35 Burst results for "Joplin"

Second Police Officer Dies After ‘Tragic’ Missouri Shooting

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:06 min | 2 months ago

Second Police Officer Dies After ‘Tragic’ Missouri Shooting

"Relief factor dot com studios. Here's Mike Gallagher. I was just reading sad, sad news out of Joplin, Missouri, a 27 year old police officer is now the second officer to succumb to his injuries. He was shot along with two other officers in trying to apprehend a bad guy, a 40 year old

Mike Gallagher Joplin Missouri
"joplin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

04:38 min | 3 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello, welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. When ragtime music first became popular in the early 1900s, people called it vulgar filthy and all kinds of horrible names that have since been pinned on other popular music. Ragtime was originally played in bars, saloons, and other places people looked down on. So they associated the music with the surroundings. But piano rags are pretty innocent. They follow almost the same form as marches. Usually, there's a little introduction. Then comes the first tune or theme. That theme repeats and then comes the second theme, which also repeats. If you call the first tune a and the second tune B so far we have a a, B, B two themes both repeated. But if you're expecting CC to follow, you're going to have to wait. Recognize that? It's the a theme back again. But this time it doesn't repeat, so after a a, B, B, a, we finally get to see. Then the C theme repeats, making a a, B, B, a, C, C what do you think is going to happen next? That's the fourth and final theme. It repeats two, which makes the form of a rag, AA, B, B, a, CC, DD, ragtime music is syncopated. That means the accents in the melody are shifted away from the strong beats in the baseline underneath, making a ragged sound. It may originally have been called ragged time. The word rag also means tease and ragtime music loves to tease you with unexpected rhythms and notes. Ragtime combined African rhythms brought through the United States by slaves with musical forms brought here from Europe, so it's truly African American. Tom turpin was known as the father of St. Louis ragtime. His Harlem rag was the first ragtime composition published in the United States by a black composer. A ragtime composer who actually performed in Harlem in New York City was James Reese, Europe. James Europe also brought ragtime to the continent of Europe. As a lieutenant in World War I, he directed a band for the first African American troops sent to France. Another famous ragtime composer grew up in Baltimore. Ubi Blake was the son of former slaves. His first rag was originally called sounds of Africa, then he changed the title to Charleston rag. Tom turpin may have been the father of St. Louis rag, but there were three composers known as the fathers of ragtime music, period. Number two was a student of Scott Joplin's called James Scott, who wrote the great Scott rag. You suppose he named the piece after himself, or after his teacher..

Naomi Lewin Ragtime Tom turpin James Reese Europe James Europe United States St. Louis Ubi Blake Harlem New York City Baltimore France Charleston Africa Scott Joplin Scott rag James Scott
"joplin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. I'm sure you look forward to a party every year to celebrate your birthday. And you know exactly when that is. These days, birthdays are very carefully recorded, but that wasn't always true. No one knows exactly what day or year Scott Joplin was born. The first time Scott Joplin's name turns up is in the 1870 census. The census is the official headcount that the United States government takes every ten years. According to the census taken in July of 1870, Scott Joplin was two years old, which means he was born in late 1867 or early 1868. No one's really sure where Joplin was born either. It was probably in northeast Texas. Japan's father was born into slavery in North Carolina. His mother was a free born woman from Kentucky. Both of them were musical, Joplin's mother played the banjo and sang, and his father passed his love of the violin on to his children. When Joplin's parents separated, his mother supported the family by cleaning houses. In one of the places she worked, Scott was allowed to use the piano. After Scott Joplin taught himself to play, a local piano teacher offered to give him some lessons. Julius Weiss didn't just teach Joplin the piano. He also taught him about different musical forms and how they were put together. As a teenager, Joplin started traveling, first to Missouri, where he played piano in saloons, and then to Chicago, where he led a band and played cornet in it for the 1893 world exposition. Then, Joplin went back to Missouri to a town called sedalia, where he published his first piano rags. Instead of letting someone buy his pieces outright for $25, which was what publishers usually did, Joplin arranged to get royalties, a small payment for every copy sold. That turned out to be a very smart move when Joplin published the rag he named for an African American social club in sedalia, the maple leaf. One of Joplin's pieces was based on something he'd seen at home in Texas, a train wreck that was staged on purpose by a railroad official with the interesting name of William crush. In Joplin's great crush collision, you can hear the whistles of the approaching trains. Somehow, between working as a pianist singer and bandleader, Joplin also found time to take classes at George R Smith college, an African American college in sedalia. After that, he moved to St. Louis, the hotbed of ragtime music. At the St. Louis world's fair of 1904, Scott Joplin played the rag he called the cascades. By now, Joplin was more interested in composing and teaching than in performing. He kept on moving, eventually winding up in New York City. Even though he was famous for his popular music, Joplin really wanted to be taken seriously as a classical composer. He wrote two operas, the first one was about Booker T. Washington, author of up from slavery, being invited to dinner at The White House. Unfortunately, that opera is lost. Joplin's second opera is tremendous about the daughter of former slaves. Scott Joplin earned the nickname king of ragtime writers. Next week on classics for kids, I'll tell you more about ragtime music. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me next time for more classics for.

Joplin Scott Joplin Naomi Lewin sedalia Julius Weiss United States government African American social club Missouri William crush Texas George R Smith college African American college Kentucky North Carolina St. Louis world Japan Scott Chicago St. Louis
"joplin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Joplin Missouri This is a city just a few hundred miles west of parts of Kentucky that were leveled by tornadoes this month It's a community that knows firsthand what kind of impact that devastation can have A decade ago one of the strongest tornadoes in U.S. history destroyed a third of Joplin Frank Morris of Casey has this report on a mental health program that was established there to help residents cope An enormous tornado with winds topping 200 miles an hour turned Joplin Missouri into a case study on building failure I remember after the tornado we had one home just a few blocks from here that was actually sitting in the middle of the road upside down Brian wickland is Joplin's chief building official He says new homes going up here now use more steel to secure roofs to walls and walls to foundations following national standards established after the Joplin tornado And it's not just houses that are better prepared The tornado forced officials like Joplin's emergency management director Keith stammer to think big If I had walked into a disaster planning committee meeting with a scenario in my back pocket that basically wiped out a third of Joplin and caused this to not be able to help ourselves from the get go I'd have been laughed out of the meeting Not now that is in our planning So planners like stammer are now gaming at bigger and more complex disasters He says that the tornado also forced a cultural change in the way that first responders deal with post traumatic stress Stanford says the old model was to just suck it up But all of a sudden when all of you or many of you are having psychological problems emotional problems this you become much more empathetic You become much more sympathetic And that goes for average citizens too Doug walker is a clinical psychologist from New Orleans who travels the world helping community struck by disaster When he got to job when he found residents reluctant to talk about their feelings When you ask someone how are you doing I'm fine I'm good You know Joe Joe Smith needs you down the way Look at a list of 5 things to check on Work relationships play sleep and consumption food drugs and alcohol He says a Joplin focus group hit on a simple question that opens up informal therapy How's your 5 And a lightbulb went off my head and I'm like you just managed to put together a peer on peer support that really has never been done before Here on peer support that walker says he's used to get disaster victims talking from Florida to Fukushima But of all the good ideas following the tornado Vicky measley executive director at Ozark center a group of mental health clinics in Joplin says one stands out like a light at the end of a tunnel The best thing that happened to us is when the school superintendent said we're going back to school in August The superintendent was CJ huff and the goalie set was a tough one Half the schools were severely damaged And many of the teachers students homeless house timeline less than three months to get the district back on its feet That was a walking heart attack I gained about gosh 60 pounds I think I'm a stress eater And we all have our coping mechanisms and mine was ice cream and lots of coffee lots of coffee Lots of ice cream CJ hoof got school started on time by building classrooms and abandoned big box stores He was a local hero all over national news But he says that a few months later exhausted distraught citizens began fighting him at every turn One of the things I learned is that when emotion and logic collide emotion wins every time It didn't matter what we brought whether it was data or subject matter experts It didn't matter Huff was demonized by some residents He says he considered suicide and was eventually driven out of the job Vicky measles says he wasn't alone Several years after the tornado you started to see major change in leadership positions She says that includes the city manager at a hospital president Now Hough is a disaster consultant and he says that every single one of his colleagues are former public officials ousted after a disaster all of them We call it the exclusive club that nobody wants to belong to Huff says disillusionment follows every disaster As recovery timetables push back Ashley mickel thought who was Joplin schoolboard president when the tornado hit Sees it as a cautionary tale So Kentucky listen up Don't do that Just know that your leaders today are making the very best decisions that they can The job is recovery has gone pretty well The tornado killed a 161 people and destroyed 8000 structures But the city is managed to grow since And there's little doubt that Joplin probably the rest of the country is better prepared for the next one Frontier news on Frank Morris in Japan Missouri.

Joplin Joplin Frank Morris Brian wickland Keith stammer Missouri Doug walker Joe Joe Smith Vicky measley Ozark center CJ huff Kentucky Casey Stanford U.S. Fukushima New Orleans Vicky measles
Investigators seek cause of deadly Montana train derailment

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

Investigators seek cause of deadly Montana train derailment

"The NTSB is investigating the cause of an Amtrak derailment in Montana Saturday afternoon they killed three people and left a handful of others hospitalized according to officials BNSF railway which operates the tracks as they were inspected Thursday Amtrak says eight of the ten rail cars jumped the tracks near Joplin Jacob Cordero was on board along with about a hundred and fifty six others and tweeted from the train all my god it's on its side all the trains destroyed down there some of the rail cars were laying on their sides governor Greg Gianforte says first responders along with local residents rushed to the scene to help they had provisioned jaws of life they did have to cut into one of the cars to extract some of the individuals investigators are looking into the cause of the accident which occurred near a switch on the tracks I'm Julie Walker

Jacob Cordero Ntsb Bnsf Railway Montana Greg Gianforte Amtrak Joplin Julie Walker
At least 3 killed and dozens injured after Amtrak train derailment

Dailycast News

00:25 sec | 8 months ago

At least 3 killed and dozens injured after Amtrak train derailment

"Least three people were killed saturday afternoon. When an amtrak train that runs between seattle and chicago derailed and north central montana toppling several cars onto their sides authorities said the westbound empire. Builder train derailed about four pm near joplin a town of about two hundred. Amtrak spokesperson jason. Abrams said in a statement. The accident scene is about thirty miles from the border with

Seattle Montana Chicago Joplin Amtrak Abrams Jason
At least 3 dead in Amtrak train derailment in Montana

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

At least 3 dead in Amtrak train derailment in Montana

"At least three people are dead at Amtrak says scores of others injured in a train derailment yesterday in Montana video posted to social media shows rail cars laying on their sides the passenger who shot it exclaiming how the train is destroyed the Amtrak train runs between Seattle and Chicago the derailment happened around four PM near Joplin Montana about thirty miles from Canada Amtrak says the train had about a hundred and forty one passengers and sixteen crew on board and that eight of the ten rail cars derailed I'm Julie Walker

Amtrak Montana Joplin Seattle Chicago Canada Julie Walker
"joplin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:36 min | 9 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"The day was september eighteenth. Eighteen ninety nine musicians. Scott joplin was granted the copyright for a song he wrote called the maple leaf rag. It quickly became one of the most famous and influential pieces of the ragtime era and a steady source of income for joplin for the rest of his life. More than five hundred thousand copies of the sheet music were sold in just the first ten years after its publication joplin earned a one cent royalty on each of those sales or about five thousand dollars over the course of a decade. That may not sound like much but adjusting for inflation. It's the equivalent of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars today if nothing else. The annual income from that one song would have been enough to cover joplin's yearly living expenses. So not a bad deal in fact when you crunch the numbers it's impressive. How good deal. Joplin was able to negotiate with his publisher. A man named john stark at the time and even today in some cases most composers make money from their performances not from their compositions joplin's arrangement was unusual in that sense and even more so since he was a black musician. Working in the jim crow south the deal he made with stark shows that both men knew the song would be a hit and in fact joplin said as much himself before it was even published. He told a friend quote. The maple leaf will make me the king of ragtime composers and. Yeah he called it. The maple leaf rag was a monster success. It launched a ragtime craze across the country. Suddenly composers were churning out hundreds of rags that imitated it sound eager to capture even a fraction of joplin success. To be clear though. Joplin didn't invent ragtime. There were plenty of other composers writing that style of music in the eighteen ninety s but joplin brought a level of imagination and complexity to his rags. That was new. For the genre ragtime music grew out of minstrel shows and was characterized by syncopated or offbeat ragged rhythms in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. You could hear it being played by black musicians throughout the midwest but it wasn't taken seriously anywhere else. Joplin was convinced that ragtime could have wider appeal if treated more thoughtfully and the maple leaf rag was his proof of concept it was also the product of his life experience. Up to that point both on the stage and off joplin was born near marshall texas probably in eighteen sixty seven or so he and his parents lived a difficult life there but since his father played violin and his mother the banjo. Their house was always full of music. Eventually the joplin's moved to tex arcana where scott's mother found work cleaning houses. It's believed he played the piano for the first time at the home of one of her employers in time. The young boys talent drew the attention of music. Teacher named julian weiss who began teaching him piano playing and composition as a teenager. Joplin formed the texas medley quartet and started performing dances weddings and other events. He later traveled to missouri where he taught music and played the piano in local bars and restaurants. Eventually his friends convinced him to study music. At george r smith college in sedalia missouri. It was here. The joplin's set to work on adapting the tricky syncopated rhythms of popular rag into formal musical notation. In the meantime he continued performing at local venues including short-lived social club called the maple leaf while never confirmed it's believed joplin named his most famous composition as a tribute to the club where he first performed the piece. After taking ragtime mainstream with the maple leaf joplin struggled to repeat his early success. He wrote more than forty other rags in his lifetime including the now classic piece the entertainer as well as dozens of other piano songs and two operas but none of them were hits in one thousand nine hundred seventeen joplin passed away from paralytic dementia complication of syphilis. He was forty nine. According to his loved ones joplin often said that he would never be appreciated until after he was dead. The composer was ultimately proven. Right but it did take some time. Most of the world moved on from ragtime in the nineteen twenties is other styles of music made their debut but the maple leaf rag and some of joplin's other songs showed surprising resilience despite the changing times by the early one thousand nine hundred seventies renewed interest had set the stage for a ragtime revival pianists who had rediscovered joplin's work started adding songs like the entertainer and the maple leaf rag to their set lists a new recording of joplin's catalog sold over a million copies and in one thousand nine hundred. His music gained a new life as the soundtrack for the classic movie. The sting starring. Paul newman and robert redford although he didn't get to enjoy the full fruits of his labor. Joplin's prophecy about posthumous appreciation was fulfilled in one thousand nine hundred seventy six when he was awarded a pulitzer prize for his contributions to american music. At long last ragtime was being taken seriously just as joplin had always wanted. I'm gabe lose. And hopefully you now know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And if you have any comments or suggestions feel free to send them to me at this day and iheartmedia dot com thanks to chandler maze for producing the show and thank you for listening. I'll see you back here.

