20 Episode results for "Joni Mitchell"

Musicians Week Morning True or False (5-7-2020)

Chompers

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

Musicians Week Morning True or False (5-7-2020)

"Good morning it's time for your morning and night tooth brushing show on the top of your mouth on one side and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each to three. It's musicians week and today we've got some true or false for you. We'll say something and you have to decide if it's true or false. Here's your first one. Music is always written down on paper. So is that true is music always written down on paper. The answer is false. You're rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth. Gets on brushing lots of musicians. Use Sheet music to learn how to play thaw. Remember sheet. Music is music. That's been written down there lot of musicians that learn music by ear. That means they hear a song and figure out how to play it just listening. Another thing musicians do is improvise when musicians improvise. It is make up the music on the spot to create something. Totally new Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and brush little circles around each to. Here's your next true or false musicians can only play one instrument. So is that true or false? Can Musicians only play one instrument? The answer is lots of musicians. Play more than one instrument. Famous musicians like stevie wonder Joni Mitchell and prince can all play more than one instrument Switzer brushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Your tongue brush to many musicians are famous for playing a particular instrument for example. Stevie wonder is famous for being an excellent piano player But stevie can also sing and play the harmonica keyboards drums organ and bongos. So that's today come back tonight for more masterful musicians. And until then chompers production of Gimblett media.

stevie Switzer Gimblett Joni Mitchell
Musicians Week Morning True or False

Chompers

03:31 min | 1 year ago

Musicians Week Morning True or False

"Chompers is produced by Gimblett and sponsored by crust and oral B. Good morning. It's time for your morning and night, tooth brushing show brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and brush, the inside outside and chewing side of each to three. It's musicians week. And today, we've got some true or false for you. We'll say something, and you have to decide if it's true. Or false? Here's your first one music is always written down on paper. So is that true is music always written down on paper? The answer is. Switch. You're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth on brushing. Lots of musicians. Use sheet music to learn how to play a song remember sheet music is music. That's been written down. But there luckily musicians that learn music by here that means they hear a song, and figure out how to play it just by listening. Another thing musicians do is improvise when musicians hip revise. It just make up the music on the spot to create something totally new. Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and brushing little circles around each tooth. Here's your next true or false musicians can only play one instrument. So is that true or false can musicians only play one instrument? The answer is both. Lots of musicians play more than one instrument famous musicians. Like Stevie Wonder Joni Mitchell, and prince can all play more than one instrument Switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth your tongue. Ab- rush to. Many musicians are famous for playing a particular instrument. For example, Stevie Wonder is famous for being an excellent piano player. But Stevie can also sing and play the harmonica. Keyboards. Drums. Oregon. Bongos. That's it for chompers today, but comeback tonight for more masterful musicians and until then. Chompers is a production of Gimblett media jumpers is brought to you by crest and oral B grownups mother's day is just around the corner and Creston, oral B might not be able to help with breakfast in bed or handmade cards. But the can't help with big healthy smiles with new dentist recommended toothpastes and toothbrushes brushing time is easier for parents and more fun for kits and crest toothpaste are safe for kids enamel and come in flavors. The love like strawberry and bubble gum, so grownups, even if the bacon is undercooked, and the glue still wet be ready for a big mother's day smile. Thanks to crest and oral B.

Chompers Stevie Wonder Switzer Gimblett Creston Joni Mitchell Oregon
1246: All The Feels by Kacie Main on Embracing Each Moment & Mindfulness

Optimal Living Daily

05:59 min | 1 year ago

1246: All The Feels by Kacie Main on Embracing Each Moment & Mindfulness

"This is optimal. Living daily episode. Twelve forty six all the fields by Casey main of Casey main dot com, and we're very own personal narrator. Just Molly reading to you from some amazing blogs help you optimize your life. Happy Friday almost to another weekend and have a brand new author for you today. Casey main. She's an author her new book is called I gave up men for lent the story of Gedid hopelessly romantic health conscious party, girl. Search for meaning highly reviewed on Amazon can find it on her site at Casey main dot com. I have that linked in this episode subscription. Without further ado, let's get right to our very first post from her and start. Optimizing your life. All the fields by Casey main of Casey main dot com. Don't it always seem to go that you don't know? What you've got till. It's gone. Why? Yes, Joni Mitchell, it does seem to go that way. But I argue there is also another way ago's that you don't know what was gone till bits back. This realization hit me hard the other day as I struggled to handle the return of some unfamiliar feelings emotions. Now, I might not make sense we often think feelings and emotions are the same. But they aren't in doing some research. I learned that emotions are physical stays while. Feelings are mental associations. Reactions to emotions basically, your brain looks at an emotion that arises in your body assigns meaning to it and that results in a feeling feelings may be the effect, but emotions are the deeper Rudy. 'cause we'll be don't wanna feel certain way, we tend to repress the emotion that causes the on feeling push it down bury it pretended. Isn't there? I did that for years now wanting to feel the pain of heartache oppressed the. Ocean of sadness altogether. And that's where it gets tricky. Because feelings are subjective. There are brains interpretation and therefore influenced by experiences memories in believes ultimately on some level. We choose them. And oftentimes we choose wrong in all my years of suppressing my sadness. I felt like I was being strong. I felt like I was moving on. I felt like I was okay. But I wasn't because years of denying pain can lead to apathy until we no longer know while we're missing I haven't felt real emotions in a long time service level feeling sure. But deep rooted feel in your body, emotions, it's been a minute these when we numb ourselves to one emotion it bleeds into others. Mike experiences with love Tom my brain to associated with the same unpleasant feelings as sadness to tie love to feelings of rejection feelings of loss feelings of hardy. So some point it'd be ended denied the emotion of love as well. We do. Get to be selective when it comes to our emotions it's an all or nothing game night was on the nothing side for quite some time without even realizing it, but here's the thing. The all is always there. We may deny the uncomfortable emotions that arise in our life. We can push them back down and refused the experience. But that doesn't mean they go away. They stay buried inside us patiently waiting their turn to surface. And in the meantime, they find every opportunity to remind us they're there. They raise their hands and were anxious stand up and were insecure jump around and were depressed. And when we opened the gate to let the pleasant ones free. Love happiness, joy, the unwanted ones can sneak out as well. That's what happened to me one minute. I felt a wave of extreme love appear feeling of joy at barely had glimpses of over the years is a fleeting feeling, but I'll still grateful stop by. Then later that day. Another emotion arrived sadness. The dull persistent unmistakable pain of. Heartache I voided for so long had returned. But this one didn't stop by for a short. Visit like his counterpart did. No, this one stuck around the rest of the night into the next day gnawing at my heart. I'm begging my brain is spiral out of control into land of insecure thoughts, needy behavior and attention seeking decisions. I resisted the urge to let the emotion take over. But I was frustrated with his persistence like barely hold onto the wave of love the one I wanted and that I couldn't get rid of the one I didn't want. What's wrong with me? And that's when the bigger lesson. Hit me the experience wasn't just practice and self awareness of my thoughts and feelings it was practice in self acceptance is accepting ourselves means accepting our whole cells and all the fields along the way, we can't deny them because they came for a reason no matter how unpleasant the exists to teach us show us aware are triggers are or where we have in del with something we can only learn the lesson if we let them in and listen patiently. Knowing may take a while. That's all we often fail to do. We don't acknowledge the unfriendly emotions, we don't sit with them without judgment until they are ready to leave. Instead, we immediately reject them barely lead them in the door before shoving them away. But we have to understand they are part of us all the emotions and all the fields are part of the human experience. So we should let them all in accept each one sit with each one. Appreciate each one knowing it will not stay forever. And we can't let it stay forever. But understanding it too has something to say understanding that difficult teachings are where we learn the most and understanding that when it comes to emotions on pleasant visitors are better than none at all. You just listen to the post titled all the fields by Casey main of Casey main dot com. You can find this article along with her book in a lot more on her site. I haven't linked in this episode description and old podcast dot com. But I'll do it for today. I'll be back over the weekend. So I have a great rest of your day. And I'll see you tomorrow where your optimal life awaits.

Casey main Joni Mitchell Amazon Molly Gedid hardy Mike Tom one minute
BONUS TRACK: A sneak listen to our upcoming Jeremy Dutcher concert

Unreserved

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

BONUS TRACK: A sneak listen to our upcoming Jeremy Dutcher concert

"This is a CBC podcast Dante pod. Let's just want to give you a heads up about a very special episode coming out in a few days a few weeks ago. We headed to Saint John's Newfoundland Finland to catch Jeremy Dutcher live in concert at the Spirit Song Festival and on December. Twenty second you'll get to hear a whole bunch of that show but I want to give you a sneak. Listen now to a song. We couldn't fit into that episode. It's a cover jeremy performed of Joni Mitchell called Cherokee Louise Sure accusees hiding here. The stone and abroad Nominees got flashlights. Because that's the time we used to imagine a COP PSALMS UH People talk and off does can't come art eh us on change Since returned uncertainty in snack by walking through the you get the third degree. Come good and Tuesday have to school. Put Up panties on win. Let's rain when round like Fu look. No heads go back doc. Also Eddie serve a Chebet hiding in turn. Nana Ne- U.. You wish to the place is where I like. It was both me among the street. Uh Jeremy Dutcher covering Cherokee Louise's by Joni Mitchell just a little sample of what's coming your way on December twenty second as we spend the whole podcast listening to Jeremy Armie Dutcher recorded in concert in Saint. John's Newfoundland. Don't miss it for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

Jeremy Armie Dutcher Joni Mitchell Newfoundland Finland PSALMS Cherokee Louise Newfoundland Eddie Fu John Twenty second twenty second
Hear Joni Mitchell's Previously Unreleased Early Recordings

All Songs Considered

39:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Hear Joni Mitchell's Previously Unreleased Early Recordings

