was also some things that aided vc that you would just put down to luck. We had a later Spring break plan for students here which allowed our province to learn from the tragedies of other provinces and other places where the spring breaks were earlier so travelers went abroad and brought cove in nineteen home before we knew what a disaster it was going to become right so our curve your has eased our peak was at the end of March. There was one day that we had on the weekend there. Twenty Eighth March Ninety two cases and then a couple of days later seventy cases and then we've slowly been coming down from. There

Home Quebec Ontario British Columbia Jordan Heath Rawlings BC Kofi Nineteen Cova Quebec Officer World Health Organization Columbia United States Prince Edward Island Times Africa Eastern Europe Latin Am Ontario Vancouver Seattle
COVID-19 and domestic violence: A meeting of two pandemics

The Big Story

09:05 min | 4 months ago

COVID-19 and domestic violence: A meeting of two pandemics

"I think it's become pretty clear to everyone by now. Self-isolation in this pandemic means dramatically different things different people at one end of the spectrum. There are the clueless celebrities making videos. About how their mansions feel like jail at the other end obviously are people who don't have a home to. Hashtag stay home and I'm much closer to one end on the other. Have a house and it has everything I need. I'm fine but there are people who at a glance. Have the exact same thing. I do. A house yard a family enough groceries but who are in real danger right now for some people. The home is not a safe place even in the best of times of course a depressing proportion of women as well as men are at risk of abuse or worse from their partners. And that's at the best of times when it's a lot easier to leave a dangerous situation as you may be aware these are not the best of times and it's not easy to leave anyone or to go anywhere so what options to people who are living in abusive situations now have what's being done to help. How can we find ways to get them out of their homes when nobody is supposed to leave? There's our guest. Today has reported on this issue for a long time and she will help us explain the crisis that so many. Canadians find themselves caught in right now but first we have to give you a quick roundup of what you need to know about. Kovic in Canada today and clear. Brisard will do that now. The cove in nineteen death toll in Canada has now surpassed one thousand however. There is some cautious optimism from Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa Tam who says the spread does appear to be slowing down. She says in late. March cases were doubling every three days and now they're doubling every ten days or so but as we've heard from so many people Dr Teresa. Tam Says we cannot let go of our physical distancing measures just yet Justin Trudeau has announced that the government is expanding the list of people who are eligible to receive the emergency response benefit. If you earn a thousand dollars or less a month you'll now be able to apply for the C. E. R. B. If you were expecting a seasonal job that isn't coming because of covert nineteen you will now be able to apply. And if you've run out of e I since January first you can now apply for the C. E. R. B. as well although British Columbia has managed to flatten the curve. The province is extending its state of emergency for another two weeks. It will also be releasing more modeling of cases on Friday and premier. John Horgan has hinted that it'll show more progress for the province. Ontario is still seeing hundreds of new cases every day but the chief medical officer says it is possible that the province is passed the peak of the outbreak. There were four hundred ninety four new cases in Ontario on Wednesday and two hundred and twenty one of those have been linked to long-term care homes in the US President. Donald Trump says he is cutting US payments to the World Health Organization during the pandemic. He's accusing the organization of failing to do enough to stop the virus from spreading when it first surfaced in China Canada's International Development Minister says Canada is disappointed in this move as of Wednesday evening at twenty eight thousand three hundred and seventy nine cases of Cova nineteen in Canada with one thousand and seventy deaths Jordan Heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Sarah Boast Feld is a writer and a reporter a sometimes guest host of this. Podcast is Sarah. Hello Jordan. How are you is that a question? You're asking you know these guys. That's how we start. Now Yeah Yeah and I think like it used to be a very simple answer. It's complicated right. You know. Everyone's healthy in our home. Everyone's safe so we're that is something. I'm going to be really grateful for and trying to keep perspective every day. Yeah how about you how are you doing? I'm doing well I'm also safe and you know my home has everything I need. And like. I said in the INTRO that That makes me lucky. So we're here to talk about People who who are not safe in their homes even though it might look like they have everything. Why don't you just start off for those of us? Who are lucky enough to not Have dealt with this in a normal situation when there is no pandemic. How would someone Plan to escape an abusive situation. Well I think at the best of times people who are in abusive situations at its take them a long time to get the not only the courage but also just that perspective that okay. This is really not a a situation. I am safe anymore. My family is safe in anymore A lot of Women in particular there are men some men who abuse to primarily women. You know they. They choose to live with it for a long time. And there's a lot of psychological manipulation that happens is a lot of Mind Games you know. Often it will be you know. Their actual safety has been threatened in an incident or are few where they decide that. It's time to try to leave and what they might do. Is You know. Make call while they're at work on a phone like their office lying or go meet with a trusted friend and a coffee shop or physically. Go seek out resources at a sexual assault centre or shelter or any of the other resources that we have in our communities as we know now. That's that's there are a lot of options that are not available to these women now amidst this covert nineteen pandemic you. How does any of that work? Now I mean are some measures of these things still available for people who need help will yes. The shelter systems. Thank God are considered essential services. So they are open they are helping women who are in abusive situations and and also I think about this just in my own life. Thank goodness to that. Technology is advanced as it is because we do have video chat. We do have texts. We do have email who do have social media. We have lots of ways that we can check in and help one another and certainly these organizations that are trained and equipped to help. These women are have those resources. Well now The dark side of technologies availability. All the time is that there is some monitoring that goes on by abusers. Will we'd women's tax listen in on phone calls or skype calls or something so that's a danger as well and I mean we could talk about the dangers Jordan that are amplified when you're at home all the time with an abuser 'cause I just described you know you can. You can make that safe phone call at work. You can like go. Meet up with a friend in person so that you're not being monitored maybe or you don't have like a paper trail of things that this abuser could could get his hands on You know and then you have a reason to leave the house exactly and I mean our on the supposed to be leaving the house when we are getting exercise and maybe you end up on a family walk right in. You're not alone You know and it could be really really difficult because also like that is a hallmark of abuse to is isolation right like so abuse women are already considered already experiencing isolation before. We've all been asked as a public service. Public Health Act to collectively stay home and isolate ourselves like even that term is used now in common parlance talking about Cova but yeah it gets an isolating experience to be abused and there's a lot of barriers. Now that are set up for you know for women to actually get help. So we've been at this Some of US for months. Some of US for longer. Do we have any idea how dangerous this lockdown has been for women in abusive situations in Canada? Yeah we ha- we do have a sense of dot and I you know I've been heartened to see a decent amount of media coverage about the increase in domestic violence You know statistics candidate is survey recently. Just sort of taking the temperature people's feelings You know around the impact of covert on their lives and one in ten women specifically reported that they are concerned about violence in the home. And I believe that. The wording was vague. It didn't say are you concerned about violence in your own home specifically so we don't really have a great picture from that but what we do know. Is that the fear is real and I've been talking with some Shelter Staff and administrators this week.

Canada United States Dr Teresa Tam Sarah Boast Feld Ontario John Horgan C. E. R. B. Justin Trudeau Donald Trump Dr Teresa Chief Public Health Officer Brisard World Health Organization Shelter Staff Cova China Canada Jordan Heath Rawlings
A guide to COVID-19 scams and how to protect yourself

The Big Story

07:53 min | 4 months ago

A guide to COVID-19 scams and how to protect yourself

"So I saw my family over the long weekend in when I say saw. That's all I mean. I hooked a bunch of us up to a teleconference for a little Easter celebration. So yeah I saw them and I guess I heard them to. That's it let sounds Nice. I saw a Lotta that over the weekend. I've been doing zoom calls with my family about once a week. It was my dad's birthday recently and they put the laptop at the dinner table so that I could see them all and it was kind of like I was there. See kind of kind of his good. But this is what. We're supposed to call physical distancing not social distancing because. I guess the point is by video chatting with my family. I am maintaining social connections. Yeah I mean you're still being social. You're just not there physically okay. We'll here's my mini rant about that. It is social distancing. It is literally socializing at a distance and it does feel distant. And I'm bringing this up because there is a bit of a debate around which term is proper and I wanted to quickly use this time to say before we get into the nasty scams and frauds. That are going around now that it doesn't matter what term you use here. They mean the same thing and either way. It sucks so pick your favorite. Yeah definitely You're right about that. I mean we're so fortunate to have this kind of technology right now but it's not the same thing as seeing people in real life. I mean it doesn't matter how many zoom calls you do. You can still feel lonely as soon as you log off and this is where we get into today's topic because guess what it's precisely when we're feeling those things when were scared or were lonely or missing family or even just looking for help and information. It's that time that were most vulnerable to frauds and scam artists. Who are right now looking to profit off of people's misery and fear here in Ontario on this is just one example but this weekend premier Doug Ford vowed to deal with these people as harshly as possible. There's always going to be very very few bad apples disgusting people that WanNa make make a profit off the docks of people that are dying. We ever catch him here in in Ontario Mobile. Come down on them like Like they've never seen before the full extent of the law. But here's the problem with that. It's almost impossible to catch them. And once they've got your money or your information it's almost impossible to get it back. What you can do though is protect yourself. You can know the details of the scams going around. You can know the signs of a fake and you can know how these people will pitch themselves to you and all of that will help so today to kick off week five of self-isolation right after the news. We will give you an extensive guide to keeping yourself and your information safe during all of this but first Claire as another week begins House candidate. Doing Y'all I'm GonNa Start in Quebec today where we know the krona viruses hit hard at police are investigating a long-term care home in the Montreal area. That's where thirty one people have died. Since mid March and nurses have now been speaking of describing unsanitary conditions. They say some residents were completely neglected for over twenty four hours because workers just couldn't handle the conditions and were walking off the job. Quebec's premier is promising a thorough public investigation. We'll province of Manitoba has put out a call to local businesses to make medical masks and this comes after a medical team in Winnipeg came up with a design for a mask that would be just as effective as the end ninety five so they're hoping to find local manufacturers to get on this as soon as possible because the province says. It's about a week or two away from running out of masks and other personal protective equipment well. There was a video making the rounds last week. Showing a man in an elevator in British Columbia spitting on the buttons. That man is now apologizing for what he did. He says it was the result of a momentary fit of anger from an ongoing dispute between him and the Strata Council in the building that he lives in he also says he has no health issues. No Cova nineteenth symptoms and Vancouver. Police say they are not investigating this and lastly Justin. Trudeau is one of many leaders across the country back at work today. After taking a rare day off for Easter Sunday. He did send out a written message though thanking Canadians for staying home especially during the long weekend he said by doing this Canadians or showing the true meaning of loving our neighbors as ourselves as of evening over twenty four thousand cases of Kovic Nineteen in Canada with seven hundred and sixty four deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Sam Cooper is a national investigative journalist with Global News who has looked into just about all of the scams going around. Hello Sam Hi how you doing? I'm doing all right. Where are you right? Now you in a basement An apartment somewhere no. I'm located in Ottawa. Usually I we'd be in a global news studio with a view of Parliament Hill. I'm a little bit further away at home in my home studio today as as we. I think most of us are at this point. Yes well We're all just trying to record from wherever we can But we're GONNA talk about scams today. Yes so how quickly did we start? Seeing Kovic nineteen scams from the day Canada. I had a case will I would track it back even further in my research. I think potentially be original scam as it were was started by China's government unfortunately when This virus started a roll through Wuhan China in November and December. There were some doctors that that we're trying to warn people and they got visits from police in China and said Retract her statements. Or else you'll be in trouble. Chinese state media said any rumor mongers talking about a SARS like virus will face a penalty's and that really created the conditions for a once in a lifetime health crisis to roll out and we started to see more traditional corporate scams appearing worldwide. I would say late January and in February. What did those first ones look like will they? They were very sophisticated and they played on the need. The crucial need for information and also some sort of fear and I think one of the very first engineered widespread scans we saw was sites that mimicked universities like John Johns Hopkins putting out data boards. Where all new corona virus cases were appearing everyone was hungry for that data understandably for these spoofed sites when you clicked on them. It was actually a scheme where the criminals on the other side were fishing for your personal information through your computer and that really sets the table for a a whole world of scams because once criminals have your information any number bad things can happen from there and it can lead to further scams. They're just building up their databases on how to social engineer. As as it's called a scams that work off a good knowledge of who targets are so. Give me an example. Then if you can of of what they would do once. Somebody had clicked on one of those sites and they'd mind some of their data once the criminals have your data. It can go into