joplin Joplin Scott joplin john stark tex arcana julian weiss jim crow george r smith college ragtime missouri texas paralytic dementia midwest sedalia violin marshall scott
Route 66, the Mother Road

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:19 min | 10 months ago

Route 66, the Mother Road

"From the first days we started working together. And i drove around a lot to gals in one thousand nine hundred seventy two green dotson roaming the tri county area like buzzing todd minus the corvette through santa cruz monterey and san benito counties in california we were doing oral histories and recording. Everybody who moved cowboys and fishermen farmworkers italian grandmothers. This was in the day of cassettes and as we drove around we always talked about how great it would be to document the roads inside roads. We were travelling so people could just pop in a cassette and listen to the people around them as they drove on through. We never quite pulled off that cassette idea on a large scale but when davy moved east for a while we decided to try the idea out on route sixty six. She'd be driving a lot so that was the start. It was the end of the road. It was the last days surf route. Sixty six as we were traveling. I mean just trying to follow it at that. Point was a you know you drive down. Affronted tro that was the old highway. And then it would just bottom out. And there'd be broken asphalt or cactus. So we're trying to get icon of people from each stretch of the road and mickey mantle grew up on route sixty six. He played baseball team. Known as the baxter springs with kids the scout for the yankees with dr along route. Sixty six looking for up and coming ballplayers and manel hits this home. Run across the highway. And that's part of how he was spotted. So we're going. where can we find mickey mantle. We started to kind sniff around joplin missouri. The mickey mantle holiday inn. And someone said. Oh yeah there's a golf tournament going. On and mickey mantle. One of his sons. Were playing so. I just called the golf course. Said ma'am please speak to mr mantle. Suddenly there was mickey mantle on the telephone. We explain the story to him. And what we're doing in route sixty six and agrees to meet us and poor mickey. He could hardly walk by that time has knees. Were just blown out. Sorta bandy leg walks up one flight of stairs gets in the room. He just gives me a look and he just goes hallo. Did you get my phone number.

Tri County Santa Cruz Monterey Mickey Mantle Dotson San Benito Cowboys Baxter Springs Mickey Mantle Holiday Inn California Mr Mantle Yankees Baseball Joplin Golf Missouri
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

07:05 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"Will was at twenty five hundred dollars of her money fund. A post mortem party for friends partygoers still in mourning packed. The tiny salmon sound club on october. Twenty six where the beer and wine was plentiful and the hash. Brownies were especially far out. No word on whether the hash brownies provided courtesy of one of the evenings musical acts the grateful dead who were perhaps cramming in one last doc- prank on their beloved pearl just months after she had returned the favor on the festival express which she got them. All shit faced on booze. Paul rothschild and the full tilt boogie band spent the few weeks immediately following genesis death. Finishing out per last out pearl was released in january nineteen seventy one three months after genesis staff almost immediately. It became the biggest record of career. Her cover of chris christopherson. Me and bobby. Mcgee was a number one single for two weeks. Paul rothschild knew he'd never make another album like the night janice died bill. Graham shut out the house lights at the fillmore west. When he heard the news it felt like he was shutting the lights out on an era in nineteen. Sixty eight gram and move the film more from the intersection of fillmore and gary to the corner of market and van ness in order to meet the demand of more and more concept cars in the summer. Nineteen seventy-one he. Shut the lights off at the fillmore. For the last time in nineteen ninety-one graham died. When the helicopter he was in encountered rough weather near vallejo california and crashed into a high voltage tower. He was sixty. When clive davis i heard about genesis. Death he already had janice on the brain. Columbia's offices had just received a new batch of genesis previous. Lp got them cosmic blues again. Mama it was selling so well. Then he needed a rea- he probably still had janice on the brain for years and years after the fact when he signed a who's who of strong female artists including aretha franklin dionne warwick. Patti smith tailored. Dan alicia keys and whitney houston keys. Eighty eight years old and currently holds the title of chief creative officer at sony music entertainment. When albert grossman i heard about janice his death. He felt like he had lost daughter. The loss of janice shook to his core and he never really recovered soon. After bob dylan fired gershman following an especially tenuous stretch. The two were embroiled in legal. Battles for much of the seventies grossman turned his focus to the recording studio and record label. Bears ville that. He started in the woodstock neck of the new york woods. Keep died of a heart attack in nineteen eighty six. When chris christopherson i heard about genesis. Death he was at joan baez place in carmel. The place he had originally intended to visit that fateful day with bob newer when the great tequila boogie came knocking on janice store. The next ninety joined a crowd of genesis friends at landmark motor hotel where someone played him. Genesis recorded version of me and bobbing the key for the first time in that moment on every time christopherson played the song and saying the line. Somewhere near salinas. He couldn't help but think janice when david nye house heard about genesis death. It wasn't that night is weeks after possibly months and he heard it secondhand in a back issue of time magazine that he just happened to stumble upon while traveling through afghanistan. Seth morgan of course heard the news right away. He went looking for liberation in his own twisted way and instead fell on increasingly harder times he became addicted to heroin and then became a pimp to support his addiction. When that wasn't enough you turned armed robberies. He did thirty months in the joy he got sober. Wrote a novel called homeboy. He took the book money and started shooting cocaine and then on october. Nineteenth nineteen ninety loaded up on blow perk dan a blood alcohol content three times the legal limit. Seth morgan drove a motorcycle at high speed into the median strip on a new orleans bridge. Both morgan and his current girlfriend who wrote on the back seat were killed instantly. Janice joplin's body was cremated that her request and following a very private and very intimate service attended only by immediate family just days after her death. Her ashes were scattered into the sea off the coast. Marin county the spot is one of the windiest in the entire state of california. The single dramatic gust. Her ashes were carried off by the wind flung from the edge of the world and into the great beyond with nothing holding them back. Janice joplin spun out in the california ether in into the consciousness of america. She didn't so much adhere to the model. Live fast die young as she did live fast. Die free even if she did die the tender age of twenty seven and even if it was only in death that she realized true liberation. I'm jay brennan and this is the twenty seven club all right. This episode of the twenty seven club is brought to you by disgrace. Land the award winning music true crime. Podcast that i also disgrace and is available only on the free amazon music to hear tons of insane stories. What your favorite musicians. Getting away with murder hitting very badly nirvana prince jerry. Lewis the grateful dead rolling stones cardi b. and many many more go to amazon dot com slash disgrace or if you have an echo device to say. Hey alexa. play. The disgracing podcast. The twenty seven club is hosted in cohen. By jake brennan zeph lundy is the lead writer and co not boding mixed show additional music and score elements by ryan spreaker. The twenty seven club is produced by myself for double elvis in partnership with iheartradio sources for this episode are available at double elvis dot com on twenty seven clubs series page our previous seasons on jimi hendrix. Jim morrison available for you to been right now wherever you gave a podcasts. If you like here please be sure to find and follow the twenty. Seven club on iheartradio app apple podcasts. Wherever game shows and if you'd like to win a free twenty-seven club poster designed by the man himself. Naacp gonzales and leave a review for twenty-seven club on apple podcasts. Or hashtag subscribe to twenty seven clubs on social media. We'll pick two winners each week and announce them from the double elvis rampage. That's at double elvis. That a fall so get out there and spread the word of twenty seven club and he talked me per usual on instagram and twitter at disgrace. Land rock roll rupa's drag race. All-stars has sashayed. Its way to a new home. Highly anticipated new season brings back thirteen fabulous queens to vie for a spot in the drag race hall of fame and a cash prize of one hundred thousand dollars and of course it wouldn't be all stars without a classic route. Twist find out what it is along with more shades. Celebrity guest judges in can't.

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

06:50 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"That he knew it. Because that funny feeling told them that this wasn't going to end well for anyone. Brian jones jimi hendrix. They were just the beginning. Rotschild could feel it. he can easily imagine. Jim morrison going down the same road. It was well after six pm that evening. When john cook finally opened the door to room one zero five step inside and laid the first pair of eyes on the unthinkable. Janice joplin dead on the floor of the landmark mortar hotel at the age of twenty seven October seventh one thousand nine hundred seventy janice joplin's body was cremated. It had been three days since she had been found on the floor of her hotel room on franklin avenue and hollywood. Her parents wanted to bring her body back to port. Arthur for a traditional funeral the janice had made her wishes clear to her attorney. Shortly before her death updated her living will accordingly. She refused to spend eternity in the very place she had spent her adult life running away from ant in life she caught glimpses of liberation and deaths. She wanted a symbolic gesture of liberation. To be the last thing she ever did. Only days later. Two hundred of genesis friends received invitations in the mail inviting them to an all night party. At the lion's share in marin county the drinks are on pearl the invitations are one of the stipulations. Genesis will was at twenty five hundred dollars of her money fund. A post mortem party for friends partygoers still in mourning packed. Tiny salmon anselmo club on october. Twenty six where the beer and wine was plentiful and the hash brownies. Were especially far out no word on whether the hash. Brownies were provided. Courtesy of one of the evening's musical acts the grateful dead who perhaps cramming in one last doc- prank on their beloved pearl just months after she had returned the favor on the festival express which she got them. All shit faced on bubis paul rothschild. The full tilt boogie band. Spent the few weeks immediately following genesis death. Finishing out per last out pearl was released in january nineteen seventy-one three months after janna staff almost immediately. It became the biggest record of her career. Her cover of kris kristofferson. Me and bobby. Mcgee was a number one single for two weeks. Paul rothschild new. He'd never make another album mike. The night janice died. Bill graham out the house lights at the fillmore west. When he heard the news it felt like he was shutting the lights out on an era in nineteen. Sixty eight gram and move the film more from the intersection of fillmore and gerry to the corner market and van ness in order to meet the demand of more and more concert cars in the summer of one thousand nine hundred seventy one shut the lights off at the fillmore for the last time in nineteen ninety-one graham died when the helicopter he was in encountered rough weather near vallejo. California crashed into a high-voltage tower. He was sixteen. When clive davis. I heard about genesis death he already had janice on the brain columbia's offices just received a new batch of genesis previous lp got them cosmic blues again mama. It was selling so well that he needed a rea- he probably still had janice on the brain for years and years after the fact when he signed a who's who of strong female artists including retha franklin dionne warwick patti smith. Taylor dayne alicia. Keys and whitney houston keys. Eighty eight years old and currently holds the title of chief creative officer at sony music entertainment when albert grossman. I heard about genesis death. He felt like he lost daughter. The loss of janice shook to his core and he never really recovered soon. After bob dylan fired grossman following and especially tenuous stretch. The two were embroiled in legal. Battles for much of the seventies grossman turned his focus to the recording studio and record label. Bears vowed that he started in the woodstock neck of the woods. He died of a heart attack in nineteen eighty six. When chris christopherson i heard about genesis. Death he was at joan biases place in carmel. The place he had originally intended to visit that fateful day with bob newark when the great tequila boogie came knocking on janice store. The next ninety joined a crowd of genesis friends at landmark motor hotel where someone played him janice is recorded version of me and bobbing the key for the first time in that moment on every time christopherson play the song. Saying the line somewhere near salinas. He couldn't help but think janice david nye us heard about genesis death. It wasn't that night is weeks after possibly months and he heard it secondhand in a back issue of time magazine that he just happened to stumble upon while travelling through afghanistan. Seth morgan of course heard the news right away. He went looking for liberation in his own twisted way and instead fell on increasingly harder times he became addicted to heroin and then became a pimp to support addiction. When that wasn't enough he turn to armed robberies. He did thirty months the joy he got sober wrote. A novel called homeboy. He took the book money and started shooting cocaine. And then on october nineteenth nineteen ninety loaded up on blow perkins and a blood alcohol content three times the legal limit. Seth morgan a motorcycle at high speed into the median strip on a new orleans bridge. Both morgan and his current girlfriend who wrote on the back seat were killed instantly. Janice joplin's body was cremated at her request. Then following a very private very intimate service attended only by immediate family just days after her death. Her ashes were scattered into the sea off the coast of marin county. The spot is one of the windiest in the entire state of california. The single dramatic gust. Her ashes were carried off by the wind flung from the edge of the world and into the great beyond with nothing holding them back. Janice joplin spun out the california ether in into the consciousness of america. She didn't so much adhere to the model. Live fast die young as she did live fast. Die free even if she did die the tender age of twenty seven and even if it was only in death that she realised true liberation. I'm jay brennan and this is the twenty seven club.

Janice joplin janice Rotschild Tiny salmon anselmo club paul rothschild Paul rothschild Brian jones fillmore john cook Jim morrison jimi hendrix marin county retha franklin dionne warwick albert grossman grossman Seth morgan kris kristofferson Bill graham
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"She didn't.

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

02:16 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"She didn't.