"On the next episode of louder than a riot. Bobby murders transition from the streets to superstardom and how viral fame led to infamy. I don't axe people from the her with. They got criminal activity going on. I know in hip-hop battered a better. Listen now to louder than a riot from npr music from npr music. You connected to all songs considered. I'm bob boylan on today's show. We explore the early works of joni mitchell. The singer and songwriter released her first album in nineteen sixty eight but a new boxed set. It's just been released. Joni mitchell archives volume one the early years nineteen sixty three to nine thousand nine hundred sixty seven. It's hundred and nineteen songs including twenty nine songs. Never released from joni. I'm going to bring on. Npr music and power to talk about this five cd set. But let's start with one of the many live recordings in this box set. This is from a performance at the canterbury house in ann arbor michigan. It's one of a well-known tunes. It's called the circle game yesterday. Child came oh to one. Do called Flying side jaw fearful. What in the sky was full island to the fall of staw the seasons go round and round and the pain phony school. We're cup do all the Who love we can't return. We can all behind for. We came in and round and round and child ten times round the sees ski. Toodle turn clear story words like when your whole must appease he promises some the making history. I'm the seasons. Go round and round. Bank famed folies. Wake up to love time we can. We can all. We came round and round in the circle. Sixteen spring and sixteen. Summer's gon na Cartwheel's into car wheels through the town. I'm the cure tie. It won't be long to drag your feet too slow circles. No one those dreams lost some grand coming through. They'll be new. Maybe better playing teen for the last fall through the seasons go round and round then the to ponies. Go up and do all time. We can't return. We can all the high k round and round in the circle we can get all hiring we came go round and raw circle joni mitchell from live at the ann arbor canterbury house back almost fifty three years ago to the day over sixty seven joining me to talk about. This amazing collection is an powers. Npr music san powers. A hundred plus tracks time-warp trove and coming about this box set and where to begin. This is such an exciting development for joni devotees of which there are so many Joni mitchell has always been somewhat resistant to archiving especially her early material but now she is launching a new series. That's going to be similar to. What her peers. Bob dylan and neil young. If for a long time. She's going to be sharing and release material in these beautifully produced box sets. And i've seen this set in the flesh and it's just gorgeous there so many amazing photos of johnny as a young girl and young woman twenty nine original. Compositions have never been released before with her singing them. I know it's it's insane with these kinds of archival boxes. It's a lot of stuff that people have heard but it's better organized. But i think this is truly like you open the vault and oh my goodness that was alive cut. That's not true of a lot of these in one. You take something nice and early. Oh yeah nice and early as early as it gets one of the reasons that johnny finally decided to put this box together was that a recording surfaced of her very first time in any studio. I think nineteen. She entered a radio studio in saskatoon saskatchewan where she spent her teenage years. With a disc jockey named barry bowman she recorded a bunch of folk songs and this recording disappeared for decades. It was you know shrouded in the midst of legend. And one day barry bowman the disc jockeys daughter was going through some old boxes and found this tape label joni anderson janis maiden name and lo and behold here was this recording of her. They made it in the off hours. And it's joni playing her baritone ukulele. Which was what her mom bought her. She wanted to guitar but mom thought of a ukulele was more economical and singing these folk songs. So even in these very early recordings i think you hear her inventiveness and of course her incredible voice. What should we hear from that Those early days for that early recording. Well that's here a song that joni probably learned on the folk circuit. It was also recorded by judy collins. Who would later. Become one of johnny's early patrons. I guess is what you'd say. She recorded You know some of gianni songs very early on. It's called anna. Thea and and i think you and i both like the song because it just shows that voice in all its glory even in janis teen years. Awesome oh laszlo. Stolen frothy misty mile island closer to that wall off. So we're in the nineteen sixty watts. Sixty three ish rain nineteen shop. She starts eventually to write songs of her own. Starch traveling right. She had the detroit. Tony thought she would be a painter before she ever considered a career in music and she even to this day thinks of herself as a painter i am so she went to art college but she also started playing in coffeehouses and and by nineteen sixty five she'd She'd moved around a little bit in canada and then she'd ended up in detroit. A lot happened that year. She had a baby whom she entrusted for adoption. She also buried another musician named chuck mitchell and she was performing with him and she was writing songs and even then she was writing songs. That later became classics. You know and. I think she's gone through a lot even by that time. And you sense that thing. That's so essential to joe knee. Which is that blend of. I don't wanna say girlish or childlike. Because that's not quite right but that poetic system and wonder combined with the kind of almost world weariness. And and that's in some of the the early compositions that are on this box set including her very earliest. Compositions one of which is a is a song that we still love. It's called urge for going and one of the great discoveries of this box set is a recording. She made for her mom for her mom's birthday in nineteen sixty five and On that little demo is urged for going and here she is you know she's trying to figure out her life. She's in this marriage. That is not working out. She is in the midst of the process. That will make her birth mother who has entrusted her child for adoption. This is intense stuff. And i think all of those experiences are in these songs but also that great sense of observation. That's shoney's gift. She has said that this is the first well written song she ever she ever hat you know and i think part of that is that it isn't just a raw record of her experience but it's also an observation of her life and of those around her in the canadian prairies who sometimes felt trapped even within the beautiful surroundings where they grew up. Let's listen to urge for going. I've written a couple of new songs since you wrote here. And i think you'll like this one especially I all day and found it already. Gobbled summer down son turns traitor trees and shoot. I never she to go yes. I go Into summertime summer girls trembling. Yes time people an idea of the world of the folk singer quote unquote which turn. I think she hated but it is a a world in which singers and songwriters sang each other's tunes. I mean right. I and this beautiful song that makes me wanna cry right now. I know was not originally made famous by her. No actually tom. Rush was the first to record for going. And then george hamilton. The fourth country singer recorded it and had some success with it to that focusing in community was so important to joanie and though yes she would absolutely move beyond the frame of the folksinger fairly quickly. It was essential to who she was at that time. And i think one of the interesting things about listening to this music as you really can imagine in conjure the community of which she is a part she would hate me for saying this but i think you can hear the influence of women like judy collins and joan baez and her voice and also she talks about you know her number. One influence at the time bob dylan. She was also too soon meet. Leonard cohen become close with him. He was saying marie. Yeah buffy sainte marie actually. I'm so glad you mentioned buffy. Joanie when she first left you know her home region. It was to travel to the mariposa folk festival to see. Buffy sainte marie buffy was essential to her development so yeah all of these people factor in and they were trading songs and then johnny became popular writer for others to interpret which i think is almost it's inevitable because the songs are great but it's also extraordinary because when you have that instrument that vocal instrument that joni had you know two for others to be singing. The songs even as great as tom rushes. Judy collins is. We want to hear tony to them. That's one of the great things about this set. You talk about dylan. There's some some recordings where she talks about songwriting. And so forth in we'd love to play What's the story. Mr blue you. A she doesn't intro. but you want to just. I'm so glad we're sharing this song. Because as much as these early recordings make us think about joni is a folk. She was always a rock and roller in her heart and in her soul in the interview. That's within the liner notes of this. Set that she did with her. Old friend cameron crowe. She says her favorite songwriters berry. And i know. I did not know that. Yeah she loves shook berry. She was hugely influenced by fifties rock and roll in two up. And all that stuff and you can hear that. I think in this song. What's the story mr blue. She also talks about. Dylan's influence specifically. Dylan's playful this is a songwriter. And how he riches throw together all the lines. He had building from all the songs he'd never completed and build a new song from it. She tells us story in introduction she also mentions Someone named david blue. And it says this is not about him. I have to wonder but david blue was a really cute songwriter and a very good songwriter singer songwriter. She was close to him at this time. So that's who the david blue is. Who is not the mr blue of this song. Suppose societas her intro. Listen to a bit of mr putin. I was reading in a magazine. That bob dylan had written one of his songs by taking leftover lines from dozens of songs. He never finished and i decided well by. Golly i've got about fifty nine finish songs at home. And what i wanna do is wanna take the lines. i like. aww each one of them. And i'm going to cram them all together into mulligan stew kind of song. The thing was that all of the songs were on very very different topics and so to put them into one song. I had to develop a very basic plot at a rock and roll. Beat him plug goes like this. You see there was a fella named mr blue. Who's no relation to david blewett. All mr blue. Because he's kind of sad and he had a girlfriend. We treated very badly and so she left him and it serves them right. That's the plot. What's the story. Mr blue stood. Blue look did you chart you too simple as you son. Too much son. I too long. She don't understand she don't fall fall. Get a little bit of chelsea morning in. That may be yes totally good call. I think that's one of the fun things about listening to these tracks is. You can hear elephants that show up in her other songs even thinking that melody you can almost hear a little bit of what becomes both sides. Now you know just in that little the way it drops down throughout this whole set you hear so much process and i mean joni mitchell. She is just one of the most sophisticated songwriters even in these early years so to be able to hear how she's building those things and and no one ever understands her guitar tunings but you can kind of hear her exploring those here and every element that becomes what we love is on the set to quick break be right back with an powers having a conversation about the new box set from joni mitchell's archives volume one the early years nine hundred sixty three to nine hundred sixty seven and you're listening to all songs considered from npr music from npr music. You connected to all songs considered. I'm bob boylan and i'm talking with. Npr music san powers about this one hundred nineteen song collection of early. Joni mitchell music. That's just come out and one thing we've both made note of in these early. Years are how painter lee. These lyrics are and powers picks up on that point and the persona that she was creating as well which you know. Was this sort of flower child but but then always with an edge and always with that observational quality. As well and i know we will get boxed sets for the later periods the jazzy period and the blue period and all of those the much beloved moments in her career who she would look at this early stuff and say you know i was just silly back. Then and hey. Let's be honest. Some of the writing in these early songs is a bit high flying. Flowery but i think that's the exploration she needed to do to become you know that was a generation of songwriters. Were exploring new ways to be expressive and mixing the poetry that they started reading and gathering around and talking about i. It is the time. Yes this is a time machine for me. What should we play in that in that writing that you call flowery that song we've not heard before we would we play well. I'm really intrigued by this little recording. She made for the mysterious michael who is the subject of her song. Michael for mountains one of her beloved early songs and on that recording. She has a couple of songs about love. That are so intensely romantic. And they're all about like my one with you or myself you know and i. I'm different than what you think. I am is just such as her expression of young womanhood. One of them is called gemini twin. Just the idea of joni mitchell. Writing a song called gemini twin. I love it. That is the sixties in a nutshell for me so show This is flow to learn. Sue took shoulder spur received an. Do we know anything about Where there was record. Obviously some of the recordings very very quality most being pretty good that one very hissy but to not hear it because of his mistake right. Yeah no absolutely and a lot of what's on. This said is a recording journey. Herself made in her own home wherever she was living. There's a demo she made for. Jack holtzman the record executive early on there's stuff. She made like that. She made for her friends. You know her lover. Then there's wonderful recordings of live concerts but you hear the audience you you just have to be willing to walk into this collection of songs as if you were as you said by walking into a time machine and taken the ambiance of the other world you've entered you know i'm a nerd complete joni obsessive so i just love to listen to that recording and think of her in her little flat in new york looking out the window sill at whatever you know the the taxis driving down the road and making a recording sitting on her bed you know so as an as an uber fan and the fact that something like this is gonna be four over fans. What is it that you love. That fans are gonna love it that you heard on this one of the great things about becoming an intense joni mitchell fan is it connects you with a community over space and time and there are songs on this record that have been treasured hoped for by fans for many years. Some of which fans have actually recorded. Because johnny's own recordings were available so a few these songs. I've heard inversions by other singers. An example of that is cares castle. I think there might be like a live version floating around of charisse castle as well but i. I heard this song on youtube covered by other people who had found a sheet music for it somehow. Yeah and and and just like okay. This journey didn't leave with this one yet. So we're going to do it so now our back to the source and and that's really really great. Come to do new bags on. The eighth took over choose stories Took any of the youtubers. Get it in your pretty good. You know i mean. I'm enjoying fans are very very devoted but one thing about that song i think is interesting. Is that you know she's painting this picture. This very poetical picture of maybe life in a rough part of town of joni. We don't talk about too much. We talk about her as a genius of the personal and the interpersonal but she also was a social observer. And i think cares. Castle is a song you could put next to one like Four free her later song about seeing a street musician and questioning her own involvement in the music industry and the value of art So you see a little bit of her her greater consciousness in that song. Joni mitchell turns st- seventy-seven this week. She's had some health issues but she is speaking quote unquote in this interview that you can read with cameron crowe on the liner notes. And we know if she's active in putting together some of these the next set of archives. It'll come out. You mentioned her. A health setback. And she had an aneurysm several years ago and and she has been recovery. It's actually quite touching. She said a few times that this is the third time. She's had to learn to walk because she had polio as a young girl and she lost the ability to walk again. When she had this aneurysm. So you know. Just pause and shout out to the resilience of joni. Mitchell incredible resilience. She is getting better but before she became ill she was really doing a lot to sort of shore up and refine her legacy she Recorded some of her songs in our kestrel settings she participated in various tributes where other people interpreted or songs She published a beautiful book of lyrics and artwork that she had created over the years. So i see this as part of a continuum. And i just can't wait for the next volume because wait until we hear the outtakes from his era or what she was up to with wayne shorter herbie hancock. There's so much more but this that we have here is a great gift and it sets us on the road in a beautiful way so take us out on. Something would be good well. I don't know bob. What do you think should we go for the most beloved and obvious joni songo the like one of the second. Where do you think well growing up in that time period. I think some something from blue would be fine. I s something that maybe gives us a little insight to her. We talked a little about the fact that she had a child and she gave that child up for adoption. And i know none of us knew that story and nineteen seventy-one when we heard this song little green now that we do know that story that has a whole different feel and meaning. It's an absolutely central part of jones story. And it's one that she was. She was talking about in her music from the beginning of her career. And this song little green you know it's sort of like a purloined letter when you know that it's about the experience of having a child and entrusting that child for adoption and the grief that comes from that but also the hope. Well you know you can never hear the song in any other way but you're absolutely right. I mean i've looked at the reviews. I've looked at accounts and really nobody in the media. Got it. it's is kind of amazing but this is definitely a song that i'm an adoptive mom myself. I have cried to this so many times including in front of joni. Mitchell wants one of my most embarrassing stories of my life but i was presenting at a conference and she was. There was a conference in her honor. And i was presenting on the album blue and i had recently a become an adoptive mom to my daughter and joni was there at the time. She had recently reunited with her daughter and they were in the front row and i started crying when i got to the part in my paper about this song and i heard this little voice bob from the front row. You can do it you can do. It was journey. I know i know in life i. Sometimes you know at the time. I was mortified but now i realize that was a gift and and now sometimes i just try to try to hear that voice again on my in my dark moments you can do it. That's what joni says to all of us love. Thank you thank you powers will thank you for spending this time with the greatest songwriter. Joni mitchell. Sorry bob dylan that is you. I've been in reading jeff. Tweedy book trying to write a song right one song and thinking men me. You definitely rifle journey. Bet that dylan guy. I don't know let's go out on a little green from the box set of joni mitchell too early years one thousand nine hundred sixty three to nineteen sixty seven. I'm bob boiler for. Npr music along with an powers. Thanks everybody how much. It's all songs considered Incans choose who's her name. She will land sued to call and green and winters cannot fe. Called green for the children have made cheap sedan sue. He went to california he. You ring. everything's or so you write him a letter and horizon blue he sends. You were poor. And she's lost to conform just a little. The spring is belong. They'll be crocus to bring to school to law just to agree lack the night and northern lights. All they'll be icicles close and sometimes suru shy soon with a three two. We re as you are sending though so you sign all the peoples in the family name you said and sewri but you know shame a lou like the kalo spring is all they'll be crocus bring to school To moral just to like the night. It's when much before you'll be clue clo and sometimes the moon shines choose rename. She will end sued to call green and windows. Can fade called green full. The children who have made uh sudan's dancer

