27 Burst results for "Jordan Rawlings"

What Do You Do When You've Been Blamed for a Covid Outbreak?

The Big Story

01:45 min | 3 months ago

What Do You Do When You've Been Blamed for a Covid Outbreak?

"I'm jordan rawlings. This is the big story. Judy is a veteran journalist. With cbs's the fifth estate which has been following the story for over a year. Now i guess. Hey judy let's jordan. It's been that time. Time has no meaning anymore really. but why. don't we rewind all way to may twenty twenty when when this started what happened in campbellton new brunswick campbellton new brunswick was coming off a high. At that point they had gone for about two weeks without a case of covid when all of a sudden an outbreak appears in this little town to small town basically in the north of new brunswick across the river from quebec and they had a smattering of cases. Roughly three cases and the premier gives a news conference on may twenty seven and he basically leans the outbreak on your responsible medical professional and at the time and i realized this is asking you guys to kind of reconstruct Who knew what more than a year ago at the time. What was the thinking From the premier's office sure but also just in general. How was it covered. Well when the premier gives a news conference and he he pinpoints the issue from an individual from an irresponsible health worker. He where everyone is assuming that because he is the premier he has done all this research. He has the backing public health. They have a lot of info that we don't have

Campbellton Jordan Rawlings New Brunswick Judy Let Judy CBS Jordan Quebec
What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

The Big Story

01:18 min | 3 months ago

What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

"Jordan rawlings. this is the big story to lead. Ramona's is a montreal based journalist also opinion columnist for cult montreal where she looked at the good the bad and the ugly of bill ninety-six tula. Hey how are you jordan. I'm doing well. Thank you for taking the time. I wanna ask you maybe just to start For those of us outside of quebec can you give us some context for the ever evolving Language legislation this is. There's a lot of historical connotations here. Right oh god where to begin will basically bill ninety. Six is is an upgraded. Its what is supposed to be an upgrade to Kickbacks language law otherwise known as bill went to one you know which just celebrated fifty one years. I think of existence Which aimed to establish french as the common long language in quebec and fifty plus years later the current government The the cue has basically decided because of issues with french because of the constant kind of fragility of the language and they feel that French is eroding vay needed to upgrade they needed to strengthen that legislation that piece of legislation. So here we are now with bill ninety six

Jordan Rawlings Bill Ninety Montreal Ramona Quebec Jordan Bill
If Canadas Residential Schools Reckoning Is Real, What Happens Next?

The Big Story

01:52 min | 3 months ago

If Canadas Residential Schools Reckoning Is Real, What Happens Next?

"Jordan rawlings. This is the big story either. Jewel is an associate fellow at the yellow head institutes. A first nation led research center which is based on the faculty of arts at toronto school. That has for a long time at least been known as ryerson university. She is initiative bay from kensey being chip was of the thames first nation. Hey eva hi jordan. Thanks for having me. First of all. I wanna thank you for taking the time for us. We waited a week to do this episode just so that when we spoke to indigenous person we wouldn't be making them revisit the trauma that just felt so raw last week for people's around the country so Thank you for being here. Thank you i guess. I want to start with The yellow head institute being based in what has long been known as ryerson university. And i want to start with what happened on sunday and tonight on the ryerson university campus. A statue of edgerton viruses the school's namesake has been knocked over. Ryerson was one of the architects of canada's residential school system. Many students and staff the university along with several other groups have been calling for the removal of the statute for years. So have you seen the video of the statue of egerton. Ryerson being pulled down yes. I have I wasn't there at the site at the time that it was pulled down. I was there a bit before it was pulled down at the in But i have seen that. The statue's has been pulled down. How did it make you feel. It was an amazing moment. And i personally i think back on the times when i had first started at ryerson knowing that The school was named after a person who had put into motion policies that directly impacted my family me and my family.

Tonight Ryerson Ryerson University Sunday Jewel Yellow Head Institutes Last Week Yellow Head Institute First ONE Canada Jordan Thames First Nation EVA Kensey Toronto School Many Students
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:23 min | 10 months ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"The pop quiz are restaurants. Open for indoor dining where you live at. What capacity what about patios but about next week where they open a month ago. Do you know if they'll be open by christmas. Or here's the thing neither do they. In the initial shock of the pandemic this spring local restaurants took a huge hit but it was a largely understandable. One they were forced to close immediately for all but takeout and delivery various programs from wage subsidies to rent help were created some more helpful than others and then they remained closed until covert numbers. Came down and patio. Season arrived with outdoor dining this fall though with the patios getting colder by the day and virus numbers rising almost everywhere in canada restaurants in many parts of the country are taking another hit but this one is much less predictable and potentially much more dangerous just to give you an example restaurants in toronto. Were slated to be able to reopen in early november as the province's extension on closures was going to expire but then the city toronto instituted its own order that extended that provincial or to mid december and now the provincial government has changed its own thresholds for what's open what's closed at various stages so it's totally unclear when or if for how restaurants will be able to operate. So what do they do. How do you plan for that. How do you keep your business afloat. How do you pay your staff even enough for them to survive. How does a restaurant survive this pandemic winter. How many of them will make it. And what can we and the government do to help them. i'm jordan rawlings. This is the big story. johnson. -opoly is a restaurant owner based in toronto. He's the co organizer of save hospitality dot ca and because work is hard these days. We are reaching him and his restaurant today. Hello john good afternoon. I guess my first question is just an. I realized this is a loaded question from for anyone in your industry right now is just how are you doing. I'm doing okay You know it's definitely a challenging time If you'd asked me that maybe in the summer with patios at full capacity we probably say hey. We're not doing bad. We're we're surviving in now with cooler weather and Abandoned indoor dining in toronto. It's a massive challenge for the industry as a whole and obviously specifically for us company. And we're going to talk about what the winter looks like in just a few minutes but maybe start by giving me some examples of some of the more creative ways restaurants have adapted to survive over the past eight months. Sure so. There's a lot of news revenue streams that people have attempted to engage for their businesses. The most is just take out and delivery people who haven't done a lot of that in the past had to sign up for all the platforms and get a delivery driver and promote their takeout menus and then also from our front. I know that we've really started to create a virtual experiences for clients whether it be corporate clients private clients for celebrations whether we prepare a meal like a full meal in a box like a meal. Kit deliver it to their house with video instructions on how to reheat. Prepare or finish it and then have like a a some kind of online live engaged. Entertainment value add as well. So there's those kinds of mechanisms which still kind of fall under the hospitality like rela other things we've done is to create an online store that we sell prepared foods prepared products wine year on a cocktail since like that obviously selling it with food Who as the law provides but really trying to create every new vertical revenue. We can and it's challenge because you don't have as many people to work with your working. On many many different initiatives everyone's spread very thin and it seems like the the guest appetite is there but everyone wants something really fast and really perfect and really ready to go So if people are trying their best and getting really creative but it is a massive challenge. How much would you say. And you don't have to be super specific. Because i know first of all you can't speak For all restaurants and second of all you might not wanna get super specific about your own but compared to pre pandemic revenue levels. What are people operating. Now how much business has been lost over. The last three quarters of a year sales are down on average eighty percent for full service restaurants and forty percent for quick service restaurants. Quick service restaurants. Were already set up for takeout catering dropping kind of thing. Full service restaurants less o. Obviously we rely on wine service and table experience and like very artfully prepared food. It buries restaurants but that's a good average. You know for us. When the patios weren't full throttle in the summer we were probably down thirty forty percent. Because there's only limited seating now we're down much much more eighty ninety percent every day now. Those sales are offset with us with some online sales and in store retail. You know kind of prepared foods bottle shop stores. We've created in restaurants You know and that's location specific. Some neighborhood places doing much better the downtown core place during much worse. You mentioned that Delivery has become a huge part of most restaurants business model. Now we've seen a lot of go. Local buy local order from your local restaurants from services like food aura. has their approach to encouraging. A local patronage trickle down to you guys. Because i know last time we talked thought was what they were doing was not great for restaurants. Bottom line has that changed at all perhaps I think it's a tough question. They definitely have been trying to drive local business that is not altruistic effort on their part the more business. They drive through their platform or money they make. They haven't really changed their fees for us. I mean some have wave like some initial startup fees registration fees. But in general there is still significant. And and you know here's the thing. Online platforms were set up where the percentage of sales they took was not supposed to be so impactful because online like uber or food or whatever these platforms are there. Still sales are supposed to be supplemental to restaurants core sales. But now happens. When those sales become restaurants for sales the percentage they take becomes exorbitant right. So that's the the flip in dynamic that's happened and the problem is that i don't believe uber eats his business. Model works at a lower percentage of the take. So that's the challenge the theory in as well. It's the kind of a necessary evil at the moment to be connected people to be on those platforms because they do provide an immense amount of marketing in research. But you know we found in our downtown locations those platforms are basically we get orders on for takeout and delivery whereas in our neighborhood locations people call in for pickup at a greater rate than they get an app. Why do you think that is. I mean i think in the neighborhoods. We've spent many many years connecting to our clientele creating regulars out of our neighbors up being a part of the community doing community charity. Work outreach work whereas at downtown restaurants you rely much more on the destination business crowd who goes down there to work coming for lunch to come and after dinner for drinks. If they're not going to work.

toronto canada jordan rawlings john
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

07:51 min | 11 months ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"The. The thing about a brand association, even a really positive one is that it can be tough to change when you ask Gay Canadian about the Green Party and what it stands for ninety percent of the time you get one answer, the environment and I mean considering how much more dire the climate crisis gets every year and how many more people are ranking it as one at their top voting issues. That's probably a good thing for people to know you stand for but is that one issue? Alone Enough to give you an electoral breakthrough. See One key issue. Is enough for some incremental gains and the Greens have seen those in recent years but it might be tough for a party known for just one thing. To start winning over wide swaths of Canadian voters who care about a huge variety of issues. So, where does the Green Party go from here? It has a new leader and that's a historic accomplishment in itself that new leader has a by-election tonight to see if she'll be going to Ottawa and then win or lose, she'll be charged with creating the next iteration of the Party and for better for worse, it needs an identity beyond the environment party. So what does she plan to do about that? We're going to ask her. Jordan Rawlings this is the big story. Enemy Paul is the new leader of the Federal Green Party of. She joins us now hello, Ms Paul Lo, I want to ask you because the vote is tonight. And you've you've spoken about this do you think there should be a vote tonight? Well, I said, it's near the beginning, not right at the beginning but certainly once we'd headed back into stage to that. These are not the conditions for a fair accessible and democratic election we had been told that to stay inside is still being told to remain inside as much as possible avoid contact with anyone outside of our immediate household, and one of the best things we've done during this period is to actually respect observe what public health authorities are telling us so. Bathroom, it was disappointing to have to have an election under these circumstances. It wasn't necessary. But we're here we are. How have you been campaigning over the last few weeks in in the writing because I imagine it's very different from years past it is very different and mostly not in good ways you know I would say there are two parts to do a really democratic election the versus getting to know your candidates the second voting So in terms of getting to know your candidates I, mean we haven't been able to we don't have a physical office because that's not safe and we have not done any door knocking because that's not responsible and so we had to do things very differently. I'm doing a lot more social media a lot more advertising in local newspapers I a lot of phoning. I've be trying to get as many M. as many media. Interested in the campaign as possible but none of that really substitutes for that once one in person contact. That really is the the the retail politics of running in an election. I WanNa ask you a little bit during this interview about your vision for the Party and and how you feel the party is by Canadians and what should or shouldn't change about that. So I guess. Begin by asking you, do you remember the first time? The you became aware of the Green party politically and and how you saw it and how it was seen Dan by Canadians. I think I became aware of the Green Party in the two thousands I would say that it's you know as let's say aware but not aware. I mean, you know my eyes were fully opened I would say during my years living abroad in the two thousands when I saw green parties emerging and becoming real a real force in lots of different countries, I was very interested to know the reasons why people had chosen finally to vote for the Green Party I became really interested in their model and when I was coming back to Canada I I knew I wanted to join a political party. I wanted to be involved in that kind of collective action and I looked at the Green party very obviously, very very carefully because it seemed based on what I'd seen abroad that it was going to be the one most aligned with with my values and with the way that I think politics should be done. What did you see in the green parties abroad that you either didn't see or wanted to see a in the party when you came back to Canada I I would say that I wasn't so much. It wasn't so much a comparative thing as. A lot of good stuff. You know I saw a diversity party politics in. In. Europe tends to still be extremely white and where there was more diversity, it was usually coming from the green parties You know there was a green member of the UK parliament's who's the Molly refugee and he was represented the UK There are Turkish people with elected positions in Germany as well. That was really exciting to be seeing that diversity of perspectives of the Green Party was bringing. I found that governments had green party partners. Our more collaborative, much more focused on people and far less partisan as those were things that just in general in Canadian politics, all of those things are missing. All of those things would be great and so it seems to me that there was they had struck on a model that that big things to life you know. So we're like five minutes into this interview so far, and we're talking about the Green Party and we haven't said the words, the environment yet. And I think that you know you can dispute this if you want. But you know vast majority of Canadians would respond with the environment. If you ask them what the Green Party stands for most, and so what I want to know from you is first of all, are you happy about that that association and How do you move beyond that I? Absolutely happy that. Association a there is no question. Nothing has changed. The climates is in crisis we have climate crisis, a climate emergency. The pandemic has not changed that, and I say that we can't forget about the climate emergency because it hasn't forgotten about us. That's for sure and so to have a party that continues to make sure that we're investing in knowledge in the area that we're developing innovative policy. And that we're making. That we're making sure that we continue to push towards reducing greenhouse gases is very, very important and will always remain important until we succeed that being said, this is a moment where it's clear that people are taking the Green party because of its social policies. Many of the things that we were talking about exactly this time last year, we had an election. On October the twenty last year at the twenty third. So it's just a year and last election in Toronto. Center I was about universal farm universal post-secondary education, decriminalizing illicit drugs and creating a safe supply, affordable housing guarantee, livable income, and had we had those things in place during the pandemic we would have been safer. would have been more resilient as oh. Yes I think we have a moment now with a new leader to have a new. Conversation, with people in Canada about yes always the environment and the climate but also about our.