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"Morgan was an unknown outsider. The scene or any seen for that matter. He didn't know any of the musicians that janice joplin ran with or the angels who called her little sister when he first knocked on her front door house in expert like so many others had before it was like he stepped out of an alternate reality to janice it was like he stepped out of a dream and he had those vivid dreams she used to have when she was lying in bed with pig. Pen the ones with the mystery man on the gold hurley painted with orange flames. Was it a coincidence. That morgan rolled up on the exact same by default. Cosmic felt best. Seth morgan wasn't like pick a for anything along for the ride him. He wasn't like david nye gregarious and star-crossed he wasn't as chill as kris. Kristofferson wasn't as fucking insane. peter. Bloch wasn't as beautiful as j. Whitaker san francisco siren. Sure wasn't spontaneous as chet helms that he wasn't high on the smell of his own bullshit like leonard cohen. Or jim marrs. Seth morgan was not like the other guys. She couldn't put her finger on but it was different. He didn't know her music and he didn't particularly like it either. He didn't hide that fact. Something about this face value outside rang a bell and just the right way and they started spending days and nights together janice was so head over heels and so hell bent on a stable relationship with a quote unquote old man to use the province of the times that she was quickly talking about marriage. Morgan agreed to get married. But his disaffected face value modus operandi. Had one caveat at how to be an open marriage janice knew that morgan couldn't be faithful every time she left clarksburg or work on a new record. Pearl in los angeles with paul rothschild in the full tilt boogie band. Morgan would hang back. Keep call girls. He'd met through dealing and rambling and then keep him company genesis bed. Perhaps it was the mystery man in her dreams that convinced her to move forward or perhaps she thought she could get morgan to be more faithful. Once they tied the knot started thinking about a proper family reality though it was doomed from the start and it was still doomed to the very end on saturday. October third nineteen seventy morgan. Call janice from the larks spur house to tell her that he wouldn't be flying into la that night as planned. Something had come up. And he wouldn't arrive until sunday janice knew something was some of their chick was janice probably younger to closer to morgan's twenty two years in genesis twenty seven. Something was lines of cocaine and bottles of booze and sweaty naked bodies writhing around janus bed. While she was busy working she was piston. She slammed the phone's receiver down in the control. Room of sunset sound studio. Paul rothschild asked for everything was all right. Didn't want to talk about it. In fact she didn't feel like doing anything at the moment. She told rothschild that she was cutting out for the day. She recorder vocal tomorrow on sunday. She'd returned midday. She told the caller at the landmark motor hotel if she wasn't awake time room. One zero five janez swung by barney's beanery the west hollywood bar that had become a regular hangout for since the great tequila boogies with kris kristofferson. She brought ken pearson. The full tilt boogie. band's is so she could decompress from the day and layer trip about morgan on somebody but at bharti's janice his mind was elsewhere. She wasn't thinking about morgan or about lark's expert or the new record. Choose thinking about the heroine. She had hidden in the back of the dressing bureau drawer at her otello. One oh five. She closed her eyes at the bar and saw those numbers on the door room. One oh five. There were lit glowing being projected from inside the room in the numbers and the dover cutouts that allowed the light to shine through. She needed to be in that room. She pictures inside the room now opening the drawer and reaching inside top-drawer back into the left and pulling out the balloon of dope sweat ran down from her forehead to her ear. She knocked the rest of the pipe back and told ken that she'd seem at the studio tomorrow. Janus is convertible. Porsche was a streak of psychedelic color as it shot east on hollywood boulevard. The entire body of the car was one big multicolored. Neural butterflies is skulls mushrooms. And even a portrait of big brother and the holding company. We're all drawn eye-popping dayglo glory. Within minutes the porsche was parked janice was inside to the source of that glowing while five was coming from inside. The top drawer of the dresser. Bureau was one. The hollywood churn outside her hotel room door in the occasional street holler from some drunk stumbling down franklin avenue muffled noises from adjacent rooms a cannonball splash. Someone was gleefully. Disobeying the hotels rules in taking after hours. Dip and the next few minutes in the room were all ritual. Routine was so mechanical that chance didn't even take note of the motion. She was going through anymore. Transferring the heroin from the bag to the spoon a dash of water flick. The zippo a cigarette dangling from her mouth as she loaded. The syringe was cooked up junk. She made a mental note. That was her last smoke. She needed to reality marlboros. She started out in the ashtray and pulled up her sleeve. Instead of maintaining it directly to regain she decided to skin pop a skin. Pop give her a delayed reaction as the drug slowly entered your system underneath the top layer of skin. Instead of the euphoric russia jolts and straight to her bloodstream..

janice Seth morgan morgan janice joplin Morgan david nye chet helms paul rothschild jim marrs Kristofferson Paul rothschild Bloch leonard cohen landmark motor hotel janez Whitaker ken pearson clarksburg kris angels
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"Morgan wasn't unknown an outsider. It wasn't part of the scene or anything for that matter. He didn't know any of the musicians. Janice joplin ran with or the angels. Who called her little sister when he first knocked on her front door house. Clarksburg like so many others had before it was like he stepped out of an alternate reality to janice it was like he stepped out of a dream. He had those vivid dreams she used to have when she was lying in bed with pig pen. The ones with the mystery man on the gold hurley painted with orange flames. Was it a coincidence. That morgan rolled up on the exact same by default. Cosmic felt best. Seth morgan wasn't like pick a for anything along for the ride hit. He wasn't like david night. House gregarious and star-crossed. He wasn't as chill as chris. Christopherson wasn't as fucking insane. As peter to block wasn't as beautiful as j whitaker san francisco siren. Sure wasn't a spontaneous chet helms and he wasn't high on the smell of his own bullshit like leonard. Cohen jim marrs. Seth morgan was not like the other guys. She couldn't put her finger on but he was different. He didn't know her music and he didn't particularly like it either. He didn't hide that fact. Something about this face value outside rang a bell and just the right way and they started spending days and nights together janice was so head over heels and so hell bent on a stable relationship with a quote unquote old man to use the problems of the times that she was quickly. Talking about marriage. Morgan agreed to get married. But his disaffected face value modus operandi. Had one caveat at how to be an open marriage janice knew that. Morgan couldn't be faithful every time she left. Clarksburg or work on a new record pearl in los angeles with paul rothschild and the full tilt boogie band. Morgan would hang back. Keep call girls. He'd met through dealing and rambling and then keep him company in genesis bed. Perhaps it was the mystery man in her dreams convinced her to move forward or perhaps she thought she could get morgan to be more faithful. Once they tied the knot started thinking about proper family reality though it was doomed from the start and it was still doomed to the very end on saturday october. Third nineteen seventy morgan. Call janice from the larks powerhouse to tell her that he wouldn't be flying into la that night as planned. Something had come up. And he wouldn't arrive until sunday janice knew something was some of their chick was janice probably younger to closer to morgan's twenty two years in genesis twenty seven. Something was lines of cocaine bottles of booze and sweaty naked bodies writhing around genesis bed. While she was busy working she was pissed. She slammed the phone's receiver down in the control room of sunset. Sound studio paul. Rostow asked if everything was all right. Janice didn't wanna talk about it. In fact she didn't feel like doing anything at the moment. She told rothschild that she was cutting out for the day. She recorder vocal tomorrow on sunday. She'd returned midday. She told the caller at the landmark motor hotel. She wasn't awake on time room one. Oh five janice swung by barney's beanery the west hollywood bar that had become a regular hangout for since degrade tequila boogie. As with chris christopherson. She brought ken pearson. The full tilt boogie beds. Keyboard is so she could decompress from the day. And layer trip about morgan on somebody but at bharti's janice his mind was elsewhere. She wasn't thinking about morgan or about lark spor- or the new record. Choose about the heroine. She had hidden in the back of the dressing bureau drawer at her hotel room. One oh five. She closed her eyes at the bar and saw those numbers on the door to a room. One oh five. There were lit up glowing like something was being projected from inside the room in the numbers and the door cutouts. That allowed the light to shine through. She needed to be in that room. She pictured herself inside the room. Now opening the drawer and reaching inside top-drawer back into the left and pulling out the balloon of dope sweat ran down from her forehead to her ear. She knocked the rest of the pipe back and told ken that she seem at the studio tomorrow. Janus genesis convertible. Porsche was a streak of psychedelic color as it shot east on hollywood boulevard. The entire body of the car was one big multicolored. Neural butterflies is skulls mushrooms. And even a portrait of big brother and the holding company. We're all drawn eye-popping dayglo glory. Within minutes the porsche was parked janice was inside to the source of that glowing. Five who is coming from inside. The top juror of the dresser bureau was one. The hollywood knights churn outside her hotel room door in the occasional street holler from some drunks stumbling down. Franklin avenue muffled noises from adjacent rooms a cannonball splash someone was gleefully. Disobeying the hotels rules and taking after hours dip in the next few minutes in the room. Were all ritual. The routine was so mechanical that janice didn't even take note of the motion. She was going through anymore. Transferring the heroin from the bag to the spoon. A dash of water affleck. The zippo a cigarette dangle. From her mouth as she loaded the syringe with cooked up junk. She made a mental note. That was her last smoke. She needed to re up a marlboros. She stopped about out in the ashtray and pulled up her sleeve. Instead of may mining directly to regain she decided to skin pop a skin. Pop give her a delayed reaction as the drug slowly entered your system underneath the top layer of skin. Instead of the euphoric russia jolts and straight to her bloodstream..

janice Seth morgan morgan Morgan Janice joplin Clarksburg chet helms Cohen jim marrs paul rothschild tilt boogie band Christopherson Rostow landmark motor hotel chris christopherson ken pearson angels leonard san francisco chris peter
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

06:21 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"With these in the air. Seth morgan felt a warm california breeze rattle through the gaps in his teeth. He heard the girl on the back of the bike. Scream with absolute blood-curdling terror mortgage cease to experience time at all. He couldn't tell time had in fact stopped or if it was actually barreling forward with maniacal speed just like the harley was barreling recklessly forward in the middle of the year mortgage was drunk if someone had asked him someone in a position of authority like a cop or something if they asked him if he was high to. He denied the probably was high. He just couldn't remember if he was high or what he was high. On on account of how drunk he was in then just like that time resuming. Its normal plodding pace. And if fucking hurt like hell. The harley slammed into the wall of a house off the side of the road there was the sound of chrome cutting into clapboard. And then the sound of twisted steel at the house swallowing the goddamn buying and then the smell of fuel so ripe it seared morgan's nostrils the bike. Was upside down on the ground. The rear wheel spinning so fast. It looked like it was possessed. The front end of the bike had actually penetrate the side of the house. Morgan picked himself up off the ground and look for the girl. She was a waitress and sausalito and she was his girlfriend but the impact of the crash had obviously rattled his cage a little too much and now he was having trouble remembering her name. Morgan founder flying against the corner of the house full to bike's length down the lawn. As soon as morgan sar face he knew the damage would be permanent life. Changing the blood was everywhere. Her face was cut. Open and smash shut is swollen. Her legs were twisted as handlebars on the bike. He had shaker awake at first. He didn't even know she was alive. She pulled through morgan breeze. The heavy sigh of relief. It was another close call in a lifetime of course calls soon after he would ask the girl to marry him not because it was the expected thing to do given that they have been together for a little while now but he really didn't want her to sue him for the accident. Some said the seth morgan could have been a literary giant his father frederick. Morgan was a noted poet and founder of the hudson review quarterly. It was in his family in and his blood but it wasn't focused enough. He took the corners a little too hard. Didn't lay off the gas pedal enough. He answered the call of the wild a little too yearly long rides on the highway. Lots of drugs zero fucks to give the closest he got to a literary giant. Was that motorcycle crash when the cops showed up to the hospital. A couple of plane guys. They asked morgan if he knew whose house he had run into. He had no idea and he didn't really care who's busy nursing a bruised elbow in pushing a call button to get a nurse into the room so that he could get something to dull the pain he had a stash of good shit that he kept hidden at home. Like it was al capone's vault but here at the hospital. He was at the mercy of others. Jack london one of the cost. Total mortgage was paying attention. The house you hit the combat belonged to jack. London way back the naturalist sure jack wanted. Morgan knew that may he's still didn't care. The cop went on wolf houses. But the places called those ruins near the house you fucking ran into fire. Burnt the place to the ground before they even finish building decades ago places on some national historic register. Simple ship the first. Call piped up. Do you hear that you ran into a historic register jack. London did his fair share of roaming dropping out of school and hanging around berkeley to was a man after morgan zone heart. Maybe jack london would have forgiven. Seth morgan for catapulting his bike into the side of his old house. The current owners. Not so much then. The cop switch gears. They were done breaking the ice. The cops asked morgan about her. Not the sausalito chick riding backside on the harley the other one the one before the girl from nine thousand nine hundred seventy one of the cops got out a small notebook in turn to a clean page. California was a small world. They said they knew the he. Seth morgan have been engaged to janice joplin. Not even a year ago. They knew he called down to city hall to inquire about getting a marriage license shortly before death and they knew that he was the closest person on earth janice joplin when she was found dead in the landmark motor hotel that october evening. They wanted to know everything he knew about that particular october eating where was he. What was he doing. When did he talk with their last year. Last why did he want to marry janice job. What exactly happened to perl mortgage deny being engaged. Chanice didn't deny that he was flying. La that night to see her that they have plans but he didn't have anything else to say about her son. He news right. Plus you'd already talked to the cops. Los angeles when it first happened. He told them everything knew. He didn't know what these sausalito cops at her south. Morgan might be a lot of things drug dealer poet fuck up but he was not suspect. The rumor mill gone into overdrive genocide. Just days after her body was found by john. Cook after not showing up for that day's recording session conspiracy theories were all the rage. Did you hear janice. Joplin was killed by john. Sky neier was jealous girl. You know what they say about who she liked between the sheets hold up. It was the cia and the fbi did watching it ever. Since the ghetto she was to progressive in enemy of the conservative state The feds bullshit. It was the mafia. You don't think jesse connections to made men come on capable men qualified meant the ice differ simone drug debt men. Don't kid yourself well. To be honest. I heard from a friend who heard from the second cousin happened over here. Conversation at barney's beanery in los angeles and it's all partisan rock and roll hit. It was the same people who did jimi hendrix last month in london. You just watch. Jack moore rollers gonna wind up dead real soon.