Canada China John Johns Hopkins Doug Ford Jordan Heath Rawlings Engineer Ontario Mobile Ottawa Quebec Sars Winnipeg Parliament Hill Ontario Strata Council Sam Cooper Trudeau Cova Vancouver
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:10 min | 4 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I remember clearly the last restaurant I sat down and ate a meal and I was going to say here that I wish it had been fancier but I really don't. It was a classic Burger Place near my house. Not a fast food chain like a real Dina and it was greasy and full of cheese and I had a double with everything on it. The fries were crispy an amazing. The Fountain drinks were bottomless. The decor was the decor. But whatever and man I would pay double more than what I paid for that meal to have it again right now claire. Why don't you tell me about your last outside world meal because I'm hungry and literally all I have is a a frozen pizza in the oven upstairs in the last meal that I had? That wasn't at my house was a breakfast sandwich. And a coffee from this great little spot just at the corner of my street and I'm just GONNA say it. They have probably the best breakfast sandwich in the city and they also have the best coffee I was there about mid March and maybe a week later they were closed. Their patio was taken down and now they have a sign on their door to actually discourage people from breaking in it says they have no money and no food inside. And that's where we're at with these places right now in that place which by the way only has the second best breakfast sandwiches in Toronto. 'cause my place has beat okay. But them and the Burger place near my house are the exact kind of establishment that it really hurts me to say. This might already begun forever. And if they're not they might easily be gone by the time. This is all over. Yeah I take walks every day and sometimes I walk along the busy strips in Toronto Bloor Street or college and those are full of bars and restaurants and cafes and it's heartbreaking to walk along them now and see all the signs and the doors with their own versions of due to cove in nineteen were closed until further notice some of them are offering takeout but a lot of them are just closed completely and the. I can't help but wonder how. And if they'll be able to come back from all of this and I think everybody's neighborhood looks like that right now and you know if you listen to this podcast you know that. Various levels of government are offering various forms of help to people in businesses that are impacted by this crisis and look by government standards. They've moved pretty damn fast on that too. Many people and Businesses. That is a godsend but to local independent restaurants. Like the ones. We're talking about here. It's not a godsend. It's nowhere near enough. So those businesses have banded together to ask for what they say they need if they're gonNA survive this and since I'm pretty sure that we want them to survive this because I don't know what my neighborhood would look like without them today. We're going to let them tell you. Why local restaurants are different from other businesses? And what happens to them when any kind of crisis like this headstone and what they're landscape will look like whenever we get the all clear to hopefully open things up and so we'll have somebody do that as soon as we bring you the news? Claire can you help us there? Well Ontario Premier Doug Ford says his patience is running thin when it comes to the provinces lag in testing for covert nineteen. It's unacceptable. We have the capacity now before I understand. We didn't have the region we didn't have all the testing. We have the testing capabilities. We have the assessment centers Capabilities the days are done of these two and three thousand a day being tested and moving forward moving forward. We need to see thirteen thousand tests every single day provinces like Quebec British Columbia and Alberta are all testing at double Ontario's rate a more provinces have been learning how this epidemic might unfold for them new modeling released in Saskatchewan shows an expected three thousand to eighty three hundred deaths and in Alberta. It's believed the outbreak will peak mid May and that the province could see as many as eight hundred thousand cases with the deaths ranging between four hundred to thirty one hundred last month air. Canada laid off sixteen thousand five hundred employees. They said it was a temporary layoff and now it looks like they're staying true to their word and already rehiring most of those people. Thanks to the government's emergency wage subsidy program at that's expected to last until at least June six Air Canada also says it has reduced its seat capacity by eighty five to ninety percent as of Wednesday evening in Canada nineteen thousand two hundred ninety one cases of covert nineteen with four hundred and seventy six deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story John. Synoptic is a Toronto restaurant owner and also the CO organizer of Save Hospitality Dot CA. I John Hello my first question for you is just how are you doing? How are you getting on well Bearing ourselves in government lobbying and and trying to push our agenda forward in order to do our best to save the industry that we care so much about so haven't really thought too much about the actual personal consequences down the road that are very possible as we all are trying to avoid The anxiety the uncertainty that comes with that but Really just like not sitting in our hands not sitting idle getting to work helping our community and then also doing our best to Save as many jobs as possible in our industry and we'll get to what you're doing to save those jobs and what kind of help you need. But first why don't you just tell me how the situation unfolded for you at your restaurants while this virus spread? When did you first start seeing it? What were the ramifications? When did you realize Oh crap this is going to get bad? I guess the beginning of March we started to see reports of it being in other countries other than China and spreading around getting bad in Italy Iran. And then we said Oh. Wow like this could really affect our society and in it does that will. It's GonNa destroy our business before anyone else's and so started really thinking hard about that and in and by the second week of March we saw our sales start to drop precipitously probably did about fifty percent of our normal sales at all of our locations that second week of March and by the end of that week we come to the conclusion that the right thing to do was to close That our staff didn't feel safe. We didn't feel safe serving customers No matter what protocols you took everyone seemed to be at risk. If you're in the same room so after March fifteenth to believe a Saturday night service we made the decision to close all of our within twelve hours. A close all of our locations Sales it also just like disappeared like we were dropping. Reservations like crazy So it didn't make financial sense. It'd be open but it also didn't sense in terms of the safety of our staff in our customers to be open either and then twenty four hours a reeling from that decision. And what do we do Monday? The Sixteenth Seventeenth Forget. What be that was. We laid off all ninety seven employees. There was a difficult day given been in business for over fifteen years and we've had some employees with us just as long We've never laid off anybody Yes very trying times and I got home that night and that money night and kind of commiserated with my partner and I said like I don't know what to do here and What is the government going to do to help us? And who knows and Kinda got in touch with them. A couple of friends of mine who are close to government lobbyists. They work in that world and I said what are you hearing? And they said they're hearing that nobody knows what to do that. government is all ears that they're listening to industry for looking for solutions that these are very uncommon times and the he said like put down your asks in a letter and sent it to me and I'll put it in the rain inboxes so I started along that process. Can you explain for me a little bit in for for other people who aren't familiar with the industry how the business model for independent restaurants works and how the margins are and why this crisis is so bad particularly for independent businesses in the hospitality industry? Yeah I'm glad you asked that because a lot of people say well. The government's giving seventy five percent wage subsidy and they're giving you forty thousand dollar. You know.

government Toronto Claire Ontario Canada Dina Doug Ford Jordan Heath Rawlings partner Air Canada Alberta Quebec British Columbia China Iran Saskatchewan
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:31 min | 4 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Thanks to Marianna and Matthew for sharing their story and we hope they get home safe and soon and thank you to Juliet. Four sharing hers. That was the big story you know by now. We're covering corona virus every day from our own makeshift home studios and we're trying to stay healthy and stay sane to hear more you can go to the big story podcast dot ca or you can say hi to us anytime on twitter at the Big Story. F. B. If you want to talk to me. My handle is at the game sheet. You should also know by now that we want to hear from you. If you're staying home how have you been passing the time? I hope you have enough supplies. Tell us what you bought. You can send a short audio clip from your phone. You can send video to. We'll just use the audio to the big story podcast all one word at our CI DOT Rogers Dot Com. I'll leave you today with a clip from your favorite guest host of this. Shell expert listening. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow. Hey Big story family. It's your sometimes. Guest hosts airpost filed here reporting from my home in these Stewart. Got a seventeen month old boy here at home that I'm trying to take care of since his daycares close so he's not getting to see his friends and I'm getting to play this same youtube video over and over and over again that you might hear him Listening to grabbing the laptop screen pointing dancing. It's really cute but it's It gets a little bit tired after fifteen times in a row Anyway my husband are trying to make it work I'm Kinda doing my writing half of the day while he takes care of our son and I do the parenting shift the childcare shift after that on. There's some work in the evenings but there's also a wine because we're all just trying to get through this. Yeah that video. He's at a our sons that are really funny as where he's super cute and hilarious but he's also into absolutely everything so. I'm working really hard but we're making the best of it and I hope all the rest of you are too sending lots of love and strength and hope you're getting some rest as well from social media and just in general naps are amazing. Take care guys bye..

Stewart Jordan Heath Rawlings twitter Marianna Juliet youtube Matthew
Some Canadians have made it home. Others havent.

The Big Story

09:38 min | 4 months ago

Some Canadians have made it home. Others havent.

"Are you there. I'm always here Jordan. Where where am I? GonNa go fair enough. Well it's the first day of the work week was your weekend any different from your week. aside from not making this podcast not really. I mean. I've just been kind of cooking and taking long walks no complaints. Can you even tell days apart right now? No I usually ask about three times a day. What Day is it today? I keep thinking that I'm supposed to take my garbage out Because every day feels like garbage day now for whatever that's worth but here's a question. Have you felt lucky over the past little while I don't know about lucky of definitely felt very fortunate? I've been trying to look on the bright side of things I mean. I'm very fortunate to have been able to work from home as soon as needed and my partner and I keep each other company. Why have you felt? I really have for whatever it's worth you know when we do research for the show. I tend to dig into the worst stuff. The reports out of Italy Reports from frontline hospital workers in Canada and in the United States and it really drives home the point and this weekend we were reading and listening to stories of Canadians who found themselves abroad when Justin Trudeau said. Hey this is serious. It's time to get home yet. That's that's easier said than done. Yeah and I traveled in February and I think about it. Now you know if it had been a couple of weeks later at the time everybody said it was fine to go a couple of weeks later. I would have been in that same situation. Yeah and some people right now are stuck where they are and today We're GONNA talk to somebody who just made it home under the gun barely and We'll hear from somebody at the end of today's episode. Who is not as lucky? And she'll quickly tell you where she has her situation's very fluid So we wanted to get her information there at the very least but quickly for people who still do know what day it is. Can you tell us where we are? Clara's the quote Unquote workweek. What ever that means now begins while the latest from Canada's Health Minister Patty. Hi Do. Is that if you're back from a trip and you've been told to self isolate and you don't do that. You could face a big penalty. It is critically important especially for those returning home now to ensure that they follow this public health advice that we're giving them and the advice will be not just advice if if we if we need to take stronger measures we will and that actually happened in Quebec. A woman who tested positive for the Koran virus was arrested for violating quarantine order because she was out walking her dog. Prime Minister Trudeau says between Monday and Wednesday. There will be more than thirty flights bringing Canadians. Who are abroad back home. And we are now seeing the first case of Cova. Nineteen in the north. It's in the Northwest Territories. And they've now shut down their border to all nonessential travel uh some. Mp's are being called back. On Tuesday to adopt the emergency measures that were announced last week. Those include the twenty seven billion dollar fund for direct support and the fifty five billion dollars to help business liquidity through tax deferrals as of Sunday evening. One thousand four hundred and thirty six cases of Covert Nineteen in Canada with twenty one deaths. When you find yourself in a situation like our guest today did of course you second. Guess yourself a little bit. Why did I go? How did I end up? Here what could I have done differently? It's natural but I think you have to remember as fast as this thing. Seems like it's moving now a few weeks ago unless you are really paying attention. It didn't seem that it was going to get bad. And besides buck once. You're stuck you're stuck. There's no point in questioning how you got here. You just want to get home and to do that. You might need the help of the government and as we know government. Can't help everyone right now today. I can announce we're working with Canadian airlines to make commercial flights available for as many Canadians who are stranded as possible. Now we won't be able to reach everyone over going to do our best to help those. We can't nothing is really guaranteed anymore and so you take your chances like today's guest Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Julia Morales is a student at McGill University in Montreal and today she is in Montreal and safe so first of all. Juliane glad to hear that. Thank you go out to you back your home now. Yes where were you last week? So last week I was in Morocco originally I was will kind of just traveling everywhere and ended up in ten years from where I was supposed to take a flight back to Montreal. Tell me how you got there. Why were you there? When did you go that kind of stuff? So Group of four other students and a professor and I left from McGill University on February twenty seventh to leave for Morocco on a geological field trip. We were going to go steady the geology of the area and sort of understand what processes lead to the current geology of the region and supposedly for two weeks however we were not able to board our flight out of Morocco because of travel bans that were then instilled by the government. What were you thinking? And I don't mean this in a bad way. But what what were you thinking as the flight approached? And you knew you were going. Were you worried Had you heard anything from the government or anywhere else advising you know actually going into the trip I think. Any of the stresses kind of just related to the usual stress of traveling. Do we have everything we need. Is Everyone have a tenth? Is Everyone have hiking boots Nothing related to the extra corona virus because as we had seen on government of Canada website about point. Morocco is very safe. There were no cases or I believe zero. The two case cases of corona in the country and Italy had yet to undergo this boon which we now have seen the past two weeks So we felt quite confident in going to the country and being safe in coming back. Tell me about when that situation changed in Morocco. What were you hearing? What was happening there so every night as we would have dinner we would actually go on the corona world meter website and see what the the statistics were saying about the spread of the virus and even until the last day we were supposed to be their only about. I believe eighteen. Total cases in the country So we weren't too concerned about our state in the country more was going on in the neighboring countries such as Spain particularly Because obviously we're seeing that it was exploding all over Europe and immediately saw that the political response in all these countries with started closing down borders. We started to get concerned about the fact that we may not be able to return but up until then we have not heard anything from our airline or the government in Rocco or the Canadian government. So we weren't we again. We're not too concerned about the idea that we were going to be able to come back home. Tell me about making the decision to try to get home. What happened and what you do that. Yes so we arrived at Tangiers airport as we were supposed to and as we walked into the airport we received the news that essentially Morocco was closing. Its borders to about twenty countries. It was GONNA stop international flights in and out of twenty countries and among those were Canada. Which is quite surprising because the USA was not on the on that list in the US has many more cases of corona virus than we do and at that point we immediately started looking for other flights out of the country and we managed to book another one through Qatar And three days later we were supposed to cash played. We found out that Qatar was also closing. Its borders and would not allow us to fly through there so this all began a whole spiral of trying to find any flights out. What did you do but did we do what we kept? Trying to find. More flights we booked another flight out of Casablanca on Foulon really quickly counseled expedia actually called us about like a few hours. After having both in told us that the play it would not be going out. We booked another flight with Air Canada which then got cancelled. We booked another flight through Royal Moroccan. That also cancelled we for pretty much just desperate to find anything that would get us out of the country so our original flight was supposed to go through. Casablanca before then heading to Montreal. So you decided to take a flight to Casablanca since it's like a major flight hub in the country and we figured that our chances of getting a flight out would increase if we were in that city and so we just kept trying once we arrived in Casablanca airport. We tried to make sure if our flight would actually be going out. And the people at the counter told us that they couldn't even find our

Canada Morocco Montreal Prime Minister Trudeau Jordan Heath Rawlings Casablanca United States Mcgill University Qatar Italy Casablanca Airport Air Canada Canadian Government Partner Cova Clara MP Royal Moroccan
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

05:35 min | 5 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"You. Hear something on the radio and then you get. You absorb that message as a listener but now you're hearing on the radio. You're getting it on a web alert. An APP alert twitter facebook. It's just so much That like I feel I feel bad but then at the same time it's like okay but people consume all their news on different platforms. So you have to feed the platforms because other people are on those platforms but at the same time. The being beaten with a baseball bat with the message is is something that I don't think we can change at this point just to make sure that the message is responsible but that social media aspect that influence amplification. I think is just It's this is unchartered territory right now for the media and for the world. I mean this is just It's a really the first major pandemic in a social media world. And we're kind of seeing that it's like it's is just causing a lot of anxiety and it's really it's sad. Well how the hell do you guys stay so calm in professional on the air in your common professional what we talked to you? I mean there's a lot of people Like us working from home or not going back to work today and wondering what they're GonNa do can you? Do you have any tips? I guess help us owed. Amber you repeat after me. You say everything's GonNa be okay. We will get through this that I mean it's just it's our job it's like I would never even dare compare Osteo a first responder or anyone. That's working in healthcare. But you go in and you you just do your job and the job is telling the news like I said when you're at work it actually doesn't seem real. It seems like you just reading this information in your bit detached from it so at work. It's easy you know we can keep it late at work It's just when you come home where you're like. Oh my God but at work it just it's like he just doesn't seem real so it makes it as they can dissociate yourself a little bit from it which might make us all psychopaths. But that's just kind of what we have to do. Finally IF PEOPLE WANNA tune into six eighty news as this goes on. What can they expect from you guys like? What's your cycle like? What are your updates like Give people a sense of what? You're providing Well we are live. Twenty four seven Constantly updating anytime anytime at all when there's an update from locally or internationally You know the latest number is just the latest warnings from the government. The latest travel advisories any update. You will get it on. Six thirty news were just so committed to getting Toronto and the GTE through this keeping us all safe because we are you right and we're just working to get everyone through this and you know. Thank you for listening. And thank you for listening to the government and we will get through this. Thank Sandra and you should know. I bought a vintage battery powered radio just for this crisis digital guy obviously but When you think about things going really bad I mean you picture someone tuning into the radio. Well there was that that tweet that we kind of had a bit of a chuckle about a couple of weeks ago. Where someone who tweeted. Gosh I wish there was a podcast to tell me more about covert nineteen and then a budget. Six eighty people re tweeted it and said well there's also the radio the podcast that never ends right the alive podcast radio so I would strongly recommend people get the deeper story on the Big Story. Podcast but constant updates anytime On six eighty news on on any radio station so well thanks amber. Stay safe and keep your team safe. And we'll be listening. Ditto thank you Jordan. Amber Leblanc the news director at six. Eighty news you can find six eighty news at six eighty on your am. Dial if you're in Toronto but also at six eighty news dot com anywhere in the world wherever you are you should look into which local radio station is broadcasting news and have it tuned in the days to come and that was the big story the first day of our new world and we want to hear about what your new world looks like. If you'd like to reach out to us you can email us either through the contact form on our website. The big story PODCAST DOT CA. Or if you'd like send us an audio clip telling us where you are. How you're doing and what you'd like to know you can send that to. The big story podcast. That's all one word at. Rci DOT ROGERS DOT COM. We'll be checking it daily. You can of course always find us on twitter at the Big Story F. Pin we read our applies our DM's are open and we want to hear how you're doing and you can always of course find us on twitter at the big story f. p. we read the replies our DM's are open and feel free to reach out about anything. Thanks for listening. I hope you're well stay safe. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

twitter Jordan Heath Rawlings Toronto DOT baseball Amber Leblanc GTE Sandra director
Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