Joni mitchell joni barry bowman bob boylan Npr music san powers johnny judy collins Mr blue bob dylan mr blue canterbury house Toodle ann arbor canterbury house fifty three years joni anderson misty mile island nineteen sixty watts david blue chuck mitchell joe knee
279: Excerpt from Nature Poem

The Slowdown

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

279: Excerpt from Nature Poem

"I'm Tracy K Smith and this is the slowdown. Do you know the Joni Mitchell Song Woodstock every time I hear it. I get nostalgic for something. I've never quite known. Maybe it's the caravan of young souls making their way up to a rock festival during what seems from this moment in history like a more innocent hopeful time maybe it's a bittersweet way. Her pristine voice reminds us of our cosmic is make place us. meals We are stardust. We are Golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden. The implication being that we've fallen colon from our original place in creation. The first time I heard the song I was a freshman at Harvard. And so maybe a you'll forgive me if I admit to you now that I had no idea at the time that she was speaking in scientific fact rather than Metaphor Stardust billion year-old carbon. It wasn't until my senior year when I barely passed a class called matter in in the universe that I learned we actually are made of the same cosmic stuff as stars planets everything in the universe. Dust bunnies he's Nebula novelists gas giants all made of the same fundamental building blocks as it turns out out some facts. Send you right back to the realm of metaphor. I like the way today's poem from the book. Length sequence nature poem by Tommy Pico moves comfortably between different notions of earthly and heavenly bodies from nature poem by Tommy Pico. When Star dies it becomes any number of things like a black hole will or a documentary? The early universe of our skin was remarkably smooth. Now I stand and a rapidly. Dampening Christina Aguilera t the first stars were born of gravity. My ancestors are sky is really the only thing same for me as it was for them which is a pretty stellar inheritance. I don't know oh how they made sense of that swell how they survived long enough to make me and m sort of at war with sentimentality. Ed generally but that absence of an answer yet suggestion of meaning isn't really that different from a poem so I started reading the stars. Nothing is possible until it happens like digesting sulfur instead of sunlight or friends with benefits. Poems were my scripture and the poets my gods but even gods I mean especially gods. Ads are subject to the artifice of humanity. I look up at the palm. All of them up there in the hot sky and fall into the water a stone. The slowdown is a production of American public media. Ah In partnership with the Poetry Foundation to get a poem delivered to you daily. Go to you slow down. Show DOT ORG and sign up for our newsletter. Follow the slowdown on instagram and twitter At slow down show.

Christina Aguilera Tommy Pico Metaphor Stardust Joni Mitchell Tracy K Smith Woodstock Poetry Foundation Harvard instagram DOT Ed billion year
#747 Joni Mitchell's Blue