Seth morgan morgan Morgan morgan sar seth morgan hudson review janice joplin sausalito harley jack al capone Jack london california frederick London jack london Chanice berkeley janice
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

06:21 min | 11 months ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"With ease in the air. Seth morgan felt a warm california breeze rattle through the gaps in his teeth. He heard the girl on the back of the bike. Scream with absolute blood-curdling terror mortgage ceased to experience time at all. Couldn't tell if time had in fact stopped or if it was actually barreling forward with nyquil speed just like the harley was barreling recklessly forward in the middle of the year. Morgan was drunk if someone had asked him someone in a position of authority like a car or something if they asked him if he was high to he denied the probably was high. He just couldn't remember if you as high or he was high on on account of how drunk you us and then just like that time resuming. Its normal plodding pace. And if fucking hurt like hell the harley slammed into the wall the house off the side of the road there was a sound of chrome cutting into clapboard and then the sound of twisted steel at the house was swallowed. The goddamn buying and then the smell of fuel so ripe. It seared morgan's nostrils. The bike was upside down on the ground. The rear wheel spinning so fast. It looked like it was possessed. The front end of the bike could actually penetrated the side of the house. Morgan picked himself up off the ground and look for the girl. She was a waitress and sausalito and she was his girlfriend but the impact of the crash had obviously rattled his cage a little too much and now he was having trouble remembering her name. Morgan founder flung against the corner of the house full to bike's length down the lawn. As soon as morgan saw face he knew the damage will be permanent life. Changing the blood was everywhere. Her face was cut open and smash up is sworn her. Legs were twisted. Handlebars on the bike. He had shaker awake at first. He didn't even know she was alive. She pulled through morgan breeze. The heavy sigh of relief. It was another close call in a lifetime of course calls soon after he would ask the girl to marry him not because it was expected thing to do given that they have been together for a little while now but he really didn't want her to sue him for the accident. Some said the seth morgan could have been a literary giant his father frederick. Morgan was a noted poet and founder of the hudson review quarterly. It was in his family in and his blood but he wasn't focused enough. He took the corners a little too hard. Didn't lay off the gas pedal enough. He answered the call of the wild a little too early long rides on the highway. Lots of drugs zero fox to give the closest he got to literary giant. Was that motorcycle crash when the cops showed up to the hospital. A couple of clothes guys. They asked morgan if he knew whose house he had run into. He had no idea and he didn't really care who's busy nursing a bruised elbow pushing a call button to get a nurse into the room so that he could get something to dull. The pain yet a stash of good shit that he kept hidden at home like it was al capone's vault but here at the hospital. He was at the mercy of others. Jack london one of the cost. Total mortgage pay attention. The house you hit the other combat belonged to jack london way. Back the naturalist. Sure jack wanted morgan yu that name. He still didn't care. The cop went on wolf house. What the places called those ruins near the house you fucking ran into fire burnt the place to the ground before they even finish building at decades ago places on some national historic register. Simple ship the first cop piped up. Do you hear that you ran into a historic register jack. London did his fair share of roaming dropping out of school and hanging around berkeley. Who was a man after morgan heart. Maybe jack london would have forgiven. Seth morgan for catapulting his bike into the side of his old house. The current owners. Not so much then. The cop switch gears. They were done breaking the ice. The cops asked morgan about her. Not the sausalito chick riding backside on the harley. The other one the one before the girl from nine thousand nine hundred seventy one of the cops got out. A small notebook could turn to a clean page. California was a small world. They said they knew the he. Seth morgan have been engaged to janice joplin. Not even a year ago. We called down to city hall to inquire about getting a marriage license shortly before her death and they knew that he was the closest person on earth janice joplin when she was found dead in the landmark motor hotel that october evening. They wanted to know everything he knew about that particular october evening. Where was he what was he doing. When did he talk with their last year last. Why did he want to marriage. Stop what exactly happened to pearl morgan. Deny being engaged to chance didn't deny us flying. La that night to see her. They have plans but he didn't have anything else to say about her sudden death. He knew his right. Plus you'd already talked to the cops. Los angeles when it first happened. He told them everything new. He didn't know what these sausalito cubs at her south. Morgan might be a lot of things drug dealer poet fuck up but he was not suspect. The rumor mill gone into overdrive with genocide. Just days after her body was found by john. Cook after not showing up for that day's recording session conspiracy theories were all the rage. Did you hear janice. Joplin was killed by john. Sky was a jealous girl. You know what they say about who she'd like between the sheets hold up. It was a cia man the fbi. They've been watching it ever since ghetto choose to progressive and enemy of the conservative state The feds bullshit. It was the mafia. You don't think jesse connections to made men come on capable men qualified men the iced drug debt men. Don't kid yourself well to be honest. I heard from a friend who heard from his second cousin. You overhear a conversation at barney's beanery in los angeles and it's all partisan rock and roll hit. It was the same people who jimi hendrix last month in london. You just watch jack. Moroccan rollers gonna wind up dead real soon.

Seth morgan morgan Morgan Jack london seth morgan hudson review janice joplin morgan yu sausalito harley al capone california frederick pearl morgan sausalito cubs berkeley jack city hall London
"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"joplin" Discussed on 27 Club

"That sweater on janice joplin before she didn't even strike him as a cashmere sweater. Kinda cow and yet there. She was kind in her seat laughing huge unbridled the far laugh tapping free the ash at the end of her cigarette. Throttling the neck of a near empty bottles so co wearing that fucking cashmere sweater. She certainly didn't play with her on the flight from san francisco to chicago Big brother and the holding company had flown into o'hare with next to nothing besides their gear and the clothes on their backs no suitcases. Overflowing with extra.

san francisco janice joplin chicago
A Look at 1920 Drummers

Drum History

03:46 min | 1 year ago

A Look at 1920 Drummers

"We're going to of look really the story in the volition of jazz drumming through through the twenty s or from the very late tends to too late twenties. Some of the main players and as we get to each new development in technology might also have introduced as we go and we can. We can hear it being played and we can also talk about it. That sounds if that's okay. We'll take a look at the way things were when the jazz age began just before in the late. Nineteen ten's Of course this point really. The prevailing musical stops ragtime which began spice around the turn of the century. Nineteen hundreds and really by the time you get the first jazz bound appearing which is nineteen seventeen. The first bound to market itself as a jazz released a lot of the ingredients for what you think of as jazz already present in sort of late period ragtime and then you get these hybrid styles for while like jess which is a precursor to jazz. They changed the spelling jasper s And ragged jazz movies different. Sort of monaco's that we use for these top of music. What was really a a transitional journal from rank time into jazz. The thing that ragtime didn't quite have which came along with jazz really. I mean the wind recordings may down there so we don't really know but it seems like new orleans was the epicenter for for these other ingredients that the weren't in ragtime which is the sort of The blues element which wasn't really present in ragtime blue notes bent notes slurs and growls not sort of stuff and also the sort of emphasis on bras and reed instruments because ragtime small groups. I mean people tend to think iraq. Tom is a piano based music. Uncles walls Joplin joseph goes but Also small bands playing ragtime cortex. Quintet's you know the perfect precursor to your your modern jazz combo in the in the late. Nineteen ten's buying this stuff but it was all on banjos and violins and mostly string instruments. But they would dramas and the drums often played some of the most cutting edge. Stuff most improvised parts. They went just reading and they would play time. You know mostly stalls that was Evolved from military band music so to beat music. You know like with too strong beats bobby. Wanna be three kind of light. You'd have with innovative in iraq these days and so they'd be playing on a bass drum usually using some kind of pedal of the first modern quote unquote molten pedal came around in one thousand nine nine but there were other ones as we as we've learned through listening to this first Because to that with all sorts of crazy young overhung designers in all kinds of stuff. Getting sort of he's robinson designs but yes they'd be playing the to be feeling the bass drum mostly playing time on the snapdragon that you wouldn't a ministry banned only of course they were making much more syncopated an exciting of hit accidents in rudimentary stuff on reading mental stuff. I should say rather almost najem and occasionally Moving to woodblock for a bit of variation because the whole thing most to vary eight chorus to chorus depending on what instrument was was taking the melody or we know leading the chin. You'd play different accompaniment a different texture behind it but unlike morton drumming where you often have you know you've got your right hand on a symbol left hand on the snapdragon. Usually you know this sort of thing. Hander spread apo- on different instruments at this point. Most of the time. The germans would focus on one sound two times. He'd have both hands on the next chorus. Both hands on woodblock because of different instruments

Joplin Joseph Ragtime Jess Monaco Iraq Quintet New Orleans Najem TOM Bobby Robinson Morton
Ellie Goulding Announces She Is Pregnant

Colleen and Bradley

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Ellie Goulding Announces She Is Pregnant

"British singer Ellie Golding announced invoke that she's pregnant with her husband, Casper, Joplin's first child, Ellie, Golding said that wasn't the plan but becoming pregnant. Kind of made me feel human, she said. I want a better word than womanly. But I have curves. Now that I never had before. I'm enjoying it. And so is my husband. Congrats to

Ellie Golding Casper Joplin Golding Ellie
"joplin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"joplin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hey, friend's gonna be back here, Sammy helping you all out here on this afternoon Sunday afternoon. I always love Sunday. I think we all need a little reset. Sometimes. Chance to just take it back. And maybe think about a simpler time matter Request here when we were gonna do this show, and I don't really normally take requests by thought it was a pretty good one. And you know, WBC's about 100 years old. So this segment we want to just take you back through things from the past that we love here, and this is a song It's about 100. 20 years old by a big hero of mine. This by Mr Scott Joplin. Raise your hand. If you would be like a little Scott Joplin. They're at home. I do. What's that, Mrs Rogers? I love Scott Joplin. So we're gonna dedicate this tow our first caller that was Mrs Rogers. This is Scott Joplin's Maple Leaf rag. Lou. Hey. Oh, kids, That's not your mother's jazz. That is some real High flying music. Um We've had an awesome time here, everyone that WBC talk radio 77 has been so kind of since we've been here, Ray and Dave and all these different people here. They actually gave us a little tour when we showed up, and they said, You know, a lot.

Mr Scott Joplin Mrs Rogers WBC Sammy Lou Ray Dave
Aruma Malbec 2018

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Aruma Malbec 2018

"The chief flying fighter DOT com. Today. A nice wine at the mall. A Little Bit Cooler All the way. On the horizon. The fees and forties. Looking for some red wine. Phones and say we have the other room. Twenty eighteen from. Argentina. Ruma is a project by `less container who's been in Argentina since the eighteen hundreds and baron. Child. Feet of Bernardo fame when I growth in Grand Cru and all those. This is their continuing project, their entry level value priced Mulbah. And it's funny because a lot of times in this price range. Get value priced wines from people who who produce value price wise, and they have a little bit different philosophy. From. These high. Lines. Awesome. It's just different and what's different about this. Is even though. Kits from some of the same vendors more expensive than what they do is they specialize in mile that. And Saban Young, which are two grapes that are well, Dabur nate sub Yang and Bordeaux and Mullebeck used to be before blocks all that but there to. Bordeaux wines or grapes. And they specialize that, and this is from those vineyards scale not maybe the the fancy parts of those vineyards but good solid parts those. But they don't use oak barrels. It's a fermented in stainless steel. That brings out the bright lively fruit and it's a two thousand eighteen of vintage, which means you know. It's it's a drink wine, but it's got a little bit of aging and that aging isn't cement tanks. They're lying tanks you're not getting reaching out whatever's in the some met. And that is something will actually getting more popular like central coast to California and then the. Valley in a place in France. And why that's good for ages. especially. Like this Mullebeck has got. Really rich flavors has got tannin's. Need any more edge to it that Oakwood rain. And the cement tanks. Thick. Enough. Insulate the wind and the need. From variations in temperature outside. He'll stainless steel that serve fairly. Thin stainless steel. Barrels earlier you know are are. Not Thick, they don't get a lot of temperature art. And when you look at. Wine that is being young age. They've put it in sellers where. It's protected from variations and temperatures and humidity. Now, this doesn't feel the steel tank doesn't go seller. Control but it's pretty good. So it actually helps to wine age. It helps deal recover. Without any outside interference with cement this. Sounds Weird maybe at first. But or just start taste, and it's fine and this is a really rich. That's Mullebeck. It's got great flavor you sometimes, we get chocolate stuff going to get that because Joplin the no are going to be here. There's no hope. But you don't Miss It. There's Tana's dusted. Shannon's there's really rich speak. Very liquorice. Softer Plums FABS. Yes got flavor and another thing Zenit. Opens Up Close flavors open up. Your first glance might be moon. That's your second. Oh, that's nice. Yeah it's a solid really. Focused Moba.

Mullebeck Argentina Mulbah Ruma Saban Young Bernardo Zenit Grand Cru France California Tana Joplin Shannon
Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

The Electorette Podcast

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode, have a conversation with the hogue, the president of Nero Pro, choice America, and he joins me to discuss her new book. The lie that binds it's really an incredible book and it chronicles how abortion rights of all from being a non-partisan backburner issue to a central 'cause champion by conservatives in the radical, right. This is really one of those books that I have to read twice. It's that informative. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Elise. Hogue. leasehold welcome to the cast. Thank you so much. You're. So before we jump into your book, I want us to talk about something because I recently learned that you were from Texas and that really my inches because I'm also from the South I'm from Memphis Tennessee, and I was reading one of your interviews where you'd said that you wanted to leave Texas because Uber afraid that you'd be bored and that was something like totally relate to. Manila it was sort of. Knew that there was a being rolled out there and I wanted to. It be challenged in You don't both my own horizons, but also different people different people think and act and. I am so privileged grateful to have been able to do that. You know I have to admit, and you may relate to this as being from a have A. Of defensiveness when it comes to people bashing Texas, they're such amazing people. They're they're such amazing within their and during such good work, and you can't judge inspired leaders. You have to judge us by Jordan Molly ivins in grammar yards and Janice Joplin for goodness. Sake. Now. There's just and that's true everywhere where there's adversity, there are amazing women trying to make a better future to Tennessee. It's true taxes in needs recognized. That is absolutely true. I FEEL DEFENSIVE ABOUT MEMPHIS TO MEMPHIS. Amazing. You know have Bill Street. Yeah. There's some things that I wanted to get to and that's where I connected with you because I was like, yes, I understand that needs to escape. But yet you know having these strong ties to my hometown It's. US You know and I always say at in calm from a reproductive rights background at came to it, and part of that is my experience in Texas in watching Texans in particularly poor people in taxes in rural people in Texas I'm being the canaries in coalmines of these rearrested policies that use reproductive oppression disenfranchise. So I really love this book because I've read some bit of this history in different books over time, and you just put it together into end. So well, right and I. I think one of the things about the Republican. Party. That happens I think we have these debates in the media when people talk about it as we just accept the Republican. Party. As is right without kind of thinking about how they got here or the illogic of their kind of overarching philosophy because a lot of it doesn't really make sense. Right. But you know when you read your book, the Republican Party today is not the way that it used to be like it's not recognisable from. Prior, to nineteen seventy right you at one Haley. How they kind of cobbled together this coalition of these disaffected smaller groups. You know these Democrats, who weren't happy with the passage of the Civil Rights Act and know some religious groups. So what were some of these initial groups in that coalition? Awkward it was a little bit. The opposite, right that every every political party has factions. There's no question about it, but you know as as the sort of book opens, you do see Jerry Falwell senior, who, subsequently passed and Paul and at small set a really fundamental as they call themselves dominion. It S, which means they believe God gave digging into white men over systems, elliptical, economic social systems, and. Our. Country, whereas before they had to do very much Mansi in short all the sudden is rich move mad. The Women's Liberation Movement is really challenging total control over power systems in the country and they mobilized to political action fighting school desegregation and. It's a long long story. You see throughout the book is that. An establishment GOP, which you still have any conservatives who still had social liberals in fiscal conservatives, they were not finding enough to hang together in related. People who hadn't been voting band goals were building over ten. Maybe we should add up and there was crew rate and they got more and more halt on a constituency within their electoral coalition that increasingly represented a small small action in the country in their views and they. Title, they were making deals with the devil and they. You know what? If anything can prince is that the artifice around abortion which seemed great to that at the time and I'm sure we'll discuss. Because one place where were toweling. Stream minority and they knew they didn't have public pain on their side. So it was a constant balancing act and what ended up happening is these radicals increasingly over to the party with each subsequent election, and trump is the ultimate manifestation of that.