The Big Story

10:11 min | 5 months ago

Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

"I I don't know about you guys but I'm tired. Part of that is the ceaseless Rahm of end of the World News. Of course part of. It's just work or family or the everyday things that always get to me by the end of the week and this week in particular there is another reason. I'm tired and you know it. Or at least most of you deal with the exception of most of Saskatchewan and none of it. You Lucky Jerks Canada's sprang forward this week and if this world isn't seem bleak enough now it is once again dark when I leave my house in the morning every year more and more people ask why we have daylight saving time and the calls to abolish it grow louder and now we may in some places be ready to actually do away with except there's about of course there is what happens if some places in Canada eliminate daylight saving time but their neighbors either to the south or to the side. Do not put up some places decide to stay on permanent daylight time and others decide the opposite. What if every province and territory makes their own call and we end up with a maze of time zones the plays hell with scheduling things like sporting events are flights or deliveries. The last thing any of us want is they solution. Daylight saving time ends up making us even more tired. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story. Alex mckean a reporter at the Toronto Star and their Vancouver Bureau and she's Ab. As tired. As I am I out. How are you? I'm tired like I said this time shift always throws me for a loop. Yeah me too. I mean I was actually not only experiencing the time change weekend but I also flew to Toronto and then back to Vancouver so I've got double jetlag going on so your province is perhaps maybe on the verge of getting rid of daylight saving time and we will talk about that but first because this is a really good part of the story. Can you just tell me who is Ray Saunders? Sure Ray Saunders is a gentleman who just recently turned eighty years old and not a lot of people in Vancouver may recognize his name but they certainly would recognize his most famous creation. Refunders the maker of the Gas Count Skin. Kwok which is one of the biggest tourist attractions in the entire city of Vancouver. It's this incredible clock that is powered by steam and has whistled plays a tune every I think every fifteen minutes or so tourists come and look at it in the context of this historic part of the city gas town with. Oh it's a it's probable streets and they take pictures with it and Race unders is is the guy that built it. He built it in nineteen seventy seven and for a long time he He maintained it as well. Now it's maintained by the city of in coober but she wrote back walk and two hundred other public clocks in Vancouver Canada and all over the world to we can a year. He goes around to all of the Public Clark's in the city of Vancouver and surrounding area and he has been the guy who's responsible for manual we. Changing those public Clark's to reflect the time change at daylight savings time so He he describes me that during the this spring forward period which just happened this past weekend. Most of the public clocks they'll have kind of a speedup function and so it'll take about Six seconds he said that for the two wine forward an hour to reflect the new delay time and of course the the opposite happens during the fullback period in November. So He's been doing that for twenty years or so. It seems so quaint in a way but this might be the last weekend that he'll ever do it. Tell me about that. Yeah that's right. It might be the last weekend he ever does it And it's you know it's kind of fitting away because as described when we were talking. He's getting older. He unfortunately experienced a fall recently which which made ladder finding a lot more challenging for him. Of course you have to climb up the ladder in order to reach the public bases. So that's part of this task that he's been doing for for the last couple of decades So but personal reasons aside and personal limitations aside He also possibly last weekend that That this kind of topic will be required in the city of in coober because Bc is looking out just mixing the time changes all together And I I think you're right it it is. There is something kind of quaint about it if if I could just describe a little bit about Something that struck me talking to ray was that he has this really interesting relationship with clocks and time so I mean I'm a millennial and I will admits that most of the time that That I'm actually checking the time. I do wear wristwatches but most of the time I'm looking at my computer screen or looking at my phone that's the thing. That's like really intuitive to me. Ray has this this cool relationship with clocks. Where he says look. There's something lost when you're just looking at numbers on a screen. The clock face the circular nature of it the fact that the hands are always kind of moving around the tell us something about the time that has passed and the time that is yet to come. It's more You know accurate to the way that we actually walk through life and I thought that was such a such an interesting idea not anything that I considered at all so I think he his sense of affection for these public clocks in and the analog nature of them really came through so why is British Columbia considering getting rid of daylight saving time and how did that movement sprang up and come to be yeah. It's a great question And different people will tell you different responses as to the origin story of why British Columbia's dealing with this thing but I'm gonNA start with the practical elements of it. Which is the. This is a conversation that it's also happening South of the border in the western state so Washington Oregon California all considering changing to a permanent daylight time and that has pretty significant implications for us here British Columbia because we're coordinated with those states. There's a lot of commerce that happens between those days even things like as work scheduling. That happens along the West Coast and these are things that it makes sense to be in in the same time as them so Washington last fall passed legislation to change their approach to time to permanent. Be Lifetime. And that hasn't happened yet because they need the approval by the The Federal Congress there in order to make it happen but our premier John Horrigan Here British Columbia was in conversation with Governor of Washington State and said look. Maybe this is something. We're interested in in British Columbia is well. It's something that the the government launched a public consultation on. They sent out a survey and they received within the first month or so. They received more completed surveys than they ever have in the history of all public consultations on on this topic of changing to permanent daylight time so they received two hundred and twenty three thousand completed surveys Colombian yeah and overwhelmingly ninety. Three percent of people said get rid of it. We don't want time changes anymore. We just want a permanent time. Is that something that we see elsewhere in the world You mentioned it's happening already on the west coast of the US but also some parts of Canada. Don't have it as well. That's true and you know after I published this story on what? Bc is doing. I got quite a lot of emails from folks in Saskatchewan because the way described it in the story was that Scotch Wayne is on permanent central standard time but both insist on reminded being over over email but in fact according to the line to Scotch. When is that? It should be on mountain time zone for the same time zone as Berta so the fact that it's on permanent central standard time actually means that it's it's more on a permanent stay like time similar to what? Bc is trying to do so it all gets a little bit confusing but since nineteen sixty six scotch and has been the Canadian exception to this time. Change practice that we have been doing and the they've been on the most places in Scotland. Anyway have been on permanent central standard time. Alberta has considered it. I understand that there's also a private member's bill In Ontario on this topic. So if it's something that people are increasingly aware of but the one that I has really caught my attention in the last couple of weeks was the Yukon because of course the Yukon is also a jurisdiction along the west coast. And they've already pulled the trigger. They said okay. We went to move the clocks forward an hour this past weekend. And we're not going to change them again. It's just GonNa stay dot so Yukon. Who is the one that's most recently has actually made the changes that British Columbia is talking about? Making what is the case in this day and age for daylight saving time? Can

Vancouver Canada Ray Saunders West Coast British Columbia BC Coober Toronto Saskatchewan Yukon Columbia Rahm Clark World News Washington Jordan Heath Rawlings Vancouver Bureau Kwok Alex Mckean
What happens when the global economy gets sick?

The Big Story

11:10 min | 5 months ago

What happens when the global economy gets sick?

"I won't pretend that I pay much attention to the stock market. Let's just say I don't have much reason to do so. Occasionally though it is unavoidable now with all the reaction to the corona virus world markets have tumbled phased suffering. Its biggest drop. Since the nineteen eighty seven crash Wall Street plunged the most is the financial crisis the losses so steep on both sides of the border at it actually triggered a trading halt for the Fed and other central bankers drop in oil prices is adding another complication as they try to gauge. How the corona virus will impact the global economy the fascinating thing about the reaction of markets around the world to Cova Nineteen. It's not really about dollars and cents. Yes a lot of billionaires lost millions and millions more are are. Sp's have taken ahead but watching what's happening here even if you have no money in the markets is a glimpse to how we all value risk. So what have we seen in the past few days and weeks? It's different from financial shudders like the crisis of two thousand eight. Where could the markets go from here? How far could they sing? And what will the world's governments do to prevent that and what happens beyond dollars gained or lost as a result of all this weather or not. Stock prices surged again. When this is over what happens in other words when global economy comes down with flu like symptoms. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Mike Apple is these senior business editor at six eighty news. He's been busy the last few. Hello Mike How are you? I'm doing well. Why don't you quickly outline? I keep in mind that we are talking in the middle of the day so stocks may do any thing quickly outline. What have we seen in the past couple of days with stock markets and oil prices? You have to go back actually three weeks because up until about the mid part of February the markets were on fire. Everybody was buying everything you could not lose money It was the greatest momentum rally not necessarily based on fundamentals which turned out to be a bit of a problem but Tesla was at a record SPACEX and Virgin Galactic Apple Microsoft all these big companies record highs and krona virus was starting at March so to speak in China. That's peculiar. Why isn't the market more worried about this well? Then as it started to spread people include in and airlines were. I think the first trigger where they started air. Canada cut flights to China. So there was this wakeup call that this was going to have an economic impact and that started the selloff for stocks and over the course of the past three weeks we have seen the biggest point declines and subsequent point gains on the benchmarks in history like there have been massive swings one day huge selling next a big buyback and we are coming off now the subsequent largest slump ever on a points basis. I WanNa make that designation for the Tsa X. Endow because when we look at it on a percentage basis. It's big but not October. Nineteen eighty seven big where the Dow Single Day drop twenty two percent. It's massive. We're talking trillions of dollars of market value. I don't want underestimated but again I wanNA put it into some context. The TSA was down over ten percent. Second biggest ever point percentage decline. Explain what's driving this. You touched on airlines. Yes okay. So that was the that was the first economic shock that the tourism industry was was seeing a major revaluation. People weren't traveling companies. Their supply chains were being shut down in China ripple effect elsewhere than into Italy in Europe and Potentially into North America. So that was the first wave of selling and then what happened? Was the reaction from the market for what? The Saudi Arabian government announced on the weekend. Last week they wanted to cut production to stabilize the oil market which had seen a bit of a downturn so they were holding meetings OPEC cartel and Russia. There's sort of a new player in the global market newish and they wanted to cut production well. Russia had been playing ball the better part of a couple of years but then for some reason they walked away from the table on Friday. They said we. We're really not thinking about cutting production. Now we think we can withstand lower prices. Have at it as you will. This incense the Saudis who say okay. Fine. We're going to raise output in an already oversupplied market to record levels. We're going to crush the low hanging fruit. Any company that produces at say forty or fifty dollars a barrel every barrel they produce is going to lose money but the Saudis can produce it around twelve to fifteen and we're still around thirty and change and the Russians are close but that was the second hit so to speak. Do we know if those two are connected the the sort of oil price wars and the corona virus? It is because the first reason oil dropped was because China basically came to a standstill China's one of the largest buyers of oil prices dropped dramatically. And then this next thing developed at the worst possible time for the market really. It's like really you got to do this now anyway They don't seem to care because this morning again. They said starting next month. Twelve million barrels Russia said okay. We'll match that or very close to it. You've got Canada in the mix the US already at record levels. Suir a globe that is going to be a washing oil which just kind of sounds gross by at least a lower prices lower prices at the gas gas stations. Great for consumers horrible for the industry. Guess what Albert is going to get hit again. Yeah how efficiently can Alberta Produce oil? And and what do they need? Oil PRICES TO BE AT in order to not crush their economy. More than it already. Is this Most recently the tech resources project that was mothballed by tech a few weeks back had a break even price. I think it was north of fifty dollars per barrel okay so significantly higher than than where we are now the established producers son core and the others. They're at a lower price point because they're already moving commodities around and this is why we're talking about you know the oil market being a barometer of the global economy and then you've got the travel and tourism industry in the mix and why the markets have done what they've done they they've re priced risk They've lowered earnings expectations. Apple has already said that its sales in China dropped substantially in February. They're gonNA drop again in March. Their supply chain has been hit again. Apple's got deep pockets. They don't have to worry. Long-term THEY'RE GONNA come out of this. But is the company worth a trillion dollars anymore. Right it's all a repricing and the pendulum that we see moves incredibly fast because everything and and it was funny to to to hear commentators about how quickly markets dropped and then recuperated in previous crises whether it was eighty seven or the DOT COM bubble. Or whatever over there was SARS or murders or any of these other things the Russian ruble crisis it. All of these would take months if not years now. We're talking about weeks and that's that's what shocks and scares people. Because it's like what do you do it? So let's just talk about people like myself and probably like many people listening who don't have tens of thousands of dollars sitting in stocks and aren't you know directly impacted the second. This happens when you look at a ticker in your money's dripping away. What does the crash of the market mean for someone like me? It's psychological more than anything else. Because you're not you're not selling you're not buying necessarily not cashing in for X. number of years on your RSP. So I mean time is your friend and all of the old market adages but you see that and you say wow. Do I want to go and buy anything big today? Do I WANNA spend money? You know when you're when you are in a good mood you're more willing to be happy consumer and when you're not and you see all these negative headlines You Kinda Kinda retrench. That's the biggest problem and again from an investing standpoint. You know it is so difficult to sell it. The high and via the low people do the inverse ratio. As you're thinking who I'm missing out when things are hitting records and then when things are on sale you don't WanNa touch with ten football so now is actually time it it. It's it's not over yet. We still seeing the virus ripple through. This is going to take some time. There's no doubt about it. Bought companies that were priced. Way Up here in the stratosphere a few weeks ago discount if you like them then should love them now and that's the hard thing to get past. How much risk has the priced in already? You know we've Seen Corona virus spreading in North America particularly So far at least in the United States is a larger spread of that already priced into these drops or could it get even worse as it expands it it. It could get worse but we are already looking at the forecasters saying okay. We are expecting that. The economy will slow dramatically. Hopefully it doesn't but it is likely going and they are already saying that interest rates which were cut last week going to fall that much further over the next two months you know the bond market which is another one of these barometers of risk and worry and flipside euphoria We have seen bond yields dropped to all time record lows lower than what we saw during the financial crisis when banks were going out of business which is just to me remarkable now as it was explained to me the reason they're lower than where they were then because they never got back up to where they were previously so you're starting at a lower point and then dropping from that so it okay that kind of makes sense but you know we could see zero percent interest rates in North America. This was something we were looking at in when Greece was defaulting. Right right and people were going. How does that work? You're getting zero percent. Yeah because you're buying that bond or whatever it is because you think that the stock market or any other asset classes going to drop further than just keeping it at something get zero percent and again that that adds to the concern in the caution right. How much of a role does politics play here? I mean there's a tremendous amount of discussion in the United States about the role. The economy will play in an election year. And I'm wondering how individual governments and especially Let's say prominent world leaders How their response to the crisis might drive the markets and impact. Well again. You're talking about a health. Risk as opposed to a financial risk more than anything. Oh Eight Oh. Nine was banking industry crisis.