Sound Opinions

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

#747 Joni Mitchell's Blue

"I am eroded downing traveling. You're listening to sound opinions. I'm Greg Kat. He's Jim Dora Goddess. And that's a little bit of the song all I want by Joni Mitchell. The lead off track from her nineteen seventy one album. Blue people are still talking about this record and influenced and moved by. It regarded as one of the greatest of all time. Certainly one of Johnny's greatest works unflinching honesty poetic lyrics. Those were elements in this record that inspired a range of artists. Tori Amos. Liz Fair. Even prince was singing. Joni Mitchell's praises for years today. We're GONNA take a deep dive into blue and discuss why it's a classic album and I said some of the tracks and we're later going to share our opinions on it absolutely greg who is Joni. Mitchell born nineteen forty-three Roberta Joan Anderson in rural Alberta Canada was a creative kid. Apparently right from the start would later go on to art school but it was not an easy upbringing. She contracted polio early on. It was that time bedridden. When she learned how to play Guitar and began to sing. She got pregnant when she was a poor folk singer struggling to make her name in. Toronto in the mid sixties had a daughter that she gave up for adoption. It was only years later in the Mid Nineties when tabloid outed that she'd had this child They since reconciled but what a thing to be exposed to the public a series of toxic sometimes a chaotic certainly Romantic relationships that I got undue attention often and all through it. Joanie is writing countless iconic songs in the folk pop tradition from both sides now. Aw Big Yellow Taxi Ono. What's gone today? We're going to zero in on what many people believed to be. Mitchell's greatest album blue. We're GONNA start our conversation. Speaking with David Yaffe author of the biography reckless daughter a portrait of Joni Mitchell. Then book was released in two thousand seventeen and details. Johnny's life career and Music David. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me for the young out there. Who Don't know. Can you give us the capsule biography? This young woman from Canada and how she set the world on fire or started to in the music world. It's interesting because usually when someone is a writer when someone is a musician. They have idols that they want to emulate and that didn't happen with Joanie not really. He had people that she knew how to imitate but she didn't idolize them so she's an unusual case that she's a great artist who didn't have somebody that she tried to emulate. I think this is part of growing up. Sort of remotely. Well that's part of it. She did grow up in this place. That Margaret Atwood described as a blank space on global culture. I mean it was very isolated was very remote. Family didn't have money. She didn't travel really so she just had that open sky and her creativity. She didn't have exposure too much but she says she didn't grow up playing guitar in the mirror or anything like that. She thought of herself as a visual artist but relented practical level. She thought that you probably ended up working in the fashion industry and that this folk revival was a fad and not go on for a few years a node die out and then she would do something else is off to star in the brain. Something that set off from the other children was when she got polio at age ten and she was taken to this polio colony and father never visited. Her mother visited once with a mask on the six months. Go by she gets her legs back and suddenly she's no longer there. I One pick for teams. You know she had thought of herself. As an athlete you kind of defined herself through that you know and suddenly her sense of identity was gone and so she started to turn inward and she started to find herself as an artist as a visual artist. The Kid who are the best dog house that kind of thing and all she really needed was just to go off in nature somewhere. Go off in the woods and be creative. And that was how she got through and then she goes to our school. She doesn't have a scholarship. And so nobody's really treating her like she's special so this kid seems like almost a little daydreaming As as a as a teenager figures out how to play guitar and basically invents an entire new style with the open tunings fifty open tunings by the end of their career or as a career is winding down this incredible method of approaching this instrument With with an immaculate voice to go with it and then this incredible songwriting Atkinson on top of all apparently self taught right. I mean and and she didn't know that would happen and David. We mentioned it earlier but she's in college at Art School. She gets pregnant during her sophomore year. She gives the baby up for adoption. This affected her very deeply. Where is she mentally at this point? And how you think. It was reflected in her music. That's right and she. She's living in a very very cheap rooming houses completely broke. I mean she the money that she's making from gigs but she starts to show too much. She can't perform anymore and so she's really you know like her neighbors are taking pity on her giving her fruit and stuff like that. I mean. She's really really broke. So she gives birth of your nineteenth nineteen sixty five. It's one of those things where like it's a. It's a situation where someone is pent up and can't say what she's thinking and can't say what she's feeling and has to keep a big secret about the source of it all and then it comes out in the sublimated way through these beautiful SAWS. Cha We love you are sending so you sign all the papers in the family name your and so because she was hiding this shame and because you had this grief of giving her daughter. The first thing that she ever rights is on the train. She's with the guy who got her pregnant scanning bread mcmath who took off soon after the on this fourteen hour train race. Toronto and so she hadn't written any songs. She was just doing traditional folk song. She was singing the songs. The jump hasn't Judy Collins were saying she was singing Santa that child ballot book. You Know Nancy whiskey interest so she's on the train and she stressed. This beautiful songs called day after day. She never records a bet it. You can hear it on. Should there's a demo of it a this kind of tragic full court that she got away from pretty quickly it's about a Damsel in distress is waiting for a hero on a horse to come and save her but she doesn't think that's GonNa happen so that's the sadness of the song was a beautiful song and it's amazing it's her first try and she didn't think it was good to record. Probably because it was riveted bet very impressive I try. And the second song she writes becomes a minor hit on the country charts and that song Urge for going. Yeah which which second son is trade trees? Shiver AVENUE. So let's fast forward. Joni goes on record her first three albums by nineteen seventy. She's won a grammy garnered. A large fan base found commercial success. And this is right before she starts recording her fourth out the record. We're focusing on today blue. How did she handle this? Since stardom being famous wasn't really something she was looking for you into it. You hope that you make it and then there's no exit strategy right. Isn't that always the case and Jones case? Because her work was so personal she didn't have a way of Creating the kind of barrier that probably you would need to have a healthy attitude toward it. I mean when you think about for example. The Way Dillon wasn't sixty six when vulnerable and you could see why he couldn't handle it in my head to go off the road for eight years and then you see him after that and you see the kind of creates this persona that distances himself a little bit allows him to to function in a way because he's an there's there's a barrier between him and I feel like Joni never really got that Johnny was always herself Fortune so call So that worked intimate in every way and so. I think that when she felt vulnerable brought on something that she thought of his like she said well people in the West might called nervous breakdown. But I thought of it. More as shamanistic breakthrough shamanistic breakthrough. That's how she thought of it and so she wanted to be. You know she. She now for retirement in nineteen seventy and and she went to live in a cave and Greece Was it literally? Did you get to the bottom of that? India's literally living in rock whole. Yes yes she was she was with the strontium Jo Ellen and she sherry she was living. Yeah it was a fashionable place to do it like a lot of hippies were hanging out there and then of course it was there that that this girl Joylin Lapidus designed to a Dulcimer for her that she ended up recording with on blue. She did case of you on that. Dulcimer California also. She was engaged to Graham Nash. They were living together and Laurel Canyon and that house in that house on Lookout Mountain. In which which I've been in the house it's a pretty modest house for rockstars to live in. It looked like a place that to graduate students would be sharing really. She was making money better. Just don't think she knew what that was or how to deal with it or anything She was just thinking about you. Know being creative and doing what she wanted and dropping acid when she wanted to and whatever. Well there's a David that fascinating interview. She gives to a Cameron Crowe about that. That point in her life. I came to a turning point. The terrible opportunity people are given in their lives the day they discovered to the tips of their toes. That they're a holes. What is she talking about? She said that she could look at people and read into them and read into their souls and it was sue overwhelming to her that she would be up to the supermarket and she would see somebody's soul and she would cry that the very thing that she was doing and blue which terrified some people which besotted others was that she was doing that with our listeners. Right because that quote is in relation to her being where she's at when she's writing and recording blue. Yes but but I think that when you hear for example like the title track of blue who To to you know live see before she's being so candid and so beautifully distilled about this melancholy that she's describing and the fact that she's using a color to describe it as important because she used Cynthia. She thought visual artist. You know you know her parents. Her father was colorblind. Her mother was also she thought colorblind whereas she was color acute so part of it was responding to her parents. And saying I can see things that you can't see you. Don't you know what you were doing when you were raising me because you see I can see it right? And so when she says blew it means a lot. It's an emotion. It's a color it's tied to the blues. You know she loves kind of blew. That was probably in the mix. They're very poetic writing. She wasn't she wasn't being super literal And I think that's part of the charm of the record is that People Wanna read all this stuff into it but there's also a universal quality to it that allows anybody to see themselves in and if they want to that's true and I call it the Joni Mitchell effect because she's hiding in plain sight. We'RE TALKING WITH DAVID. Yaffe author of reckless daughter a portrait of Joni Mitchell this very nineteen seventy habit of the music world in particular but my in general of of You know framing a women's talents and success and career with the men in her life. So as a biographer. You're telling the story of making blue writing blue recording blue And you can't ignore you know there's the Graham Nash. Relationship has unraveled the time in Crete living in the cave in Greece. There's a relationship with a a waiter and then James Taylor's in the wings and this romance. There is a Peace Corps activist who a cook named Kerry rats carries the song and then and then Leonard Cohen is in there too because a case of us is really about Leonard Cohen. I mean to the extent that any song is about anybody I think it was also I think just for additional context here just to add to that. Is that the way the record was perceived around that time rolling stone did a whole section about who Joni Mitchell had slept with around the time. There's record came out which to me kind of like okay. That is a typical male response. radio record by a woman to frame it in terms of who she slept with as a generation to generation of men in that. I guess what I would say. Is that her. Experiences are hers just in the same way that Bob Jones experiences are his without Leonard Cohen's experiences or his or John Lennon's or whoever else you want to think of as being in the Peer Group of Joni Mitchell Paul Simon. They write about their life. They write about their love to stay right about their sex life. They write about what they do. And it's their prerogative to do it as artists and nobody's GonNa question it and just as Question and if you're Joni Mitchell or anybody else right everybody's everybody's life is grabs when you're an artist so she's an artist but I also think that the experiences are less important than than the fact that they happened to Joni Mitchell and that Joni then has this way of articulating it. She has this way of interpreting it. She has this way of expressing her reaction to things that happened to her. And so it's not very remarkable to you know have of love. Life have breakup. Yes some of these people that she was intimate with were Amos. But that's pretty typical too if you think about it because people they often hook up with people that same field with what you're saying though if you remove all of that context of who it was specifically that she may or may not have been writing about. It's still a masterpiece. It's a masterpiece has been