Texas Memphis Tennessee Republican Party Hogue Jim Taylor Skinner Jordan Molly Ivins Elise Manila Nero Pro Janice Joplin Hogue. President Trump Jerry Falwell America GOP Haley Women's Liberation Movement Coalmines
Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

Dose of Leadership

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

"Jared Welcome to the show welcome a dose of leadership. Thanks to be here. Well I'm excited to learn more about employer advantage and really your leadership philosophy. It seems like I'm. Looking at your background man you've you've done a lot of things and now you're the president of employer advantage. Traveling the world working in various branches of government learning multiple language Arabic is that right to get that right you understand. Yeah, Eric my Undergrad is an Arabic. Wow. Well let's start. Let's talk a little bit about how we got to employ advantage. What was the kind of as you're going through school and working what was your dream at the time? I can tell you my dream was not to end up in. Joplin. Missouri. But I know my I guess my my dream candidate evolved. By the time I got through law school I knew I didn't want to be a lawyer and so I had to figure out. What I wanted to do. So I went into corporate law for a little while I was looking for a chance to pivot to the business side of things because I decided that's what I was really interested in. and. Had A a cousin in DC where I was working Who have happened to have a father-in-law that was? Had founded a business along time ago and was looking for some help some young blood to get into the business to. Start with. A succession plan. and. He learned me out to the Midwest and. I guess we haven't looked back. So how long has that been? How long have you been in Missouri five years five years so prior to that, you were working in various branches of government and you're doing it was many. as an attorney as a lot. What was it doing what we doing government? So I worked before law, SCHOOL In the private sector actually in the healthcare it sector but then during law school and after I actually thought. I thought government was what I wanted to go into. That's actually part of the reason I studied Arabic in my Undergrad as well. It's thought government was around I wanted to go but as I got more experience in government i. realized. I didn't think that was going to be for me. and. Why was that? Would you see there that just turned you off to it I think. I worked with a lot of great people and saw a lot of really interesting things but. The the kind of lockstep. Advancement structure of most of the government. Offices wasn't very appealing to me I I saw people that had been there for thirty years and it seemed like if you wanted to get anywhere, you had to be there for thirty years and there's no getting anywhere without putting in your thirty years. there. There's also the factory you know have a pretty large family. We're expecting our child next month and I knew if I was going to support a family of that size. It's Government salary. Yea. I I know I understand the attraction in the allure. I thought about going into government to at one time when I was laid off from American you know. In the lure was kind of a the security, the job security, everything else and. I got to say a lot of consulting work with the government I've been out of the marine, corps and doing this. And it's such a challenge because what I found is that there's There's just this kind of embracing of mediocrity and it's nothing against the people within it. It's just it's it's a culture of mediocrity. I think and I don't know what your thoughts are on that. Again, I don't into government bashing session but well, exactly I that's I. think that's probably what I was trying to say with trying to dance around and be a little diplomatic but I I totally agree I and I think you're right I don't think it's any individual person just as. Houses that it's the it's the whole system is just too big. It's too bureaucratic right and an end. To. It's that too big to fail mentality. They all know that that they're going to have a job they don't have the pressure of trying to turn a profit to kind of motivate them but. I don't know if they're they're tons of fantastic. Working in government and I I admire the work that they do. But with a lot of great intentions, you're right in the. Same reasons that just wasn't for me I needed to be around a little more Spontaneity. In the the fact that if Wanted Faster Pass towards performance in the object objectives that just seemed like it was applaud you know what I mean like a slow applaud. Yeah. Yup totally get it. Very. Cool. So I'm curious to before we start talking about your roles a president here. What live in Jordan for four months? What was what year was that and what was that like? In two, thousand, nine It was awesome. Just incredible experience. You know as part of my. Undergraduate studies studying the Middle East Arabic So I got to go there and really just immersed myself in Jordanian culture. In my Arabic study I had just gotten married the year before. So my wife and I join me and she actually celebrate our first anniversary in Jordan. Wow and just an amazing cultural experience you know when you visit somewhere as a tourist. You see some cool things but you don't really get a good feel for what people really like where the country's really liked but when you live there for a while. We were able to go to church there and and just make friends interact with people in their everyday lives. It was just awesome to. Be Part of a culture this. So completely different from ours you're live two years in Sweden, but Sweden in so many ways this is just a lot like America so it wasn't kind of a full foreign experience, but Jordan was definitely full foreign experience and There were definitely parts of it that weren't as fun. You know there's water rationing. There s he had you know. Limit, your showers and and and just be really careful with your water and we had bedbugs. there. Definitely. Reasons. That we were happy to go home but man, I wouldn't trade the experience for anything such memories of time that

Jordan Missouri Government President Trump School Jared Midwest Sweden Eric Joplin Attorney America
Brain Juice. It Was Brain Juice.

The Ladies of Strange

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Brain Juice. It Was Brain Juice.

"We are the ladies of strange I'm Ashley I'm Tiffany and I'm Rebecca. Thank you for joining US each week. is we discuss the history mystery? In theory of all things, questionable and Airy, good job, guys. You got through it. Straight face no GIGGLEFISH I bit my tongue, and almost said something, but I thought you guys with. Yell at me for stopping. That sounds like a bad side show clown straight face fits. What. I don't know that's just what came in my head. When I sent straight face, no gigabits man. Oh, okay, another clown murderer! No I'm thinking like. In nineteen fifty sideshow clown probably would be in like freak. Show like American Horror Story Freak show. I mean he could be a John Wayne Gay. See Ma'am Times to. Why are you on your laptop? I'm not on my laptop. Are you lying I'm not a D. do you see my laptop open? I don't think you close now yet is closed. I WANNA teach us some stuff to have a history lesson history, okay? And seven years ago, I got really excited about this forefathers. Numbers in there so Jackson Beverly Wilga where collectors of vintage photographs and had in their collection a dagger type. Oh you don't say an old photograph taken using a process that involves a silver plate and Mercury Vapor, and his photo was of a young disfigured man. the photograph was believed to be taken in the nineteenth century. The man in the picture was believed that the man had encountered a whales. He was holding Harpoon like object in the image. TIFFANY's face. That was fun. they couple had the image on display in their home for years in December of two thousand and seven, the couple decided to share the image on flicker and titled it a one eyed man with Harpoon super, super creative, so one win was. When did they have it? In their home? Court were the years they had in their home, but they didn't post it till flicker until two thousand seven. Okay, so they decide like a random picture of some random disfigure. Yeah, some people collect mentioned photographs. My Dad is one of those on. This might make him happy. One Flicker user contacted the Combo commenting that the man probably isn't a whaler as he wasn't holding a Harpoon in the picture, was he holding buy outs. Oh, sorry I thought. You said he was holding her. They said it looked like her. so another user saw this picture and said Hey, this might be the only surviving photo of Venus Gauge, not famous gauge. Where's verb? Not Verb just just benny US I. Don't know that name so shown, either. That's why I said. Where's Fergany isn't firm? So, y'all ready to learn about Fini's gauge. Liz Foreign and eighteen twenty three, the DSP gauge lead, either an uneventful lifer didn't bother keeping a journal because he doesn't pop up again until eighteen forty eight, okay. Okay. No list of at the age of twenty five Fini's was working as a railroad, foreman and common dish Vermont and on September, thirteenth eighteen, forty eight made a really good attempt at receiving the Darwin Award. Oh my God. Yes, so excited, so phineas worked for the RUTLAND and Burlington railroad company as a form part of his job involved coordinating, blasting out rock to make way for new. New Rail. Lines does part of the job required knowledge in geology and trigonometry, so I have a note to me, saying Insert statement about how trig is as useful of the maths, I will say I really liked. trig choke is super. Useful triggers the most Hallo basic addition. Wouldn't just like OPRAH EMMY BE MORE USEFUL THAN TRADE? Because I never took trig and I'm getting along just fine. Your overcompensating at all. No compensation here I come to terms. Okay, so geology and trigonometry so not only did. They have to be pretty clever, but he also had a handle his crew, who was described as a gang of men who basically needed all the. Since they enjoy things brawling shooting and drinking, they sound like sounds like my. Sounds like the type of people that didn't take trig. had good people skills. Though so is crew liked them to blast the area involved not only defendants have to create schematics aware to drill holes that were a couple inches wide, and a few feet deep, but also had to be able to place them along natural joints and rifts in the rock to make the job easier because why work harder than you have to the cracks just like push it a little harder so i. Like my mental health. Hey? Push it just one step further fine, are we? I completely lost what I was going to save. Thirty Oh. Did He Oh, I was thinking like the he needed to do dousing, but you're talking about like actual cracks in the ground. Yes, we're not looking for water. He's trying to clear out pathways like blowout rock lay lines, not like no crat down, sorry. You bring a witchy friend along. Here is the source of power here. Blow the spot so once. These holes were drilled. Blasting powder was placed into the whole untapped down. Using typically crowbars. Vinnie. As was kind of a big deal. He had his own tampering device made by local blacksmith to Tampa device was basically a Joplin with thirteen point. Two five pounds was forty three inches long and tapered from a diameter of one point, two five inches, which was an eas for taping into a point. Any guesses on where this is going. That's his Oh. Oh, is that how he lost his eye? So once I found stated that the incident happened a one day while camping bananas endured the Osha Guidelines for tapping blasting powder into the earth with a long metal spike. Parentheses, which wouldn't be the Osha wouldn't be until nineteen seventy-one, but that's not the point. Close parentheses and I can only assume look down into the hole above the spike. CH- one source I founded the incident happened around four thirty pm near quitting time, so either finance wasn't paying attention as he was telling his routed group to behave, or his assistant forgot to put the ever important sand into the hall before tampering because San Prevents, sparks from getting to the plastic powder either way. The blessing powder ignited

Trig United States Fini Osha Jackson Beverly Wilga Tiffany John Wayne Gay Oprah Liz Foreign Fergany Benny Tampa Joplin Foreman Rutland Vermont Burlington Darwin Award
Texas venue that launched Janis Joplin's career set to close

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Texas venue that launched Janis Joplin's career set to close

"Janis Joplin was a college student in the sixties when she launched her career at Threadgill's a converted gas station in Austin Texas the restaurant has been closed since early this month an owner Eddie Wilson who report all re opened the place in nineteen eighty one says Threadgill's will not be re opening after the pandemic lifts

Janis Joplin Threadgill Austin Texas Eddie Wilson
Joe Walsh Takes on the Trump Cult

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:55 min | 2 years ago

Joe Walsh Takes on the Trump Cult

"I wanNA start sort of in the beginning with you because I think he your trajectory to where we are today is very compelling and also I think there might be something that people can relate to write our story right. So will you tell us a little bit about how you grew up pretty mundane? I mean a big Old Irish Catholic family of nine kids Dad both passed away within the last couple of years. I Love My mom and dad a pretty lovely boring childhood. I was the middle child of nine. I grew up a loan in the family and I knew when you come from a big family. Elissa you fight for your parents attention and so when I look back a lot of the things I've done in life has been to galvanize people to make people stand up and pay attention about things I care about but I loved coming up in a big family. So what were your interests you know? I always in maybe similar to you from the earliest age. I cared about history. I've always been enamoured with American history. I was watching the other night. The first part of the special on the history channel George Washington. I saw it too is wonderful. I WANNA watch the rest of it. I'm convinced I've always kinda believed in reincarnation. I'm convinced I lived at that time really Olisa. I've been obsessed with the revolutionary period for as long as I can remember really. Yeah so how does that manifest itself in your daily life? Do you get deja booze. Do you get I often and I've often ramped of that period. I've been obsessed with books in movies of that period and it's led to my interest in this country the problems in this country where we are now suavely. My interest in history always led me to politics governance so in high school. What was important to you. Are you an athlete at all? I was I mean I was Mr Baseball Basketball football president my senior class all of that but always board a little bit nice school. I was always thinking beyond high school and then when I was in college I was bored and college and think beyond college so I never really felt like I fit in in those slots and you study in college. I was in English major political science minor interesting. Yeah Yeah so you get out of college. You're still in your hometown. Where'd you get a call? I went to a small school in the middle of Iowa called Grinnell College then I transferred to the University of Iowa graduated there. I took time off. I hopped on a greyhound. Bus came out here to become an actor. Didn't 'cause I was lazy ass and I rode my bicycle. Up and down all over California tended bar and just dreamt a lot then went back to I will finally graduated once the acting bug kind of went away and then I spent time in the city of Chicago after I graduated mostly on the south side of Chicago working with low income black white and brown kids on job training and educational at their educational skills. And you were registered Republican. At this time. I've probably been registered Republican my whole life. I've rarely describe myself as a Republican which is odd because I ran for president as a Republican. I've always considered myself sort of libertarian slash conservative. Don't like the word conservative. But I've always felt an obligation to help people who are not as well off as me. I've never anything that that drive came from. Joplin my mom. My Mom was a servant. She was a teacher. She was a a special education teacher. She loved history as well and she just. She instilled in me at least that that was part of why we were here. A big part of why we were here and that combined with my sort of political ethos which is i. Don't want government doing everything for people. I want US doing more for our fellow. Man has always led me toward the helping professions. It's interesting because I think when you think of Libertarian. You don't think of fellow man helping fellow man you think of like someone you know in a cabin who doesn't over them show all by themselves. Who has you know? I think that if more people understood that the libertarian sort of ethos is that and yeah but I think there's so much that is politically misunderstood right now and I think it feeds into exactly what we're seeing right now with this administration but also it's so interesting to me how we've lost sight of the grey areas in life and I don't know if that's because maybe twitter maybe we have these little short bursts of information and were not able to really see nuance right. Like nuances dead total. So we think of Republicans and we think of Libertarians. And we think of Democrats we think of very specific people void of any nuance right. I mean if you are this you have to be this this this and this. I'm wondering when you started to see that happen. I mean my husband when I first met him was a registered. Republican was he. Yeah he was a register and you know a progressive Republican. I don't know if a progressive Republican exists anymore is that what is that but you got. I mean it's better than a regressive Republican which seems to be the way of the party right now. It's a-list issues everything's broken. I mean just step back. We have a horrible human being in the White House. I mean you and I may differ on a lot of issues almost everybody outside of his crazy supporters understand that we have horrible human being in the White House. How the hell did he get there? I think he got there because our political system is just flat out broken. So why should we take you seriously? And I don't know that you should. I hope you look. Let's just be clear from the outset. I announced about five months ago that this former Republican congressman is going to take on a sitting trump sitting president named trial. Nobody JOE in their right mind should think about doing this. Unless you have a really good reason it's easily the most freaking difficult thing I've ever done as you mentioned. I mean I come from a certain place politically most of the people in that world politically. They loved trump. So I've lost my friends I've lost my supporters. I get threats all the time. It's been difficult. The party has tried to whack me every single day. I'm doing it and I got into joe known it would be difficult many things but I'm not dumb. I knew it would be difficult. I thought it was important. I believe unfit so. It's that message that we've led with. Which is I know who I am. I know this isn't going to be easy but that kind. The White House scares the hell out of me. He should scare everybody. And we've led with that message in everything we do. What is the most broken thing that you feel enabled him to become president about the political system? We go into the social aspect. I think there is a lot though is broken in society that allowed for him. I think especially when you talk to his supporter and I know his supporters. Well because they voted for me and they've listened to me on the radio the last seven years they feel like Washington. Dc doesn't give a fuck about them and hasn't for a long time. Republicans and Democrats. They don't care about me. We got like thirty nine different. Genders now everybody Kerry who they WANNA marry. I got people who don't look like me coming across the border and Washington's not listening and so along comes this asshole this demagogue. Who At least gave them the impression that he's paying