Green Party Federal Green Party Canada Greens Ms Paul Lo Jordan Rawlings Toronto Ottawa Europe UK Germany
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

06:54 min | 11 months ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Tyler. Harper is a reporter for the Nelson Star, who's been to this beach and covered it's deadly history. Hello Tyler. Why. Don't you start? For those of us who don't have a map in front of us, and just where exactly is six mile beach like geographically. Yeah. So six beaches a fifteen minute drive west pardon me east of Nelson here in the Kunis in British Columbia and it's a you won't find on any tourism guides, local tourism guys. They very specifically don't tell people about it as a visitor center here in town, but it is an incredibly popular spot in this region. Can you describe it? Give me a sense of you know how you get there and? What you do or what you see I guess when you get out of your car and walk towards it yeah. So you have to know where it is. That's that's the first thing is. This is all this has long been considered a a secret spot that only locals really know about in the last you know few years especially, the secret of God out. So we have to do is drive down this little dente highway, and then take an exit off onto the small road, and there's no sign to show you where the beaches you have to know. It's you stop off at a little spot on the road and there's a forested pass to the beach and it's to note that. The beach is beautiful like this isn't just another beach. This is a Nice beach. The sand is perfect. It's got beautiful views, Kuni Lake and the thing that makes it a real draw for people is very unique sand spit that extends out into the middle of Cudi Lake and you can walk out onto that sand spit in feels very much like you're on the surface of the lake in the middle of the lake it's not something you get anywhere else in the Kunis earliest in the West Kuni. And it's you know it's a common sight in the summer to see people out on that sand spit. Just, walking around and taking dives into the water. How did you hear about it? Why cert-, going there I I moved here five years ago and after hearing about it from people who live here, know about it my family went out there and. You know a lot I've been there a lot over the last several years with family I'd take friends visiting out there and you anytime family would come out. We always go out there. There are a lot of beaches out here there's a in Nelson there's a lakeside beach was, which is the municipal beach. Very popular but it's not. It's not nearly as nice along the beaches at here. Quite rocky six-mile is perfectly silted. There's no rocks anywhere. It's. It's beautiful if you know about it and look a lot of people do now. It's definitely the ideal beach to go to. Okay. Now tell me the deadly secret part. Well. So he also this is the other side of the wishes, the beaches incredibly dangerous so in. Nineteen fifty nine three children drowned at that sand spit, and since then there have been two more deaths the latest happening in July heater a twenty, three year old man and his partner went onto that sand spit and the woman was saved but the demand round And since that happened, a local residents have been calling for change at the beach and since our story went out a week ago what we've heard overwhelmingly is that people did not danger of that beach that they've been going out there for years with our own families and didn't realize that it's a the drowning Possibility is huge when you go onto that sand. Can you explain? What's so unique about it in like how these accidents happen? It's kind of combination of things. One is that. It's very steep. So if you consider the beach as. A point that goes out into the middle of the lake. Now, there's the one side, which is the eastern side, which is quite Wonderful, you can walk out there. It's. you know again, perfect sand is very, very gradual. Totally. However once you go into the spit and on the western side, there is a significant drop off in depth. This is combined with two other factors. One is that again, the sand there's no rocks. So it's very, it's very much it's it's very unsteady the feet when you're walking and the other side of this too is that at this point where the speech is located, Kuni Lake really becomes a river. There are several dams on on Cudi River and there's a current that goes around that. Around that each and is quite strong and the other side of this too is that cooney like is very cold. So if you get out there as one one of the people who involved incident told me once you get out there you're you're very cold and One woman who saved the child's lives about twenty years ago over just over twenty years ago, she was actually diagnosed with hypothermia. In doctors told her she wouldn't have lasted very long in the lake because and this is in the middle of the summer. How is it that? There's a lake that you know all the locals know about in and you know you've been going there for a while and then you publish an article in the local paper and people say I had no idea that it was dangerous. Well I think this comes to the lack of management the beach. So the beaches located on crown land. I spoke to the forestry ministry about it and they said, you know fraud purposes is like any other water access point NBC. And probably across candidates, which is to say use your risk. So the regional district government out here has no jurisdiction over management. Is Too far away from the city. So the city has no jurisdiction there, and there that means nobody to warn people that the danger of the speech. Now, one of the issues that came up with speeches at I, lack of sign at the beach to warn people about the spit before the death happened in July there was one sign it was covered with graffiti. So you had to kind of squint to see that there was a sign warning of an undertow, but it wasn't very specific and the other side of this too is that the death in July witnesses told me that the the man and his Kayak? To the beach so they wouldn't have seen any signs anyway they wouldn't have known about the danger. So having a lack of a sort of any safety measures put in place by the government of an east of any level is kind of the reason why nobody nobody.

Kuni Lake Nelson Kunis Tyler Jordan Rawlings Cudi Lake West Kuni Harper reporter forestry ministry Cudi River British Columbia hypothermia NBC partner fraud cooney
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:13 min | 11 months ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story Dr. David Fiszman is an epidemiologist at the. School of Public Health is also our favorite person to talk to you through this pandemic even though is rarely had great news for. US. Hello David Hello. Can you start by explaining? As I sit here in Ontario. How it came to be that my daughter can't go trick or treating next week. You Know I. I'm not sure. I. I get the sense and again, this is through the grapevine that there were. Concerns that the signal.

David Hello Jordan Rawlings Dr. David Fiszman US School of Public Health Ontario
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm not sure if you're aware of it or not but there's an election going on in the middle of a pandemic. Would you out who is on your list Joe? This is Joe Johnson. I think this is. GonNa give me of ended the segment. No no one. Thank. God, there's actually an election in. British Columbia in the middle of the pandemic it's the first major election covert nineteen hotspot in Canada since the pandemic began, it might turn out to be a blow out at might not. But whatever happens NBC over the next month were about to learn some valuable lessons. Will Canadians vote by mail in massive numbers in order to stay safe if they do that can our election infrastructure and Canada Post handle that? Will voters make the DP pay for calling an early election in the middle of all? What does campaigning look like from at least six feet away? What will your local polling station look like and how can the province everybody safe while making sure that everyone also has an easy opportunity to cast their ballot Owen lastly, if this works and the and ep get their majority, will this become a blueprint for other provinces that have parties riding high in the polls and could this pandemic become a power grab? Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Liza. Used is the legislative reporter NBC Four News Eleven thirty and four city news. Hello Liza. Hello. How are you? I'm doing as well as can be expected. Thank you for asking. Can you why don't you start by telling us how you are? Well, I think I'm pandemic -Ly Okay it's just it's so much. Isn't it? I mean just removing from work that this pandemic is kind of bananas and doing the job that we do. It's just it's like you're inundated with Cova and now we're inundated with election. It's just it's a lot I'm looking forward to two thousand, twenty two. This is why we wanted to talk to you because it must be a lot out there right now and. You're in the middle of election, and maybe for those of us who don't live in B. C. or who haven't been following it. So closely, could you give us a brief overview of you know what the political landscape has been like before this election, you know how long was left in the mandate in whose mandate all that stuff well, I think it depends on who you ask about how stable it was but the situation was that we had a government. A minority government that was supported by a and E. P. minority government that was supported by an agreement that they had with the BBC. Green Party is called cast the confidence and supply agreement which meant that they were going to the EP, would keep their mandate going unless and would not call an election unless they lost a confidence vote in the house. Didn't appear to anyone that was going to happen and the BBC Green leader, who is now I know and that just happened a week before the election was called that the BBC elected. Leader she had said that you know we'll support. You will support you until the end. The next election was supposed to happen a year from now in October twenty twenty one, it was a fixed date was set by the government. So by all accounts. We could have kept going with the government that we have until a year from now what you heard and have heard from the DP leader Premier John Horgan now and EP leader John? Horgan. While the goes on campaigning goes on. He asserts that it was not as stable as it appeared that although the Greens had said that they would not take him down on a confidence vote. There were a couple of pieces of legislation in the last session in August that did not pass they pulled from the docket because the Greens were not going to support. Them was energy based a BBC Hydro Bill, our energy company here, and the other was a youth mental health, a piece of youth mental health legislation. So John Horgan saying look we're in a pandemic, this is you know everybody's on tenterhooks with everything right now we don't need to be waiting to see is an election coming is luxury coming in his election coming? And when criticized for reneging on this confidence and Supply Agreement with the Greens at election would not be called unless they lost a confidence vote unless the MVP confidence vote he said look when we wrote that agreement, there wasn't pandemic that logic fails me a bit I don't really get how pandemic comes into effect there but but that's sort of the lay. Of the land. So to say that the Greens are unhappy is an understatement the newly elected leader. Sonia I know came out you know spitting mad saying, this is unnecessary. It is irresponsible and as you know minced no words and pulled no punches on how she feels about this election and this election will be a big challenge at best for that party. So the NDP's reasoning is that they wanted to essentially get the election over with in order to get on. With the active governing which they say was was difficult. What do skeptical people say is actually behind the decision. Peer Simple power grab. They are very high on the polls. Premier John Horgan. has been pulling as one of the most popular leaders across Canada and hearing you know in the back rooms political organizers were saying come on like this is the time to move. It's not going to get better than this. You know our provincial health officer, Dr Henry who has been leading the charge in combating Covid Nineteen Has Been Very popular challenged a little bit now was school coming in, but but in popular. So as the government, they get to ride the wave of even though that's an independent body they get to ride that wave of popularity of having a strong response. So the cynics say. Pure and simple power grab and. This is politics and this is what politicians do, and also you know our former premier, Christy Clark who did lose her job in a confidence vote? You know a lot of the criticism flung had her was that she was you know for lack of a better term power-hungry would keep going for the power and this does not seem that different to a lot of people. Who will be as this campaign gets going then the main opposition to John Horgan is it the Greens? You mentioned that they're in tough right now is it? Is it someone else? Where's the challenge from oh? Heck. No, it is not the Greens much to their chagrin. It is the BBC liberals. The BBC liberals have a lot of challenges. One could say that they are going through a reorganization they are. Getting the old guard that's the the guard under, for Premier, Christy Clark and people who had been there long before her. And bringing in a new garden. So the leader is. Andrew Wilkinson. He is not very well known by people. So that makes it very challenging and I think even more challenging in a pandemic but I don't know if that would make a huge difference. So he's not well known by people I think he's entertaining, but he has a reputation for being..

John Horgan Greens BBC Christy Clark Canada Joe Johnson Liza Canada Post Andrew Wilkinson EP NBC Jordan Rawlings Supply Agreement British Columbia Cova Owen Green Party reporter
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Outside is closed. That's being. My daughters. Go to phrase for the past three months. Outside not totally closed anymore of course, and now that the weather's nice. We want her out there. We want her running around and playing in the backyard, and exploring the neighborhood and just being kit. But sometimes she refuses, and then she says it and I wonder how long that phrase will stick around even when we get back to normal I'm not the only one wondering staff and the experts are worried. On Wednesday, the hospital for sick children issued a report. It recommends that children be allowed back to school in September even though it acknowledges the virus won't be radical by them. It says that the risks of infection and transmission in children have to be balanced with the effect that closed. Schools are having on kids, physical and mental health. And that's the worry that I keep coming back to and I suspect many parents feel the same way. What do we know about the long term impacts of kids being yanked out of school isolated from their friends for months on end. How does that? Impact kids at different ages and in different situations, and how to researchers even attempt to study this. What don't we know right now? About the long term impacts of covert on kids, and what will be likely, find out in the years to come as the Kovic. Generation grows up. Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Sir Mr Superman is an editor at large at mcleans at large right now. I guess means at home with the kid I saw. A LOW Jordan. Why don't you start because we're going talk? About the long term? Impacts that we know and don't know about cove and kids. But why don't you just start by telling me what we do? Know and what we've learned over the past few months about what? This virus does two kids, so we do know some things. It's a confusing picture even with the things that we know, but the things that we know are that most kids don't seem to get sick from it when they do get sick from it if they're if they test positive at infections tend to be milder, the symptoms tend to be milder. So? That's what we do. Know We don't really fully understand why it doesn't affect kids. There were theories floating around early on research out that show that there were. Particular features of young immune systems that handled the virus differently. But there's now a range of research showing very different conclusions. Their studies that show that. Children don't translate the virus at all. Their studies that show children transmit the virus worse than other people, Children Research, showing the children transmit the virus, but a slower rate not much as as adults, so it's a pretty mixed picture between what we do, know in what we don't know. And in the meantime we're kind of stumbling around in the dark with kids at home. Not knowing what that's doing to them with doing to them, and then the last thing that I would add about the things that we know. Is that a couple of months ago? There were these terrifying reports out of hospitals in New York. Children afflicted Very rare that kids who either test positive for Co, bitter or or test positive for Kobe antibodies meaning they've had at some point in the past show these symptoms, but there are symptoms associated with a very dangerous syndrome that. It's causing. Oregon shut down in kids, heart failure, and so on. It's extremely extremely rare, but as a mother who wrote about the experience. For The Washington Post. Put it. It's rare until it's your child. And you know all of that stuff. as parents is terrifying, especially, because there's so much, we don't know, but even that is relatively concrete compared to I. Guess what we know about. How this is actually impacting kids beyond the itself in terms of like physical and mental health. Yes, exactly I mean the virus itself does not affect kids in great numbers, as does the elderly for instance, but the measures that have been put in place to. To flatten the curve and to stem the spread of the virus, affect kids in very particular ways and as every parent who has a child or children at home. That the measures are hard at everybody, but there particularly hard on young people who are trying to navigate various developmental milestones in stages in their lives, depending on how old they are, it's pandemic. That is quite unprecedented in the last century in the last hundred years, and so we don't really have all that much research that shows for instance what what it might do long-term to a child. There's just a lot that we won't know until we start to come out of this and start to. See The impact on kids and refrain that I heard repeatedly in that I kind of. Sensed just from talking to kids and talking to parents is that it will probably vary quite a lot from child to child. We and I'm going to ask you about some of the reporting an interviews that you've done but I just as as a mom I guess and I kind of mentioned this about myself as apparent in the intro. Do you what? What's your sense on? How profoundly this is going to impact kids how how much they'll remember of this. Will it be something that sticks with them as they? Turn eighteen as they turned thirty I, suspect it will be in the first month, or so I tried to get my my son to keep a diary in. I tried to get him to write down impressions because I thought Oh, this will be this thing that he will look back on the strange period in his early life, and it'll be this blip as the pandemic continues in his measures. Put in place you know some of the lifted now, but there's always this hovering threat of a second wave, and the possibility that we will return to some form of of pandemic measures in lockdown measures. I A starting to have the very real sense that this may not just be a blip. Oh, five or six weeks that happened at one time that it may be something that that stays with kids. I don't think it's necessarily all doom and gloom in the way that it stays with children. I went into the story. Concerned about things like anxiety, mental health, and so on, and and some of the effects that I heard about those researchers, and for the kids that I talked to. surprised me. There were there were benefits and some of that I see in my own child's life, and he seems mostly happy. He missed the school and he misses friends, and he misses being able to have normal contact physical contact with people. But he's done things. My my my son in the last three months that he never done before he rides his bike down. A downtown Toronto Street right in the middle of the street. He scooters around unsupervised and so in some ways it. Reminds me of my own childhood. Growing up in India in neighborhoods that didn't have a lot of cars in them and kids were just playing on the street. What's it like? Talking to kids about this because you, you didn't just talk to your own son. You interviewed a whole bunch of kids at various ages I did yes, I think the younger youngest child that I talked to was six or seven seven and. The oldest young person I talked to was eighteen, and it's really easy to talk to the kids about what their lives are like, and and how they feel about this time, because for most of them, the coronavirus doesn't actually Lou mauled at large. They don't think about it as this terrifying. Thing lots of the younger.