China Russia United States North America TSA Canada Mike Apple Apple FED Cova
How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

The Big Story

09:12 min | 5 months ago

How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

"By now I think most of us no problems with the GIG economy. It treats workers as disposable doesn't offer benefits or protection or anything we traditionally associate with. You know a job. It doesn't pay well enough either so a regular shift can barely make ends meet so for the workers not great for users. It's incredibly convenient. And it's not going anywhere and that means that if anything is going to change in terms of working conditions in the GIG. It's going to have to happen the same way. Those conditions have been changed for more than a century with organizing but before you can officially or at least in the eyes of the law in Canada you need to be classified as workers not as independent contractors or entrepreneurs so that is the first fight but once it's been one then the doors open and then we'll see who tries to walk through it and how the companies that drive the GIG economy. Try TO SLAM IT in their face. Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story Sarah. Much headway is the work and wealth reporter with the Toronto Star. She also has an upcoming podcast. That is all about the fight for working conditions in the GIG economy I saw. Why don't you start because I know you've done a ton of this reporting? Just tell me a little bit about what it's like to work in the GIG delivery economy for food or or companies like that. Yeah I've learned a lot over the past year about kind of the daily routine and kind of daily reality for these workers. I mean the first thing to say is obviously often very physically demanding job done and often quite harsh and Brinkley. Dangerous Conditions Just imagine riding your bike around Toronto fifty kilometers a day in minus twenty weather. It's it's not easy so One of the major concerns of these workers as safety on the road and that partly speaks to as well the way. Our city is designed and not being Super Friendlier. Safe for cyclists. But you know. A bunch of the careers are also drivers. And there's a bunch of safety challenges that come with that as well in terms of having to sort of be tuned in this APP on your phone and driving around the city having to find parking spots that it's very challenging The second thing is that the pay is very low. I mean it's they get for food or are they. Got Four dollars and fifty cents for each delivery. And then they get a commoner a dollar per kilometer from restaurant to drop off so there's really an An incentive and an pressure to get as many orders as you can so again. That's quite demanding in that sense. In order to be financially viable. Really have to turn out those those orders. So yeah the low pay. The unpredictable pay is is Is a major feature of the job and I think. Lastly it's the sense that there's a bit of a lack of respect. I think is how the carriers would have described it for their job and For the for the people doing it. So so that's really sort of what I've learned about the everyday realities of the job. Will you mentioned briefly when you were talking about driving? But to what extent are they tied to this APP? At least according to what you've heard. Yeah so there's been hearings at the Labor board over the past six months that really revealed a lot about how these APP companies operating and obviously most companies don't have to reveal their inner workings but in this case they've sort of had to in a tribunal setting so we've sort of gotten a window into how the APPs intervene in workers kind of daily workflow infra doors case There's an algorithm that determines when you can get shifts so basically the fastest rider the best riders. The ones that you know never are late logging into the APP. And all that kind of thing they're gonNA get first priority in terms of selecting shifts. So that's one way that the APP kind of heavily bit of control. I didn't even realize that they worked in shifts. I thought it was kind of like Uber. Where you know you log in whenever you're ready for some more now that's the major difference between Food Aura. And say Uber Eats. You can just log in and start picking up orders but with Dora. There's sort of this. Extra layer so so some of the features of the way food were operates are are unique to fidora shifts has definitely one of them and then once you accept an order you sort of have the APP beeping at you and telling you whether you're on time in terms of delivering and that kind of thing so that's another way where you're sort of interaction with the APP all the time and Auras also unique because it does have a layer of human dispatchers who careers can also communicate with While they're on shift and what we kind of learned is that those dispatchers are in some ways monitoring couriers behavior which again can restrict or change their ability to log into the APP get shifts so the dispatchers issue strikes for what they see as poor performance whether it's late deliveries or whatever it is And that can in the worst circumstances actually lead to craze being deactivated from the APP and not being able to log in at all. So you've kind of hinted at a couple of times but what is unique about food or maybe explain this just Through the Lens of who is I've an Ostos. So I've also says a career with Dora and he's being at the forefront of trying to organize the union and If this group of careers successful they will be the first at based workforce in Canada to unionize and actually one of the first on the continent so it is a. It's a big deal and really the reason From speaking to an interviewing Ivan and other carriers that they're sort of trying to form a union it goes back to wages the safety and the respect on the job and really a big part of their argument is that you know food says all of these couriers are self-employed entrepreneurs. They don't have the right to form a union. They're you know they're entrepreneurs doing their own thing. The Independent contractors that we hear about all the time exactly and this is a huge pillar of the GIG economy and what Ivan and other careers basically sat at the Labor Board. Was I mean no? There's all these ways that the APP controls the way we do our job and in that sense. It sort of resembles an employer telling you you know when to work and how to work So that was One of the main thrust of what we heard at the Labor Board and recently the Labor Board essentially agreed with the carriers and said yes. This looks more like an employment relationship. So what is the difference or at least? What's the difference supposed to be between a fulltime employees or even just a part time employees and the typical independent contractor? Yes so I went. Boil it down to say that an independent contractor someone who has a lot of power and control over the way that they do their work and these stand to either profit or lose profit from the fruits of their labor so really easy to example to think of as a contractor that you hire to renovate your house your apartment you know you strike a deal with them and then they choose how they go about doing the job whether they bring in five guys to do their work for them or you know they call the plumber to come in and do something. They're really in control of of how they do that. Work and you can say hey at the end of the day. I'm not happy I'M GONNA end this contract. But you can't be like you know. I'm going to give you a performance review and discipline you for this thing that. I don't like that you did because they're not your employees so that kind of is the essence of an independent contractor And again most APP companies Classify their workers in this way. How does the term allow up companies to get more from these workers? Well I think what it does is really reduce the burden on the company as certainly a financial burden it means that the company companies are not paying into a pension plan into an inch employment insurance neither of the workers It means that the workers have no protection under provincial employment laws. It means that they don't have the right to join a union that they don't have the right to minimum wage. So you know it's really downloading a lot of the responsibility for you know your rights and protections on the job to the individual worker and removes them from the system That is set up to protect regular employees on the job. What was food or

Labor Board Toronto Canada Dora Ivan Jordan Heath Rawlings Reporter Brinkley
Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

The Big Story

11:42 min | 5 months ago

Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

"Take a look around you on any given day and it won't take long to notice. Women don't have equal rights but there's one place where we find some of the more shocking examples that's at work statistics candidates with its latest numbers on the gender wage gap college and university graduates. Who are men earned more on average than their female counterparts worth eighty two percent of Canadian women viewed as over bearing if they had a strong opinion at work but on the flip side to that it's eighty seven percent felt men who expressed strong opinions at work are viewed as leaders and confident woman. Now hold twenty. Four percent of senior management positions globally. Those numbers are important because workplace. Equality is what's generally used to measure women's progress and the progress we've made can't be ignored but women still don't earn or own as much as their male counterparts and those positions at the very top of the power structure. Women rarely occupied them even when they do. The same challenges persist this is despite messages of empowerment being touted globally despite women being encouraged to have more confidence and to own their own careers. So what's stopping us from getting to the top and staying there? And how do we change it? I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Laurent mckeon is the author of no more nice girls a book about gender and power. An excerpt from her book recently appeared in the Walrus island so when we look at statistics of women in power in positions of power in Canada however we represented at the top Not Very well in fact in a lot of industries and spheres of public life We're not really represented at all and I think what makes it. Even more depressing is that you can see the disparity between representations sort of at the middle bottom where women are represented and then when we get to the top you know and they're not so for example thirty eight percent of all. Mba Students in Canada are women which is not parody but is okay but then when you look at Executive positions in Canada fewer than ten percent of women occupy those positions. So we start to see the disparity when we look at government has vote. We are represented among half of the voting population But then you get to the level of MP's for example we see that the number hovers around like twenty five thirty percent of most years and we look historically and only eleven percent of premiers in Canada. Have been women so you know it just once you get to the top. It's like where are we? We're not really there at all. So eleven percent. How many premieres is that actually? Eleven Eleven Hodel not even present so eleven total and the I was not elected until nineteen ninety one and one hundred and fifty years. Yeah those are kind of depressing numbers. So what happens when women do get to the top? Yeah I think we believe that wants women get to the top. You know. We're at the top and we will have the you know the power that we fought for for the C. O. You know we will run the company. People will listen to us. We'll stop having to deal with maybe all the B. S. that we dealt with When we were working our way up but that's not true. We have this idea of a glass ceiling and you know we shut her through it and then we are on the other side but we're not thinking about all the broken glass but still there once we shatter and in fact the stats. Here are pretty depressing. As well. We know that once women occupy the C. Suite their pickup actually widens to sixty eight cents For every dollar a man earns from I believe seventy eight or seventy nine so it. It dips earlier and on top of that. We also know that women like women. Ceo's are significantly more likely to be fired forty five percent more likely to be fired even when they're doing well like especially when they're doing well because it's like oh like well now's the time to get the white dude back in here like you know. Now we can You know really. Innovate and exciting. Again women are also far more likely to get hired when a company is in crisis. So it's forty percent of women are hired when a company is crisis versus twenty percent of men and we could say. Well that's great. That's because we trust women when companies in crisis but is actually a research shows that is actually because it's easier to blame women when things don't turn around and it's easier to replace them when they do so. There's this white savior effect where women people of color are often replaced by the white savior. Who Comes in and saves the company from you know the disaster that they put it in and it's all just smoke and mirrors to kind of maintain the power balances that were used to. Can you talk about more of the double standard between women and men when they're in the are in positions of power? Yeah a lot of women that I spoke to and and the research but you know women that spoke to feel that. They're kind of in the situation where they can't win. And it's sort of this double expectation Particularly when your power and the idea that you're supposed to be nice but not too nice and you're supposed to be you know a boss but not bossie or else you might get called another be word that is not as flattering You know they're supposed to be attractive but not too sexual authoritative but not mean and it kind of just swings back and forth until you're like well. What am I supposed to be like? You know I'm you can't win and you're left to follow this very narrow tightrope that is incredibly easy to fall off of. Yeah it's I think you described it as superhuman almost in your writing right yeah. It's the standards set like no one can live up to that. And you know we've found that when you inevitably don't live up to this impossible standard your judge so much more harshly Then men are in a working environment so I wanted to talk about the pedestrian bridge that collapsed at Florida International University. Can you can you tell me about a bit about that story? Yeah so it was a real story. Yes which and why emphasize that will become important in. Just a few seconds so in twenty eighteen other bridge collapsed and six people died and out of that real horrible incident Sort of this myth grew online until people believed it and it was the mid that an all women engineering team built the bridge and people created fake news actual fake news that spread and they cribbed all of these photos from the actual company that was responsible but from their international women's Day posts so they just pretended and made all these fake sites and links so that it looked like only women worked out the company. Wow and then a lot of people would say like well. That's what happens when you hire female engineers. No wonder they aren't in stem and it wasn't just on the Internet. I would hear this story repeated to me more than a year later or just regular people be like. That's not true. It's not what happened but it shows. I think the power of the kind of societal Gulab. That women are not competent in certain fields in particular he feels that are historically male dominated. I mean this is not the only time women have been blamed for something. That isn't their fault wire. Wire women the scapegoat when things go wrong. You know. I think that were just kind of we're primed for it in a lot of ways like as a society were primed to blame women. We blame mothers when kids do something bad and we you know wives when husbands. Do something bad you know. It's always the story of like well. What did she do to make him do that? You know that kind of a narrative that has persisted in politics and pop culture. You know we look back at history and literature. We're just so predisposed to do it when someone nudges us there we go the whole way. And then how does that play out for women? Who are in positions of power. What does that look like at the top were often really adverse to the idea of women in power and you know for a lot of people that I spoke to who you know started thinking about this or maybe changed the way. They approached power and leadership for them. A big moment in history was Hillary Clinton's loss and the polls expected that she was going to come out ahead. You know everyone thought it would be okay. Even though is seeing the herring that she took in the press and sort of the the hate that was happening on social media and and then you know she just became like this ultimate person. Who CAN'T DO ANYTHING RIGHT? You know. It was criticized when she got emotional. She was criticized when she was powerful. Choose was criticized for what she was wearing issues to five hundred masculine and she wasn't perfect of course but she became This symbol for everything like we don't like about women in power and when they get to the top they topple you know they become such a target That people just work very hard to take them down right. So can you explain the he skilled? She's lucky phenomenon. Yeah there's this phenomenon that researchers I've done what you just said that he's skilled. She's lucky and is this tendency that we have to would may look at men and women empower you know and whether that's in a very public position or maybe just like in in our own small company were man's promoted or women has been promoted and we tend to fall back into these very stereotypical traditional narratives. Which are like well. He got there because he's so good at this one account or he really killed this project and of course he deserves to be there and if it's a woman we say well she's lucky is probably because she's attractive or you know she was really nice to the boss or like and it. Kinda just goes from there. But it's not just other people that follow this narrative women fall into this narrative. Allot to you'll hear and that's part of how the term got coined because you'll hear a lot of women. Researchers have heard a lot of women that they interviewed like. Ceo's people in powerful positions when they're asked how they got there. Just had this like really lucky break. I was really lucky to be in the right place at the right time and you know kind of fell my way when I got really lucky with this one piece of success we ha- we buy into the narrative to in it. It perpetuates it. Gotcha I WANNA get more into that in a bid but I. I don't want to ignore the intersection of race and gender here so what happens to a woman of color who has the same qualifications as an a woman with a so called white name? Who's applying for the same job right? Power is so layered and our perceptions of power and who deserves to be empower and who's skilled and not lucky really becomes more complicated