in fact. I think that if you take it for what it should be than it is about intimacy. I mean that's part of the store relationships I think it's artificial to remove it from its intimate content. Because that's the point talk to applause. I think David you used the word intimacy and I think it's a fascinating one and my rock critic hero Lester bangs set of blue that it's a record that that's too intimate. I almost feel like a voyeur. As a man Listening to blue. It makes me uncomfortable. Does that make sense? Oh Yeah no. I think she wanted because she was feeling uncomfortable herself and so. I think I think that's. That's the effect that she wanted. She wanted to confront people although she she did so in in dulcet tones. But she did. I mean the last time I saw Richard is a confrontation For sure you know all Romantics meet the same fate someday that that is meant to make people uncomfortable although of course it's with beautiful voice in these client finding candidates and so on. Cannell out almost talk to anybody about James. It's a combination of the lyric writing the melody writing the cords the rhythms with these truths these these intimate and often uncomfortable truths to be fair about this record by the way. I think I said this in the book that blue was maybe a sixty percent moping record in a forty percent party record yep because some of the songs are actually joyous and when talk about blue they think about all this grim stuff but you have cary which is very playful song and dance to get out and California. Kind of hopeful. California's Kinda sweet. I'M GONNA see folks leaving Kisa sunsetted peaks. It's interesting because like you know she she. She wasn't like Janice Joplin I mean Janice Joplin had this kind of raw reality. That she was taking it too and it was something that led to later. Patti Smith and whoever else you WANNA say Louis through Cindy Williams Liz fair minute certain kind of aggressive quality that and that. Joni herself would kind of have an an a later. Incarnation of her life but on blue. Everything is so you phony us? Even when she's talking about the darkest thing I've been blue. Is this beautiful beautiful song like while it's about losing yourself and and do something that could be. You know the heroin that James Taylor was hooked on could be destroying the darkest darkest place of trying to hide in the cloud or melancholy. The album Especially if you go to the bluest songs on blue like blue like last time last time I saw Richard like a case of you. It's just I mean. This is where the teased about it a lot. But it's just so honest and but what's remarkable is that a lot of things can be honest. Something can be honest and also not be good right sure. Blue is unflinchingly honest and it's a thing of beauty. Yeah and so I mean and maybe that makes people uncomfortable. It's confusing to two men because I think The emotions that you're talking about a lot of guys really are uncomfortable dealing with those. Let's forget not just Joni Mitchell but just talking to women in this way. In general a lot of men is very difficult. And I know a lot of women who really relate to this record because she's expressing what they would like to say or are feeling but can't articulate. Necessarily an interesting split the way it's interesting. A lot of male critics reviewed this record at the time But since then we've seen a lot of women chiming in on the record You know as their voices become more hurt in our media and I think they're the ones that are really championing this record and a lot of ways. Oh Yeah and and I mean listening to it. You know anytime in the new millennium listening to it in the ninety s no. It's IT'S A it's a different experience listening to it in nineteen seventy one and also about like why it wasn't that well received when it came out was not an instant big seller when it came out it took a long time to become biggest seller and a lot of that was like in the nineties. Yeah really and when the whole sensibility changed when you could be a different kind of a woman I think like Patti. Smith really shook a lot of people up and Sort of moved the needle. All the ways that you could express yourself as a woman. We'VE BEEN TALKING WITH DAVID. Yaffe author of the biography reckless daughter portrait of Joni Mitchell. David thanks for coming on sound opinions. Thanks for having me and thanks for such a stimulating conversation after a short break. We'll continue our discussion of Joni. Mitchell's blue by talking to music critic Lindsay Zoll all adds about blue's impact later. We'll share some of our favorite tracks from that record that's intimate unsound opinions from WBZ CHICAGO NPR ex. Welcome back to sound opinions. I'm Greg Kat. He's Jim dear goddess and this week. We're talking about the nineteen seventy one album blue by Joni Mitchell now earlier in the show. We discussed the context of the record and some of the tracks. And now we want to explore the album's influenced the lasting impact and legacy of Joni Mitchell. Today here to talk about is music. Writer and critic Lindsay Lads Lindsey welcome to sound opinions. They give your having the high. You wrote this brilliant piece fear of female genius about Joni Mitchell and we thought you'd be perfect voice to bring in to this conversation as we look at the legacy of blue first of all. That's brilliant title brilliant phrase you use throughout the piece. Tell us what you're thinking of when you say there's a fear of Joni Mitchell's female genius. Yeah I think that there are so few examples in pop culture of women who've lived and had careers and behaved like men who we call geniuses. Obviously I'm a huge fan of her music but I am fascinated by the way that she's moved throughout the culture and at each stop and each decade and era kind of show us what the resistance was to a woman living and working as freely as she did uncompromising brutal when someone you know challenges her she you know she takes no gump from nobody. Never yeah absolutely. She was so impervious to the criticism. She didn't ever let it slow her down or change the way she was doing business or or soften her in any way and I just think she's so fascinating for that reason and for so many reasons to all right. Well when she was making blow she even sort of dropped out of the music industry For a while before that record was made she's a famous woman. She had relationships with famous men. She was constantly being framed within these relationships. An incredibly condescending viewpoint of a great artist So what was the context of blue being made and and being as personal record as it was was it because of the environment That was sort of being shaped around her. The sort of the narrative that she was being forced into a sort of a the lone female artists may be that was getting that sort of recognition among a male dominated industry. Yeah I think there's always a sense of Joni. Removing herself from the context. She was in the story that the press was telling about her but it also is the moment after she leaves Graham. Nash and I talk about that in the piece to that. That seems like a really kind of pivotal turning point for her turning away from what could have been perhaps a stable and comfortable marriage and just fleeing and traveling and living a life of freedom and also kind of questioning what she was leaving behind by choosing freedom over. Graham scared away a lot younger than me and Greg and I wasn't even there when Joni was making her music wasn't quite conscious yet. You're younger woman. How did you become exposed to Joni Mitchell? And what sort of an impact? At what point in your life did the music half? There's something really match lineal about the way people get into Joni Mitchell and and that a lotta time it is literally through their mothers and back in the days of like burning. Cd's onto your computer. I one day just was like oh I got a few a Joni. Mitchell is all about and I remember sort of doing it. I took it sneakily from my mom's collection and like put it back so she didn't know that I was like the age to kind of understand. What Joni Mitchell was was coming from emotionally. There's usually kind of the older brother figure passing down the cool records and it's not a very cool story to say. Well I like Joni Mitchell because my mom expose me to her under the surface of the cannon that we usually talk about of of men defining and passing you know what is the great music on demand. There's something kinda subterranean about the way that her music Passes FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION? I love that. I don't want you to put you in a position of speaking for all young women today. Lindsey but I am so Ask Spokesman for two minutes. Anyway I just kind of record a record that was made in the early seventies Having an impact on a generation that was born. Well after you know Joni Mitchell's. Heyday can still listen to this record. And say you know I I relate to it I mean or or does it feel like a historical document rather than a living breathing thing that speaks to a young woman today. I think the record itself feels like a living breathing thing that people have gender can relate to and and young people because this sort of feels like a farewell to the twenty s record. And that's you know always kind of a theme pop culture that's that's recurring throughout. Whatever generation is in is in the twenty something slot at the time? But I think that she. I read about this a bit that. I think Joanie is so uncompromising and kind of prickly in some ways that she's hard to reduce into like a gift or a sort of Internet icon in the way that like. I wrote something about Stevie Nicks last year too. I think she's someone who. The image of Stevie Nicks has translated a lot more seamlessly onto lake internet culture youth culture. For whatever reason but I think there's sort of the image and then that is the gateway to the actual music so I think both those artists the music. Because it's really well. I think Joanie though harder to kind of packages come out if I in that way once the music reaches you. There's something about it that feels timeless and feels raw and current no matter what time and what generation you're talking about what would you say to the Cardi B. Fan? The grimes fan the Janelle monae Fan. You know the the precocious adventurous eighteen year old music lover to say all right all right. That's great playlist. She got there now. You gotTA listen to blue. Words FAIL TO DESCRIBE LIKE YOU. Kinda just have to sneak that on. Yeah Yeah I think a lot of those artists to would say that they were influenced by her. And maybe that's a place to start with people that that are unfamiliar with her. Like there's just you know talking to peace about her connection with Prince and how prince as a teen would go to these Joni Mitchell concerts and actually wrote her fan mail like in the Prince Syntax with the number and Yeah and I think that you know just the influence she had other artists who then influence other people. It's all this web of influence. That kind of goes back to her. There are a lot of forward thinking. Female Artists Lindsey. What about you mentioned? Prince as being one of the artists who was heavily influenced by Joni. What are some other artists that you've come across in recent years that people may not be aware of that sort of mentioned? Joni Mitchell as a as an influence on the way they make music. I think in modern analog to her maybe apple I think she has about her influence. But just in the the vividness of the lyricism and the kind of uncompromising way she has conducted her public life. And Kinda just plowed through whatever people had to say about her and and kept making albums that went deeper and deeper into herself. I think she's maybe one of the closest artists but she also is not as prolific journey. Was it. It's fascinating to look at that period in the late sixties through the mid Seventies. Just but how much she was fighting against every system that she came across but was making so much music and putting out a brilliant record pretty much every year I think Lauren Hill. There's a comparison to be made. There is low also someone who has not put out a lot of music is kind of I think part of the the kind of quote unquote female Genius Persona is. It's really difficult to get things through the system and to get to make the necessary compromises to even release a record that you're proud of so I do now that I'm thinking of it. Just the women that you could compare to Today art maybe having as easy time with their record labels or with the public perception. Yeah I mean yeah and Lauryn Hill. I mean both paid significant price for for for their You know we're criticized in public in disturbing ways you know in a way the Joni never put up with. There's just a lot of a lot more scrutiny. Now a lot more lenders to scrutinise women through Just on the Internet and with the way that the news cycle kind of works. I I do think it might be harder in some ways to to be a woman like Joni today but I also think there's just I'm hoping that the the floodgates are starting to at least if not open weaken in in some way on because I do think there's just a much larger volume of female artists out there. They're more visible. You have to kind of dig around to find analogues In in more modern context for her. I think that's also. That's a good point all right. Let me play. Devil's advocate question. Lindsey the headline of your piece of fear of female genius You know the problem when we have something like the NPR lists of greatest albums ever made by women last year. Right you know. Why aren't they just the greatest albums ever made right? Why are they almost by women? Why is she female? Gee I mean obviously. She's her. Art Is Very much from a female perspective. But are we limiting her by saying female? Genius