President Trump White House Washington Chicago Grinnell College JOE Twitter United States Iowa George Washington DC University Of Iowa California Football Joplin Kerry Congressman
The Frame Oscar Special

The Frame

04:42 min | 2 years ago

The Frame Oscar Special

"Are ready. Let's do it. Welcome to the frame Oscar special from KPCC in Los Angeles. Welcome to the one million breath and the Oscar goes to and the Oscar goes to and the Oscar goes to get anybody. I'M GONNA find you're GONNA give you. Massive snow snowed. Everybody who bought a ticket told somebody to buy a ticket. Thank you I love you if I may be so honored to have all all the female nominees and every category stand with me in this room tonight the actors Maryland you do it everybody else will come on all right all right all right. I'm John Horn host to the frame and joining me is Jacqueline coli editor at Ron Tomatoes Jacqueline. Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me John so I know we're only a couple seconds in certified fresh so far. I think you're doing great. You're certified fresh and honestly I would say all the best picture nominees are also pretty awesome. It's probably the highest average on the tomato meter of best picture nominees. We've had in a while so I'm excited to talk about these phones. So let's start with probably the top story. I think of this year's Oscar race twenty acting nominees. One person of Color Cynthia Revo who stars as Surrey Tubman and Harriet. Yeah I'M NOT GONNA lie was extremely disappointed. When I watched each array and John Show read out the nominees few weeks ago? But I wasn't surprised actually just wrote an an article rotten tomatoes discussing this when you talk about the ninety two years of the history of the academy. There's only been thirty. Five Black Women nominated and twenty one of them have been for playing a slave a maid or woman in abject poverty it is an alarming and slightly depressing trend. I would say in the academy's Tastes And when you have performances from Octavia. CBS Spencer and loose Alfre woodard clemency. Jaylo in four inch heels giving us all she could for Hustler's and Aquafina further for well. It's really really alarming for you to say to yourself that this is where we are at the state of the academy. I'm going to hope that this year. We can have parasite as a moment if it wins. Best picture that we can say. We're moving forward. But again Cynthia being the only nominee it's It's a bit depressing parasite. I think has a legitimate chance to win the best picture. Oscar Oscar Think Bong Jun ho who directed and Co wrote. It could win director as well if it wins. The top prize the first foreign language movie in Academy History to take that prize. That is important in its own right regardless of the fact that none of its actors were nominated for performing in it. Yeah and it's also again a trend unfortunately with the academy there have been six previous best picture. Nominations from Asian cinema where none of the actors were honored with an acting nomination and unfortunately parasite kept with that trend this year here however We keep a track at our wars leaderboard and rotten tomatoes dot com of all of the winds of all of the films that are in the conversation and parasite has dominated with over a hundred in twenty five wins and to give you sort of a relative idea. The next winds is at seventy one. So parasite has been dominating with critics groups and with these these various guilds so it's poised to maybe take home the top prize but it really depends on the academy's taste and what those nine thousand members feel about the film later in the show. We're GONNA talk talk about the best picture race. We're also going to hear from some of the directors of some of the best picture nominees including Greta. Gerwig made little women was not nominated for best director. Sam Mendes from one thousand nine hundred seventeen and Bon John Hoult from parasite. But we'll start this Oscar party with some leading actresses three of the five nominees in this category had add the particular challenge of playing real people on Screen Cynthia Rio sharply staring and Renee Zellweger. Who Plays Judy Garland in Judy Yukon? There's an audience other ways. It hears you sing my mouth driving. It was judy takes place in the late. One thousand nine hundred sixty judy. Garland's career is floundering. She's struggling with sobriety. She goes to England perform at a London nightclub and Joplin one thing that surprised me. was that renee. Zellweger wasn't convinced that she could actually pull off as part. I wish I think is so crazy. That's Texas girls for you as a Texas girl I can say we're like deprecating on our talent and always like underestimate ourselves but she absolutely murdered murdered this role I remember. I woke up right in early at the tyrod film festival to watch. Her sort of embody. Judy Garland for this role and it was so I would say mesmerizing.

Oscar Judy Garland Oscar Oscar Renee Zellweger Director Cynthia Rio Editor Los Angeles Texas Academy History John Show Hustler Alfre Woodard Maryland John Surrey Tubman John Horn Sam Mendes Ron Tomatoes Bon John Hoult
New UK government brings change and uncertainty

FT News

09:30 min | 2 years ago

New UK government brings change and uncertainty

"Week's UK general election saw. Boris Johnson. Lead the Conservative Party to its biggest victory in over thirty years instantly the value of the pound and UK case stocks jumped now that election excitement has died down. We take a look at what to expect from the new government here to discuss this with me on George Polka political editor and Adam. Sampson had a foster. Let's start with brexit given them get brexit done John was the Tory campaign slogan will the UK believing the E. U. at the end of January. And what will that actually mean George. Well certainly expectation is that person will leave on the thirty first of January and the brexit done slogan Surf Bars Johnson extremely well in the campaign captured. I think the mood of the country that whether you're on the remain all the leave side of the debate. There was a bit of a sense that the three and a half years of Political Guinea since the referendum result how to redrawn an end and he's now gone native seat majority which squirrel allow him to deliver his withdrawal bill and to complete the first stage. And it's important to stress the first stage of Brexit on the thirty first of January then of course becomes much more uncomplicated and the real negotiation which is about the future relationship with future trading relationship between Britain and the EU and some people predict that will be even harder and potentially messier and the first part so when will Britain finally leave the EU. In that case well we legally leave on the thirty first of January but then the question is at at. What point do we leave the so-called transition period the standstill arrangement where effectively Britain remains part the same issue trading system under the European Court of Justice? And all the rest of it until a final final agreement is in place now. Boris Johnson has said this week that he will leave on the thirty first of December. Twenty twenty come. What May and indeed he's GonNa put legislation or claws into his withdrawal bill? The will make illegal him to seek an extension of the transition period beyond December. Twenty twenty now. Lots of people doubt whether a really serious trade deal negotiated in such a short space of time. I suspect if there is a trade deal in place by that point it will be very thin one mainly covering goods mainly covering things tariffs and quotas but not fully fledged future relationship that we've been promised and then the second question is if boss Johnson's determined have this new relationship in place on the first of January twenty twenty one. Is it practically possible to have all the systems in place including a new custom system. New checks new border posts a new immigration system potentially all within the space of twelve months. I think that makes an heroic assumption about the ability of white small businesses to make that kind of big adaptations short space of time. And could this also be a rocky time for British unity. The SMP in Scotland is pushing for a second referendum on Scottish independence and Northern Ireland's highlands position could become more precarious as it becomes the border between the EU and the UK. Will indeed. I mean that's one of the ironies of this whole brexit process. Assessed that in taking out of the European Union is Boris Johnson unst itching the United Kingdom of course Scotland and Northern Ireland both very strongly to remain part of the European Union. The fact that there's a resentment north of the border in Scotland about Brexit has created a situation where forty eighth out of the fifty nine seats in Scotland went to the Scottish National Party which wants a second independence referendum in Scotland. Boris Johnson said no so far. But it doesn't take that much. Imagination to concede that Scotland could become a bit like Catalonia with with a grievance festering people demanding the right to have another say on their future and in the case of Northern Ireland. Is You mentioned. Schoener the deal that Boris Johnson struck will leave Northern Ireland effectively within the economic space of the European Union in the customs union but name and the single market therefore the border between the mainland of Great Britain and Northern Island. For the first time and again you know people in Northern Ireland we'll be looking to Dublin or Brussels to protect their interests. SARS the economy's concerned rather than London. It's obvious obvious. That's unraveling the unions certain extent. Boris Johnson calls himself the Minister of the Union that so tightly gave himself after became prime minister. But that's going to be a big job for him and number ten to try to keep the Union of the UK together. Also the same even European Union now the conservative manifesto sketched out plans for constitutional institutional change. So what differences. Can we expect to see well a slightly strange page forty eight which is quite slight infamy in In politics where it talks about a whole range of constitutional changes whether it's the future of the House of Lords or the relationship between parliament and the Supreme Court which of of course famously became very heavily involved in British politics in the autumn and stop Boris Johnson closing down parliament's at a crucial moment in the brexit process. So there's lots of unspoken unspoken intent there about doing something about changing the system. If you like and Boris Johnson's chief advisor Dominic Cummings is basically a revolutionary who thinks the British. The system is bust. He thinks that the Brexit vote illustrated the distance that a grown up between many parts of the UK left behind person if you like 'em the elites that run the country whether it's in the media or the courts or the politicians and he wants to turn it on its head now part gets in. This mission is an open question. That's going to be a review of constitutional setup up in the country which will take at least a year. It'll be interesting to see how far postal prepared to go down that route. But certainly there's a real energy and almost revolutionary zeal about the people around Boris Johnson number ten and within government. A new business department and changes to foreign aid are on the cards. What are these going to look like well? That's the other thing that's Dominic Cummings. Mister Johnson's advisor wants to do. He previously worked as an adviser in whites-only thinks that basically the British civil services Pretty hopeless he thinks they they tolerate failure. There's lots of blame passing no reward for imaginative thinking and he wants to turn the British system on its head as well and one of the things that traditionally percents proud of his value has a permanent civil service which carries on doing the job. Even when there's a change of government very different of course to the American system where you have a complete sea change in Washington every four years potentially but Dominic Cummings said in the past. He thinks that's civil. Servants should be fight if they do about Joplin generally for life at the moment and he's also talking about a a big change in the number of government departments. So you mentioned that two of the most interesting ones. One is the idea of folding into the Foreign Office the Department of International Development which has a very big budget thirteen in billion pounds burst Johnson. Things could be better deployed inside. The Foreign Office is part of a wider global Britain foreign policy and business policy on the other one is the idea of turning the business department much bigger department covering international trade for example almost like a department of economic affairs pushing this agenda. That boss Johnson has trying finds a push wealth out of the prosper southeast of the UK out to the North and the Midlands. Now if I can turn to you Adam how has the business community reacted into this conservative. Victory sure so business. Confidence was very very subdued for a while for a year and a half in the run-up to this election over brexit over the gridlock. So I I think. The community breathed a collective sigh of relief. I least that Boris Johnson has a decisive victory. He has a majority he can push things through a lot of business. Leaders leaders reason the phrase clarity on policy that kind of thing it also averts a no deal outcome at least in the short term over the next several months. I think that was all seen as as a positive however I think there are many longer term doubts as far as what this is going to look like George. You mentioned earlier that it's very unclear as to whether there's going to be another cliff edge brexit in in a few months from now so I think well people are cautiously optimistic in the business community at the moment. There's a lot of doubts about what this looks like in the long run. So so what will the new government mean for business. Can we expect to see a tidal wave of investment after Brexit as Boris Johnson has promised so kind of said there there may be a short-term boost in investment. That just been like you said pent up. You know in the months of gridlock and over brexit concerns and it may be that boost growth in the short run as well. Maybe over the next few quarters early next year but again there's a lot of doubt as to what exactly the economy looks like go into the end of next year whether we have a rerun of exactly this drama that we saw over the past few months taking place again and there's just the economic forecast is shrouded in doubt at the moment I would say and what has been the reaction to the election in the markets so the mercury actions been quite interesting sterling. Shot up more than two percent after the exit poll on Thursday. They night a really big rise for a currency like the pound. The next day you K- markets were up substantially especially domestic facing stock so homebuilders her certain banks companies. That were at risk of nationalization from Jeremy Corbin's plans but what we've seen after that is a significant fall back in the pound found in fact the pounds now given up all of its gains from after the election outcome over those doubts about what exactly brexit's going to look like and I think specifically this I did there may be a cliff. Edge Breaks Leumi now at the end of two thousand twenty and Just you know these persistent doubts about what Boris Johnson's political plans will be. We still have uncertainty going forward. It looks like it seems like there's deep uncertainty among investors and business executives. Well thanks George and thank you Adam and thank you for

Mister Johnson European Union Boris Johnson Brexit UK Britain Dominic Cummings Scotland Twenty Twenty Adam Northern Ireland United Kingdom George Conservative Party Foreign Office George Polka Sampson Advisor European Court Of Justice
Wealthy Donor Promises College Tuition To Help Spur Growth In Hometown

All Things Considered

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Wealthy Donor Promises College Tuition To Help Spur Growth In Hometown