Canada CEO Walrus Island Laurent Mckeon Stephanie Phillips Florida International Universi C. Suite Hillary Clinton Jordan Heath Rawlings Gulab Executive
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:50 min | 6 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"That's called a ghost hotel and nobody except the people who make money from these things want them to exist. In the city city council has even taken steps to prevent them steps that were taken more than two years ago and still have yet to come into effect. So in the meantime at the intersection of these two problems tragedy. Is this enough to shame the city into into action is it enough to shame AIRBNB and two new regulations. We're about to find out UH Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Jennifer Peguero of the Toronto Star. The perfect person to talk to today. She is currently a city hall reporter and previously a crime reporter Jennifer eight hundred. Why don't you I For people who don't live in Toronto for aren't familiar with the area describe city place so city places really right in the heart of the city in Toronto terms. It's a relatively new neighborhood. There's a a lot of high rise condos Just recently the city has tried to figure out how to make it a more fulsome community building a have built a school community centre their They've put in some other amenities but it was really a built as a high rise residential community. There's just a lot of condo units all pushed into this one very small the area at the foot of the city in the heart of downtown. What Happened there this weekend. And what do we know about it so over the weekend there was a pretty significant shooting thing at three people died in that shooting. Two other men were injured. We know that all of the victims were under the age of twenty one and the most recent. Something we've heard from police is that they're actually investigating it as a possible murder suicide there. Three young men they haven't explained to us. which ones were you know? The alleged victims is in which was the alleged shooter but in any event three people dying in one incident is an extreme tragedy. And what about the location where it happened. What was going on so one of the first things we learned from police was that the men were in a unit that was being rented out through Airbnb and that is something that we have seen in the past? There've been incidents in AIRBNB units and that was a piece of information that police told us right away and something that's sort of I think been at the heart of the story. How how often does that kind of thing happened? I know Just anecdotally at least that city places notorious for being half real renters and half empty apartments. That are on AIRBNB. One of the downsides. I think to having this really rapidly growing city as we've had a lot of condos condo go up and a lot of people have purchased units as investment properties and one of the ways that they are garnering investment. Out of these is to rent them on sites like like AIRBNB. AIRBNB is not the only site. It's probably the most popular one. But you can make a lot of money just renting out these places on even just a weekend and the issue is that these the units that are being rented out this way are often not the owners primary residence again. They've purchase it as an investment instead of renting it out through kind of the traditional means or someone on signs a lease for twelve months just even a shorter amount of time. It's allowing the churn of people to come through and in buildings like city place. It's not the only place we've seen this. There are often multiple units in one building where people are renting out through AIRBNB and that creates a problem for the residents living there if the people coming to their building don't have a respect for the neighborhood or the neighbors and we. We've seen that in incidents like this. We hear about them so anecdotally. It sounds like a lot. It's hard to know how problematic the units are th. There's thousands of units listed on AIRBNB. So you have to put that in perspective but there certainly have been incidents like this. Has there been pushback from advocacy groups from neighborhood associations renters. Yeah there is is an advocacy group In the city which is quite organized airbnb. And they've been really pushing back against these types of units where they're are primarily rented through AIRBNB. We know it's a huge nuisance for for residents that live next to these. Units are in the same neighborhood is these units and it's also initially for the city because it means that these units aren't being offered as long term rental solutions in a city where we have a housing crisis. What was the immediate reaction from Serbian? Be after this particular shooting. Well there's been this ongoing issue of what they call ghost hotels and they're they're deeply concerned about these these kinds of units being rented out in this way Obviously a shooting building is is devastating for everyone And they would like to see. I think a crackdown on have been pushing for a crackdown on these types of units. What does the city tunnel sue the city at the end of two thousand seventeen after a lot of debate AH decided to regulate AIRBNB and what that means is that AIRBNB is allowed to operate and companies like AIRBNB are allowed to operate legally in the city but there are rules and some of those rules and I think airbnb and others would argue? The most important rule is that the unit that you're renting out has to be your primary residence residents and you can only rent it out for a certain number of days or consecutive days in the year and the idea. Is that if it's your home the home that you live in most of the time time. So let's say you have a Condo in Toronto this is true for a lot of Seniors in the city for example. But you go to Florida for part of the year. It would allow you to rent out your condo to someone on Airbnb while you're not here but the hope is that if it's your primary residence then you would take perhaps greater care in in screening the people that are using the unit or that it would prevent this ghost hotel phenomenon. That's been such a problem in Toronto. Okay so that was the end of two thousand seventeen exactly What happened? So what happened is that there were appeals. Made to this provincial tribunal It's called the local planning appeal tribunal. Oh really long name. We Call Them L. Pat but essentially they hear these types of appeals when it comes to city planning and development issues and and there was a pushback that the the regulations the city had an council had approved were too strict and this is coming from a landlord groups and and others who want to be able to rent out their investment properties in the way they always have been and finally in the end of last year the Alpine actually sided with the city and said no that the city's regulations would stand so we're actually in this strange Limbo period right now where the rule of the land are the regulations. The city put in place. But there's still some uptake in that the city hasn't actually started actively Lee licensing and having those already signed up on Airbnb as part of this licensing scheme so there will be this period up until The city says the summer summer where they haven't actually started actively licensing or enforcing the units. But that's coming. So this was a really ill-timed Not that any shooting is not ill-timed but I in the gray area between Enacting it and enforcing totally. So the hope is that once they start licensing enforcing part of that what is going to be a requirement that the companies like Airbnb are verifying the identity of the owners and their principal residence so that they would be able to identify that an owner lists a unit that they didn't show some kind of government defor as their primary residence then hopefully that unit would be delisted because because it doesn't adhere to the city's policies and that could be something that Airbnb what essentially regulate by adhering to the rules that the city put in place whether that works in practice. We'll have to see once. Those enforcement mechanisms are in place. But that's the hope is that you're not allowed to rent out an investment condo unless it's your primary residence or it's let's say it's your kids primary residence and it's hard to know what the loopholes are until they got a lot of reliance on the company itself to police this. It's it will be interesting to see to what extent city enforcement by law enforcement officers can play a part in. And that's the part of the challenge with AIRBNB and sites like it as that. The city doesn't have really insight into sort of the back end of the system. They they can't necessarily see that information. That AIRBNB has when you sign up to list your house right and that makes.

AIRBNB Toronto Toronto Star Jordan Heath Rawlings Jennifer Peguero reporter Jennifer eight murder Florida principal Lee
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:24 min | 8 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"And individual had to prove that they were report and And we don't do that anymore. We do not feel that we are being taken advantage of in any stretch People don't go to food banks To take advantage of of the system The We we get rid of that barrier by how we Interacting and greet Individuals yesterday had a wonderful meeting with with two of my colleagues Who Run the Food Bank? I at New Toronto Street and these are individuals who who really value An individual clients coming in and saying How how can we? How can make your day better and And so we we make it a shopping experience. It's not a not a not A. Here's here's your bag food and Employees it's shop for your for your food. We're glad that you're here. We make sure that That individuals have access to all of these social benefits that they They are entitled to so we set set up systems of of referrals so that Individuals we can shorten the line of individuals needing Food banks but you know the food banks are. There's an important They're an important resource to tens of thousands of people in our city. So while while we have this emergency need We will continue to fill. But we're GONNA advocate for systemic changes our donations as the need for this rises at least in Toronto donations. are are difficult We are very grateful for anybody who makes a food or a monetary donation to the organization Because daily bread needs and it goes you know into to such a simple Needed item food. We just need And so the charitable sector In my opinion is the most competitive sector of our economy It represents about ten percent sign of the economy and They're eighty six thousand charities across the country and all have brilliant missions and so if you have to compete against eighty six thousand great missions And differentiate yourself it becomes very difficult and so how do you do that. That actually fascinates me that that you're in competition with so many worthy causes we Make it known that it is that somebody's active generosity is being used wisely and is desperately needed and People you know it doesn't matter your your background we can all we can all think about a meal It's a commonality across cultures. Everybody knows that That it is a basic Right that individuals have and and And and I wanna see that fulfilled and so we make that known we work with other charities to To make sure that you know social services are provided and You know it's very difficult but time I would say Canadians want to see every individual In their neighborhood doing well and when they're not then they step up to the plate and And they pull out their wallets. Aren't they drop off food. And and they It's an Edward expression of their their inward values. In practical terms is a better to give food or money and what kind of food in practical terms. It's it's better to give to give funds John's but I I don't want to discount the giving of food you know I recall my mother taking me around Lob laws and Often saying here's the paper Bag You know I want you to fill it up with food that you would like and we'll we'll we'll drop it off either at a fire hall or at the end of the grocery store and so t to give food you you you have a a a a great tangible experience that you can pass down to to your Children That that opportunity to think beyond your yourself so I think that there's great lessons through through food to be able to give Funds are also very much appreciated And so as time And so is so as somebody raised their hand and advocating for for change so people have the opportunity to to donate to volunteer advocate. And we're we're grateful recipients on all three what changes for you both in terms of the need from clients and the donations that you get as we move into the holiday a season so the The holiday season is a time where the daily bread food bank makes breaks the next year. It is critically glee important. We are we. We work very very hard and very long hours in order to be able to mobilize that great army of volunteers To be able to raise foods and Diane funds and you know what what what changes I would say. The need doesn't doesn't change during during December but were reminded you know each each and every day as we visit food banks has food is distributed as hope is raised We're reminded of the need and and and we can see it And and this is a time of reflection for many families and so as they think about a season of hope. I think they want to make sure that there is There is hope uh-huh right across sectors right across cultures Roy For every individual living in the country. How do you go about making the move from being a food bank? It is on the front lines feeding people to more of the advocacy and the campaign for systemic change. That you mentioned without kind of taking your eye off the ball you mentioned like resources are limited right. How do you do both these missions? At once what he sacrifice well the good thing abode advocacy is a actually. It's quite low cost to do it. You know we It does not cost us a lot to be able to meet with a minister to meet with if they Member of parliament and city councillor and provide them with the research and the data that supports a compelling case that that that of poverty in the city and and the solutions to it. So it it. It's a lot of Subway Tokens and meetings Rather than cost to do it So our mission is clear We will I work very very hard to increase the quantity and quality of the food. That would is being distributed abated across the across the network While at the same time we devote a fulltime staff resource to mobilize the community and And and we make use of all social channels And that's actually been one of the positive things but social media's it's you know in terms of democratising our our ability to advocate for systemic solutions. So so that is Another tool that we make a great use of finally. What is if you had to sum it up one of the key takeaways from this report that you want people to understand that they may not have understood before about Food Insecurity well. I think I would summarize the report by saying the need is growing and the NITA's growing and it's the Woman or man Sitting beside you on the bus or or at a Tim Hortons who is in need of food banks and unless we Respond to a call of action that need will continue to grow zero and so let's let's respond to it joyfully and and and And Begin to work and fix the stomach The challenges that we have so that everyone I in in in the city. I can escape the clutches of poverty. Thanks for joining us. Now thank you. You'll have ten. CEO of the daily bread. Food Bank if you'd like to help her volunteer you can go to daily bread dot ca to find out more for more from us you can head to the big story PODCAST DOT CA. You can also talk to us on twitter. We're always listening. Have B- big story Afghan and we're in every podcast application. At least the ones we know about where you can write us in review US give us five stars. Tell your friends like subscribe everything that podcast people do. Thanks for listening. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow.

Toronto US Jordan Heath Rawlings twitter NITA Edward John Diane Roy Tim Hortons
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:01 min | 11 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story Greg Macarthur investigative reporter at the Globe and Mail along with his colleague Robyn doolittle he traced the roots of Canada proud out back to Ontario. I Greg High. Why don't you start getting into where on -tario proud came from an who is jeff battling all its founder so antero proud started as a essentially just a facebook page and was in in its infancy what Jeff bellinger describes as something that was just fun for him to do so Jeff Jeff Baylon goal is like sort of a cut from the cloth breath lifelong conservative political operative and he has all of the trademarks of like you know your classic sort of dyed in the wool audio log from from a certain party volunteered for local candidate when he was a kid got involved with the PC youth group. you know knows all of the people who've walked in these circles as they got older and got more involved in real government and he's a true believer in terms of like you know the basic core principals as it comes to like economic freedoms and smaller government most conservatives ascribe to and he he continued on that path after working for a conservative defense minister after working for a a right leaning city councillor and he briefly worked at some news he ended up at navigator which most people in immediate have definitely heard of. It's probably the premier crisis. Communications firm navigators is has been a home to many conservative strategist strategist that have come out of government and are looking to apply their skills elsewhere in the private sector like many other before many others before balance ended up navigator and hated it he he said he was really bored and he's not to say he didn't learn some things but it wasn't necessarily for him and so while he was at navigator and he said he'd he'd he'd been kicking this idea around for a long time. and it's and it's been a bugaboo for a lot of conservatives is the idea that there was no real third third party advertiser in Canada or in Ontario that could take on the working families coalition. Tell me what what exactly was on -Tario proud when he made it. What was it like so so. It's it's started it started as this facebook page essentially this this is simplifying things somewhat but it it was basically just like a meam factory like he would produce photos superimposed with with taxed and and or videos that went really really hard at Premier Kathleen Wynne then then Premier Kathleen Wynne and it was unlike like a lot of a mainstream television ads you see that are attacks against certain politicians. It was like kind of no holds barred the language was was pretty crass and the recycle and somewhat juvenile to like like name calling type things example if I can think of a few like calling Kathleen Wynne a scumbag Doug referring to her as a clown on multiple defend April fools on on April first dates referring to posting a picture of her and calling the fool now now. That's not to say that that's that's all it was because he he would attack specific policies and in particular where he got a lot of traction attraction was around hydro. Everyone will can recall a couple years ago that in certain more rural parts of the province hydro bills were shooting through roof with explicable and Balan Gall and we're on -tario proud pointed the finger straight at the liberal government for this problem up and it was during that time that the website became very very popular and his content his videos as memes began to be shared very widely. The conclusion was a big following for the The facebook page. So what do you do with that. He did a couple of things one he he's very savvy digital marketer and he recognized that whenever you share something on facebook or engaged with content and away other than just passively sort of reading that produces all sorts of data that can be used to understand your audience better that allows him to tailor messages it allows him to collect Komo addresses for people that might be possible supporters both of Ontario proud and or the or certain political ideas so he he has built up. I don't WanNa make it sound like like I've seen this because I haven't it's proprietary he would it would be on his computer but he's built up a probably a really excellent snapshot of a certain segment of the population and that is like minded with zero bride and and what what they liked digitally what they don't like digitally who they're connected to he's done a couple of things though with that audience one one is that he has recognizing this goes back to him kicking around the idea of there not being a really effective third-party advertiser in the province he has filled fill that void and he has turned to a lot of corporations and individuals who would typically support Conservative Party and has sought their support financially and and they have supported him. He has raised a lot of money. We only have a really small snapshot shot in Public Filings of what has been donated to Antero proud because they are required as a third party advertiser. They're required by law provincially to you report all of the money that was given to them within six months of the writ being issued for the last provincial election and and whatever money they raised after the writ was issued during during the actual campaign itself and during that time Ontario Proud received donations totaling four hundred eighty nine thousand in dollars. Now there were many individuals that gave the but in terms of the vast bulk of that money came from a construction companies and developers who have a keen interest in getting certain government policies pushed through provincially but what our investigation or research showed is that that there are there were many other donations were given to Ontario proud outside of that reporting period that the public the media and and regulators have no insight into whatsoever because this is. It's perfectly legal. Ontario proud is not obliged to tell anyone who's wanting outside of that that pre period and the campaign period. Maybe now give us a little context about what third party advertisers are in Canada and the history of them in Ontario so it is an interesting designation this whole idea of being a third party advertiser and it. It's it's in keeping the the reason why they are designated that way is that it's in keeping with sort of this core principle. We have as a democracy that we don't want a level playing field when it comes to elections and that means not just because someone is well resourced sourced has the financial means organizational means to really sway public opinion that that should not they should not have a leg up and that goes for both political parties and it goes just for individuals who wanted to propagate a message so as a result we've created this designation in law called a third party political advertiser and It's a it's a group with specific. Partisan messages usually designed to attack a certain party. That's running and there there are specific examples that the regulators Peter's give out about activity that's covered by by this regulation and if they're engaging in that sort of partisan activity they're required to to register Sir with Elections Ontario or case of a federal election the required to register with elections Canada and if the if they raise a certain amount of money and they spend a certain amount of money they're they're required digging an audit done by an independent firm They have to disclose how they were funded. What spent who received the funds. Although there's not not totally uncommon in Canada it's much more prevalent in the United States right where you see a lot of and because of certain legal court decisions citizens the united the most famous one it's a complete. It's a bit of a free for all and you've seen the rise of these things called Super PACs yeah they call it dark money. some people call. Tony would like it depends on what side of the what side of the spectrum one sits so you know other people. I didn't realize that was a loaded term well. I think I think it a book called Dirk money right by by Jane Mayer her. I think like if you were to ask them one.