as opposed to neil young genius Bob Dylan genius. Leonard Cohen Genius just genius. I think eventually hopefully we'll get there. I don't think we're there yet in the culture. You know she she was number one on the NPR women's last. But I think in the the rolling stone greatest albums of all time I think blue like number thirty and that was the first one by a woman a reason that she is really fascinating to me is an just to look at her. Whole story is that she showed us the limitations on women at the time and also the way that they were able to be transcended so I think that focusing on you know I talk in the piece about her pregnancy and the adoption and just the the way that that did kind of wait on her throughout her life. That's and the way that that was always kind of something that was gonNA tether her to reality more than it did The men who kind of behaved like geniuses around they could leave their family is a lot more freely than a woman was able to at that time so I think looking at her in that context. What does it mean to be a female genius? Are there inherent compromises in that that make it different from a male one and I think that just with maybe someday we'll get there where there's not but I think just in the culture we are unfortunately not there yet? There are not enough journeys. We've been talking to lindsays all adds about Joni Mitchell. Thanks for coming on the show Lindsey when we come back. Jim and I are going to share some tracks that we think are important to highlight from that album. That's in a minute on sound opinions from WBZ CHICAGO NPR. Alex welcome back sound opinions. I'm Jim dear got us. My partner is Gregg Kat. And this week we're doing a classic album dissection of Joni Mitchell's blue which came out in one thousand nine hundred seventy one and is arguably Mitchell's biggest success. We're going to share some of our favorite tracks now and why we think it is a classic Album Greg. You First Jim. I want to highlight the track California which some people think of as one of the more optimistic songs on the record. It is a song about home or at least her adopted home in California. Obviously she was born in Canada. This was written as part of her European hiatus she Basically dropped out of the music industry for a number of months after her first three came out and made her a star. She just wanted to get away from everything including California. She went to Europe and live like a Hippie for a while. But you got homesick. She decided even though I'm very disillusioned with California. I'm wearing out and on this European lifestyle. I WANNA get back home. The whole idea of coming home was was a hopeful sentiment. But there's also a key question at the heart of this song. It's a plaintiff question that I think is the key to the album that line. Will you take me as I am? She's speaking to California she. Speaking to America she speaking to her fan base. She speaking to the men in her life she is talking about. You know I'm I'm this woman who was independent is doing my thing on my terms. Will you accept that? Because if you can't I don't want any party. And that that really is kind of the impetus of the blue helmets and emancipatory album in many ways with that question at the heart of it and at the same time the feeling of longing expressed so beautifully a later in the song by a little subtle touch pedal steel guitar from Sneaky Pete Klina of the flying burrito brothers. The way that pedal steel sort of wafts through the atmosphere created by. Janis voice and her Appalachian Dulcimer. I think it's a beautiful song but with many many layers and is a great example of the multilayered songwriting. That is the key to this. Very simple arrangements. With many many textures and feelings coursing through them. California from Joni Mitchell's blue range renews shawl looks bad. They won't give peace a chance. Just a dream. Some of still. Does he WANNA stay here? Too Old and cold and sit in. I'M GONNA g-get leaving kisa sentences pig pound Dan Sperry well. He gave me my smile but he kept my cameras South Boulder because good omelettes stews and I might have stayed on with him. My full you fallen that is California. What I think is one of the key tracks from Joni Mitchell's blue. Jim would have you got greg. We have to Play Little Green. You know we were talking about this daughter that Joni Mitchell had when she was a struggling college student and folksinger had to give up for adoption. That's in the mid sixties. It wasn't until the mid nineties when that part of her life was exposed by tabloid and she subsequently years later Started a relationship with that young woman. Her Daughter Kill Lauren. Gabe I'm I you know. I think one of the sins that listeners a male and female but in particular the male rock crawling establishment lays upon. Blue is reading an as strict autobiography at all times. The reason I mentioned this This is obviously a song written about her daughter. Little Green but You know nobody knew about that. And for a good twenty five years and now that's all anybody talks about in the context of this song but if we look at the song one of those classic Weird Joni Mitchell a guitar tunings you know of her own songs in hoping g You know we look at the lyrics. It's about a longing in general. It could be. I heard as longing for the seasons to change away from the cold and into the spring it could be more specifically. I think longing for any parent In particular father all right. I'm a father of a daughter. So are you. You've got to About a daughter Both both being a an obsessive love but also some day. She's GonNa leave you and that's GonNa leave a whole you were talking about. How much longing and sadness and and emancipation runs throughout blue? It's not just in the romantic sense. It's also about in in the sense of childhood and then I think it's just a great song about hoping for something better period. You don't need to know everything that happened to Joni. It's part of the context but this is an immortal song because it stands without any of that little green by Joni Mitchell on sound opinions. Oh with the Moon in can serve choose serving name. Shulan sued to Cau- Green and the winters cannot all agree gypsy dancer. He went to he. Did everything's warm so right. Who is Jewish? Look Great. He's in Joni Mitchell. Little Green on sound opinions Greg. Another song highlight from blue. I like I like your choice of Little Green Jim because I think you know the the strength of Joni songwriting. Because you wouldn't have known it was about her daughter unless you had inside information it would have been about many many situations at the same time. Take drawings very specifically on the pain in her private life to create a song That has universal significance. And I think many of the songs on a blue have that regards to call a confessional album. I think completely misreads what it's about A great example of that is the Song River. You know it's amazing how. This song has become a Christmas standard holiday standard. You can hear it at starbucks plane. I'm not you know when you go in for a coffee starting about mid November You know it's just one of those things that's Kinda like wallpaper now for the holidays and it is an incredibly sad song. It's almost like a eulogy. Here's the Canadian girl singing about skating away on a river while she's in California a place that at the time. She does not really love and is kind of getting disgusted by the key. Line for me. I wish I had a river river so long I would teach my feet to fly. And the way her voice just sort of flies off on that last syllable is just so beautiful and heartbreaking And then lands on. I made my baby cry. This whole notion of I've just gone through this relationship that ended terribly. I miss my home of origin. I miss my childhood. You thinking about all these things coursing through the song and doing it. Beautifully with the framing device of jingle bells. I think people have a holiday song but it's played so sadly and mournfully and she starts off. Saint Kinda plaintive tone to those cords and then at the end. It's devastatingly slow. Slow was almost like a eulogy. So it's a beautiful and yet heartbreaking song that I think encapsulates the the multitude of emotions that are coursing through the blue album. Here's river from Joni. Mitchell unsound opinions cutting down trees put up reindeer and singing songs of joy and peace. Who I wish I could ski. Snow here stays pretty green. I'M GONNA make a lot of money then. I'M GONNA quit this scene. I wish I had a good ski wisha. Long would teach me away Aby River from Joni Mitchell. You've got one more great blue track for us. Jim A case of you Greg The Mitchell obsessive who I think often are obsessing and not listening Debate is this song about her romantic split from Graham Nash. Or is it about Leonard Cohen. I you know I don't care I that's life. That's not her art. What is brilliant about this? Art Is that we've all had a case of someone that is both good for us. And bad for US everybody you know obligatory rock critic quote. I'm a lonely painter. I lived in a box of paints. Okay but to me the the lines before that you know you are in my blood like holy wine you taste so bitter and so sweet. I could drink a case of you and I'd still be on my feet. That's everything I love about Johnny Mitchell number one. She's tough as nails. You know what I mean. You Not GonNa drink me under the table. I tell you I write number two the play on a case by case abuse a bad case of the flu but also I'll I'll devour case of you. I can't get enough and I love you but I'm also a broken by this relationship as we end it. All of these feelings are encompassed. And you know a lot of times. We talk about artists who cover something. I think it's a testament when a wide array of incredible talents. Come to the same song for inspiration and make it their own Tori Amos prints Diana Krall Katie Lang. All of them have done versions of case. View I think that they are all hearing something in it Different and bringing something of their own and you know so is everyone who really listens to in loves blue a case of you by Joni Mitchell on sad opinions just before you say constant as a northern star said constantly door whereas dead in a Carter. Tv's in Canada Sketched on Oh sweet still beyond my feet or I would still be on a case of you. By Joni Mitchell wrapping up our classic album dissection of her nineteen seventy-one out and blue. Now we want to hear from you. Do you have any opinions on blue or Joni Mitchell or anything in the music world? Call eight eight eight five nine eight thousand nine hundred and leave us a message as always sound. Opinions is produced by Brennan. Banish Alex Clayborn ionic interests and Andrew. Gill is that my phone On sound opinions everyone's a critic so give us a call on our hotline eight. Eight eight eight five nine eighteen hundred new messages. Hi there this is Clifford Lee from Minnesota and I really love your show about animals at our household here especially since we have six long weeks of winter the dog and I will take a moment and we will choose something to listen to before we go to bed and one of the things that we have listened to. Recently even though cats are our nemesis we have found a certain sense of solitude with listening to the virtue to the cat trilogy by the weaker than a way. And that's one of the things that kind of a go to for us here at the House and love your show. What would you guys do? I'm glad you're staying on and we hope to hear you Talk more about these fine for creatures that make us our friends take care. Now bye guys. It's James in Los Angeles California to songs come to mind about animals. Adrian Balu Loan Right through and blue the King Crimson with a dinosaur pop to mind great show once again. Keep up the good work. Hey Jim in Greg. This is Phil calling from Honolulu. Hawaii and just listened to your episode on songs about animals and when you mentioned animal farm. I thought certain you were going to actually mentioned. Chicago's own kid. Indie rock band by that name. Animal Farm in fact. I'm not sure you guys have ever done a review of children's songs or records for children but this is a fantastic band. All of their songs are about animals. I actually listened to the record even when my kids aren't in the cards. My favorite song is a song about change. And it's a song cold shed your skin and Eventually went to check them out. Animal Farm there a kid. Indie kindy rock band from Chicago. Thanks for your show. You guys are terrific like hi. This is Aaron calling from Chicago. I just listened to your little bit on this episode about Jesus Christ superstar. I have kind of an embarrassing story. I mean my cousin and my neighborhood friend we would listen to this record and twelve year old girls. We would pretend to go into trances. There were inspired by this and sleep. Walk around the room. One zero save him Jesus and it was somehow very mystically inspired by Jesus Christ superstar. Thank you enjoy the show by how you doing. This is John From Minneapolis. Just listened to your bid about Jesus Christ superstar and yeah might rock or not. I haven't really processed that part of it. The only thing I remember that one night like friends and I had a long night of drinking and the next morning somebody put on that record and my friends. Being a bunch of Catholic boys knew all the words and started to act out the script and I became Jesus and they proceeded to try to crucify me company. Jumping fall him. I had to escape through an upstairs window and run down the street so that play will always have a special place in my heart. Thank you great show messages to share your opinions on sound opinions. Call eight eight eight five nine. Eighteen hundred we'll be back next week. Unsound OPINIONS FROM WBZ Chicago and distributed by P R X.