Children Research Jordan Rawlings Mr Superman Kovic New York India editor Lou Oregon The Washington Post
Outside is closed!: Whats COVID-19 doing to kids in the long run?

The Big Story

08:14 min | 1 year ago

Outside is closed!: Whats COVID-19 doing to kids in the long run?

"Outside is closed. That's being. My daughters. Go to phrase for the past three months. Outside not totally closed anymore of course, and now that the weather's nice. We want her out there. We want her running around and playing in the backyard, and exploring the neighborhood and just being kit. But sometimes she refuses, and then she says it and I wonder how long that phrase will stick around even when we get back to normal I'm not the only one wondering staff and the experts are worried. On Wednesday, the hospital for sick children issued a report. It recommends that children be allowed back to school in September even though it acknowledges the virus won't be radical by them. It says that the risks of infection and transmission in children have to be balanced with the effect that closed. Schools are having on kids, physical and mental health. And that's the worry that I keep coming back to and I suspect many parents feel the same way. What do we know about the long term impacts of kids being yanked out of school isolated from their friends for months on end. How does that? Impact kids at different ages and in different situations, and how to researchers even attempt to study this. What don't we know right now? About the long term impacts of covert on kids, and what will be likely, find out in the years to come as the Kovic. Generation grows up. Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Sir Mr Superman is an editor at large at mcleans at large right now. I guess means at home with the kid I saw. A LOW Jordan. Why don't you start because we're going talk? About the long term? Impacts that we know and don't know about cove and kids. But why don't you just start by telling me what we do? Know and what we've learned over the past few months about what? This virus does two kids, so we do know some things. It's a confusing picture even with the things that we know, but the things that we know are that most kids don't seem to get sick from it when they do get sick from it if they're if they test positive at infections tend to be milder, the symptoms tend to be milder. So? That's what we do. Know We don't really fully understand why it doesn't affect kids. There were theories floating around early on research out that show that there were. Particular features of young immune systems that handled the virus differently. But there's now a range of research showing very different conclusions. Their studies that show that. Children don't translate the virus at all. Their studies that show children transmit the virus worse than other people, Children Research, showing the children transmit the virus, but a slower rate not much as as adults, so it's a pretty mixed picture between what we do, know in what we don't know. And in the meantime we're kind of stumbling around in the dark with kids at home. Not knowing what that's doing to them with doing to them, and then the last thing that I would add about the things that we know. Is that a couple of months ago? There were these terrifying reports out of hospitals in New York. Children afflicted Very rare that kids who either test positive for Co, bitter or or test positive for Kobe antibodies meaning they've had at some point in the past show these symptoms, but there are symptoms associated with a very dangerous syndrome that. It's causing. Oregon shut down in kids, heart failure, and so on. It's extremely extremely rare, but as a mother who wrote about the experience. For The Washington Post. Put it. It's rare until it's your child. And you know all of that stuff. as parents is terrifying, especially, because there's so much, we don't know, but even that is relatively concrete compared to I. Guess what we know about. How this is actually impacting kids beyond the itself in terms of like physical and mental health. Yes, exactly I mean the virus itself does not affect kids in great numbers, as does the elderly for instance, but the measures that have been put in place to. To flatten the curve and to stem the spread of the virus, affect kids in very particular ways and as every parent who has a child or children at home. That the measures are hard at everybody, but there particularly hard on young people who are trying to navigate various developmental milestones in stages in their lives, depending on how old they are, it's pandemic. That is quite unprecedented in the last century in the last hundred years, and so we don't really have all that much research that shows for instance what what it might do long-term to a child. There's just a lot that we won't know until we start to come out of this and start to. See The impact on kids and refrain that I heard repeatedly in that I kind of. Sensed just from talking to kids and talking to parents is that it will probably vary quite a lot from child to child. We and I'm going to ask you about some of the reporting an interviews that you've done but I just as as a mom I guess and I kind of mentioned this about myself as apparent in the intro. Do you what? What's your sense on? How profoundly this is going to impact kids how how much they'll remember of this. Will it be something that sticks with them as they? Turn eighteen as they turned thirty I, suspect it will be in the first month, or so I tried to get my my son to keep a diary in. I tried to get him to write down impressions because I thought Oh, this will be this thing that he will look back on the strange period in his early life, and it'll be this blip as the pandemic continues in his measures. Put in place you know some of the lifted now, but there's always this hovering threat of a second wave, and the possibility that we will return to some form of of pandemic measures in lockdown measures. I A starting to have the very real sense that this may not just be a blip. Oh, five or six weeks that happened at one time that it may be something that that stays with kids. I don't think it's necessarily all doom and gloom in the way that it stays with children. I went into the story. Concerned about things like anxiety, mental health, and so on, and and some of the effects that I heard about those researchers, and for the kids that I talked to. surprised me. There were there were benefits and some of that I see in my own child's life, and he seems mostly happy. He missed the school and he misses friends, and he misses being able to have normal contact physical contact with people. But he's done things. My my my son in the last three months that he never done before he rides his bike down. A downtown Toronto Street right in the middle of the street. He scooters around unsupervised and so in some ways it. Reminds me of my own childhood. Growing up in India in neighborhoods that didn't have a lot of cars in them and kids were just playing on the street. What's it like? Talking to kids about this because you, you didn't just talk to your own son. You interviewed a whole bunch of kids at various ages I did yes, I think the younger youngest child that I talked to was six or seven seven and. The oldest young person I talked to was eighteen, and it's really easy to talk to the kids about what their lives are like, and and how they feel about this time, because for most of them, the coronavirus doesn't actually Lou mauled at large. They don't think about it as this terrifying. Thing lots of the younger

Children Research Jordan Rawlings Mr Superman Kovic New York India Editor LOU Oregon The Washington Post
Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

The Big Story

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

"Now is the covid nineteen pandemic continues to grow, so are the parallels being drawn between it and another deadly virus that struck the globe more than a century ago, talking about the Spanish flu. Guys. We've been taking a look at some of the video from nineteen sixty eight. There's a lot of pieces of video that look very similar to what we're seeing today. Implementing the images and emotions coming out of Minneapolis too familiar to what happened right here in Ferguson Missouri in two thousand fourteen George Floyd arrest on a Minneapolis street corner, and his frantic pleas for help have given rise to one of the most turbulent periods in recent American history. The question that I can't stop asking myself. How does this all and You may have heard. At various points this year that we are living history right now. The truth is we're always living history. It's just that some of us can afford to ignore it until it boils over. But when racism and police brutality, and the rage that comes in response to that are laid bare for the world to see. In the middle of a pandemic and martial law is threatened. And nobody gets to look away. Everyone wants to know what happens next. Do, we even have a historical precedent for what's happening in America and around the world right now. What is the larger context of how we arrived at this moment? What are we missing when we watch people discuss it on. Cable News. And what needs to happen now? But does each of US need to do? For this to be a moment that changes the world for the better. That's still possible. I'm Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story. Andre Demise is a writer and journalist, a contributing editor at Maclean's and a Nathanson fellow in history at York University. He is one of the smartest guests. We ever have on this podcast hi Andre. How's it going toward? It's going about as well as it can more importantly, how are you? doing my best I'm trying to reduce stress as much as I can by hanging out with my children and you know. Occasionally occasionally seeing partner but we're both in school. We've both got tons of homework were both busy plus jobs and everything else so yeah, we're even busier than before. The whole lockdown happened. Figure that and now you're spending this week with white people like me, asking you to please explain the historical context of this well I mean yeah, yeah, I am spending a lot of time explaining shift away, people. I mean I all. I can say I sincerely. Thank you for it. you know I? Just I find you incredibly smart and able to help me. learn some stuff from this. Thanks for taking the time Oh. Stop stuttered. Stop your flattery. I'm about to Leeann as I can plan. Why don't you just start by telling me while you watch everything? That's been happening this past week. What's going through your head? People say things like we've been through worse or we've been here before, and I have to ask the question. When when when of we've been here before we've been here before. Quote Unquote in nine eighteen during the Spanish flu pandemic. We've been here. Nine, hundred nineteen during the May Day riots and during red summer. We've been here before in nineteen sixty eight. But. My question is when when is all this happened at the same time? This is not this is unprecedented. My. Question is what is supposed to look like when when it's all over when the dust settles. Because at some point, there's going to be a change of some kind. Throughout history what happens in the course of a popular uprising that moves to straight up volt. The two methods that the ruling class can use. To try and tamp it down. One is use of force. This is where the Jimmy breaks down. This is where the state has to reveal as violence. And come out against the people with arms, or can try placating the people you can try it for example, the Civil Rights Act. It can try the declaration of the rights. It can try any number of mechanisms. To make that, the populace still has some faith in the state, but what? This looks like I don't know that there's anything to placate like there's I. Don't know that there's any mechanism. The state can try to convince people that social contract is worth upholding. That's the thing that keeps going through my head. Is You know what kind of concession can be made universally across? You know the entire United States that would actually mollify the anger I do know some of the answers to those questions I do know. That and this is something that I've been talking about over the last few years. That capitalism depends on racism to be able to reproduce and propagate itself. It's just plain fact If you beat Donald Harassed, who is a former economist Stanford also happens to be the father of Kamla Harris the former presidential candidate. But apparently they didn't. They didn't really have much of a relationship, but throughout American history. The the use of Racist promises the promising of white rages. what's been described as racial republicanism by scholars like David. What that does is incentivize the white working class against their black peers. It has the white working class essentially the. Generates like we are the only people that deserve to have. Rights. Everybody else is a on a cast below us. And until that cycle is abolished until we move away from a system of capital that accumulates the value of people's Labor and the crews it to a few select people. And then spreads out the rewards among certain other people, and then makes promises to certain people. Until that cycle is broken. I'm afraid we're going to be seeing this for the rest of our lives. I mean you're a fellow in history what? have. We seen that even close to like this in the past that ended with concessions. You have to go back very far. I mean you can. You can look at for example I mean not. Bolivia has been taken over in ashes coup. But if you look at Bolivia for example, the the presidency of evil, Morales and the Movement for socialism in Bolivia, lifted thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people out of out of poverty. It increased literacy rates incorporated indigenous eighty into the broader society. You had the the coca farmers. The the coca does I their their practices and their agricultural methods were incorporated into the broader nation. So that you didn't have eight of. The United States rating forms and burning crops. You headed that this is this is a a plants, but this is also a way of life that is valid, and the fact that it's been twisted into a normal trade has nothing to do with the people that originated the practice, so look at Bolivia for example like that. That was up until very recently and experiments in creating a broader. Social Democracy that was more inclusive and helped marginalized people, so

United States Bolivia Minneapolis Andre Demise George Floyd Coca Farmers Jordan Rawlings Ferguson Missouri America Leeann Partner York University Jimmy Donald Harassed Contributing Editor Morales David
Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