Ontario facebook Canada Jeff Jeff Baylon Kathleen Wynne Jeff bellinger Conservative Party Greg High Jordan Heath Rawlings antero Greg Macarthur Robyn doolittle Antero investigative reporter Balan Gall founder Jane Mayer liberal government Tony
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:34 min | 11 months ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story sorry Sheldon McLeod today longtime journalist and radio host he is currently host of the Sheldon McLeod show on news ninety five seven in Halifax. I shelf could teach you Jordan. Were you on the air when Dorian Heff. I was called in to do a special broadcast on Saturday afternoon. we were going live live from one until we planned about six o'clock so that ended up becoming a an eleven hour broadcast. How was it long long but it was very rewarding in many ways. we had an opportunity to obviously give give play-by-play. That's how I described it to a meteorologist that I had join us. which was the idea that you had time to prepare didn't exist anymore? We were at the point where the system was moving in and it went from. Here's what you need to do to get ready to. What are you seeing. What are you experiencing. I took the opportunity to to reach out to the number people. I've met over the years we had the mayor of a small town in southwestern Nova Scotia garment join US spoke with the mayors from from Shelbourne to to Bridgewater Lunenburg Homema- all the way up towards Cape Breton in order trite and see where the system wasn't how it was affecting community and as the winds intensified hence applied as the rain continued here in Halifax. I it really wasn't opportunity that I wasn't entirely sure it would be a good radio radio but people were very interested in sharing with us what they were seeing what they were experiencing so tell me how quickly it came on because one of the reasons we're calling you is i. I don't think in the lead up to the weekend many of us in Canada. We're expecting dory in to to hit these coast. Let alone as badly as it did. So so how. How quickly did it come? compared to what was expected will the storm itself. Dorian had been obviously churning through the Bahamas in had caused devastation the station and destruction and had stalled earlier in the week meteorologist then said you know best as we know the best gas is that this track of this system will bring it ashore somewhere in Nova Scotia at some point on on Saturday exactly was it wasn't exactly a an easy thing to predict as they sat until it got to about two hours or so away from us. They wouldn't know the exact path so. We knew something was coming. We knew something was going to happen. In fact on on Friday night I had reached out to meteorologist Richardson Hausky who actually happens to be a counselor city councillor in Halifax and I said is there a possibility that this will arrive at category two strength which is exactly the same strength as the hurricane one that we experienced back in two thousand three he said once we get him within the two hour window will know a better. We'll have a better idea of win. It'll be aware opie making landfall and it was headed headed directly towards Halifax it was expected to move from Halifax inland and through towards Prince Edward Island so at one o'clock when I started broadcasting. The rain was obviously falling quite heavily. The winded started to intensified not necessarily at hurricane strength but throughout two o'clock ah three o'clock in the four o'clock it was well quite a quite a scene outside of our studio windows and we could see trees bending in the wind we could obviously sheets of rain that were coming through and oddly enough strangely enough people still out on the streets driving their cars. which is Kinda hard hard to believe? Will Yeah where people told to evacuate. Did they evacuate. How did people prepare the voluntary. Evacuation order went out by the Halifax Regional Municipality on Friday afternoon and several of the coastal communities they had given a warning through environment candidate through the hurricane center that waves could in fact hit peaks of fifteen meters close to fifty foot waves on top of a storm surge timing this happened not during high but we had hi tide during the event and there was some considerable concern that people in their homes along the shorelines might in fact become stranded rice later or worse from all accounts when the Red Cross emergency centers were set up people org. I told by municipal officials. They had people visiting their homes calling them up saying you might want.

Halifax Dorian Heff Jordan Heath Rawlings Halifax Regional Municipality Sheldon McLeod US Canada Cape Breton Nova Scotia dory Bahamas Richardson Hausky Bridgewater Lunenburg Homema Red Cross Prince Edward Island Shelbourne fifteen meters eleven hour
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

22:43 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Jordan heath rawlings and this is the big story. Lash etzel is a reporter with news eleven thirty in vancouver and she's been on it since the beginning eyelash i can you tell me just first of all well how strange this story has been to cover over the past three weeks probably one of the strangest just because of all this lack of information that that we felt that we had with this case because a lot of the times when you know we're able to find some kind of information about the the suspect something that can help us you know walnut except what they did or dismiss it but at least try to understand a motive and understanding about getting inside their minds but we're we'll be all we had this time was a couple photos from surveillance footage <hes> stories about going to another province for work and just some information nation about the teens from friends that they had made on social media and gaming platforms <hes> that we weren't even sure was really them or maybe just a couple of fotos does so it over all this has just been really strange to see something that is stretched over almost a month now that this has been going on and just to see see the despite the longtime that we've been talking about this story the little information that we still have about it so tell me where this story began and how different <hes> <hes> was it back then when you first heard of the story <hes> what did please describe it as well. This was a case spanning twenty four days from the time that we first heard about this too just the other day hearing about <hes> what we expect to be the kind of the conclusion so we first came into the story on monday july life fifteenth and that's when police came into its saying that they had found two bodies about twenty kilometers south of leered hot springs. That's on the alaska highway and those death seem suspicious but police didn't offer many details so all we had as journalist was two bodies bodies and it wasn't until three days later on july eighteenth that we learned their identities. We're going to begin with this. A man hunt is underway after the american woman and her australian boyfriend were found dead china d._c. And lucas fowler were on a road trip in northern british columbia police in fowler's native australia. Throw you say it appears. They were both shot. We learned the pair had they had met her. <hes> hostile in croatia two years ago fallen in love and they were avid travellers travelers and they were on a road trip across canada when they were murdered now the two young men at the heart of the story <hes> who were found dead the other day. How were they initially reported. Initially so <hes> cama cloud and brownish miguel ski weren't even in the picture at all. They eventually actually came into this as being reported missing v._c._r.'s n._p._r. Asking for the public's assistance in locating nineteen-year-old kim mccloud and eighteen year old brier squiggle ski from puerto bernie have not been in contact with their family for the last few days they were driving the vehicle found on fire fifty kilometers south of dease lake. The family family said that they had left their home port l. bernie on vancouver island on july twelfth and said that they were going up to white horse to find work work so that's quite a drive up <hes> from all the way from the island all the way up to <hes> well way up to white horse and they hadn't been i heard from since so the family was concerned <hes> and but they were just reported as missing at the time so that's all that we knew about it and that's how they were reported. Adverse was that we had these murders and that these boys were missing but we did not know exactly how they were involved and there's one other victim that comes into play play here and who's that yes so <hes> what we had then was <hes> on july nineteenth r._c._m._p. And dease lake aac that's around a twenty hour drive from vancouver got a report of a dodge pickup truck with a camper on fire just south of the town and that's when a man's man's body was found two kilometers away but days went by and that man was not identified for several days <hes> this is actually aware <hes> shimon belsky and mcleod finally kind of came into the public eye four days later and several hundred kilometers away another mystery this one near dease lake lake a pickup truck outfitted with sleeping camper was discovered on fire the owners nowhere to be seen but not far away. This man was found dead along a highway. You pull out. It's not clear what kind of connection he had. If any to the camper truck it was being driven by nineteen year old cama cloud and eighteen year old brier sh- miguel ski from vancouver couvert islands r._c._m._p. Said that the truck found on fire was being driven by the pair but at this point like. I said they were just called missing scene so we're wondering are they part of. Are they victims in this are they connected to this man's body because we weren't even sure if the vehicle was connected to this man at all we learned that the like i said the pair traveling up to white horse to find work and no one had heard from them since but there had been reports that they've been spotted medal lakes scotch win. That's about a twenty four hour drive from dease lake so these are vast expanses that that this seems to already be covering and it was another two days and finally <hes> r._c._m._p. <hes> release that the man that they had found the mystery man that had yet to be identified fide as leonard dick. He is a <hes> botanist who taught at the university of british columbia and he's from vancouver and this at at this point r._c._m._p. Announced that schmidt elsie mcleod or actually being treated as suspects given these latest developments kaman brier are no longer considered answered missing the r._c._m._p. Are now considering ken macleod and brirish miguel sqi a suspects in the dease lake suspicious death and the double homicide of luke's fowler and tannadice this is when we finally start to hear that the young men <unk> are moving away from being labeled as missing to being suspects in these murders so from your perspective and the rest of the media and i guess <hes> families and just general <hes> british columbians as well right before that announcement was made what was going on in the community <hes> what was has the coverage like when when the r._c._m._p. Would hold press conferences because at that point you've got to separate murders including three people two missing teens and if i remember knbr correctly from out here nobody really knew how to connect the dots no at this point. We weren't sure how to connect them. A lot of this was because we were waiting for those dots connected by r._c._m._p. We knew about the deaths of of the to tourists we knew about the mystery man <hes> but we didn't understand how how that tied in exactly to <hes> mcleod and szumowski because all we knew is that they're finally learned that the truck that they have been driving was the one that was found on fire and so the information that we had was limited and so at the at those news conferences there was just so many questions being thrown at police saying like can you tie by these together. Can you tell us information and it was still like very early in the case so we weren't having quite the same like news conferences that we were seen every day once the ones the search manhunt began in gillam in earnest up until that point. I think a lot of us were just reaching out to all the r._c._m._p. Detachments and these are detachments that i don't don't think get a lot of the attention that they were getting so it for them. It was a very cautious approach of we don't want to release too much information when we are still working on this is case confirming it ourselves so once mcleod inch mcculskey were considered suspects. I'm then you guys started digging a little deeper into who they were and what became clear when you start you're doing now. The first lot of the information that we were getting was through social media some friends of the teens or people who said that they were friends in new them through social media dan gaming sites <hes> had brought forward some photos of <hes> briars miguel ski in particular the video showing him standing in <hes> combat bat fatigues of a rifle in hand <hes> as well as some like apparently on air soft replica rifle and wearing a gas mask and also some photographs autographs of like a saas tika armband and a hitler youth knife longingly at this point. We weren't sure there's not a whole lot out there about these boys but we're we're not trying to label them as anything when we don't know exactly what they are. We have no no posts on social media about the the pair but what they wanted to do. There's is nothing suggesting that there was any sort of malicious intent at this point so all we really had that point was a couple of photos <hes> and we didn't want to just be making these assumptions about who these boys were their family coming out saying these were young boys. They just wanted to work. They had just finished school looking for <hes> the next opportunity and felt that they could could find out in another province so tell me <hes> how and where the real man hunt started in what happened from there so it wasn't really until july twenty first i that the man hunt itself really began in earnest or at least in the public eye <hes> up until this point the boys had just been missing and that was the point on on that date that they were finally confirmed as <hes> suspects in the death of <hes> china and lucas fowler and also charged in the murder of leonard dick from vancouver so the next day on july twenty second <hes> police found burned out vehicle near the fox lake cremation reserve outside gillam manitoba and that we still had to wait some days before police. He's confirmed that that car was actually the one that the <hes> that was linked to the boys and that it had been stolen it belonged to leonard dick and that macleod inch miguel ski had stolen that vehicle and <hes> likely brought it to this point but this is also the day that anyone i can confirm that they actually saw the pair and police finally identified leonard dick on that day over the next couple of days the search around gillam intensified and this is a small town it was just inundated with mounties and the military they were searching by land and water air and they set up information check stops along the only road in and out of the community now. This was just to talk to residents get to know them. Also maybe jog their memories. Now of course these boys had been on the run or at least missing for many days and that gave them lots of time to not be in the public eye and get across a vast amount of area where people would just look at them and think these are just two boys choice in a car or on a road trip or they're just going from point a. to point be so that gave them a lot of time to cover quite a bit of ground and this was is just they're hoping that at some point in gillam that that somebody may be just recognizes them and maybe they even accidentally or they they helped them not knowing that they were suspects in any murderers because even at this point most of us didn't know so like any good samaritan you see somebody on the side of the road. You might stop and help them and you don't know so this itself like this. This whole search is intensifying in in this very rural and very untamed in an unforgiving part of the country. I mean the the northern parts of the prairie provinces <hes> i'm from calgary and just going up to northern alberta and in northern manitoba itself. These are vast expanses of dense bush. This is must gag. That's let's swamp open bog and just really hard to get through <hes>. You can't drive for most of it. There's only a couple of access roads and you're surrounded. This is the one of the heights of the bugs season and there's just wildlife everywhere so there's just all those risks and that terrain is tough. This is the kind on of land that you can easily sink into and just never be seen again at this point. We're wondering if they got lost out there. This search might never ver- come to an end and this might have slowed them down but it also meant that would hinder the the police searched for them as well because the police also had to go through the same land that these boys were going through so tell me about then because you mentioned that that was sort of july twenty third twenty fourth tell me about the ten plus days <hes> before their bodies were actually found this week because there wasn't a lot of information but there were all kinds of rumors rumors. There certainly were so many people coming forward saying that they had seen them in <hes> in northern b._c. In alberta <hes> other or people once once the days started to roll by people started calling in saying to ontario police that they had seen the boys in ontario so now now the question became had the boys doubled back perhaps found another car and made their way south and got into ontario because there's just so many there's is limited roads and limited access so obviously police looking into all of these tips getting hundreds of tips by this point and nothing being confirmed not nobody nobody being able to provide that that physical proof or or the very sure thing that this was a verified sighting of the boys and so actually the last time that we really knew that we had seen the boys confirmed was on monday july twenty second and since then there had been nothing so there were a lot of rumors is going around a lot of fear in communities at one point <hes> r._c._m._p. Being sent down to <hes> yordan to check out and make sure that any <music> <hes> there were had been reports again unconfirmed so we had another community that was getting involved in a high alert and again r._c._m._p. Swarming the area that turning out to be nothing so r._c._m._p. Call were called down and resume the search around gillam. That's really where they seem to to intensify the search for for those boys and it's not that they didn't search a small area they searched eleven thousand square kilometers and with within perspective that that is larger than the g._t. A that would be searching all of the g._p._a. And that's in swamp. That's in rough terrain so that's not an actually a very easy search and it turns out that they were found not too far from there right ultimately so what we had was that on like you mentioned that the ten days so on august fourth we had members in the r._c._m._p. Underwater recovery team they started this search of the section of the nelson river <hes> near near gillam and about northeast of it after they announced that they had found a damaged aluminum boat on the shore two days before and r._c._n. R._c._n. Manitoba had the dive teams go through the water around that area over the weekend but they didn't find too much. They told us that then then they were they found some items on identified items in the area along with the boat that kept them centered around that and this was an area that was is eight kilometers from where the suspects were the last known vehicle was found on fire just outside of gillam and so this was actually not not very far when you think about the fact that they had searched eleven thousand square kilometers and it all came down to just eight kilometers away this morning at approximately ten a._m. R._c._m._p. Officers located to male bodies in the dense brush within one kilometer from where the items were found. This is approximately eight kilometers from where the burnt vehicle was located at this time we believe these are the bodies of the two suspects wanted in connection with the homicides in british columbia. What do we know about how they were found. What condition they were in. What were they found with etcetera etcetera. How did this end at at this point. We don't know much about how they were found exactly where they were found and and in what condition beyond that we know police. These were saying that we i that police believed without a doubt that these were the bodies of cat cloud brirish miguel sqi. We don't know at this point what the cause of death is of these two bodies that were found <hes> exactly where they were found if they were found in the water <hes> if they had some connection into that aluminum boat what were those items that were found on the shore did they. They were linked to the boys. But what exactly were they so but these men are dead and we're never going to get a trial already. Are we ever going to find the answers to these questions. A trial at this point is probably unlikely most the time if somebody is found dead obviously there's nobody to charges oranges nobody to punish <hes> police have said that at this point they they feel confident but they're going to keep investigating <hes> to make sure that there are no other suspects acts that there are no other <hes> that they believe that there's no other way that lucas fowler china dis and leonard dick could have been killed other than by <hes> <hes> shmegegge game macleod but we just have so many unanswered questions and like you said that we still don't know exactly why the boys left home if they had a plan to find work in white horse if that was actually true how could they become suspects in the murders of these three individuals and charged urged in one of them so far and if they are responsible for all these deaths what happened i mean police say that. They don't think the deaths were targeted so so we don't know why these young men could have possibly done this so what happens next all right now. It is waiting for that autopsy on the bodies. It's it's being done as we speak so police should get some answers in the next coming days when they release that information or even if they do it's still still up in the air and then through that we're just gonna keep seeing police probably mentioning talking about the ongoing investigation. They might not release a whole lot of information about how they're gathering their evidence but at the end of the day because of the high profile nature of this case we will hopefully find out ultimately when this case will be closed and when they when they have determined that that these boys although they will never see a trial and i don't think that we will ever be able to you in the public eye definitively say that they were convicted of these murders or that they that they that they did them. I the end of the day that leaves the police will say we do not believe that they were that these murders were committed by anybody else so that we don't think that that we have some people still on the loose when you have a case like this that involves different parties it spans provinces that spans thousands and thousands of kilometers and you have a multiple <hes> divisions of the r._c._m._p. This n._p._r. Involved and local police nobody's really saying anything. How do you piece something like this together. In a newsroom with a lot of people and a lot of people are looking at very different angles angles. Thankfully we have multiple people in the newsroom who were able to make out different calls to the various r._c._m._p. Divisions when you're trying to reach so many different bodies so many moving parts it's sometimes nice when somebody is constantly on a constant beat and checking in on certain files and also just staying in touch. Most of the information that we were getting was coming out of manitoba because that's where most of the press conference were happening. It's where the search was was is going on and where they believe that the boys were located. How do you think we'll remember this story. In the the weeks and months and years later i think that a a lot of it will come down to that. The question of why that we won't have a lot of those answers that we really crave and that i think that a lot of the the people involved here especially the family members of the victims won't get that closure that that they want or the justice that they deserve when it comes to a case like this the rumor mills will all have their their hi policies especially on what could have led the young men to northern manitoba to potentially killing these individuals goals if they actually did this and if so just why you don't see cases like this a lot most of the time were able to or at least police are able to piece together and understanding of why these things happen and i think that that is the big question that has not been answered. We have a lot of the other questions as journalists that we ask things like the <hes> the how for many of the suspects are for the victims how they passed the when the wears but that big question that i think a lot of people will keep asking why thanks lisa. Thanks for having me. Lachapelle is a reporter with news eleven thirty. That was the big story for more on you can do the big story podcast dot c._a. You can find and all of our other stories. They're more than two hundred fifty of them now. You can also talk to us on twitter at the big story f. p. n. And of course you can find us wherever you get your podcast on apple on google on stitcher or on spotify. Shoot us a rating and review if you wanna be really nice. Claire is the producer of the big story. Stephanie phillips and ryan clark our our associate producers and lisa. Nielsen is our digital editor. I'm jordan rawlings. Thanks for listening have a great weekend. We'll talk monday.