Joni Mitchell Joni Jim Dora David Yaffe Johnny Mitchell California Graham Nash Joni Mitchell Paul Simon Tori Amos Leonard Cohen Chicago Toronto Mid Nineties Greg Greg Kat Joanie Joni songwriting Canada polio Liz Fair
30 Overshoot Playlist: Top 10 Environmental Songs

GrowthBusters

44:19 min | 1 year ago

30 Overshoot Playlist: Top 10 Environmental Songs

"Erica is music important in your life. Yeah. I love music more than life. Yeah. Me too. I think it's pretty powerful. And so today on the growth busters podcast, we're going to be talking about music. I. Welcome to the growth busters podcast, where we discuss the joy of sustainable living and the work that needs to be done to get our entire society into a recovery program for growth addiction, ask your doctor, if sustainable living is right for you. I'm Dave Gardner director of the documentary growth busters. Hooked on growth and chief scientist here at the institute for advanced growth addiction studies. Hi, I'm Erica areas. I am co host of the growth busters podcasts for cutting edge information about our cultures. Unsustainable love affair with growth and what we can do about it. Visit growth busters dot org. Lorca before we get into it. I like to share a little bit of listener feedback whenever we get something interesting. So I'm going to try to do it quickly today because we have lots to talk about in listen to I I wanna share an Email. I got from Joshua spo- deck. He hosts a podcast called leadership and the environment. And in fact, I was a guest on that podcast on one of his earlier episodes. And if you haven't heard that you might want to go back and dig that up Erica anyway. Josh wrote, I, I enjoyed your last episode. I don't watch much TV. So I welcomed your curated picks and comments on them, and he was talking about the, you know, the real time with Bill Maher, and the, the piece from the late show with Stephen Colbert. He went onto right? I'm writing to recommend my latest podcast episode. It's about eight minutes. It's number one, eighty three reusing and recycling our technical reducing is strategic it puts together some ideas. I've been working on for a while related to huge miss. Understandings about recycling as opposed to reducing that is reversing growth. I think you'd appreciate it more than most. I also love your thoughts on it since these views are evolving, Josh. Oh, and then he had a PS when you and Erica, talked about the strategy of creating more babies in the hopes that some would come up with solutions. I thought, yes, we did that they came up with a solution have fewer babies. I love it. Oh my gosh. Thanks, josh. Sometimes I'm tempted when people think that we're going to innovate our way out of the all of these environmental crises that we've got sometimes I'm tempted to say you know what, what if the innovation is that we decided to scale back the whole scale of the human enterprise? That's pretty that's real innovation. And then he had he had a PS have I told you about my new book, initiative that launched a couple of days ago? And I really think very highly of Joshua specs all include a link to his podcast. A link to his latest book in our show notes, and I'm thinking that we might invite Joshua to just join us kind of on a regular basis for, like a five or ten minute conversation. I think we could have some interesting conversations. So. More about that later. Okay. Now one more listener feedback. I wanted to share this was an interesting inner change. I'm going to share with you. This guy's Email and that what I wrote in response. How ironic that? The first thing I hear when listening to your podcast about the wisdom of examining human growth is a request for a new co host to accommodate grace, who is breeding another child. Wow. That's kind of what I thought. Well, that's a little maybe a little on the on the techy side, but not altogether surprising that somebody's going to come up with that, because people are always looking for, you know evidence of us being hypocritical. Yeah. So I think our listeners might find informative what I wrote back to Todd. I wrote we'll all be sure to share your comment on our next podcast. It is her first child. And I hope her last. But people in this world are on all parts of the spectrum of living sustainably, none of us are perfect as I'm sure you're aware, I had two kids thirty years ago turns out, I should have had zero but I thought at the time that stopping at two was good enough. Be sure to check out the episode of the overpopulation podcast with Travis reader, discussing this very subject, and let me know what you think, and what I recommended he checkout was episode seven of the overpopulation, podcast, our moral obligation to conceive just one child with bioethicist Travis reader, who authored a short book called toward a small family ethic how overpopulation and climate change are affecting the morality appropriation now, you know Travis reader. Very well. Yes. That was a very, very Dr reader has, I think all of this writers concerns can be easily answered just by reading picking up Dr book towards a small family ethic. He's brilliant. Yeah. Definitely pick that up if you can go to good. Good. Good reply from Todd hero back. I just had to point out the irony, which reminds me of my green environmentalist, friends bragging about their flights to epic overseas vacations on Facebook where it is lauded, as enviable behavior. Humans are sure interesting. You know what related to that? We're about to do an episode on music and a lot of these artists are really big famous artists, and they tore, or at least they used you some of these older like Paul McCartney and I don't wanna give the list away before we go down. But some of these artists horror, and I think about the gas emissions. They think about the gas emissions and they'll call themselves out, but we're not perfect just like you said, so, at least they're using their status to bring awareness at the end of the day. To see people, you know, who have that kind of notoriety, be great role models and be as good, an example as they can be. And it's probably true that most of them have horrific ecological footprints in carbon footprints, especially, but I'll tell you what I would want to invite you in any listener. If you know of someone who, is, you know, a big movie star, a big musical recording artists, or, you know, somebody who's just got a real claim to fame, and they are really walking the talk of sustainable living, then let us know about them, because we would like to definitely celebrate the best examples picking on people for their hypocrisy. I don't know. I'm not sure that, that's really the most productive strategy for us to take an I'll be the first one to confess that. Man, I am so far from perfect fame. We all do it. We can do and talking about it is just the first part of the battle, and just recognizing that we're not perfect. That's all we can do. I'm pretty proud of myself here. We are in summer. It's really great weather finally, for bicycle writings. So there were a number of days this past week that I left the car in the garage never got in the car. Rode my bike to meeting rode my bike to the bakery, to support local Baker, and get the most amazing loaf of bread road. Then to the supermarket to kick groceries and won't be too long before I'll be able to ride to the farmers market to get produce. And I am just enjoying the heck out of being on my bicycle instead of behind the wheel of an auto thanks. It's good exercise. You are saving the planets and yeah, you get to enjoy the beautiful day. There you go. Well, we're both pretty excited about what we're going to talk about today. So let's get into it the main event in this episode is. We really need to decide what we're going to call it kind of came up with environmental slash overshoot songs because I mean environmental songs is a really broad category. I don't think we've necessarily picked songs that are only about overshoot. What do you think we should call this list? That's pretty accurate. Actually, most of my songs either address, climates or consumption. So I think having overshoot her list is excellent, excellent idea. Yeah. Let's do that. Cooker. We cannot people to write in and rate, the songs for us, and see we can, you know, cross reference, lists and want to avoid the listeners to submit their own song suggestions. We will have overlooked some or whether intentionally or unintentionally, and so it'd be kind of fun. I think to get a longer list. Alternately. So go to the show notes just a lot of good things in the show notes for this episode and one of those things is going to be a link to this playlist that we've put together at the growth busters YouTube channel, and we're definitely not calling that the top ten because we are going to continue to add other songs as we discover them to that playlist, and I think I've already got probably thirteen or fourteen videos in that list, and you'll probably enjoy going there, even if you've listened to this episode of the podcast and heard the music in some cases, you know, the videos are pretty cool, and we're not showing you the videos on this podcast. So what we want to do is, we want to share Erica. And I've put together our favorite ten who knows why we love that maybe we think they have the best lyrics, or the most effective, or maybe they've got the best hook or, or what who knows and here's the deal. If you're listening to this podcast in its normal spot, we're going to play a little bit of music, but because of copyright issues we're only gonna play a little bit of each song here. However, erica. And I've gone to the trouble of creating another version of this podcast, same conversation, but it includes all of the music every song from start to finish because there is one place on the internet, where we can do that over at mixed clouds. So if you want to hear all of each song, then head to the show notes, and listen to this episode over at mixed cloud, we'll have the link in the show notes. But if you don't want to hear all the music, and you want your speed demon, and you're listening to us at double speed. Anyway. Then you can stick with us right here, and we'll do a shortcut from the beginning to the end of each episode. Is that a decent mix explanation about it's perfect? Yeah. And anybody can go and access the music on our YouTube page where you'll be able to also watch the video along with hearing, the fully song, definitely want to hear from our listeners with their ratings of the tunes that we talk about today, but also suggestions of ten so we had to the list kicking it off on our list is an all star collaboration recorded in the lead up to the Paris climate conferences that took place in two thousand fifteen this song is titled love song to the earth. It is by Paul McCartney along with Jon Bon Jovi Kobe Colette and others. Who sing about how the future of our planet is in our hands. And they call directly on each of us to save it from being destroyed from the potential ravages of carbon emissions, and anther genyk affects that define our current climate crisis. I think this is really a political means for waking people up to an issue that concerns every living being on this planet. So. Was really a great way to motivate those in power to take action and having unification of popular voices in or not just pop music. But in media, in general, is something that's all of us activists strive to do. And why do we do this? Why do we share clips about Bill Maher or Stephen Colbert, or have an episode dedicated to songs about environmental consciousness and sustainability while because our current situation suggests that we haven't been listening to the experts and the scientists, we'd rather listen to those we look up to for whatever reason we look up to them, and we're actually really lucky that some of these people are not only activists, I'm sorry, they're not only artists, but they're also activists who are consciously aware like us, and they are using their status for the greater good of all people and the planet altogether. Better myself. We'll give it a listen. Susan mobile. To give to a hands. Now. Soon. All right. Well that does pull the strings a little bit. That was very heartfelt song. It's great. I it's a really beautiful song video is beautiful. So, again, if you have the time definitely check it out there YouTube channel, the I thought maybe Paul McCartney was kind of pulling his punches, and trying to be a little too vague and not specific. But then he really comes through with Seema earth is in a crazy mess. It's time for us to do our best from deep sea, straight up to Everest. She under crazy stress. She under crazy stress definitely definitely and six billion people all want, plenty nece some people think this is harmless. But if we continue their only be emptiness, but right on makes me wanna love the earth. It is. It's a love song to our planet, and it is the only one we've got to take care of it. Another really great thing about this song is every time the song is purchase streamed or shared, the royalties, go directly. Towards the efforts of friends of the earth to keep fossil fuels in the ground and lower carbon emissions, and also to the work of the UN foundation to inspire international action on climate change. So that's really cool earth is no slouch, environmental outfit. They're one of the best ones going out there in my book. So next on the list is a song that just absolutely. It's such a classic. There was no question about whether or not this was going to be on the list, and it's big yellow taxi, which Joni Mitchell wrote and I recorded in nineteen seventy you've heard the song before, right? Erica, I have. Yeah. Very happy that you added to your just asked that question because you're a whole lot younger than than I am. And so some of these oldies, I'm never sure if you're familiar with them, this is definitely all these on my list to you went back a little bit. Interesting story Joni recorded it but she got up just to, like, number sixty nine on the billboard hot, one hundred chart, whatever the chart was that everybody. Paying attention to in those days and another group the neighborhood recorded a version of it. And for some reason that really caught everyone's attention and that sword. Right. Past Joni Mitchell's version, and ended up being much higher on the chart and on the chart longer than Joni Mitchell's original version, and then finally in nineteen seventy four so four years later Joni Mitchell records alive performance of it. And that live performance caught on, and that ended up spending ten weeks on the top one hundred nineteen seventy four another Joni Mitchell version, and then festival were two two thousand two and Counting Crows recorded the song, and there's a video, and of course, we'll have links and the show notes to that, too. Great video. And I really enjoyed the way they treated the song, maybe we should just let the song speak for self. So we give it a listen fan. All right. Gonna do something unusual with this, because we have three versions, we have Joni Mitchell's original, we have the neighborhoods chart topper. And then I'll just skip Joni. Mitchell's live version, seventy four, but then the Counting Crows in two thousand two different enough. I'm going to play for you a little bit of each. So we're just going to shut up and let you hear this song. So if you're listening to the version of this podcast, where we can play all the music than you'll get a little bit of each so you can kind of compare them. Dies up. Booty. Spot. Kandla. That's a great song. It's going to be stuck in my hand on say. I think when I first heard this song, I can't remember exactly when, but I did not realize what the message was, and I think that's for a lot of us initially hearing a song, you don't really realize it until you actually sit down, and like dissect it I actually really enjoyed looking at this song, little deeper and realizing it's like clear as day the lyrics, speak for themselves going to have to stop and think about it too, because I've always just treated it as a, as an environmental song as a song about us, destroying nature, paving paradise putting up a parking lot putting trees in museum. That's all pretty obvious stuff and that you don't value it until it's too late because it's gone. But when I was watching the Counting Crows music video their video really didn't focus on that part of the story there. The oh, look to me like it was kind of a love story about a guy not appreciating. The person he loved. Yes, exactly. That's exactly what I was thinking myself when I heard this song, and even now just looking at the lyrics that you don't know what you've got until it's gone. I think a lot of us, think about our relationships and how we don't appreciate what we have until it's gone. But the same goes for the planet, our home that we all live. We won't appreciate until it's gone. Good a treat for you Erica. That bet you haven't, I'm hoping you haven't seen it, there was this television show. Well back before you were born called the Sonny and Cher show. You probably know of it, right? Sonny and Cher in their early days, there young days before share a really became this big sex, symbol, and the way she dressed and performed share on that show performed the song, and they had the there was a an artist who I guess, created some little cartoons for them from time to time that they used on the show. They asked this artist to create a cartoon to go with the song big yellow taxi. And so we're going to include Lincoln the show notes to YouTube video where you can see and hear early share performing the song, plus this really cute, great cartoon that really is all about the environmental angle of