The Big Story

08:41 min | 1 year ago

Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

"If I had to guess what you'd say if I asked you how long a Kobe nineteen vaccine would take. I Bet I could do that. But best estimates even though we've ramped this up or probably twelve to even eighteen months away from having that available the first vaccine could be ready in eighteen. Months could still be at least a year away and I said that could be a year to a year and a half. I'm not changing any of the dates. So where does that twelve to eighteen month timeframe come from to be honest? I couldn't really tell you but I've heard about it since March and it does sound good to think that a year and a half is the long end of this but this of course is one of the challenges that we all face in the course of learning about this virus the guts of how we research and test and develop and manufacture. Vaccines is probably not something. A lot of us spent time thinking about until now all of a sudden though any piece of good news is desperately welcome so we start to hear about every single potential savior tonight the new findings from the NIH on the antiviral drug rim desert showing promise in speeding up recovery worldwide. There are now roughly one hundred vaccine candidates under view. Researchers advisor believed this Genetic Code Vaccine available as soon as September. How likely though are any of those trials to result in an actual vaccine and even if one of them does. Will it really be available later this year or early next year? Do we even know how to make the vaccine that we might find on a large enough scale? And have we come to grips with the fact that not every disease is a vaccine? How well do we really understand this process? How well do we understand the hope that we're clinging to today? We'll try to help you understand it better right after a very quick update from Claire Broussard. The government says it'll be very careful when it comes to easing border restrictions with the US. That deal which means no nonessential travel between the two countries is set to expire next week but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not say whether or not the border would reopen. At that time Deputy Prime Minister Christie Freeland said. Talks were ongoing. The federal government has announced financial aid for seniors a one time tax free top payment. Those who receive old age security will get three hundred dollars and those who receive the guaranteed income supplement will receive two hundred dollars as the number of new cases of Kovic Nineteen in Ontario remain. Steady the province's chief medical officer of health. Dr David Williams says the by the weekend. Health officials may consider advising the province to move to the first stage of its reopening plan that includes opening select workplaces allowing for more people at certain events like funerals and having hospitals resumed some non urgent surgeries and lastly tradition in Ontario. The Canadian National Exhibition has been canceled for the first time. Since the Second World War it was set to take place August twenty first to September seventh. The President of the Association says they did not take this decision lightly and it was made in consultation and with the support of public health experts. As of Tuesday evening seventy one thousand one hundred fifty seven cases of covert nineteen in Canada with five thousand. Two hundred eighty three deaths. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story. Robert Venison has worked on various vaccines and in the vaccination industry for almost forty years now. So I'm hoping that he can kind of walk us through this high Robert. Hi How are you? I'm doing really well except I never know how to feel these days when I see news reports about a new potential vaccine for Cova nineteen and breakthrough and success. And then it's still eighteen months away. Do you know what I mean I do. Why don't you sort of start by telling me what the media and the public get wrong When we discuss potential vaccine for this virus. Well what a here on the media is. It's almost like it's a slam dunk for starters and that it's not going to take very long at all and twelve months eighteen months. I I feel that's really very overly optimistic. My view is that it could take much longer. The probability of success is a lot lower. And you know for some diseases. We've never been able to come up with a vaccine like AIDS for example right. Can you sort of walk me through the typical process for finding vaccine For something I won't say something like this because I realized this is kind of unprecedented in its global scope but but when you normally discover something in you're searching for vaccine what happens well. The normal process takes fifteen years the ranges between ten and thirty years and it starts with an awful lot of academic research understanding the disease and the disease organism before manufacturers even. Start Looking at a potential vaccine. But once they do. Then there's what we call the preclinical phase where we do a lot of animal testing and developing what was called a vaccine platform and scale up occurs and production of enough vaccine for clinical trials. And then after the clinical trials there's three phases one two and three submit to the regulators for a license and Which usually takes a year and then you have to manufacture it and some vaccines like salk polio. Vaccine for example takes eighteen months to make really yeah from scratch. It's not like pharmaceuticals. You're not cranking pills. Can you tell me how the search for a covert nineteen vaccine can cut down that Really Depressing Time Line. Like everybody's working on this one thing around the world. What do you do to shorten that? Okay there's a number of things that we can do first of all. We do everything in parallel instead of doing one thing I and step to second and step three first. We started all of the steps at the same time where wherever we can. So we're we're going to do without a lot of academic research and knowledge of the organism. We're GONNA use some new technologies that we haven't used for vaccines before so these newer technologies hopefully will be a make us able to manufacture a vaccine much quicker. What are those technologies these are some of the DNA and RNA? Vaccines that are being looked at. There's never been a vaccine currently licensed using these technologies but there's a lot of axes in the pipeline so the thought is it might work for this so while these cut down the timeframe on the other handy reduce the probability of success. Where are we then in that process? I mean I read different reports every few days. Well the good news is there's about nine hundred ninety five vaccines that are candidates for clinical trials. Not all of them have started yet. But there's a and of those the top sort of Twenty that I've looked at the top twenty contenders. Some of those are finishing up animal studies and some of them have actually already started in phase one clinical studies so the positive thing is that there's so many companies developing candidates that wild up the probability of success of any one of those is low the fact that there's a lot of them means that we may get lucky and And one of those will come through or two when you say you look at ninety five or however many that are being done around the world and then you look at the top twenty contenders what makes a potential vaccine a contender as opposed to one of the other ones on the list. What are you looking for? Well what I'm looking for because I know how difficult the process is. I'm looking for basically a platforms. That have we have some experience with. So we've had some success with this platform in making another vaccine and I look at how fast that platform will be able to be scaled up to make to make a manufacturer vaccine because normally it takes five years just to build a manufacturing plant for many of the traditional vaccines. We need something. That's a lot faster

Ontario Robert Venison Deputy Prime Minister Christie NIH Dr David Williams Federal Government Justin Trudeau United States Prime Minister Aids Claire Broussard Cova Canada Advisor Jordan Rawlings Medical Officer President Trump
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Injury. They will tell you that it can be a long uh complicated and frustrating process. ACL MC L.. Back Concussion knee shoulder doesn't matter there's always a lot of work to could be done in a process to be followed and you just can't rush it which is why you will often hear quotes like this. Yeah for sure it's like I said it's frustrating shooting and you're going to be a medical team here so take care of you. That's a little frustrating for me. Because I know that I could play. I just can't play today you know it happens I'm okay but You know just trying to move on from for Nexia but for all that frustration. At least there is. It's a process. There's another type of Rehab at some of the world's most elite athletes go through for which there is no blueprint. There is has no real timetable. There is not even any certainty if they will ever get back to their previous form and it's not an upper body or a lower body injury. It's right in the Middle Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Christina Rutherford is a senior writer at Sports Net Christina. Hi Hi how are you doing really well. Why don't you tell me about some of the amazing comebacks you wrote about in particular? Why don't you start with telling me about Meghan? Mickelson's injury rehab all right so Meghan. Mikkelson is a two time Olympic. Gold medalist she's a veteran defender on the Canadian Women's National National Hockey team and she's orchestrated two of these come comebacks and the first one happened in twenty sixteen gene and she targeted returning for a world championships and she had sustained. I don't even know if you call it an injury. But she was coming back from a a big life changing event and she rashed back to get back in time for six months down the road to peer at the World Championships which she managed to do but in the process she went through basically a laundry list of injuries reese. She pulled both of her grinds. She had bursitis. She had tendonitis. She'd been relatively healthy her entire career but she'd never been through anything quite quite like this. So what was the event so she had a baby. She's now to actually. She's still on the Canadian women's national hockey she still is yes So her latest comeback. She had a daughter and she waited a little longer. The second time to come back because as of how difficult the first comeback was she gave herself a bit more time but yes she's now one of two members of the Canadian National Women's hockey team who come back since giving giving birth and the other one is Meghan Augusta and in the history of the national team. Only three women have done this. Becky Kellar was the first So it's pretty you neek but it's also happening all across sports right you called it the Middle Body injury. Yeah well the reason I wanted to pursue sued. The stray is because I barely cocky and every single year we lose a different woman our team to pregnancy. And you know. How hockey has this upper and lower body injuries so we thought somewhere in the middle so we started calling it the NBA? I And and then I started seeing you know athletes like shelley and frazier price becoming the world's fastest woman in holding up her two year old son after becoming the world and thought how in the world are these women doing this. And that's what sort of led me to the story. Well how do you rehab. Something like that. Like it's where do you start. So that's the thing. There's no cut and dried formula. No doctor will tell you well. This is exactly how you we do it. Because every pregnancy is different every athlete different every sports different every training regimens different. So you kind of take it as you go and it's different for everybody. I think the most telling thing I learned was one of the studies. They looked at looked at women in the military who returned turned after childbirth and found that I forget how many women were studied but it was a good number found that the the quickest return to sort of peak fitness after birth was two months and the longest was two years. So that shows you the variance and experience right there. So it's sort of what. What can you expect when you come back after giving birth? You're not gonNA have any idea until you go through it really. You sat down talked to a few of the women who've done this. was there anything that stuck out to. You is common to their experience. The unexpected nature of all of it definitely Bentley stuck out or give me some examples. Well I think the one thing that all three so I spoke to Melissa Bishop an eight hundred hundred meter runner one of the most successful in Canadian history and Taylor Hill. WHO's in the WMBA and making mickelson hockey player? I think all all three of them said that one of the biggest challenges was actually time management so in terms of how do you fit your training in when you're breastfeeding is feeding. How do you feel A-ok to train when you woke up three times in the middle of the night to feed your baby in Melissa Bishops case when she returned learn to sort of full throttle training six months after she had her daughter Kerlin? She found that she wasn't producing adequate breast milk for her baby anymore. It was more like water so she had to resort to formula because she realized okay. Well my daughter's not getting what I need. Because her body body was I guess using all those nutrients just to operate and so that she could train at a high level. But yeah those fitting in those the feeds and the lifestyle lifestyle change. I think was sort of the the biggest common denominator when you talk to doctors for reporting this like what does pregnancy he do to the body of an elite athlete. So I spoke with doctor. Michelle Mottola who works at a Western and her lab was actually the first and North America to study exercise in pregnant and postpartum women. So she knows more about this topic than anybody and she'll be the first to tell you there's a lot to be learned still. There's just not a lot of studies out there. Because it's a tenuous thing to study right a little dicey to tell a an elite athlete. WHO's pregnant can you know? Push it as far as you can when it comes to exercise because two lives are at risk right And same goes for afterwards. So there's very very little out there but the main point that Dr Matola made was that pregnancy actually affects every single system in the body. And it's the only only the only thing that doctors know of that actually does aside from I guess death so every single part of your body is going through transformation I formation while you're pregnant and after you give birth all of those things have been building up like your heart rate increases the amount of blood you're producing increases that doesn't up and disappear after forty weeks when you get birth so your body still adjusting after you give birth and it's obviously still adjusting to the the trauma of literally giving birth so your pelvic floor has gone through a massive transformation and is still sort of in a way confusing itself back together. Melissa Bishop described it as just feeling loosey Goosey while she was running around which is crazy. It literally affects everything it makes your joints a little looser so You can find maybe that you are more flexible as an athlete but also that you're more susceptible to injury which is why Mickelson who you're talking about off the top Went through so many injuries. After her first birth it sounds insane. Not that these women would return to competition because naturally they would want to but like with everything you've just described that they would push push themselves to get right back to where they were in that it would even be possible. Yeah Absolutely Melissa. Bishop was actually talking about that. You know it's a personal. I choice to decide at the peak of your athletic career that you want to start a family. And in her case Grin was a happy surprise and she was terrified. Same with Taylor Hill but I mean neither of them would change it for the world and I think what they both found is. They had to temper their expectations. As is to win they were gonNA come back in Taylor's case she didn't feel like herself on the court until a year later yet. She was back on the court a few months later playing in the playoffs offs and in Melissa's case she had to shut down her first season back running. She was hoping to qualify for world championships and never hit the standard because she was constantly injured so that the tempering of expectations is also another commonality among these women but another thing all of them told me. Is that what they tell other. Athletes is that you can absolutely do this. You know it's not going to be easy. It's not a piece of cake. Obviously but it's it's possible and women are proving it all over the place on every sporting field in every arena. We have the first example that comes to my mind is obviously Serena Williams. Yeah I was GonNa ask you like is it because that she was so public with her experience or just because of her level of star power but she did sort out of become the face of this. I don't know if you would call it a movement or not but I wouldn't call it a movement I mean it's been happening with a long time. I I think what has happened in recently as because of social media. We're hearing a lot more about these women women's experiences whereas before are you didn't really get a document. There were no blogs.

Melissa Bishop Mickelson Meghan Augusta Taylor Hill hockey Canadian National Women Nexia Middle Jordan Rawlings Becky Kellar Serena Williams Melissa Bishops Christina Rutherford Mikkelson reese NBA Bentley writer Melissa North America Michelle Mottola
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"And Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Dr David Fiszman is an epidemiologist at the University of Toronto. He was also a part part of the team at Toronto Public Health during the SARS crisis in two thousand and three I David Hello. Thank you for being no problem. It is my job to we kind of the voice of the audience in these situations so my first question is just basically like how terrified should I be. is not at all an acceptable. Answer answer I think not at all is probably the most accurate answer is a welcome. Yeah I mean don't be terrified. We've seen this movie before. Tell me the about the movie. So what when did we I hear about this particular virus and what were the reports. It's about three weeks ago. This is apparently now based on reports. We know this is the outbreak such as it is has probably been going on since December. The initial outbreak was in The Chinese city of Wuhan which seems to be where most of the cases are concentrated. The initial report was of a cluster of forty people who had pneumonia and fever fever and those people had the commonality that they had all or almost all been in contact with an animal market in Wuhan China in those first forty cases and this is important. There was one instance where in a household somebody. Who'd been at the market transmitted the virus Paris to someone else in their household? So you had forty primary cases and then you had a secondary case but good on China for telling Everybody and being. I don't want to say sound kind of like Jerky but like surprisingly transparent And getting this they're rapidly Chinese Virologists rapidly sequencing this new virus showing us that it's basically a close cousin of merce corona virus and SARS SARS coronavirus of course has canadians sort of having nasty flashback. Yes but it's it's one of them it in the families called the Beta Corona viruses. If you WANNA be like Dorky with your friends you say oh I think this Beta corona virus separate in Wuhan but so you have forty primary cases making one secondary case now. They're or engaged in case finding and you know I sort of looking at twitter and face palming a bit because people are saying Oh my God. It was forty cases last week. And now we're up to you know oh to forty cases two weeks ago now. It's two hundred fifty cases a few weeks later were right and that's why I asked the terrifying questions because it it does spark that emotion. Yeah Yeah I know for sure and I think we're hardwired to feel that emotion. So why are you face pumping though why my face palming So so so. We don't know the dynamics of this thing but I'm I'm working from analogy from the corona viruses. We do know which is SARS and Murs and what I'll tell you is we've seen this movie. This is this is the same as last time which is reassuring but also potentially scary in some ways. I guess we SORTA unpack that because I do have concerns. I'm a physician. I work part time in hospital roll and I also was a public health officer in two thousand and three so have very vivid memories of SARS and what a an absolute nightmare that was to get through. It's very important and consistent with this weird it's transmissible but it's not transmissible thing. It's very important to remember. During SARS stars I think it was twelve North American cities imported cases of SARS Toronto. Being one of them Vancouver was certainly one of them Chicago. New York San Francisco. Oh L. A. I can't remember the others but we were the only city in North America. That dropped this fly ball is like it's an easy fly ball is hit hit to twelve different baseball players. Eleven of them caught it rate and then they hit Toronto. And it's like Toronto. Dropped bounced all over. You know you sort of one of these humiliating and things were asked to leave the field so we had this sort of and Toronto was sort of An epic disaster last time around with SARS. Because not only only did we have outbreaks which hospital centered and that's also important and we can circle back to that. Hospital centered outbreaks. But we had our own little kind Not a cover up exactly but people started playing fast and loose with numbers to try and make the thing go away which meant that. We were the only city on planet earth that had a double SARS outbreak so we had a SARS outbreak that started and was going away by April Two Thousand and three and then came roaring back in. May I think the question is. I've talked to colleagues about this. You know this is our stress test. How much did we learn from? SARS I think in terms of clinicians the knowledge base is very different in terms of how respiratory viruses can sort of take you down down kill you fill your colleagues close your ICU. Like people get that you say SARS shorthand for that infection. Control role in hospitals is at a different level than it was in two thousand and three having lived experience with both what I worry about in terms of the Toronto health ecosystem. is the crowding. You know because that's what kicked off SARS was dude in emergency room in scarborough for hours and hours and hours and able to transmit to three other people during the emergency room visit which sets up this whole chain of transmission which results in the take down of our healthcare cure system effectively and one point one billion dollars in costs. So that's what I worry about is the is is the crowding which we still haven't figured out the physical plant of our hospitals. It also is a little bit of an accident waiting to happen. I think. Tell me what we know about this virus in particular You mentioned it's close to the other two you know. What are the symptoms symptoms? What does it do how dangerous it so it seems to and this is again is always the case with emerging infectious diseases is the more severe cases? This sort of have you know sort of put their hand up and say please count me. I'm super sick. I am in the ICU. With mystery pneumonia. So Oh please test me for all viruses including weird new fish market crazy virus right so people. People are focused on folks who are super sick and then the bigger the concentric circles around that the less the severity. The less likely you are to actually identify cases so we probably what we probably have here. Here is probably the tip of the iceberg. There's been some work you know. We all have our kind of thing that we do. There's a group at Imperial College London. Who have this? You know they've they've sort of added a Jerrycan of diesel and started up their mathematical model that takes exported cases and tries to back calculate. How large outbreak must be for you to have this many cases in Japan this many cases in South Korea and so forth based on travel plans who travel travel patterns very And they're saying that real denominator must must be about seventeen hundred cases and it's like well okay big city. It's a big place bigger break. Four thousand people die every year in Canada from influenza. So Oh you know just to put those numbers in context at any rate be that as it may. What do we know about this thing? Well the sequence of the virus is very similar muller to the sequence of SARS burs SARS origin mors probably bat origin via camels. Okay so this if you had to bat that Dot origin live animal market seafood market predominantly but other critters being sold at this market. That SARS again How'd how'd SARS from bats to civic cats? Well you know there's this very sort of Catholic lower case z Catholic dietary The kind of regime in some parts of China and people eat a lot of different critters. There are a lot of live animal markets to meet that need. So what you have is creatures. Is that normally would be widely separated by habitat or geography suddenly cheek-by-jowl and you saw this with SARS with civic cats being stored in Live civic cats being kept in close proximity to other animals and presumably the backfires getting to the civic cats that way so I I'm presuming. It's GonNa look something like that. We know so. It's not that transmissible. Usually 'cause we had forty primary cases in one secondary case right we also from our virologist friends that those I sequences of the first virus that they sequenced. Aren't that different from each other and are much less different than you would have expected if the virus had passage from person to person to person person to person says well conserved that suggests a point source outbreak right. So it's like you know it's like diarrhea outbreak at the Burger joints..