murder lucas fowler leonard dick vancouver dease lake gillam miguel sqi elsie mcleod reporter Manitoba ken macleod alaska manitoba croatia alberta vancouver island Jordan heath university of british columbia
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Sarah Bosvelt is a writer at chatelain and other publications. She is also a sometimes host of this podcast and for the purposes of this discussion but listed last a mom. I Sara Jordan. Thanks for having me. Oh no problem you. <hes> put your finger on feeling that I think anybody with kids has had or anybody with annoying friends on facebook have kids what is this insanity is my friend okay the kid tell me about the moment you realize you become one of the competitive parents yeah so I think I was about baby was about four months and I don't know if you remember the starting but four months is a bit of a Harry time for sleep. You know there's something called the four months leaper aggression. I don't think we had it too hard but you know you're up a million times in the night so this is my major caveat is like I was not having much sleep at the time I called in a bad after a long day with this baby and and understanding that I was going to be up many times in the night and I check my phone which is something you shouldn't do for you go to bed and I saw foes facebook posts from my friend very close friend of mine who also has a an infant daughter little bit older. I've assange the daughter and she was looking for childcare spaces and I knew that she didn't need it till eighteen months and I was like you're one of those parents. He's like all up in this planning trying to get everything done like why can't you just enjoy being you know apparent to this infant in just like chill on the stuff but really my reaction to that and being angry about that and Shell signed her kid up for swimming lessons which is like what to do that too was really just hey like. I'm not thinking about these things. Should I be thinking about these things as you're making me an anxious mess because I'm not thinking about these things of course I was only one making myself anxiousness but we can get to that later sort of the the environment that we're in that moment. I sort of like damn. Why am I being kind of a jerk to my friend? Who's he's just trying to do? Her best is all about me and my insecurities in my feelings of not measuring up and so I think that the legal I gave it was competitive which is really just. I'm thinking that I should be doing more doing better doing things earlier and I see people all around me doing that and it's making me insane because I'm not doing these things and so I must be doing something wrong. I must be failing my child somehow you're judging your worth as apparent by other people's kids yeah. It's really lame to say it allowed. Oh how but that's totally how I felt but you're not alone now. I realize that actually after writing this piece. Tell me how it happens to parents how you go from whatever it is you're expecting and for the purposes of this discussion discussion. We're talking about first time parents because that's all we are ended also tends to be the people that you see on facebook who are getting carried away with what their kid is doing and and how how far advanced little johnny is right totally I think you hit on and both of those notes very well. Already you know I think we are in a parenting culture. Every generation sort of has one but <hes> you know we're in a time when people are not really starting their families until they've had most of their twenties unease often and not everywhere in Canada a lot of pockets of Canada where you still start your family pretty much when you're young but the general numbers are numbers are increasing. I think it's you know averages around thirty plus for just north of thirty for for women for a first time time child and so you've had maybe a career where you are you know been. Maybe a little bit competitive trying to get your foot in the door. Get a job establish yourself and then you start your family which is different from generations past also you. You mentioned facebook. Can you mentioned instagram. You mentioned sort of this environment where you could see everything else in here. From lots of people you know talking about their child's achievements and we all know that on social media you like to present only the good moments everything that's happening name very well. You're you know annoying parent friends. If you don't have children how many of those milestone every single month photos you see babies and it's like this baby is eating lots of solids already and he's months old months and I can do this and I miss and that makes me so mad but especially if you have a kid who's not doing this and this and this by that age drives you batty but you know the Internet really makes <hes> sort of think that we're not measuring up. I think people who may be tend to be hard on themselves as I as I tend to be. You know you really see what's going on around. You knew assume that everything is going so well. In that person's life everything's perfect. Everything's humming along. They're not running into any snags or any. They don't have any worries or concerns when really they probably have lots. You know they're just like any of US lot of concerns a lot of fears so maybe that is the way that they're showing you know what they're doing while they're talking to themselves as much as trying to put on a good face for everybody else will. It's the milestones that you mentioned that I wanted to ask you about because on the one hand they are good things <hes> to keep track of your child's development woman and certainly in all the modern parenting books <hes> but on the other hand they do become like laps in a race. Oh Yeah Oh yeah so the big the big milestones are things like you know rolling over <hes> starting waiting solids sleeping through the night and I think you know we hear a lot of people say oh my kids such a great sleeper. I sleep through the night and it's like what do you even mean by that. Do you mean like twelve hours without waking up or do you really mean like a stretch of six hours you know and so I think like milestones are also extremely broad you know but when you see someone clearing them <hes> who's maybe in your direct orbit you know in your kid is looks about the same seems to be about the same age same. You know stats. I guess as it were you think well like if he can do. I mind doing it. It's like we don't actually talk enough about how broad that range of normal as and so what is the difference difference between the milestones that we have in our heads and on our social media feeds and when early childhood professionals talk about milestones how they see them. That's so funny like I would go sell the stuff going on at you know in my social life like the moms together with and then I go to the doctor and I'd be like well. He's not rolling over yet and like going. Should I be worried just like all know he's like fifteen pounds. He's huge. You know whatever I have a very large child. He was born at ten pounds and he is now twenty five ish I think he's nine and a half months so he's a big boy so yeah he's got a lot of weight to roll over and so it's like Oh yes gravity and mass and physics like all apply in as well sure <hes> personality and you know the way they're motivated. Also very I mentioned my friend had a daughter Minke. We do know developmentally girls tend to do things earlier and then boys do and it's not necessarily early rule but I think you know an early childhood development person might be. I don't know if they're more chill than other Estevez because they just know more but I it's sort of very natural for us to look around us in say why see this person doing it. So why why why am I not kind of babies. Just have different personalities never really different well and the interesting thing too. Is You know yes. You know you've you can. There's so many things in in pregnancy that I think prepare you for. Maybe sometimes well and not well enough for parenthood because there's a lot you can't control going on in your body when you're pregnant and then there's so much you can't control when they're outside of you. You know <hes> 'cause they're. They're crying. You don't know why and you try to do all these things to sort of help sued them and they're not being sued and it's actually quite maddening that you can't control or help them. They kept talk to you. You know I think there's a big part of that going on as well that makes parents so crazy and anxious to judge that you're gaining only like control. I'm doing well like I'm on like that's why I was like reading the piece today not spending time in the floor with them did like I ruin him by sitting in front of the T._v.. With me and it's like I know I'm not supposed to do that. Still I still feel oh badly but it's shocking mistreat works yeah. He loves the T._V.. But Yeah it's it's at least a milestone sort of like a few like things are humming along. I'm doing this thing right. I'm keeping this little person alive. I'm actually doing more than that which is to make sure that they are healthy. You know along with the the developing well going to be a smart person contributing to society but you remember it was maybe back in the early to thousands that like baby Einstein started right there was that was a big program it was it was a company trying to make lots of money right you know but there's like whole industries around these anxieties that we have and so there's going to be all kinds of products in programs and you know in my neighborhood in Toronto. There's like classes you can take. With your infants like crawling classes can like practiser agility and I'm like what are they like a show dog. Do you need to and and again build the baby's core strength right and here. I am though like judging these MOMS you WanNa do this and I'm like no see the judgment is such a minefield all too but at the same time it's like we are offered these things to spend our money on because people are anxious because we're in this Internet soaked society where we are concerned. All the time about something happening to our kids are concerned about not doing enough for them. We're concerned about out not measuring up you know and also we have a year of Matt leave which is a blessing in this country but we have time to kill you know money to spend because a lot of people have established their careers and have some money <hes> you know when they're on leave so I think like businesses are are are catering to that too and helping us but also playing into our anxieties so you've had a child for almost ten months now. Yeah life is very different. Now I'm sure do you remember how you would have viewed the kind of conversation we're having now or the kinds of posts you're talking about on social media scrolled right pass them so bored real boring. I try not to talk about my kids you much with my friends who don't have kids but at the same time I I have written about parenting and parent culture her before just as a as a journalist <hes> when I was at the national posted at that quite a bit so I did. I was aware of this culture and so I think what did you think of it. Though I thought it was crazy I thought I thought you know why everything's going to be fine. You know our parents arrays us and we generally turn out fine but I think the the instinct and desire I think with most generations to do things better for your kids. You know than you were done by. Even though you seem to have had a great childhood in you know maybe most people have but I think thank you you always want to improve but it gets to a point where things get a little nuts and so actually I remember writing about this book called expecting better. I talked to the author back then it was <hes> author named Emily Osters. A new mom was an economist and she's in based in listening in her her whole thing was when she was pregnant. She was given a lot of advice given a lot of like you know. Don't go on a hot TUB. Don't eat raw fish. You know all the sort of rules she looked at the data and the evidence around that and was like well it does does the research backup that this is something I really shouldn't do or is it gonna be fine and drinking is a big one to the no amount of alcohol is safe kind of thing but in the span of human history the no drinking rule is actually super super recent yeah yeah but I think it's you know but if I think advocate for the record I remember writing about that that book and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome people were like Whoa you know. This is very dangerous to actually said this message that even a little bit is okay and I think a lot of the public health messaging around co sleeping well which is having the baby in bed with you <hes> not recommended by public health same with drinking <hes> but a lot of people not a lot of people but some people do it and they're like okay..

facebook Jordan Heath Rawlings Sara Jordan assange Sarah Bosvelt Canada writer chatelain Harry US Shell Emily Osters Estevez Matt Einstein Toronto four months eighteen months
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"You may have noticed recently that the truth is now a matter for debate. Well, as you know, twenty eight team brought its share of fake news fake news is the worst thing that you can call a journalist. This is fake news. It's a fake news really know where it's come from. It's all fake news. We let's just call it lies in a time when opinion bias reporting an anecdotes are increasingly mistaken for one another at least in enough people's mind to make determining what's true difficult backs. Have never been more important when everything else is in question, you go to the data unless it's just not there. You would be amazed to learn just how many things candidate doesn't keep track of or if it does doesn't make available to the people who need the information. If a country's data said is a solar system of interconnected numbers and figures collected from around the population, then Canada's is riddled with black holes. And what happens when you can't answer questions with data never heard of the phrase flying blind. This is what happens when a country tries to do it. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. The global mail has spent the past year investigating a phenomenon it caused the data deficit. Joining us today our reporters, Eric Andrew g I n TV grant. Who is arguments Siddiqui. And how does the story kind of start with her? Yeah. So argument is a public health researcher. You've t- I was thinking about writing an editorial about this phenomenon. I had noticed more than a year ago now that reporters like Tapia actually in Robyn Doolittle and other people in our newsroom were doing the job of stats can over and over writing stories about how we didn't have numbers and then going out and finding numbers about what's the most dangerous job in Canada. Or how often police determined that sexual assault complaints are unfounded. And I was on him still kind of on the editorial board kind of filling in for someone writing the Globes opinion about X ones that I was just going to kind of meth off about this and say, this is really dumb and frustrating and right seven hundred words and be done with it. And so I emailed some colleagues in the newsroom one of them put me onto arguments at this drives her crazy all the time. So I called her up. She works on race and health figuring out racial disparities in health, and that's really hard and Canada, and that drives up the wall. So I could tell media they when I started talking to her that this was going to be a cathartic interview for her. She started kind of spilling her guts. This is the beta my existence..