"Just changed for many in the tiny Kansas town of neo to Shea a wealthy businessman is hoping to save his shrinking hometown he's launched a program to pay college tuition for neo she's students the idea takes its cue from bigger cities but it could hit some unexpected roadblocks Celia your piece Jepsen of the campus news service reports then Cutler grew up in New York Shea in the nineteen fifties when it had a thousand more residents than today's twenty three hundred he left campus for a career in finance and insurance but never forgot his home town situated about halfway between Wichita Kansas in Joplin Missouri and his business success has led to the that's new dishes three hundred middle and high schoolers in their auditorium recently when they learned color will pay their college tuition they have to earn a two point five GPA and two other boxes but the new ownership promise will cover the price of tuition and fees at the state's priciest public school the university of Kansas Daschle council is a senior she wants to study dental hygiene I'm still in shock right now I've been really saving up for college I know most of my classmates have been also saving up working real hard and this is just a real relief off of our shoulders the program has two goals obviously change lives right now two years after high school fewer than half of students here are working on a college degree second goal bring people to this rural town families need to enroll their kids in school here by the sixth grade to get the full deal colors offer is good for the next twenty five years at least possibly decades beyond that it'll likely cost tens of millions of dollars but here's the problem border in school districts have been losing enrollment as well to nearby districts have fewer than two hundred students left because most of southeast Kansas is shrinking near she's plan might simply shift people around among dwindling towns Matthew Sanderson is a sociologist at Kansas State University if you're thinking about regional economic development lease with the stage you look more like a zero sum game to spur real growth nearly Shea has to attract more employers and jobs and though community leaders say promise programs elsewhere have benefited economically they're usually in more populous places like Kalamazoo Michigan that town has seventy five thousand residents still hundreds of workers commute to this town every day from across the region for manufacturing jobs a plan like this one Coble both we're a team is building the whole of the luxury motor boats so this process just gets repeated layer by layer resident glass or live company president Shane Stanfill says now maybe more of his workers were moved to town to take advantage of the free tuition and others would follow and with that bill though many jobs and that will also help help us to get you know find the right people to work for us but is firing residents may need to get in line near Shay's other big challenge is a housing shortage a common issue across rural America thunder Ben colored says the town is ready for the hard work I don't think any of us that are have been working on the scholarship program now I've been working on it for a couple years I think that this going to be easy this is going to require some heavy lifting on the part of the school on the part of the community on on the part of the businesses here meanwhile Matty Sanderson says he's curious to see if new addition I can pull something off beyond the usual zero sum game a town this small trying to reinvent itself with this

Shea Kansas Twenty Five Years Two Years
"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Yeah yeah so she really liked to put it out there for people to learn about her heroes house and a lot of them were women is also important to note how many women as you point out were inspired by Janice yeah mix and a million other people from stevie Nicks to Alicia Lisa Keys. I mean that's pretty cool. A wide range of different styles of artists have been inspired by the different facets of Genesis Artistry. Now when you get into genesis drug abuse and her self destructiveness some of it seemed to be powered by a real sort of existential depression. She she called the cosmic blues. Her father had a similar thing he called it. The Saturday night swindle. What was that well? Her Dad was pretty much a fatalist and told told her when she. I was Kinda down and out in San Francisco about sixty four or something like that. Hey look you know in ain't never gonNA get any better you know in Janice. She had that fifties optimal you know you work hard and you get better and then you'll be happy one day and basically his kind of existential show anx was no matter how hard you work. You think you're going to get the Saturday night to go out and have fun. Well guess what that's GonNa suck too you know you're gonNA wake up with a hangover the next day and feel like Shit Shit so Janice realized that no matter how much success she was going to have there's always going to be maybe disappointment loneliness emptiness other holes holes in her soul that you know as much as she wanted to be successful and wanted to be a rockstar. That wasn't gonNA fill that part. So yes she called the Cosmic Osmond Blues on this one of my favorite songs that she wrote Cosmic Blues which is on her first solo album I got to mow cosmic blues again. Mama which came out fifty years ago this year. I can't believe that use a in another moment. That caused dredd when you read it. As when she kind of in some ways it was inevitable in some ways it wasn't but when she shoots heroin for the first time it's just like Oh that led her down the path that little to me to her death. It's hard to see otherwise. Yeah it's it's a horrible horrible problem problem in lots of her heroes. You know Billie holiday and a lot of the jazz players got into heroin and there was this horrible kind of romantic kind of idea. Yeah about heroin. And of course she really got into it when she did leave big brother and was trying to for the first time. Be A bandleader which takes it's a Lotta work to learn how to instead of being a member of the band to run the band to hire the players to be in charge plus write new songs doing a whole new stall music etc and there was so much pressure She was getting tons of media attention and so she started just kind of going into that blanket of numb numbness of heroin. And Yeah it's so many musicians musicians. I mean look at Eric Clapton. Keith Richards Dwayne Allman. I mean there were so many people from that same period that horribly fell into the same trap and the same time as much as there are things that when you look at it seemed to lead in the direction of while she would have been pretty downcast at that point in her life. There's an awful fight with her mother were mother says I wish he never been born which aches and she was very upset about the death of Jimmy Hendrix which people don't realize that didn't know each other super well well but they had a real sort of affinity for each other tight and so you can say. Oh Jeez you know. Things were bearing down on her at the same time. What actually really happened as you clearly tell us she just had the wrong kind of heroin? She did dose. That was four. What's usually would have? But she had China White. I think a very pure kind of heroin. There was a total axe. Yeah it was kind of like the whole federal thing today and horribly you know Janice had a drinking problem for sure and drinking alcohol. Alcohol is much worse on the voice than drugs heroin so basically she was trying to cut back on the drinking. She loved her band. She loved working with her producer..

heroin Janice Alicia Lisa Keys Mama Genesis Artistry stevie Nicks Eric Clapton Jimmy Hendrix dredd San Francisco Keith Richards Billie China White Dwayne Allman
"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"When a couple of semesters then she dropped out just the week of her twentieth twentieth birthday and that's when she moved out of San Francisco and was doing the coffeehouse folk scene kind of thing bland. bessie Smith songs in her own stuff and she did actually you. You know one of her future band members who actually formed big brother and holding company basis. Peter Albin he was on that folk scene he and his brother had a little duo and so she did kind kind of museum then so a lot of people who would become part of her inner circle just a few years later in sixty six when she moved out for good and joined big brother and the Holding Company Company. That's when she got embedded with them. Let's jump to sixty six when dance. Joplin moves out to San Francisco again and and this time big brother and holding company are essentially waiting for her. She got audition like the moment. You got there pretty much. Yeah I mean they've been together since sixty five had been playing some of the crazy like atr tests and things like that and you know the scene was really starting to cook by sixty six in San Francisco. I mean you know you're talking about the summer we're of love really you know. Sixty six was the real summer of love. And that's when she arrived in June now Chet Helms who she knew also Taksin met him in Austin Austin in that period you know sort of be confusing but in sixty three. She had originally hitchhike with him to San Francisco. He stayed when she left a comeback back to get off speed and everything so anyway he became really part of the whole Ground Zero of the family dog he started avalon ballroom so he was part of that and he was managing big brother and the Holding Company. Now a couple of bands had female singers. Great Society had one name Grace Slick and another one. Lynn called Jefferson. Airplane had a Sydney Anderson and later of course grace would take her place finalized yet but Big Brother other Peter Album who co-founded it was doing most of the singing but you know it was a very democratic banned. It was part of that whole communal kind of things just like grateful dead at that time. Time so different singers sang different songs. Different members of the band. There was two guitarist. Same Andrew and James Gurley. They contributed songs to and they sang some mm songs but they were realizing that they had a strong female singer. Could bring them up a notch you know and so Janice came out and you know. She thought it was an audition but the the minute. She opened her mouth and started singing. They knew my Gosh. This woman is amazing and she had never ever sang with an electric fan before she suddenly had had to completely change her style because she had these really loud guitars behind her. They were rehearsing at this old funky carriage house. Kind of loft place with no monitors senators or anything. I mean the clubs in have monitors really and she had to be able to hear herself suddenly seeing over this glaring. They called Freak rock at the time so it was. It was a huge again another evolution musically for Janice to adapt and come up with this whole new style of singing and of course develop up this amazing stage presence that she did. Yeah I thought that was fascinating that she hadn't thought of herself at all as a rock singer up until practically that moment when she got in front of Big Brother in the holding company she really had thought of herself as a blues singer. Had done this route. CR stuff that leaned towards country but there she was is and it's sort of like she had gone to a certain point in her development but it took standing in front of that band to take her all the way to being the Janis Joplin that the world would know if yeah exactly she worked again very hard on developing this unbelievable stage presence that she had the way that she was able to connect act with. Her audiences is unparalleled. I mean I have interviewed people for the book who saw her and sixty six play at San Francisco State soon after she.

San Francisco Holding Company Janis Joplin Janice Taksin Holding Company Company Peter Albin bessie Smith Chet Helms Grace Slick Austin Austin Sydney Anderson avalon ballroom Peter Album Great Society James Gurley Lynn Andrew Jefferson
"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

13:28 min | 2 years ago

"joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"I'm in the studio with Holly George. Warren author of Sixteen Books Most recently Janice her life and music. which is what we're going to be talking about? Today is Osso two time grammy nominee and the longtime editor of Rolling Stones Book Division and a lot of books came out of that job. He asked over forty bucks over the years from photo books Anthologies of writing from the magazine. Kazini going back to the earliest issues to all kinds of rock and roll reference books the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia Rock and roll album. Guide elsewhere. The history of rock and roll. We did it all. Aw and you wrote biographies of Alex Chilton and Gene Autry. So this is your third biography but this book Janice her life and music is is a real accomplishment I think the highest compliment. I can pay to. It is by the end. I was dreading what was coming as I was was reading the last one hundred two fifty pages and then for the first time. This is someone who died before I was born. I never mourned her until I read this book and after I finished the book I was really really sad for a while. You know. It's her life is in some ways a tragedy in some ways. Not How do you see that. Well yes I mean she. She died way too young. I came to love Janice myself working on this book and interestingly I was alive when she was around down but I was just a wee lassie living North Carolina and basically Pearl posthumous album. That came out in seventy one was the first Janice album that I got and and I didn't know that much about her. As far as her own path her own journey as a musician as an artist. I of course read some books along the way. And she created such a vivid persona this image that I bought hook line and sinker this kind of Blues Mama and this kind of this flash of talent and and energy and then poof she was gone like a comet but going back and learning about her over actually quite a few years going back to when I was out rolling stone and got got to participate in conferences of the Rock Hall of Fame About Janice I decided wow you know there's so much about her I don't know and I really want to understand. Janice the person listen but also Janice the musician because I had never really gotten a sense of that from the other books so luckily for me I got to meet people. Close goes to her her bandmates people that worked with Chet Holmes who took her to San Francisco for the first time back in sixty three before big brother and the Holding Company and I was able to go back and meet friends of hers from High School and Learn about her youth in her evolution as an artist looking to find out about music and things like that that it took her on her journey out of Port Arthur Texas so yes. I'm always sad. I still tear up sometimes when I'm reading my book myself when we lose her but the the thing about genesis is she made a lot of tough decisions and she was fearless and she knew what she was doing. She knew she was taking a lot of risks. So I really do not want her to come across as a victim in my book. I mean. We're the victims because we lost our but she made those choices and you know sadly it was an accidental overdose. That took her out when she was only twenty seven hour. Among the many things I was struck by is the extent to which Janice was pushing pushing boundaries for a young woman in any era but especially her era and it actually reminded me weirdly of ethnic Curtis's recen- in Bio of Lou Reed where you learn. How ahead of the time? He was where people in high school were just like. This guy is insane and it was in some ways very similar because these were people who were literally ahead of their time they were ready to create the next generation the next era but she was already living it although from her perspective perspective. She was a Beatnik so she was in previous era. But what surprised you. Most about how far she pushed it even by the time she was eighteen years old. Yeah it's interesting. You bring up the Lou Reed book by Anthony Curtis Because I did read that book and loved it and I thought there were some real connections and the persona of both Lou Reed and John and I mean I think Lou himself was also very much inspired by the beats early on and there was that whole idea of for Janice when she was fourteen years old she read on the road. Jack Kerouac when it was published fifty seven and his whole concept of beat being kind of beaten down you know outsider Outcast but still trying to experience life experience the dark corners of life away from that post World War Two optimistic like you know the white picket fence and everything you know the husband wife and two kids and the dog that kind of idea of life and Janice at such a young age really glommed onto the idea. The beats soon. After that she discovered the blues she discovered some lead belly records. And then after that Bessie Smith they just totally turned her around as far as what music could be now. She grew up at a time when you know the early rock and roll little. Richard Chuck Berry Fats Domino. She heard some amazing music driving around around in you know she was in the Gulf coast area of Texas and they used to call it Doing the triangle going from Port Arthur to Beaumont to orange. Just listen listen to the radio. Smoking cigarettes drinking beer. You know and she was really a fan and she was also a very very curious Korea and wanted to find more this music the lead belly and the Bessie Smith which those records were really hard to find in the nineteen fifties. So she started seeking out that kind of music but but she didn't consider herself a singer. She was born with a beautiful soprano voice that she use in the church choir and the Glee Club and school and everything but it was only after she started trying trying to work with her voice and seeing a different way with more guts and with more rough edges to it fast when she really started to find herself as a singer and she wouldn't have done that. I don't think it hadn't been for like Louis kind of going outside. The norm of what her typical Roth culture was in port. Arthur taxes axis in the nineteen fifties. There's a moment when she for the first time breaks out into the first version of that voice and it was actually imitating. Data is took off. Yes she was. I was really drawn to African American voices and she discovered a no debt or record. Now Oh Donna was trained. I think she was even an opera singer like like Janice she could sing. All different kinds of Music Janice called it her kind of Mule Skinner Blues type of Sand with what Janice was drawn to but again you know this there was so much amazing music going on in that period that part of the country that I think she really glommed onto but she would actually go up to radio stations at night to try to meet the DJ and like find out about the records. And can I get some coffee and stuff like that because she was just obsessed but she thought going to be an artist. She wanted to be a painter. She was quite talented artistically but when she started singing for an audience basically by the time she enrolled at ut for awhile in Austin Texas in nineteen sixty two and started getting that feeling of the audience feedback when she sang performing with this little Combo called the waller our creek boys that really set her on her path to become a performer as well as a singer. And that's one of the things you emphasizes while an interview. She would kind of propagate gate this myth that it was all kind of an accident and she fell into it. There actually was a long period of training and studying that led her to develop her Stalin. Voice Worse yes. She was the perpetual student of music and she was still doing that. You know when she recorded Pearl in nineteen seventy. She never wanted to just kind of stay with one sound or one style of music. She was driven to continually evolve as an artist. Sing different styles of music. Different musical Kohl backing again. She tried to make it early on after she left Austin and sixty three as a blue singer doing some original. She'd already started writing writing songs herself. She learned to play on a harp. She was teaching herself guitar. And so she went out to the Coffee House scene in San Francisco. And actually I rub shoulders with the people like your Macau Conan and Jerry Garcia. Who of course later a few years later they'd all be the king and Queen of the counterculture and Haight Ashbury and all that but She did that for a while so I mean. She was constantly evolving as an artist but also working really hard to and yeah. I totally always bought her myth that she's just like all all about the field. ABC You know and just going out there and do letting it all out and just kind of almost like just kind of came out of her and that was really not the case. It was a lots and lots hardwork and effort on her part that trip to San Francisco. The first one is one of the places where I said. Wow this was an incredibly brave young woman because it was so Outside of the norm for that time and she was taking huge risks and then she did very quickly she ended up. Pretty horrifyingly ended up a very I serious speed at it with terrifying speed. Yeah Yeah it was an actually. Brian believe it or not. That was actually her. Second Time Hitchhiking The San Francisco. She I went when she was eighteen. Eighteen years old hitchhiked. She was living out in Venice. Beach trying to be a beat neck. And so she hitchhiked up to San Cisco when Kinda just hung out checked out the scene and everything and then took the bus back home to Texas but yes when she really went to try to make it. It's hard for us to imagine now because there's such infrastructure now if you want to build audience and go out and perform but here she was all alone. A young woman nowhere to live sleeping on floors sometimes slept on the floor. The Coffee House where she he performed making you know five or six dollars maybe usually pass the hat kind of things and speed was everywhere in North Beach in the summer of that period of the early sixties. And she yeah she fell into that and you know in the beginning she and some of her friends were doing it because it just like taken can pep pills which she had done in college even they were very widely available in those days and then she went from that to methamphetamine and horribly ended up injecting it so she definitely pretty much wrecked yourself at that point and by nineteen sixty five. She had really won a lot of fans with her voice but by then then she was really sidetracked by you know she was down to like eighty eight pounds and had to go back to Austin and oh I went back to Port Arthur and was kind of nursed back to health family and then eventually she ended up performing in Austin again. There's a harrowing moment. When in the early dissolution she fell into? There's a sign up at a club club. I think in San Francisco said do not under any circumstances give money to downs Joplin or something like that which is like Yikes. I mean that shows how far she went so fast and again you have to remember how old she was you know. She was still in her early twenties at this point so she was just this kid she really had for the first time in her life. All these wide open possibilities to just go out there and you'll be beat so She did that and it really scared heard her though she knew how close to death she had come and when she did go back home she totally straightened up. She actually transformed into this taxes. Axes college co ED. Commuting to Lamar Tech in Beaumont Texas wanted to be a sociology major. Fortunately for me she wrote amazing. Oh my my God. These letters that she wrote to this horrible cad conman boyfriend that she had who was supposed theon say she like seventy or eighty letters over about three or four months and they're just so self analytical they're funny they describe her life with her State of mind her family. I mean it's it's literally like I got in her memoirs something getting to read all those letters which were in like a family archive the D.. Allowed you access to know those letters. Yeah she later wrote home to her family a lot when she ran off again and sixty six. She told her parents. She was going to Austin for the weekend. She really moved back to San Francisco so of course they were horrified fight because they thought she was going to end up like she had the first time and so she wrote home a lot of ladder so yes the family shared those with me. These letters thank goodness. The guy the one good thing about him being such a con man horrible guy was that he sold the letters so I was able to find lots of them through some dealers who handle rare manuscripts scripts and letters who very kindly gave me scans to read. I found some on the Internet from other auction houses. Who have them up for sale? And I think the family we had a couple that they had actually purchased over the years so I was able to track down a lot of them and also she wrote letters to some of girlfriends that I was able to track down so luckily luckily she left this amazing paper trail. You had really strikes me that It's going to be a lot harder..