SARS Toronto Wuhan Toronto Public Health China University of Toronto Jordan Rawlings Dr David Fiszman merce corona twitter Paris David Hello baseball Wuhan China pneumonia diarrhea Vancouver Murs Chicago
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"The numbers so when you look at for example the idea that younger generations are lazy. There's this idea that they you know boomers or older. People sometimes feel younger. People Act as though they're entitled and you know they're staying at home for a long time they're using the Bank of mom and dad to get ahead and they're they're not working very hard and advancing in their careers the way they could if they just pulled hold up their bootstraps. That's not really true if you look at the data millennials are not working less. They're not less interested in buying a house. They're not less interested in starting a family necessarily They're just sitting on fewer resources allowing them to to do that at the same age as this baby boomers did The timeline has changed in a big way When you look at generation said which is the generation? That's behind. Okay buber right. They're the ones on tick tock this Social Media Platform that we can. We can talk about. They are By all accounts it's a very responsible cohort of young people The data show that they are More cognizant of environmental concerns. They're more socially aware than the generations that came before them. They're drinking less. They're taking fewer drugs less promiscuous or at least they are having safer sex than thenn generations before them were so on many fronts. And I'm talking to you about social social stuff not just political and economic nick Side of things. They seem to be pretty okay and so we have. This tendency has older people to judge Younger anger generations negatively. And that's actually written into our genetic code that's actually said he's shown Something that older people have always done when they've looked down down at at the kid's fair if you look at it. That was something that I was GonNa ask you though because it's a fascinating element of your story is that how much of this is just Our genetic code repeating itself that old people are always like kids these days. Yeah and you know I mean you can find plenty of examples to From the last fifty years of Older people complaining about younger people and vice versa. Right I mean this is not the first time that people have blamed baby boomers for for you know taking their jobs jobs or hanging on Cindy to power people like Rick Mercer. We're talking about that. When when he was much younger person couple of decades ago he's ranting about it on TV? Maybe you know so this is not new and like I was saying we also have evidence. scientific evidence to support the idea that This is just something thing that we do as humans There's this study that came out a little while ago. That suggests that adults will actually judge young people according to the traits that they have adopted or the the values that they have adopted as adults. They don't remember what it was like to grow up. So if you as an adult bolt have developed sort of authoritarian tendency instead of remembering what you were like the kid you'll judge the kids right now according to your current values values and you'll think to yourself man. They sure don't seem to respect their elders. Or if right now you read a lot of books as grownup you don't remember how many books used to read as a kid instead you think to yourself well. These kids don't seem to be reading very much. The other thing I found fascinating and should have known but didn't didn't zoo. We actually haven't had generations for very long yeah This theory was only proposed in nineteen twenty eight. We've been dividing ourselves into these groups for for under a hundred years and we don't know yet I don't think any consensus has been reached on whether that's actually a good way of defining Our societies it might not make a lot of sense There's some research that a that eyesight in the article to that found generational theory A sort of a self fulfilling prophecy. If you see another generation has different you will treat them differently and so they turn out to be different. Because because you've been treating them differently so it's it's unclear how useful this is actually as a way to define ourselves even though it makes sense and some ways and and helps me to narrow Dan my statistical categories for this kind of reporting right. This is a question I could probably ask About any topic topic we cover but How much of this is made worse by the Internet so you could argue that it's made worse because the Internet has driven us to our opposite opposite silos and made us sort of polarized and a new way? You could also say that the Internet has made things a little better because for a younger generations Today they are being listened to on a new level and a new scale because of social media and because of viral hashtags and memes In a way that I think they couldn't be before We today we had. The media are paying attention attention to the trends of thirteen to fifteen year olds because that's available to us we can see some of the content that they're putting out there and I think that this positions them really well actually to take advantage of that and to sort of show us what they're about and what what they want to see in the world and I think this is. Why people like Gretchen? Berg another young activists are seeing this global platform That they might not have if we were still living in a time when adults were looking to MTV to see what the Gen xers were thinking about this just kind of A. There's definitely a positive way to look at this. I think it's it's a new megaphone for young people as much as it. It has highlighted the divisions in our society as you reported this piece and talk to people on both sides of the divide that might not really be a divide. God what do they have in common. And where do they share common goals that they could actually work together on and is that happening. Yeah I mean to some degree it it is happening and and I guess I would point to politics as a venue where While people may be extremely frustrated there is sort of a slow progress in Canada. Our leaders are younger. They are younger than in the US. For example where we talk about you know. Donald Trump being a baby boomer and all of the the leading candidates for the Democratic nomination on twenty twenty being baby boomers here we see a millennials Increasingly represented in national politics. And you know. Our Prime Minister is a Gen. xer things like climate change income inequality and housing costs even if we don't have Wonderful solutions for them. We are talking about. Those is things that are national level and thank younger. Politicians especially are are pursuing those issues in a big way. Will you mentioned how old all of America's politicians are. I mean how much of this is exacerbated. By the fact that the baby boomers aren't really dying off the way previous generations nations might have at around that age. Some of these people are gonna live for decades still. Yeah I mean so this is actually a bit of a misnomer to something that and I was told by a representative of a car. The Canadian Association of Retired Persons. Is that well you know. Young people should just kind of wait their turn in a way because they're going to live so much longer than baby boomers even are and they're living so much longer than their parents and grandparents were. Everything's just happening on an extended timetable. the argument being that you know if baby boomers are going to live like let's say a decade longer and then millennials maybe eleven other decade longer than baby boomers. It doesn't matter if you buy your first house at twenty five or at forty five. That's not necessarily true though if you look at the stats. Baby boomers have only got about four years. Extra on the previous generations Mueller. Yeah Longevity is certainly is increasing Life expectancy is up in Canada. And you know we have way more centenarians than we used to But on average you're not looking at you know decades longer necessarily In your life and there's also some evidence that seems to support the idea idea that millennials could live shorter lives than and Gen xers for example. There's a bit of research showing that because of of high rates of anxiety which I think you could argue Things like income inequality housing prices. Climate change are contributing to that. They're going to you possibly not exceed the lives of those that came before them. This means that the argument is sort of bunk. In a way there's still time for medical research to catch up of course and there's plenty of progress ahead. I'm sure but we shouldn't act as mobile. Any else have got these hundred and twenty year lives ahead of them that make it so that the struggles of their youth don't end up mattering did you or Mcclain's in general. I guess I'm to any kind of conclusion at the end of this. It's complicated. It's hard to come to a conclusion and I think you can look at the same set of statistics and factoid 's and arrive at different conclusions depending who you are and possibly how old you are you might land on a different opinion After you've read the package that we put together here and I think that's what's fun about it. We aren't GonNa make that decision. But here's here's the evidence. Here's what we believe for myself after doing reporting on this after trying to actually go out there and find examples of intergenerational solidarity. I went to a place place where seniors and students are volunteering together and asked them if they see much division where they are and their families and I think on the ground around you could make the argument that at least with certain causes certain issues. There's a lot more reason for optimism than there is pessimism and because of the Internet we have this opportunity to come together in a new way. Even though it's GonNa come with a lot of snark that's what the Internet does best. Indeed thank seventy. That was Marie. Danielle Smith of Maclean's and of course this is being the big story. Find us at the big story. PODCAST DOT C.. Find us on twitter at the Big Story F.. PM and find every episode of this podcast actually only the last three hundred episodes doubts. But that should be enough. Wherever you get podcasts on apple on Google on stitcher on spotify on cast box you pick give us a rating give us a review? Make sure it is five five stars. Thanks for listening Jordan Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

Canada buber Canadian Association of Retire twitter nick Side Rick Mercer US Donald Trump first house Danielle Smith Jordan Rawlings Gretchen Dan America Marie apple
Why do we pit one generation against another?

The Big Story

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Why do we pit one generation against another?

"There is a generational war going on. Yeah you might have heard. We've talked about we're all guilty of it. We're guilty of it on this podcast. You know what it sounds like the cover the new Time magazine. Taking a look at the millennials also known as being needs integration and narcissistic self interested unfocused lazy but entitled is the Big One. The millennials generation Z.. Have the Peter Pan Syndrome. They don't ever want to grow up. Your generation needs everything to be about you. And that's very upsetting to US baby boomers because self-absorption option is kind of our thing memes and Stereo tapes and rants are fun. They're great for getting attention online but this week a new project decided to actually go to the numbers and the science to answer some questions. Are millennials really L. E. Lazy and entitled are the baby boomer's keeping younger people from owning homes and finding jobs are old people living so much longer that they're to blame length for income inequality. Do people coming out of school. These days really make less money than they used to. And critically is as the generation gap really worse than it's ever been or are we just doing the same thing that we've always done. The same thing that it turns turns out is hard coded into our genetics are the boomers to blame millennials. To blame for is the real villain. The person who came up up with the concept of generations in the first place Jordan Rawlings. This is the big story. Re Danielle Smith of Maclean's went to the numbers. You try to figure out what's true and what's not when it comes to who to blame hey. MD My first question for you is. Where did the whole concept of the dual covers for this Mcclain's issue come from from in the gigantic package? Folks put together on this. You might have heard of a thing called okay boomer podcast about okay so even it means so this so this was an idea that or I guess. Retort that was popularized in the fall and prompted a lot of soul-searching researching about whether there's some kind of general racial warfare happening and if it's there is it based on reality is that a creature of the Internet and what's behind it. We decided that we should go big with that idea and delve into it ourselves. What are the two covers? One cover has an older gentleman. Gentlemen on the front and it says it's all your fault boomers and then on the reverse side it's a younger woman and it says it's all your fault millennials so depending on the way that that you pick up the magazine you'll see one or the other so like I mentioned to you. We covered okay boomer before when it was a mean. And we just talked about The general assumptions That go on between generations and the rhetoric that gets thrown around but you guys actually decided to to try to look at the data and see WHO has a better? Who has it worse? WHO's at fault? What kind of a process was that Well this story is about everything if you think about it the idea of age cohorts is just permeates everything in our society Eddie from work to schooling education Money business every everything that you can think of has some angle to it that has to do with generational racial differences so it was a pretty big task to bite off and chew and so I decided that you know there's a few things we can focus on. We have statistics picks that show data to do with income inequality we have evidence that younger generations are more mobilized on the issue of climate change. there's a few hugh areas where we can kind of dig deeper and dissect whether this difference between generations is Is Real how big is it. And how much animosity is it really causing or as some of this just you know scuttle butt on the Internet right and when you did look into that what was the first thing you found. That was different than you'd expect going off. What the SCUTTLEBUTT on the Internet says? Well I guess I mean the first thing that I personally personally thought about. When I was writing the story was when I look at my own life and I look at my family and the the wide age range among my family and friends? I don't feel generational animosity right away. I can't really see it The ways in which I think we can all notice. Differences are in the beliefs Thoughts and beliefs about policy ideas thoughts and beliefs about the way that people should vote. And what issues sir. Important housing costs are very very different for young people today than they were thirty or forty years ago but when we sit down down at the dinner table. We're not necessarily having these raging debates over those issues what really Brings US together is without getting to combat is is love you know I mean generations. Get along in a Lotta ways so I just wanted to figure out how crazy I was thinking that we can all just kind of get along and enjoy each other. And how can we come together on some of these issues that. Divide us when you look at. What what boomers say about millennials and millennials say about boomers? What do they get right? That's actually backed up by data like who's who's using real facts Fox here while there's sort of two competing narratives right and maybe I we can talk about what. Those narratives are That are not necessarily backed up by data. This is what we typically see online. We see older people suggesting that younger people are entitled That they don't work very hard that they don't appreciate the social progress that came before them that they're whining about their feelings online and that they're not appreciating this sort of ground that was trodden by their forebears to get us here on the other hand. You have younger people saying you guys have been at the peak of political and financial dominance for a very a long time. They're saying to the boomers. Listen you had things much better than we did. And we are waking up to this now and we want changes and we feel hard are done by because you've used this power to benefit yourselves at our expense. Parts of those narratives are true. A little bit of all of it is true. And I. It's it's there's some contradicting data. Here that I found quite interesting There's a group in Canada called generation. Squeeze which is sort of the primary group advocating eating for policies that help millennials those younger than them their data that they've compiled has a few key points that I think Illustrate the problems here. One is that your fulltime income. If you're a between twenty five and thirty four at about eight times that income is how much it you'll pay for for an average house. It was only four times your average income a few decades ago they also claim and there there is some dispute here with some stats can and data which I can get into but their claim is that generally speaking. We'll also make less money if you adjust for inflation than baby boomers dead. Where does that come into conflict with stats can stats can did a study recently? That shows a slice of the millennial generation versus a slice of Gen xers and a slice of baby boomers sort of when they were around the same age It doesn't reflect the generation as a whole and. I think that's where there might be some discrepancy but what the stats can data shows. Is that on average. The median incomes for millennials at at a younger age is higher and the net worth is higher to than it was for Gen xers. There's and baby boomers. The the caveat to that is that the debt for millennials is much much higher And your net worth is higher. Because you're accumulating assets that are more expensive right housing more expensive so the median debt for a millennial age aged twenty five to thirty four. This study found is thirty. Five thousand dollars versus nineteen thousand dollars. Gen xers around the same age and eleven thousand dollars as for a boomers around the same age. So that's where Generation squeeze another advocates really like to focus because the debt load is is what causes the anxiety that we see from younger

Boomers Younger Age New Time Magazine Peter Pan L. E. Lazy Danielle Smith Jordan Rawlings Mcclain Eddie Canada FOX Maclean
Does Vancouver need to start turning tourists away?