Canada Siddiqui researcher Robyn Doolittle Jordan heath Rawlings Eric Andrew g assault editorial board Tapia Globes
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"And there are forces that are counting on you feeling that way on the fact that the task will seem to huge or your own contribution to insignificant to actually achieve anything. But of course, that's not true. That's a messaging strategy. Nobody's going to stop climate change by being scared or afraid or hopeless or by accepting that it's already too late. But you can do it by beginning by being to paraphrase, a famous story. The falling of small stones that start an avalanche in the mountains. And how do you do that you start by talking about it? I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Catherine Abreo is the executive director of climate action network Canada, and the author of an op Ed in the national observer about how fighting climate change is an act of love. Was there a time recently at all where you kind of felt like we were on the right track towards battling climate change. And your Optima stick. That's a great question and the years twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen were unpredictably some of the most hopeful years in my career working on climate change how so so in two thousand fifteen I went to my first UN climate conference in Paris. You've probably heard of it cop twenty one. And that was when the Paris agreement was signed one hundred ninety five countries from all over the world came to the table and said, this is what we're willing to do to address climate change and the Paris agreement took shape it then went into force faster than any other international treaty in history. So within less than a year, we had an operating Paris agreement within that same span of time. We came back to Canada with a newly minted Trudeau administration who made climate change one of the key priorities early on in their mandate and within nine months. It had to separate first ministers meeting on the issue of climate change and drafted the pancanadian framework on climate change and clean growth. And you have to remember this was on the heels of a decade of the Harper administration, which was relatively uninterested in the issue of climate change and really hadn't done much to address it. And so suddenly we had this kind of history making international treaty and the most comprehensive climate plan that we'd ever seen in Canada. And both of those things were still totally insufficient. You know, that's one of the hooks of working on climate change is that more often than not the solutions put forward by governments are not as robust as they need to be however within the span of year, we had come to a place that I could never have imagined being in two thousand fourteen or even early twentieth. Fifteen so that was a time of great hope for me. And it seemed like things were moving it did. So what happened? What happened? Yeah. I mean, I can talk about the kind of details of how thing. Things get tricky when we get into the phase of implementation, and why that might be, but if I can make generalization I think what happened is the folks who have very vested interests in maintaining the status quo that causes climate change realize that there was a new level of seriousness that global governments were taking in terms of their attitudes to address the issue. And so we saw what they could do when they felt threatened those incumbent interests. And we are now kind of living the reality of their pushback, and they have tremendous amounts of power. I am talking about some of the richest companies in the world and some of the politicians who whether they genuinely believe or are doing the right thing work on behalf of the interests of those companies how much of this is a PR battle. I think it is for sure the case that the way in which the public understands climb. A change the way in which people like me or governments or private actors communicate about climate change to the public is really important. But I also think that we can sometimes overestimate the importance of that public campaign that public PR campaign..

Canada Paris Jordan heath Rawlings UN Harper administration Catherine Abreo executive director Trudeau nine months
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Lurch of dread for the city's LGBT community for the families of the missing and dead men for Toronto which could only stare in horror the specter of a public trial loomed. Like, a gavel all the evidence will be laid bare the vultures of international media would swoop down on a grieving community. Imagine all the columns and opinion pieces, and the creepy fascinated voyeurs learning about how the victims were stocked and preyed upon it would have been a circus, and it would have broken Toronto in a very real way. So yes, the guilty plea that came Tuesday meant attentive shaky ex now the city will be spared at trial, though. So a different question needs to be asked. Maybe it won't get worse. But how can it get better? How does the city recover from a crime that fractured and already tense relationship between the police vulnerable community? How does the space lake Toronto's gay village that has served as a beacon for so many people fleeing prejudice and judgment start to feel safe again? I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story moment Karachi is a reporter at six eighty news. He has been on the ground covering the MacArthur trial since the arrest been to almost every hearing. He's had since then I met him is to one or two along the way, but pretty much everyone and made many visits to Mallory crescent. Yes, there were a lot of whispers well before the arrest that something was happening as someone who's who's a general assignment reporter for for a newsroom, we'll kind of whispers, we're going on around there. And what have you heard? Well, I mean, it was it was definitely something that was being talked about a lot particularly in the gay community in the village here in Toronto, you know, men were disappearing from that community people were feeling unsafe. There was a lot of talk about their potentially being a killer. The community was calling for kind of pushing police to look into it. There's some push back from Toronto police against it. And then, of course, their worst fears realized when MacArthur was. Rested of the we'll realized before that. But they came to fruition of being a real thing. When when the police finally arrested MacArthur, it feels like that was a moment that something change in the relationship between the city's gay community and the police, you know, it's it's definitely a relationship. That's been inflexible. We see evidence around this case. And then if you look at the ongoing back and forth about police in uniform participating in pride, right? They've definitely had a fractured relationship. Over years. You go back to the bath house raids that happened a few decades ago. So the relationship between the gay community and Toronto police has certainly been fractured overtime..

Toronto Jordan heath Rawlings MacArthur general assignment reporter reporter Karachi
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. David Coletta is the of Abacus data one of Canada's leading polling firms. So David how many polls am I going to hear about between now and Tober twenty-first? You're going to hear a lot of polls. And it's not just going to be the horse race polls that tell us, you know, which party ahead or which is behind, but you're gonna get, you know, hundreds of polls that look at issues, and what we think of the leaders and how Canadians feeling about the economy. There's going to be, you know, election years, whether you like it or not I think you're gonna get a lot of polling this year. If you look at the past four or five elections, the number of polls only gone up, and I think that's going to be the case this year as well. We're going to see a lot of polling in part because I think there's a there's a fascination with polls. I think both media enjoy reporting them. It helps them understand the narrative. I think there's a lot of interest in the consumption of polls your. Listeners even if they don't wanna admit they like polls, they are fascinated by what their neighbors think of things. But I also think we're headed into an election that's likely to be very competitive, and the not kind of environment, you often see more polling firms getting involved and trying to understand the pulse of the country where things might be going without asking you to speak to Abacus data in particular or any of your competitors. 'cause I know it is a pretty crowded field. What is in general when you sort of entered this stage of a race? And the polls start getting ratcheted up. What is the signal to noise ratio in terms of all the polls that are out there? How many of them are ones that paint a good picture for us versus sort of ones? That are flash polls that we should probably not put too much stock in any one individual pool doesn't really carry much weight. Whether it is an Abacus poll or not, and I think what we what sometimes for for a consumer of polls. Is you get different signals as you said that that really is noise that a one or two point lead for one party. Or another or change of one or two points from one week to the next or even a difference of really a picture between two poles doesn't really tell us all that much because there's margin of air built into all of these surveys. There is a a level of imprecision in polls. I think one of the the challenge is polling firms face is that the expectations of how accurate we can be has gone up. And that means there's an expectation that, you know, if we say that the liberals are thirty seven percent that few days before the election, and they don't get thirty seven percent. That's a failure of the polls. So given all of that. I think, you know, my best advice to listeners and consumers of of all the polls are boat to you're gonna vote to be dated with is to take a step back and say, what are the trends? Looking like if you look at three or four different polls. Do we see that the liberals are going up or the conservatives are going up or the end EP gaining some momentum as opposed to what one single? Tells us because because first of all again, there's that that Arab built-in. But another reason is as we get closer to the election. The polls should get somewhat more accurate, and the reason is because voters are become more firm in their view road one week to the next so much happens in politics so much happens in the world that shifts people's views that that anyone snapshot may not actually be an accurate snapshot a week from now, and it's always remember that that we live in a world where Donald Trump says something one day, it becomes the most important story that day and the very next day. He said something else that completely changes it or a report comes out that says climate change is far more serious than we ever thought or GM closes plant in Oshawa..

David Coletta Donald Trump Jordan heath Rawlings Canada Tober Oshawa GM thirty seven percent one week two poles one day
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"If you are listening to this podcast on your commute into work this morning. First of all, thanks second of all if that commute happens to be from your bed to your desk in the room next door. Then we hope you're not lonely, and we're here to provide some of the things that you don't get when you work from home. Collie? How's it going? Hey, Jordan, good. How are you? Great. What'd you get up to this weekend? Oh now, much me. Neither mondays. All right. It sounds dumb. Right. It's perfunctory. It's the stuff you think that you definitely wouldn't miss if you could somehow avoid the office. But it turns out that we need these little interactions. However trite they seem you might not feel like it when you're sloshing into work on a Monday morning, but you are at heart a social creature and going all day without talking to anyone has consequences. So naturally, of course, our culture is making that more difficult as freelancers and telecommuters make up a growing portion of the workforce, we're asking what is a work from Homer supposed to do. And what are companies doing about this now that we are actually learning about the effects of workplace loneliness? Is there a happy medium between the obvious perks of leaving the office behind and the basic but necessary emotional connection, the your colleagues provide? I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Erica Lenti is a freelance writer who wrote this story for pivot who has also written for the walrus, and the globe and mail and many other publications Erika, thanks for leaving your home office to come talk to us. Thanks so much for having me. So what is workplace loneliness? I mean, it's defined in many different ways the way that I've sort of found it in my research is when you are working remotely, which is happening much more frequently these days and in doing so you're just missing that social connection that social engagement with people in the workplace. So you're alone in your home office, which I am these days, and you know, you you're emailing people and you're chatting people, but you're not seeing them face to face, and you're sort of spending your eight to ten hours of work time alone in your little office, and that can kind of take. Drain on you that can affect the way that you're feeling emotionally and physically that we're not really considering as much as I think, maybe we should be these days. What does some of the research say about the number of people working from home? Yes. So there's a stats can report from twenty ten and that's the most recent data. I'm sure that these numbers have probably grown one point seven million Canadians are working from home at least part of the time, and that data found that was just people who are working from home employed by other companies or other employers that didn't include people who are self-employed. Okay. So not freelancers. Yeah. Exactly. Which is what I am just like three quarters of the median, exactly. So I think those numbers not only are they probably under reported because of that element. But I also think that given that we're in twenty eighteen it's been eight years since the data has been collected that number has probably grown quite a bit. Given all of the new technologies that we have and the research and. To the benefits of working from home and slashing that commute into nothing. Well, that's what I was going to say is it kind of sounds on the surface like a dream, right? And you hear people say it that way when they finally leave the office, and they get to work from home that I don't even have to wear pants, or I you know, I had to shave my saved my entire commute time or it's cetera et cetera. I don't have to eat lunch in the cafeteria. And I don't want to quash those benefits in any way because they are great. I mean as someone who works from home. I get to hang out with my dog all day. I have a one eyed rescue dog, and she is like the best ever, and she is like a total lapdog. And so I get to sit there and work. Well, while my dogs in my lap. And I'm like, this is the best thing ever. They're definitely tons of benefits. I can appreciate not having to commute in Toronto. But we don't often think about those like the the lack of social engagement, and what that does to you..

Jordan heath Rawlings Erica Lenti Erika Homer Toronto writer three quarters eight years ten hours
"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"jordan heath rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Andrew Potter is a longtime journalist and author former editor of the Ottawa citizen self-confessed space. Geek, he wrote a Twitter thread on Halloween and Andrew before we talk about the reaction to that. And what it says about how we consume news. Take us through the story that you told right? So it begins with this weird object at that came through solar system last year, which scientists gave the name. Which is I think Hawaiian for the visitor or something like that. And I've been sort of fascinated at from fascinated by since since it came through because of all the objects that come to wrestle or system, the comets and asteroids, and so and had a very strange orbit Ness strange dynamic in number of ways such people were speculating, whether it could be a fragment of ancient civilization, and so on so I'm sort of following just sort of the the data and the reports the date of this coming out based on it. And I'm also a bit of a space. Geek, I mean, Elon Musk fan, and so on and so I subscribe to a lot of space feeds and space Twitter accounts, and so on and I was sitting around went, Dan, I kind of noticed that had been a few curious little things that come up. Right. You know, some some a couple of telescopes went down. There was a very strange raid on solar observatory in the United States that they sort of the FBI came in put a police tape shut down for week. And no one really knew what it was everyone's gonna tailings and and a few other elements. Like this. And then as it happened. A report just came out of some scientists saying that sorry, what is starting to look like a really weird object and some speculation that was actually maybe an alien probe of some kind based on its orbit and someone and I thought well, this is a little curious. So I said, look, here's here's some evidence. That maybe the thing that came through was a space probe in. Here's some things that happened in the year after that, right? Donald Trump starts talking about a space force, very importantly, I'm here by directing the department of defense and Pentagon to immediately begin the process necessary to establish a space force as six branch of the armed forces. That's a big statement suddenly are orbiting telescopes go down, and they read a solar observatory and shut it down please tape. And I was like, you know, I need to draw you a map, right? And I guess you kind of put up on Twitter actor of space invaders and so on and. It kinda went viral in a number of ways. I a lot of people thought. Oh my God. This is like dead serious. Right. And so a lot of conspiracy theories jumped all over it and said, you know, see, I told you right? The Trump's hiding stuff from us. And there are a whole other people jumping on it and saying, you know, thank God the front of the coming to put her with out of its misery. And anyway, it's a close thing I've ever had to a viral Twitter thread, and it continues to go gets picked up every few days. It's been it's been a week now, and it gets picked up a few days, and there's another sort of burst of activity on it with people, sending me all kinds of links thing you forgot about this. There's this weird stuff on Mars and the great red spot on Jupiter disappearing and so on so that's that's sort of it. I'm now, I'm now sort of on the radar of the sort of space conspiracy theorists out there, and it's kind of interesting. I am myself a little bit of a space. Geek, so I see things here and there, and I've seen a couple of these things. But obviously like not even bothered to connect the dots. But you used these stories to tell your own story, essentially. Yeah. So. Another aspect of this is I've always loved like, I'm a big fan of, you know, apocalyptic thriller type movies like the day after tomorrow independence day, or you twenty two thousand twelve you know, these movies that you know, there's always some like family and divorced couple at the heart of it. And there's a big tragedy, and there's gonna blissed destroy..

Twitter Donald Trump Andrew Potter Jordan heath Rawlings Elon Musk Ottawa editor United States FBI department of defense Dan Pentagon