Janice San Francisco Lou Reed Bessie Smith grammy Austin Texas Port Arthur Beaumont Texas Alex Chilton Coffee House Holly George Kazini Austin Texas Anthony Curtis Warren Richard Chuck Berry Gene Autry Jack Kerouac
The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists: Recruiting and Hiring Data Scientists

Linear Digressions

07:59 min | 2 years ago

The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists: Recruiting and Hiring Data Scientists

"Hey everyone instead of your regularly scheduled programing with myself a ban This week has special gas Michelangelo. Dr Casino he is the senior the senior director of the Shar vp by my former boss great the scientists ed he and I together Britain and a Riley report that covers a lot of the managerial aspects of do that we thought you would be interested in so Colangelo thank you for joining me again reporter so this week we will talk about how we think about recruiting and interviewing and hiring folks you're listening to a nearby Russians so a little bit sitting here so you have data scientists who you work for you say you're presumably involved or have been involved in recruiting interviewing hiring let's the team I think there's a director and seven folks but I think they're really well have been part is that I started here about two and a half years ago when there was no data science team at all so I I was hired to basically build the team from scratch and so that involved a whole lot of all all this stuff we're about to talk about it tell me a little bit about how you started to break apart into pieces yeah it was really interesting experience because because so as Katie mentioned we worked we worked together before at our previous company our company had its historical origins and the Obama Campaign in two thousand twelve and so we have a lot of like favorable publicity and I would say we didn't have to try very hard to recruit the people like we have a very active top of the funnel We're good luck candidates were just pouring in and so our main job is basically like sifting through those candidates to find the people that were really really good and then convincing them to come come work for us but it wasn't like a demand generation problem When I started here I had almost completely the opposite experience so we had no data science team in place we were known for data science the company as a whole was probably ably like forty or fifty people then there's probably two twenty five now so so we were small and we didn't have a huge name and so the top of our frontal it was like almost completely dry or like the things that were coming into the top of the phone or just sort of garbage and as an asylum topping here so you're gonNA company I do you can shop runner I that would probably be some useful usual context listeners to have yeah so I I started the data science team at shop are Chicago based e commerce company that kind of like to second elevator pitch of what we do that we run across retailer Amazon prime like service for obviously non Amazon Company so we have millions of members and over one hundred retailers are members get free today shipping and returns kind of across that network so my team works with can imagine there's a pretty interesting amount of behavioral data we can collect from across that network and so my team works on building data products on top of all that data cool so yes assembling from the business mental life pretty strong product but you're still Chicago is unhealthy data science teams but I wouldn't say it's the same order that you say that they are worker Boston or some think I think there is healthy competition for what talent is here in my experience so yeah so that's that's a little bit of the environment in which you've found yourself trying to start up this T- yeah the backdrop so actually it was interesting when I started at a shop owner we had just hired a new seat CEO and our headquarters was actually in the bay area and the CEO decided to close the bay area headquarters and move it to Chicago and his which I think is actually born out is that you you know in the bay area the the supply of great engineers great data scientists is quite high but if you're a small fish in a big market and you don't have a name or like you're you're you know you're not on the front page of the newspaper all the time or you're not something like super cool APP that people are using all the time it's very hard to attract really good talent and so his bat was that and we could come to Chicago and get some of the best people in Chicago and actually ended up being in a much better position I think that that's sort of born out but to go back to like the challenge which of hiring the team like a lot of the the issue is that people didn't know who we are and you put job postings out there and you create people how jobs already or they they're on the market for a very short period of time and they're probably just not applying to your job post and so how do you actually go out and recruit and find those most people and I think one of the we talk about a handful of strategies and the report but I essentially like I did two things one was like I drank in insane amounts of coffee like literally anyone that would that would talk to me or anyone that ever sent me an email I wanted to chat I would go and have coffee with them because I think like having network and trying to like build up those connections like matters a lot because I I can tell them a story about like revision about what the team is going to do in in the future that they don't get a job hosting necessarily even if I wrote the job host in Jackie jobless things this is Joplin and it's rare that I see one of the lake really captured I think what it would be like to work somewhere so I I get so much more of an impression flavor from actually the jobs I yeah absolutely so I like head coffees with anyone that would have copy of me I and then the other the other piece was kind of like investing a way to try to get our name out there I guess so one of the things we talked about in the report is like using open source as a tool in your arsenal so actually open source sort of like a silly Jupiter Notebook widget actually very early on in my time here but that got kind of noticed noticed a few places and has hundreds of hub stars and started to get our name out there a little bit and we wrote a couple blog post initially started going to more conferences invents and that actually like slowly started to pay off a little bit so the the first data scientists we hired someone who is I saw was giving a talk at of meet up and a local meet up in town and I sent her an email and I was like hey you're talk like super interesting like would you like to have coffee hiring you're interested and it happened that like she was on the market and she's kind of like ultimately ended up hiring her she was kind of like the foundation of team she's now a manager managing other folks on the team but like a funny thing we one of the other things we talk about the report is Mike is Diversity techniques for recruiting diverse team and and one of the things we mentioned is that large laundry lists of skills in a job posting tend to turn off women and minority candidates more than non women I'm and non minority candidates lots of reasons for that but sort of just a fact and this candidate in particular had seen job hosting and thought she wasn't qualified and didn't apply but then randomly I had center this email and we had coffee and then it turned out she applied and was like amazing so that was just sort of sort of a funny little side story all right but we hired her and then the other person who is our second data scientists with someone who just randomly reach out about coffee and it was like hey I'm dropping out of the PhD program and I'm curious what inch what opportunities are in Chicago we had coffee and ended up hiring her and then slowly kind of built from there her

Dr Casino Senior Director Britain Riley VP
Talking Tech with Richard Smith

Talking Tech

06:16 min | 3 years ago

Talking Tech with Richard Smith

"Tech today with my all time favorite guitar player. Richard Smith to just happens to be in California and really interesting guy because he travels seventy percent of the time and believe it or not have guitar will travel in his car from Nashville, and I'm talking to now in California. And the big question is how does one live with technology in the car? And I think it's called an iphone six fund six or whatever the latest one. I've gone. I find six I means everything only I can pretty much do everything on that. There's a certain there's a few things that having a laptop is is beneficial. I can pretty much do everything including Eddie, my website for the most. Adding certain photographs and send things make it a little easier on the laptop but seven probably seventy percent, sixty seventy or eighty percent of the stuff. I can do there's no laptop in your car. There is one in the back of my guitar case. Most of the time. Yeah. But there's not. Yeah. Yeah. That's always laptop in my car. It's too cumbersome to be traveling. Yeah, I find it so easy to do everything on while you're going down the road while my wife is driving not one I'm driving when she's with me. I can work in the cost. She's not, you know, it's just a heavy just playing YouTube on going through the the motion going through the motions of YouTube or I've got music on it. And so it just makes life easy. I've also go XM serious as well. That's that's a must for the car. You realize that I think so. Yeah, I mean, but sometimes I just don't want to hear anything sometimes. I just want to think my own stuff. What a think for myself instead of listening to somebody else coast. The news list of all of the news channels. Gotta gotta listen to all sides of all of that. And let's paint a picture for people because you're in California right now, you'll be leaving here and driving to Utah, New Mexico and Colorado to give gigs. Okay. So you really are the guy in the car what kind of car is this. We have a Toyota RAV four an icy drove out. I started in Nashville we played the Jerry re tribute show on September fifth went up the car. It's you your tar amp iphone six fund San. And and Mike's sim Mike, see, I may be a PI system. If I think I'm going to need it. Suitcase full of clothes cigar box. Those times off to the gate when you just want to just relax and may be has ago. If that's you'll think handle your bookings on the iphone six everything is done by Email for much. Yeah. Everything done by Email of everyone's oh it pretty much everyone's number eight mile or messenger Facebook messenger. I always a little people on social media that just. It's just so it's such a great time. It's such a great time. Every basically if people know you to the whole house concert thing is a big thing. These days is a lot of people doing that. You didn't have to be venue. You just need a roof and some power, and you do a lot of you do a lot of house concerts. I would say maybe forty percent of the gigs. I mean, I'm doing music shops smoke theaters festivals house, concerts. Workshops like this. Go f- clubs functions on it's just knowing. It's no in people, the the mortgage, you do the more people that know, you the more people, you know, in a certain area where you can just say, hey, any chance of a gig on this date. And if that person count, do you call someone else, the more people, you know, the more full your calendar becomes and then you can be the only reason I'm not working all the time is because I've got dogs at home. I'd never see them on. My wife is on on the road with me some of the time. I'd never say Hillary the so it's you just have to make a balance, and I've got a studio back in Nashville as well fifteen years ago when you were making the drive in driving all over the country compare what it's like today with keeping in touch with you versus what it was like back that didn't have a web. So you just have to know you had to know people you had to send out packages of with physical product and physical print. Just you don't need any of that stuff. These days not need any physical stuff. It's it's information that sent and then people could see you on YouTube, Facebook, all kinds of social media. It's just a much easier a much more independent world. The I think there are a lot more independent more independent artists than ever before. They don't even need independent labels fail. The label that just going to people like disk makers imprinting up CDs or even doing that. Just even those that that's outdated. These days people are just doing everything online. Downloads youtube. I mean, it's you need anything. You just need to know people in one gig leads to another to describe yourself. Now, I'm I guess I come from the Chet Atkins. Jerry Reed mull Travis and then kind of studied went down the Django Reinhardt off a little bit of what Brent's doing Oviously a big influence, the bluegrass guys. I'll I'll play Joplin rags skull Jobling, piano, rags on the guitar a place embark, and I'll play some standards. I gave some Beatles some Beatles and some Sousa marches, and you know, throw a little bit of fun comedy sewn. Then a little bit of blue. I try to mix it up anything from Mozart and Chopin to to the Beatles to two old southern fiddle tunes. Tell everybody had to hear you and see you on YouTube. Oh, they got you just such Richard Smith guitar, and I should come up check this. There's two or three Richard Smith's, make sure it's the right me by by going to Richard Smith music dot com to start with there'll be pages of maize, you know, which one it is on YouTube, and I've got the coast that will have got the YouTube channel WWW dot YouTube dot com slash Richard Smith music

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