The Big Story

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Does Vancouver need to start turning tourists away?

"Vancouver is a very nice city to visit. If you've ever been you don't need me to tell you that. In fact nobody needs to tell them that in fact Vancouver itself would probably prefer. I didn't tell people that the city's tourism industry industry is booming so much so that rather than ask themselves how to keep attracting guests. The city is wondering how to ask visitors to maybe stay. Stay at a place a little bit Outta town. Maybe go somewhere anywhere other than the marquee attractions like Stanley Park. There's no doubt that ten million visitors per year can do some great things for a cities economy but what Canada's most picturesque city is facing now. Is these same leg that has come for some of the oldest list and most popular destinations and the world. There is such a thing as too many visitors. So how does Vancouver politely say actually were full right now it becomes back later in the offseason Jordan. Rawlings this is the big story. Molly mccloskey is based in Washington. DC and she's a contributor at city lab among other outlets and she Ended up going wing to Vancouver to report this story today. Molly can you start by telling us how you came across the story. Well I love Ann Cooper. I've spent a fair amount of time there and I'm based on the West Coast states states now although still spend a fair amount of time DC. And so I was elected as a media scholar for the women deliver conference which is a massive international women's rights and family. The conference is held every couple of years and this year it was hoover and so as I was coming up to Vancouver I kind of reached out to the Tourism Board and smother contacts in the area and said you know what's really going on in your town that I should know about as reporter a somebody coming to visit. Who maybe want to see something that I haven't seen before? And as as a result of that conversation the person I was speaking with mentioned almost as an aside will you know we. We really don't promote Vancouver much in the summer anymore and I thought that was such a fascinating knitting idea because you know the tourism boards by their very nature. Their job is to bring people to town right. We see that all around the world and the idea that there are some places that are maxing out on what they can with either can or want to accommodate tourism. Wise was really fascinating to me. We'll do you have an idea of the scope of that leg. Just how did tourism do I guess in Vancouver in two thousand nineteen well. The latest numbers aren't finalized. Of course but when I spoke to them they were expecting ten million visitors In Vancouver in two thousand nineteen they were expecting about two hundred thirty cruise ships to come in and of course when you look at cruise ships versus other forms of tourism. It's a little bit different. Because cruise ship passengers don't necessarily stay in the hotels they may be. Don't necessarily elite at all. The restaurants like other drawers might so it's a little bit of a different beast but still I mean two hundred and thirty very large cruise ships Over the course of the year and and up to ten million visitors coming to Vancouver alone is a pretty dramatic flux of tourists. No matter how you look at it is that number increasing generally over the last little while for Vancouver. It is actually and Vancouver. This summer are expected to be at ninety five percent capacity which for the city that means for cities in general that means really looking at how often the hotels are booked how often restaurants overcrowded with the capacity of special events and things like the women deliver conference how many people that's bringing into the city and if the rate of services such as transit ed or taxis or rideshare which has just launched in Vancouver if they can keep up and keep people moving in a even steady daddy non dramatic flow. That was going to be my next question is do we know. Kind of how approaching capacity impacts the day to day life of a city. Yes we do actually and we seen it in backlash Around around the world really. It's it's really a global tourism boom and keep in mind too that so so many cities depend on tourism as a huge part of their economy. Right and so and that goes back to you know when we were all hunters and gatherers authors and then switched over to an agrarian society and really suddenly started having more and creating more than we needed to consume for ourselves cities of always accommodated or expected to accommodate visitors. Four things like trade as they popped up on trade routes and rivers that sort of thing so this idea of tourism mhm has in some way shape or form existed as long as we've had this idea of cities but as you look at places like Venice or Amsterdam or Barcelona where there's just just too many. There's too many people coming to the scene. Few attractions We've seen in some cases like New York City and Ellis island where the tourists worse. That are coming aren't necessarily very mannerly The rise in social media and instagram and and this idea of I need to get the perfect shot as opposed to you. Experience the perfect sunset or visit. The Perfect Museum has also changed the way that we travel and experience the places that we go to keep in mind too. That tourism in general is very trendy so when I was living in Croatia I lived in the summer before Chris joined the EU the summer joined the EU and the summer after and suddenly Zagreb was the hot spot for tourists and so everybody was there and that immediately impacted things like services for residents and the prices of things things and whether or not there were apartments available at reasonable rates or foreign investors. Buying them up all the time Vancouver had a similar instance where a lot of people were buying properties that they were not living in and keeping them as investment properties. So all of these things when you when you upset the balance of a city for its residents residents that occasionally accommodates tourists versus city that is dependent on tourism to support its residents. It's a different dynamic namic and that's something that cities around the world are really having to grapple with as they are seeing more and more people traveling what kind of actual evidence Did you see in Vancouver. Did they tell you about just in terms of its impact on popular landmarks or the city in general. And what have other places around around the world done to curb some of that Eighty million people lined up for the same instagram shot. While if you take an instance like Quarry Rock in North Van which I love northbound I I climbed the grouse grind a couple years ago and fell and got experience Canadian. Healthcare there's ever in Vancouver but if you look at something acquire rock. which was you know? E- community hiking trail. It was a place that the locals new. They'd spend a Saturday and suddenly became. I'm an international destination and so you had very large tour buses trying to cram into parking lots that were really just meant for locals and for sedans the ends Maybe a minivan or to The the trail getting to the trail. There's lots of gridlock. There was community tension. This idea of we're being invaded by people that are not in our town. I feel that way. It caused a lot of tension and so they put in their new parking harking laws or when he finds their overflow areas they would the locals who put up signs that basically said like the trial had is full like you. This is not the day for you to come to the trail head and as a result of working with the locals the team at Tourism Vancouver finally said okay. You know what we agree. We will just flat out not not promote quarry rock at all and we will start promoting other

Vancouver Tourism Vancouver Tourism Board New York City Molly Mccloskey Stanley Park DC Canada Rawlings Instagram West Coast Ann Cooper Ellis Island Wise Perfect Museum EU Reporter Croatia Washington
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Different lines a lot of different coverage on this situation and and I love reading because I'm a big for the industry but you know it's hearsay to a certain point because we're hearing from both sides and and you know the saying is the three sides to every story and so we've heard from Taylor and we've heard from big machine in the way of scholarships or scooter Braun and then there's actually what happened and that part's a little bit fuzzy. But you know Taylor's Fan of of Scooter Braun. And she's been very vocal about that. She's not she's she's had her issues with him. In the past I She was very unhappy that that. That's where the company landed was in his hands. And she I think felt maybe betrayed from from what I what I gather from her. What she's expressed? She felt betrayed by Scott but of all people that he would sell her music and the company that started. Did you know on on his back but on her music to somebody that she really didn't trust the industry so I think that's really what fueled the fire initially but how it's escalated escalated. I think the fact that it's gone public the fact that there's so many hands in the pot I think that's what's escalated it to the level where we see it now. Do we have any idea what happens next like is there. Is there something that could resolve this as their next. Step that either Taylor or Scooter or big machine would take well. I have heard that Taylor after after there's some sort of cooling off period or or there's a timeframe coming up where she will actually be able to rerecord those songs and and have ownership of them I. I'm not one hundred percent sure what that timeframe frame is. It's been reflected differently in different outlets but I. I know that that she has said that. That is our plan to to re record some of that music so that she has control over it again. so that's exciting for music fans standpoint to know that there'll be other versions of some of your favorite songs whether it be love story or whether it be fearless or some of those mega hits That new versions will come from those. You know she she's on a new label with a new record. Deal was took things very differently. This time around Obviously going from being of a fourteen year old to someone in their mid twenty. She's learned a whole lot so I think we're just GONNA see different decisions made different processes happening thing And I think that this happens all the time where somebody loves the idea of a record deal and they sign it. Maybe not understanding fully. What's going to happen or maybe understanding understanding and working for them in that timeframe as they grow and evolve it no longer works for them? And that's why we see people changed labels start throwing productions and so you you know. I don't think that part surprises me. The thing that stands out the most for me is how public she felt she could be. I think that's again a testament to the relationship. She has with her fans and I guess how things escalated because of that you know when she wanted to perform on an award show recently and was told she couldn't play the songs she used her platforms and her fans ends to make it so that big machine to a certain degree felt pressured and allowed her to do it from a business standpoint. It's it's brilliant to be able to have that resource to get you. Oh you need for your own product. Is this going to set any precedent for how artists approach Deals that they're tired of or ordeals is that they wished they'd never signed or is this something that like you know to your point. That is kind of unique to Taylor because she has an army of fans. I can't think of too many artists that would be able to the have the power that she has with the fans that she has with with how she's been able to use social media user fans us all of her resources to come together like like that. But I think that there's always things are going to be learned from these stories coming out and again even in my standpoint even being close to the industry as I am. I'm reading eating all of this and I'm I'm taking all the Senate I'm hearing conversations and I'm kind of drawing my own. Conclusions are forming my own opinion based on all of that so. I think that you're always going to have people learn from it. You're always gonNA GONNA have people push boundaries because they see somebody else do that. I think Taylor has been a pioneer for that for Welsh since she started from fourteen year. Old Walking up and down music. Ro there were people who said I'm going to do that. And then being the youngest female on the most powerful females list or the youngest woman to set records all over over the place. You had people say I'm GONNA do that too and I think this is no different than that. I think that people are GonNa look at their deals. Look at how they're making money look at how they're running their businesses and say I'm going to do that or I'm going to change this and she's you know she's constantly been a trailblazer. I don't think this is any exception to that when we talk about her re recording these songs what does that actually mean. Does she have to like change. The arrangements or make different versions or different lyrics to make sure that she's not exactly copying the songs that she doesn't own any more or can she just like do the exact same song again. I think as lyricist she you know and this is my understanding of it. But but the she's able to leave the lyrics as they are she wrote them initially I I would imagine the arrangements have to change. I don't know what the percentages And I don't know if big machines still gets money off of her re recording the songs I would would imagine that there's just like when somebody's samples a piece of Taylor track in their song. You know she would be awarded some sort of royalty so I don't officially know what the breakdown is i. I know the songs will come across as different I would imagine that they would need to in order for her to actually have some sort of separation for you to audibly be able to say this is love story from from early two thousands and this is it now and I think she'd WanNa do that. She's grown Atanas artists and this is an opportunity for her to have new music that people will want to consume and if it was identical anacle there wouldn't be a point in them downloading it again or streaming it again so I think though be audible differences in the songs for sure what Scooter Braun have to say about all this. What I've seen is him saying you know he bought a company and he's he's always wanting to talk to Taylor about opportunities? What she says is totally different? So you know. He has the backing of a lot of big artists. Who have worked with him for years? Who when this all initially came out area guerande Justin Bieber? They all went on their socials and talked about what a great guy he was. So he's constantly talking about how he's willing to cooperate and how he's willing to work with Taylor to make sure they come to a resolution everybody's happy with that's what I've seen his story Again it's represented differently in a lot of different articles or or reports or outlets. That's really interesting because I didn't know that this kind of had the potential to split some of the megastars in the music industry between into pro and CON camps yeah. I don't know that that's happened recently. With the sort of resurfacing of the story when Taylor wanted to play that music Play her music at the award show but when it initially came out that big machine had been sold and Taylor. It was very vocal about her thoughts on that There were a lot of artists that went about for scooter. Braun allotted artists that went to bat for Taylor saying you know. Give her her music. And this isn't right it. It was extremely divided. And I think that's why it caught so many people's attention to see stars come forward and weigh in on something that they felt they could could weigh in on even though maybe they're not part of the the initial deal or story. What do you think ends up being the end result of this in in the music industry and for for Taylor Swift? I don't think this is GonNa Affect Taylor in a negative way like I said. I think that she's very very smart. How she does things? I think that her fan base and I've said this numerous times but it's just incredible what you can accomplish when you have people who have your back all the time so. I think that that's phenomenal. I think people there's more is as on her again. Just great business sense you know. People are watching to see what she does and she does music so well whether it's country whether it's popper AC. It's just so well done so you know. People are watching her. Even more in our people are GonNa Watch for these new songs and it's it just seems like a really smart business plan to to me. I think that the story will continue. I think we're going to constantly see it come in waves because I. I don't think it's resolved and I think it's GonNa take a while before the wounds heal you'll over. I think people were hurt in this process. I think a lot of things were said and I don't think that's GonNa go away quickly. Thanks Amanda Thank you. Amanda Kingsland is the national national music director for Rogers Radio Country Music Stations. That was the big story for more from US too big story PODCAST DOT CA. I hope hope you have that address memorized. By if you WANNA talk to us on twitter had to at the big story Afghan you can yell or scream or praise. We don't mind any of them and please give us a rating and review. Wherever you get podcasts? Thanks for listening. I'm Jordan Rawlings. We'll be back with something new a few days.

Taylor Swift Scooter Braun Senate Scott US twitter Amanda Kingsland Justin Bieber Rogers Radio Country Music Sta WanNa Jordan Rawlings director Welsh
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"That if this does happen our guys can feel free talking to somebody about it. Do you think the kind of culture what's your were talking about today comes from the NHL and then trickles down to all the minor midget coaches who want to be NHL coaches. Or the other way round. I why that is. That's a really good question. I tend to think it's the other way around because the NHL undergoing shift right now where you know you've got players. Now who spend their summers working with skill coaches. That's something you used to go to hockey school in the summer now once he got to the NHL Galleon everybody. I mean you'd you know you'd have scrimmages with guys and in the summer and then he'd go drink beer and then you go boating. In the MUSKOKA. He'd come back and scrimmage what you're seeing hockey there's a lot of stuff kids started doing when they were eight nine ten eleven and twelve that starting to creep up into the in into into how they do either business now that they're pros and we talked about Sheldon Keefe. The new leafs coach. He's got skill sessions in his practice. He's got nine coaches on the ICES. His marley's assistance lease assistance assistance. Barbara underhill there skating coach and instead of working online Russia's the working on how to retrieve the Puck from the boards and get it down the ice and then he has music going while while practice practice is on all that stuff that you've seen at at younger younger age groups so I think that change is going to have to come from the ground up you know and and I think a lot of minor. Sports organizations a lot of minor hockey organizations. They're doing things you know like you have to know. Coach can be is is allowed to be in a room with the player alone. There's gotTa be another adult stuff that you know. Some people may roll their eyes at but those are structural things that prevents stuff from happening or allow stuff when it does happen to be addressed. So I think it's going to be you're going to see it. It going to see it coming up. What did did you think yesterday? And it's it's still happening as we're recording this right when you see layer after player come out on social media. Not all of them are naming coach describing specific incident. But they're all saying this kind of stuff happened to me. I happen to a lot of guys I know. I think it's great. I I really do believe you need to get stuff out in the open and beginning to realize after you know reading some of the stuff Akeem allu- said about sort of seeing what's happened Colin Kaepernick and how that that has kind of that was part of the reasons he came out and he said what he did. And I've always looked at Colin Kaepernick. That's kind of an NFL issue NFL racism. That's that's an NFL. Show coming in to think that Colin Kaepernick sort of two and a half years in the wilderness. It's going to be a huge turning point for athletes. And you're you're you're going to hear you're going to hear more for this. I'm not surprised unfortunately because as I said you kind of know a bit about the hockey culture and the way players are developed finally players seem to feel comfortable talking about this and I don't know if it was necessarily the whole Mike Babcock Mitch Mariner thing again. That's a completely different issue. But I think this is the idea idea. That hockey has always had these issues with kids and at the junior level. And all that. And it's like that the investigation Kinda stopped once you got to the NHL. And now I think people are taking a look at the actual NHL Culture and it's the players who are leading the way and it is Kinda funny because a lot of them are ex players like they're not I don't I don't know if you'd call them. millennials a little older than the guys are in the league now but I I really think it's good and I think again if the NHL SMART NHL teams are smart mark. They're looking at this and they're saying you know we need to talk to our guys and you start by talking to the team captain and you just you tell your players you know. There's there's there's an avenue here what I found interesting about how babcock kind of kicked this off is not. Because he's alleged to have done anything remotely lake Some of the Peter Stuff that we're discussing but because if there was a coach who was too big to fail it was babcock right. He's a he's an Olympic champion. He's a Stanley Cup champion and if he can be fired because he lost the locker room and because his tactics weren't working on young the players and then that that's a big shift in the power dynamics you're talking about and then you can speak out. And who had hand in his in his firing the guy who played for Brendan Shanahan A guy who he hired him and he knows Mike Babcock. It is a real shift and I think the other thing that people I might be missing a boat Mike Babcock is in a we. We were talking a little bit for. He went in the air. Why why haven't we heard? I mean we've heard stories from players like Mike. Commodore and all these guys kind of these fringe players Mike Babcock's and Asshole Dada some his core in Detroit that he won with but I think part of the reason. There is at least with the Canadian in hockey players. Mike Babcock was also part of the hockey Canada Power Structure Right and do not underestimate the cachet that comes with being the Olympic coach. And and and I think that Mike Babcock powerful guy. When that was one of the reasons when the lease Hiram everybody was happy because this is like instant culture change this guy brings a whole culture with them? was not the right culture. It's not maybe it's not the right culture for this group of players since they're are so young I think it's because they're young I think it's because their general manager is really young. We know that kyle dubious. And he's he he's talked about this mean. He text his players in the summer. Hey how's it going Yeltsin Lake. Read this article on motivation. You know I'm just passing it on to you you know. Howard our the Fam- I think that's also factored into this? Because the players have the general manager is a little older than them is some paddock. Oh to use his words and then they've got at this hard ask coach. I think what happened to Mike. Babcock is once kyle dubious took over and I and I don't think this was intentional. But I think Mike Babcock found himself young. GM really really young players all of them under contract all of them super good. God I'm I'm a dinosaur. How do I take control? And that again guy holds us and our relationship right. How do I I gotta get power over this situation? He clearly didn't know how to do. So you've mentioned a couple of times that that this could be a good thing if NHL teams you know our our start to look at their own structure and say how can we make sure this isn't happening in our house. What comes next next a at an actual structural level right? It's one thing for them to sort of Look Inward and say should we address this or whatever but what what could actually we happen to turn this into a positive and encouraged the next Chemo Lou to feel like he can speak with a waiting ten years. I mean I think where this goes goes now the NHL. As I said I think. NHL teams need to ensure that they have a structure in place. For these be reported. I think than chart nature. I think the National Hockey League players there's association has to step in here now and say okay. Get the player reps together. We need to take control this situation now. and professional athletes are the most conservative people on the planet because essentially get to where they are the systems probably worked for them. I mean if if you're Austin Matthews your systems worked for me. I'm twenty years old pretty good looking. I'm making a lot of money. I mean I'm I'm a star. Do I really want to change like am I in favour Dave revolver hauling the system and the reason why you said it was ex players speaking out at largely is yeah but I. I do think that we're going to see that. I think we're GONNA see the NHL players. There's association I mean the NHL's got it's exclusive it's inclusivity program and on the and the NHL has. I mean they've they've tried to expand and their base into into different communities different ethnic communities largely the economic seven because those are the growing communities in North America. Those are the people who are going to buy your product and by the way eventually this league is going to have more African American or east Indian players. Because that's just that's our country is is changing the face of the country's changing. I think it's really important that the NHL realize that in addition to taking all these sort of official steps do unofficial things things to to make it more comfortable for players. And that. And I really do think the NHLPA can take the lead in that players have more control in the NHL. Now than they've I've ever had. This is a really good moment to use it for something other than their economic gain. This is a really good moment to us at control to try to make a better workplace environment knowing sort of what we know about some of the young players. I think you're GONNA see that. I think you're gonNA see guys like whether it's Mitch. Mitch Marne or Austin Matthews. I I think you're GONNA see guys start to take more control of the situation here. It's a horrible thing but I think at the end of the day and it may take a year it may take two years I think the NHL may be in a better place. Because of this. I hope so. Yes Jeff no problem thank you Jordan. Jeff Blair of sports net dossier and sports net five ninety the fan. That was the big story for more from us. Had Two big story PODCASTS DOT CA. Find find us on twitter at the big story F. P. N.. Find us in your podcast player. Whichever one you might prefer if let's you leave us a five star review or even better type something say something Nice? It's good for the soul. Thanks for listening. I'm Jordan Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow.

NHL Mike Babcock hockey Colin Kaepernick leafs Sheldon Keefe Austin Matthews NFL MUSKOKA Barbara underhill Brendan Shanahan Akeem allu twitter marley Jeff Blair ICES Yeltsin Lake Jordan Rawlings
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Lingerie or a up on a billboard and That that makes sense and that was something that people were interested in seeing But I think it has also just everything seems to have kind of come almost at the perfect time. It's like the perfect storm where you also also just have people now who are becoming more conscious in their consumption and I think a lot of that has to do with education Maybe social media is while the this idea that you know instagram and everything. We saw things that were so heavily edited and filtered for so long that there was this switch even online into people now wanting things that seems more authentic and more applicable to themselves. And I think that's kind of what's happening in the fashion industry industry history as well and there's just more information out there as well for people to know where their clothes come from. You know what's behind it and brands ends. I think that you can't just be it. Doesn't serve you to just be a brand and to put out nice things and to put out pretty images you kind of have to have some substance substance behind that and you have to stand for something when you guys see. New Companies entered the industry and try to get attention for themselves. Even in Canada new Canadian Etienne companies. How are they trying to tackle the new world that we're living like do they? Do they actively pitch towards this more woke example of fashion industry. I think yeah you have to. I think that's kind of the. That's the baseline now So I recently wrote about Victoria Secret And the show being canceled and I spoke with Mary Young. Who's the founder of a ethically made Canadian lingerie brand called Mary young and she launched in two thousand fourteen eighteen and she said that for her? The time Mary young very much was kind of a loan in at least in Canada on being ethical on wanting to have that inclusivity across the board so she was kind of alone in that but that was something that she was really wanting to focus on and she's seen a shift in the last last five years. We're now brands. That is kind of like I said the baseline and I don't think it's that hard to do I mean I'm not starting launching a brand or anything I don't know really what goes into that but I just think now. There are so many examples of brands. That are able to do these things and are able to. Do you want to be successful that I think now. It's there is some sort of a blueprint for brands. That are coming out and emerging so. It's maybe not as daunting is it. Maybe because they're actually advertising marketing towards women now as opposed to men probably that would be. I mean that's that's a nice thing and maybe this is the byproduct of that. That's a good observation. I hadn't really thought of that. I don't know because I see ADS now. on the T- were in Toronto for you know women In lingerie lingerie who have had mastectomies and stuff and it is re- like the advertising itself is really powerful but it's nothing like traditional Lingerie the famine including advertisements. And I I often think like who is that ad intended to appeal to and it's intended to be a powerful towards women who are the ones actually buying the products talks. That's the thing is I think that's something that obviously wanted to talk to. I don't know I really don't know I think it's probably because men have. I've been behind the scenes largely for most of the time In Marketing in a lot of industries. So maybe that's shift but I mean it's it's smart of them right like the women are such a big consumption group or we're like very vague into buying our lingerie and our that's who it's four so it makes sense that it would be marketed towards women and what happens now With Victoria's secret when they cancelled the show did they give any ideas of how that future direction might actually show up. What am I look like They didn't give anything specifically they did say that the brand would be engaging with consumers still through social media and other means but just nothing on his biggest skill L. as the fashion show but I mean in speaking again with Marianne. She mentioned that she thinks probably for the brand. What would be smart would be? Maybe Victoria's very secret will start buying smaller brands or will look better. Just emerging and maybe those will almost be a vehicle for them to engage with inclusivity acivity and sustainability. Because they're starting I guess from the ground and can just build it build that into their brand but I really don't know what Victoria secret will do. Because it's hard because I don't think by any means this end of Victoria's secret fashion show means of the company's done such. Yeah it's such a Juggernaut of a company it's been been around like we said for forty years but the flip side of that is again. It's been around for forty years. This is this is what it is like. It's built a brand band around this one idea of what beauty is and I just don't really know how you pivot from that or or how you authentically pivot from that. Is there any chance. Given the way you're describing The industry now for another company to become as big as and as emblematic of an entire aspect of fashion the way. Victoria's secret data. I think so. And I think you're seeing that I mean I don't WanNa keep harping on her going back to Riana and savage by. Not even though I I love it but I think in a way you know. Victoria's secrets on a bit of a downturn right now and I think savage by Fendi is going into the next Victoria secret. Maybe that's very hyperbolic of Mir. Im just hyping it up too much but I really do and I think it's really cool. Because brands brands like savage by Fanti or doing things on their own terms so for instance the her latest Fashion show was Aired on Amazon Prime which was really cool and it was more of it was more of a show? I guess if you'd say which was another criticism of Victoria's secret grit and maybe something that also affected you know their sales. Is this idea that maybe they became a little bit Lisi in their marketing and even in the show itself you know again I spoke with Shivani persad. WHO's a model in the states and she's also out of Toronto and She was talking about how the show itself really left nothing the imagination. I mean onstage. There's nothing to the imagination. But even in the lead up with their promotion for it by the time the show came around they kind of laid all their cards on the table. When you knew what you were going to get? What's different about a reality show? So Riana show is more. It's more of a performance. I would say This year show she we started by. She started onstage herself and she there is a dance number she included musicians the same way. Victoria's secret dies but just in a very very different way. They were modeling clothes and again these were musicians who were all different sizes different body types And they were really just involved with the this show and it was just much more of a performance. It felt more like a performance art piece almost than a regular runway show and I think just in general with the amount of just stuff there is out there for people to consume any person. WHO's a creative kind of has to put on something different or you know some sort of different performance so it's not just applicable to lingerie but I think that's something that really caught people's eyes and I think that's that's a brand if you're gonNA compare to Victoria secret directly? I think they're going to be the next Victoria secret. Thank you for taking me inside this industry that I am admittedly clueless about. You're welcome Kathryn. Sing assistant editor AT FLARE DOT COM. That was the big story. If you'd like more for you know where they are. They're hanging out at the big story PODCAST DOT CA. Just waiting for you you can also talk to us. We're actually hanging out waiting to talk to you on our twitter account. What's the big story F.? And every episode you might need is in any podcast player you might want at over there five stars how your friends thanks soliciting. I'm Jordan Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

Victoria Toronto Mary Young instagram Canada New Companies twitter Riana Jordan Rawlings Amazon Fanti Shivani persad Lisi Marianne Kathryn
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"All if you were younger than say forty five or so you may have found yourself staring daring up at the moon over the past week wondering if you will ever see a moment like that in your lifetime a half century ago today as you have no doubt heard over and over again a first humans to set foot on the moon returned safely to earth and we went back a few times after that you might also have heard even though nobody talks about those missions with the same reverence last time was in nineteen seventy-two but since then the the furthest actual human beings have been from our little blue rock out to the space station back about about to change legions of welders and metalworkers scientists and engineers stand ready to build a powerful new rock gleaming do spaceships and that goes with all of the other things that were building in our country. I must is one of the visionaries of private space expeditions while some decolonizing other planets is a pipe dream this basic C._e._o.. Has a very different outlook on my space. Exploration is so important the anniversary of the moon landing as rekindled some of our collective wonder will allow wonder translate into action and if it does what should that action be. What's the goal the Moon Mars beyond what's next? Why is it taken so long I mean I made the notes for this episode on a pocket computer but absolutely dwarfs the power of the machines that took astronauts to the moon back? So what should we be doing the technology Jordan Rawlings and this is the big story. Michael Wall is a senior writer at space dot Com. He is also the author of out there a scientific guide to alien life anti-matter and Human Space Travel Michael. How are you doing? I'm great thank you and fifty years ago today. Humanity returned safely from the moon so fifty years later is putting <music> a human being on the moon still.

Michael Wall Jordan Rawlings writer fifty years
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

15:09 min | 2 years ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"Hotdogs and other meat substitutes have been around for a long time and with apologies for my own journalistic bias. I have always found them disgusting but last year something changed they've got a prime spot in the meat section at this Montreal grocery store but these burgers are entirely meat. Free beyond meat is one hundred percent plant based protein. Don't Shit uh-huh. Maybe it was the relentless browbeating from all sides telling me that my love of red meat was helping destroy humanity. Maybe it was the marketing promise of a better meet alternative. Maybe it was because has a restaurant that shall remain nameless for now brought a tray of them into our newsroom and gave me a free one okay to come back for seconds either way. I tried beyond meat. It wasn't bad it tasted like meat and within a few months it was everywhere it is now available at two of the most quintessentially Canadian fast food chains. Its stock is tearing up the index. It's brand has become synonymous with imitation meat in a way that Kleenex is with tissue or Jacuzzi hot tubs. How did we reach that tipping point? Where is it likely to go from here and even more interesting? How is it that an innocuous little yellow pea came to be an integral part of the fake meat creation in process and has given Canada a chance to become a world leader in a brand new and exploding industry? I'm Jordan Rawlings and this is the big story. Jake Edmonston is they reporter at the financial post he dug into both the branding and the success of beyond meat but also the process that creates a Jake I first of all because beyond some marketing campaigns. I'm not sure that everybody has really dug into this. <hes> tell us what exactly beyond me.

Jake Edmonston Montreal Jordan Rawlings reporter Canada one hundred percent
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm jordan rawlings and this is the big story john gibson is they reporter for berry today who's covering rocks at us back when it was still a real events going to actually happen sean hey how are you i'm great thanks i wanna talk to you today they about rocks a death yes everybody was too yeah so first of all.

jordan rawlings john gibson berry reporter
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

13:38 min | 2 years ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"If you watch or read or listen to the news, your probably afraid, at least some of the time, you're probably angering the rest of it. It's been a week's fire kill father in his two year old daughter and a small hamlet of Kamande, an alleged killer in court charged with partner in the deadliest mass shooting in New Zealand history, a realtor allegedly sexually assaulted while showing the home at an open house for government walks to go from thirty five public health agencies to just ten to Canadian women working on an exchange program in Ghana have been kidnapped that according to. And so how do you react lot of shutdown Bihar them and that's understandable? But won't fix any what might fix things, though, is all of us, caring more? And letting that empathy lead us towards action towards compassion for one another towards policies driven by love and not fear. And that is not some hippy pipedream that is ridiculous in the real world. I know this because I can be as cynical as anyone and I realized that's what it sounds like. But what if I told you there was a ton scientific research toback that statement that there was a growing global movement to put compassion back into our politics? And that there was bottom line evidence that practicing compassion in the corporate world can lead to more prophets higher valuations. All the other things that look good and quarterly reports what if I told you that a lot of that awful stuff that can make the world feel so hopeless. We actually could kill it with kindness. Yes. Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story and Kingston, they senior writer for Maclean's. I, I can you start by telling me, why you decided to explore the issue of empathy. Right now, it was two.

Maclean Ghana Jordan Rawlings Kamande partner New Zealand Kingston writer two year
"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

13:26 min | 2 years ago

"jordan rawlings" Discussed on The Big Story

"A lottery ticket from the oh, L G for some condoms from Trojan, and you can crash out on your IT Abed an order dinner from skip the dishes while watching C TV until you fall asleep. None of that is intended as criticism. Right. Is a huge event. Now, every huge event needs corporate sponsors is fantastic. The companies want to be seen as inclusive and supportive allies to the community. But what that list was intended to do was illustrate what pride is today? And how different it is from where it began. So how did this? Event come so far as it strayed, too far from its roots. And what if anything do those sponsors? Oh to the community. They are celebrating with rainbows beyond simply a check. Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story. Rachel Giza is the editorial director at Xtra Canada's LGBTQ to publication Joe, I can you start by and I know this probably could be a whole other. But just giving us a sense of when pride I began what was it, and what was it supposed to do? So pride.

Abed Jordan Rawlings Rachel Giza Xtra Canada editorial director Joe
How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

The Big Story

09:02 min | 2 years ago

How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

"There are lots of myths, and lies and assumptions at their regarding abortions, especially these days, especially in the United States, where things are not going great right now for those who believe and a woman's right to choose what she does with her own body. The dominoes keep falling in the Bush to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Ohio governor signing today would critics condemn as the most restrictive abortion law in the country today. Missouri became the latest state to pass one of the order now becomes the third state since March to sign your loan, thirteen other states have introduced or advanced similar legislation to Alabama the lead. Est battleground in the newly energized abortion. But there is one myth in particular, that we need to talk about. And it's not about the medical procedure or who gets them or when or why it's about the people who oppose access to abortion. And this myth concerns, Canadians to it's very easy to look at the old white faces of the men in power in America who are imposing restrictive state laws and viewed them as the face of the anti-abortion movement. And that's fair. But it is not the whole story. And what you think you know about who exactly is out there in front of clinics or at their marches for life is probably wrong. So if you're a person who believes in the right to choose. And in the progress that has been made on that front over the decades, then it's important for you to take a really hard look at who is pushing the anti-choice agenda, and where they're doing their recruiting. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story, Sydney Loni is a freelance journalist, she investigated the anti-abortion movement in Canada for flare dot com. Hi, said, hi, let's start with general question, how supportive are we of rate to choice in Canada? I always thought we were very supportive in this sort of non-issue. There was a poll in two thousand seventeen that found seventy seven percent of Canadians support pro choice, and that's a pretty good number. I thought it was on a low side. And if you compared to other countries like, France, it's actually eighty six in Sweden's eighty seven percent and support. So we're, we're still and we have a little ways to go. What is the typical image of the pro-life abortion activists anti-abortion activists in Canada? Gentleness conception out there that sort of, you know, angry white men yelling at side, abortion clinics. And when I did this piece, and I spoke to many anti-abortion. Vists. That's what they said that they wanted to sort of dispel, that myth at. That's what they are. And but I think that it's sort of persistent. We think that sort of a small fringe group. I know you know, when I was in university. It'd be the handful of people walk by maybe five or six people with signs you kinda give them wide berth, because there is sort of seen as these kind of weird outliers. And I don't think that that's the case anymore. What's changing, I think the biggest thing surprised me the most too, is just sort of the, the size of the movement now and the youth of the movement. It's, it's not it's, it's young educated women women university. Many of them when Wednesday spoke to many of the women, I spoke to are pursuing careers in healthcare, and that also surprised me, but these are sort of young articulate s- university, educated women. How do they come by these views because that does seem really in congress to me? Yeah. And that's a good question. I think one of the women, I spoke to some of it is based on religion. They've been brought up with these views and they say that their family is also PR. Prolife, but many, you know, in highschool, they've sort of set of tapped into this, and it sort of resonated with them. Many women, I spoke to said that they saw as being cool movement whereas really years ago. Yeah. Years ago, you know, the said that being pro pro choice was sort of the default everyone, you know, their grandparents are now pro-choice, and they see this sort of rebellious the new rebellion movement and whereas before it was cool to be pro choice. Now, they say it's cool to be pro life that seems so strange to, to be honest. Handle telegraphing my head around that one as well. But yeah, I think a lot of us who are pro choice or just in general progressive people. They see you, as the future of their movement. Right. Outta your member after the shooting and park land, Florida last year. There was this whole movement from these teens and the, the message around them from adults was youth. They're going to save us. Right. And, and it seems like you know, we see young kids fighting climate change and speaking out against racism, and I feel like abortion, just gets lumped in there, too. And maybe it shouldn't. Yeah, I, I think maybe I think maybe we've become complacent about it. I mean I certainly had no idea how big this movement was earlier in may that the March for life, which I'd never actually even wasn't really on my radar took place. And that sort of where I interviewed on these women who are preparing to go the March, and they're excited about the March when young woman, I interviewed was hosting a gala at in Victoria, the university after the March. So it's like a big it's a big cool party and the March started in nineteen ninety eight and were. Seven hundred participants in this last year, they were fifteen thousand and that's only an Ottawa. So the marches all over your city across the country, and it just shows the size of the growing Amenam of this movement. Tell me about a couple of the young women, you've met, if there are any who stand, particularly to you, and what they're like. Yeah. I think one woman in particular, she's she's eighteen eighteen and she was her first March. And she was just like a kid going on a trip. She was really excited about it. It was her first she's, she just graduated from high school. Her family is she told me was also antiabortion, but she was excited to be other people, our age who share those views, and she wanted to be part of the movement, and wanted to possibly in the future, maybe intern at some of these organizations. And that's the other thing is a lot of these groups have interns, who start very young and use of Ashby, where these people are coming from. They start out, you know, they were being recruited in high school to, to come into the offices and work there. And then they end up also out on the streets holding the signs. And the things that we do. See that was actually my next question is, is this, a conscious effort by anti-abortion organizations to get younger? I would say so definitely and even the place to everyone, who I talked to said that they had I'm been exposed to these ideas in high school and in some schools, one of the women, I didn't end up talking to her article, had followed her, and we had talked a little bit, but she actually goes into high schools and does talks about, you know, the antiabortion movement. And so there's that aspect as well. What are pro choice organizations doing to try to? They must see the tide turning than I, I don't know, if the thought that the right metaphor being possibly one woman, I spoke to was very concerned in and she had no when she found out, she wasn't an activist didn't think of his office when before the March for life. But then this was the first year that there was one in Toronto as well. And that kind of freaked her out a bit. And so she organized a counter protest in got on Facebook and got all these people involved to come out of warn people was happening part of it, and also to sort of. Have a have a voice for the other side for the pro choice side, and another woman in Berta longtime activists said that. Yes, there is momentum and that the people who are active in the movement are doing whatever they can about it. But the society is a whole has become a little bit on the complacence. I we don't really haven't really isn't on our radar, and we look so th and think, oh, that could never happen here. And I think the concern is, you know, if it can happen there, I can happen anywhere and you we have some very vocal pro-life politicians who've been elected, and people are electing them despite having them holding these views. So that is an issue. We did a podcast last week about Sam who Stor off who's, obviously interesting not female, but very young. And very vocally anti-abortion, and when we talk about this stuff, even people who are critics of him say, they would never actually change the law. Stephen Harper didn't change the laws. Andrew Scheer has no plans to change the laws. Right. So there is. It's not necessarily complacency. But there just seems to be a thought that this is a done deal. Right. I think that's maybe dangerous thought I think that the anti-abortion people spoke to said that their goal was to, to support pro life politicians into get into show them that they have a huge movement behind them, but there's also this sort of more insidious things terms of, you know, our, our side in tarot back to the nineties, and we're taking steps back everywhere else in related ways. And just how hard it is for women to access abortion in Canada. I think people don't necessarily realize that I mean, you've only been only got one MP is nineteen thousand seventeen and in other provinces. Well, it's not it's not easy there. It's hard to find clinics to find train doctors long wait times. So it's a lot of barriers that,

Canada United States Missouri America Alabama Intern Ohio Wade Bush Jordan Rawlings Facebook Sydney Loni Congress Andrew Scheer Stephen Harper ROE France Florida Sweden
The best and worst places to be a woman in Canada

The Big Story

04:00 min | 2 years ago

The best and worst places to be a woman in Canada

"Today is International Women's Day global Dave reflection on the hard-won rights now enjoyed by the quote, unquote, fairer sex days. Also, a reminder to keep fighting on behalf of the women and girls round the world who don't get to enjoy a lot of those rights just yet Canada, if a pretty good the least compared to a lot of those other countries, but was sharing perfect women are still disproportionately affected by poverty. Racialist indigenous trans disabled women face far greater risk of sexual violence and barriers to employment than white women. Women in rural areas have to jump through all the hoops, if they need to get an abortion. No life is not all roses for women in Canada. Despite having a feminist prime minister who might not be having the best International Women's Day of his time in office. We know about this persistent inequality, thanks in part to an annual yardstick that measures the gender gap between the lives of women and men in this country since two thousand fourteen the Canadian centre for policy alternatives has published the best and worst places to be a woman in Canada. The report their fifth out this week. It's a snapshot of the differences in economic impersonal security education, health and representational leadership. Roles for women twenty six cities across this country. I'm Sarah bows, vowed sitting in for Jordan Rawlings on International Women's Day. This is the big story to chat about the findings of this report into also just reflect on that general idea of quality of life for Canadian women right now, I'm joined by Maclean's columnists and senior writer and Kingston Haim being here. Sarah good to be here at love to start by talking about the creator of this report and honoring her came back and turf. So brilliant, feminist economists you and I both knew she passed away last summer of cancer. She's forty nine years old. What can you tell us about her vision for this report why she sort of created it to begin with Kate? Yes. It was she was the genius architect of this report. And it had a couple of functions. I as I understand them as she told me about them, obviously, it's to to gauge the fact that wage inequity exists in Canada. And also that it exists equally. She also wanted to highlight. certain, you know, certain metrics by which we could see improvement or sort of see ground level local involvement in certain issues. So for instance, they're five measures. They include health include security things like intimate partner violence, really important, measurements police responses wage inequities and whatnot. So so it was a way to take kind of a snapshot of the country, and but more importantly for her. It was a platform for conversation and one of the her sort of focuses was the importance of local community were and women women's organizations. She firmly believed that you know, sort of investing in women's organizations was a great sort of gateway to better equity between the genders. So that this is a wonderful report because it allows, you know, people in Windsor people in got no or Vancouver. Wherever to sort of use the data that is collected and use it to. Advocate, use it to discuss things with their own governments. It's it's so it's a tool very practical tool as well. So as feminist to can, you know, and you've written a lot on data in this country and the lack thereof to she was really big on. Let's get some real numbers here. Let's crunch. Let's like show how gender equality inequality affects us day to day Lutely, but the other part of that is also showing where we don't have the information. I mean, you look at something like, Robin doodles. Series. The you know, the fact is that you know, you have to drill into these numbers. So we're increasingly learning. I mean Kate was again a pioneer in. This regard in that respect even though it was only twenty fourteen the importance of Dada to make these measurements. And what data we should be looking at and what data's missing what do you think?

International Women Kate Canada Sarah Bows Dave Prime Minister Jordan Rawlings Kingston Haim Dada Maclean Robin Doodles Partner Windsor Lutely Writer Vancouver Forty Nine Years