it. It's great cartoon. Thank you. What's next number eight on our list is the Marvin Gay's mercy? Mercy me the song was released in nineteen sixty eight well before climate change was a largely recognize social concern. At least I don't know. I was in the life back then. But it definitely wasn't to the point to where it is. Now, this is more of a direct mourning for the destruction of the earth. There's a few specific examples in the song, but I think was prominently the lyrics what about this overcrowded land, how much more abuse from men can she stand? I think about one says at all. I was really touched by that way ahead of its time. Shame because I forgotten about this song. And so I didn't come up with this view nominated this. And I just said, of course, I can't believe I forgot. Let's give it a listen. Scott. What about this overcrowded land, how much more abuse from man? Can she stand? Yeah, you're right. Those pretty good catalogue of transgressions of man against the planet. This one's really direct. There's a few of them on our list that are not. You know, we have to kind of dissect it a little bit more to derive meaning and what the artists intended message was, but this one's really just as it is and beautifully done book in nineteen sixty eight. And of course, this was about the time when we were really waking up to the damage that we were doing that famous book by Rachel, Carson silent spring, the cuyahoga river catching on fire, so we woke up and we did we got busy and cleaned up our act and a lot of ways the week cleaned up the air pollution was a lot worse and most US cities back in nineteen sixty five or nineteen seventy than it is even today. And so some people a lot of economists seem to think, oh, yeah. We solved that problem. We had enough economic growth that we could afford to clean up our act. But the truth is, we had this, I think my opinion of it is that we. Had a just a temporary decade of progress. You know, and then all of the progress, we've made just completely got swamped overwhelmed as we just continued the relentless pursuit of more of everything. More people more economic throughput. And, and so now we're even though the Brown cloud in your cities, atmosphere may not be quite as visible to you today as was maybe in nineteen seventy Thurs, so many more toxins in our environment. There's so many more toxins in our bodies, and we've got, you know, a climate that is getting set up to maybe kill us. So we've lost ground. That you said that day because I don't know what that is. But it's this thing that people do it might just be a human nature to sort of sit back kick back and once you have these small victories, you celebrate. And you think it's okay we're done with that problem. Now, let's go onto the next one, but I think that mindset is dangerous. And if we acted that way in any other. Regard in our life. I mean that's like we're who would we be? Plus, we've doubled human populations then, you know. You know, it might not feel like we are in a disaster land. But that mindset is not one that we ought to have if we really want to see the future thrive. So those kind of the song, and so I'm kind of glad that we're following that up with number seven on the list is one of my favorites because it really is hilarious. I don't know if you're a weird Al fan or not, but weird L yankovic guys genius. And this is a fairly recent. This is from two thousand fourteen from his album mandatory fund first world problems. I'm inclined to play the song. I talk about it later. Do you have anything you want to say about before we share it? Let's have a listen. This will actually be my first time listening. So, so you haven't seen the video either them of this. You've got it is hilarious. Let's give it a listen. Jack komi. That was a great song. Really funny. So, like I said, you have got see the video. So be sure to had to the show notes for this episode and get the link or obviously, go to YouTube and search for an you'll find it first world problems. What a great. I mean, it's going to be a classic and other being time capsules oughta be in the Smithsonian because it is perfect catalogue of over consumption, and the overdeveloped world. And these problems sort of just deter attention away from the real stuff happening. And that's you know, the goal of the entire system. I just love my house is so big. I can't get wifi in the kitchen problem. I like my sonacare won't charge. Now, I gotta brush my teeth like a Neanderthal. Oh, no. What are you gonna do? So this next one, I never even heard of confess. I was unaware. Number six on our list comes from one of my all time, favorite bands. They are definitely a high school band, while something I listened to in high school. They unfortunately only recorded a single album, but it was a great one, and it continues to be one of my favorites that I can listen to on repeat, the postal services two thousand three album, titled give up includes our number six on titled sleeping in after hearing and analyzing the lyrics of this song. Ignorance is bliss comes to mind, these singer implies that nothing is exactly how it seems unless you're dreaming, and it's much easier to sleep in and pretend that the world's threats issues don't exist than it is to wake up from the dream and actually take action. So all let you play. Exactly. Just. Yep. A never had heard of it. That's a pretty song. And yeah, this whole idea of sleepwalking or sleeping in where sleeping through. Lyrics concerns about the world getting warmer, people thought they were just being rewarded, now, we can swim any day in November mad almost directly speaks about the climate changing and at the time the song was released in two thousand three so people didn't really refer to our current situation as climate crisis, but more so just global warming. And so it's just refreshing to now see like at the time. I didn't really appreciate them for doing this, but just recognizing that issue for indie bands. What to just say that this Nick song for me? It gets us into the big leagues here. In fact, this next song may cash, if it wasn't for the fact that the two after that, that I am contributing to our top ten list are so amazing. Really, I've got the next three songs submitted by Dave Gardner. I think our wall of famers for environmental slash overshoot top ten list there, so incredible while of excellence status. Yeah. Totally. Yep. All of excellence coming back again. Yes. So, so this first one matchbox twenty two thousand seven how far we've come every list has to have the song captures. I think better than any of the songs that we're talking about today, this really weird condition that we're in where progress is killing us. You know, we are so proud of what we've accomplished and yet what we've accomplished is, we have figured out how to burn down the house. Enough said, let's listen. Waking up at the start of the the world peeling every. Now. The cars. Our? The passengers. Can you tell me what was ever really special? Top that. Oh, I don't know. I think number two is like number two is definitely my favorite because it was originally my number one, but, but no appreciation for matchbox twenty. How far we've come is great. And I love what you had to say about it. Couldn't have said it better myself. Counting down to number four on our list is Jack Johnson's gone. The song is about over consumption and losing oneself, to possessions, instead of realizing what's really important in life, the white rhythms, and simplicity of the song, kind of reminds us all that the society that we live in is just driven by mass consumer ISM. And at the core of all of this is just our need to fit in so, yeah, I'll, I'll go ahead and just let you. Hit look good. All those fancy clothes. But these keep us wall. Joe slack. What about your son is in code? Is it straight from the bone ready to be so? Yeah. Wow. And what about your soul? Is it cold and ready to be sold? Just the symbols of status. Continued aflutter human experience on a daily basis. And I think even now more so with the rise of social media, and just being able to all those people we deem successful and just trying to be versions of them. I think it all really just compromises our morals and just keeps us from rarely looking out what's important. Looks on the list was mine full, steam by David Gray and anti Lennox and us another one I think, is a classic. It's going to have to be in the museum in the wing that chronicles the destruction of human civilization. We who's display together by this is classic. We all saw it coming. But we still bought it. Enough said interesting. I want to quickly share with you someone on remember who but I also found someone had done a quick interview with any Lennox David Gray about that song. And so got a just a short clip of David Gray's, comments about that share with you, which. This. So it's like beings you hanging, you don't quite sure exactly what's going on? With often a dream world are making. I said, mankind westernize man, we can see what's coming. We know if. Yet, he'll getting the latest gadgets talking shit which the how green we're going to be. Yeah. Another depressing one, but man really captured what we're doing to ourselves David Gray Antion eggs, so that brings us to our number two. This was kind of a hard one and a struggle for us. We talked a little bit about what's going to be our number one song fairness, it was just look at the job because I wanted to go, first with number ten and she didn't realize always conning her that if we alternated that I got the number one position. This one really close. They could still be number one. I don't know. Well, maybe we'll wait to hear what the listener say, but this one is by Radiohead. It's titled hideous tech and it's been a longtime favorite of mine for it's dark and puck elliptic by. I'm a huge radio fan. And this song can be interpreted in a number of ways, mostly, I'm thinking it speaks about some natural disaster war, or technological, breakdown, and just if anybody's familiar with Tom York being a very strong environmental activists. He's been very vocal about his concerns related to climate including his solo release of his two thousand six album, title eraser, I think this song speaks mainly about the current climate crisis. Title attention. Thanks for bringing this to the table. It's a great tune. So let's listen. We're not scaremongering. This is really happening. That spoke to me, too. I love this long so much patrolling. Would you think about that one or wouldn't say love it, just like Schindler's List, great film, but I'm not going to say I love it. I don't wanna watch once a week when I say, I mean it is just a work of art is a masterpiece. I think Radiohead, just in general like mad respect Radiohead. If you're listening, I love you. Pretty chilly. And that brings us to number one, and I want to ask where you familiar with road to hell before I put this list out embarrassed to say, no, don't be embarrassed because I would hazard a guess that probably ninety percent of our audience, never heard of the song, maybe never even heard of Chris rea-. This is an amazing amazing song and the videos pretty awesome also. And if you do, just go to YouTube, and look for you'll find different versions and the long version is is the coolest. There's like six minute six minutes. Eight seconds or something like that really has a really neat intro, which we're not gonna play for you here because I've got the four and a half minute version today here. So previously did not listen to any of them because I wanted it to be the first time I. You really need to be watching the video, so you're going to have to go to your hallmark, but enough said. But. Boils for that employees. Streetline alive. Joe? Scabby on. Wig on in the shadow. Joking smile every. Ringing out. Sang tack. Down the row. You really got to watch the video when you listen to this. Yvonne, I'm going to be doing after this. I mean, this is gonna go down in history. Tell you this ain't no upwardly mobile freeway. Oh, no. This is the road to hell. When when was this released the year eighty nine that's the year? I was born. Well, sorry, I'm so sorry Erica for the fact that my generation hadn't figured out what we're all figuring out now finally slowly. And that was that we needed to we needed to take the first exit off of that road to hell. We're still struggling to do that today. So, hey baby steps. And so, you know, in a way, this kind of a Downer of an episode because most of the songs that we've shared are really. I mean, they're pretty much bad news. These are songs where the messages. Hey, you guys just like David Gray said. Net up change your ways. Yeah. You know what I have strong guilty? Pleasure for the darker songs, and the sad ones, and the ones that actually mean something, and these all very much have a message to share. So it's important I'm really glad that we had this episode. And I'm glad that we're sharing these songs with everybody, and hopefully this doesn't make anybody feel too depressed. But, you know, enough to actually act deal. What I'm going to do. I feel like if you've listened to all of this, and you are a little down in the dumps. Now what you can do in this episode is over, and it is not quite over, because we've got a bonus song to end the but what you need to do is go. Find Louis Armstrong's what a wonderful world which in so many ways belongs on this list, too. But we'll leave, you feeling a little better because it does celebrate the best of this world and it really reminds us of what we need to protect on love. How does a great great piece of advice? Thanks for. Sharing. Guests Groot zone into that myself on the reason that we've got a bonus song hair is because no list of great environmental songs would be complete without the growth busters theme song. So it's the opening title music and the growth busters documentary. And the closing credits music. We also opened and closed this podcast with just a little bit of it. But our listeners, never get a chance to hear the whole science really is a work of art. I wanna give up huge. Shoutout to Jake FEDER who wrote it and did the music and Carlos Jones, the vocalist, you can find these guys on the internet, and we'll include links to their websites. Because after you listen to the full version of the growth busters theme song, you'll become fans. Now, of course, you'll only hear the full version, if you have headed over to the alternate podcast episode over at mixed cloud where we're able to include all of the music. So if you're still listening to the air check version, where we have to skip most. Of the music, then look in the show notes, and I find the link to the full version of this podcast, where we actually play all the music. So we'll wrap up the episode, and then we will end with the growth busters theme song, but we will end with it in full for just one special treat. So before we do that Erica. Do you have anything that you wanna share with our audience about this episode now? No, but one thing I do feel kind of bad about is that we did not share with our listeners that it's your birthday today. Is that is that private information? Let's not let's not private. And I'm ashamed of myself for working on my birthday, but we've got a planet safe. We do. I just want to wish you a very happy birthday, Dave. I'm honored to be your co host, and for all of our listeners blessed working with you Erica. What is this, our third episode together at the said three? Yeah, that's great to have you along. So thank you for your dedication. So don't forget to explore these issues that growth busters dot org. Subscribe to this podcast and share this episode with your friends. And just another quick announcement, if you like any of the tracks we've played today and you like Spotify there is now a playlist for you. So check that out. We will be providing a link at the end of our show notes. So check that out all recommendations. Welcome, and happy listening. Here we go with Jake fater and Carlos Jones and the growth busters. Something. To pay mountains and good. Nut me. Bro. Best. Jeff. But. Not. Bro. Buster. The cost up genetic thing, bigger is better, the coughed up. But. Brome bust. Comment. Throws. Plus. Call. Drowning option. Been our own coffee. The. Now. Regard. I think this acid rain is. All in college. A little Robin. Brain much longer. We must bus. Taken in Robin Knapman gases stain this disease. The much longer. The growth and bus. I. Road. Rubbed.

Erica YouTube Joni Mitchell Paul McCartney Dave Gardner Bill Maher David Gray Stephen Colbert Joshua Josh Joe slack Lorca scientist Facebook bioethicist Travis Todd
Esperanza Spalding

Broken Record

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

Esperanza Spalding

"When s bronzes spalding one new artists? At the grammys twenty eleven. She made headlines for two reasons one. She was the first ever jazz musician to win the award and two. She still best new artist from Justin Bieber. The Believers are still pissed since that first big win. Esperanza has won three. More grammys seven studio albums. Including twenty-seven exposure which was conceived written and recorded entirely in seventy seven hours on facebook. Live in two thousand eighteen inch. Release twelve little spells. It was inspired by the Japanese healing. Art Rakia with each song composed as a spell for specific part of the body. Here's a sample of one of the spells. Called Day hips interesting natural falls apart. Abbas your looking at her body of work and how she's evolved from a young digits stand up bass player jazz composer to an experimental multimedia conceptual artists. It's easy to see why. Esperon spalding sees herself as more than Jazz Musician. But our improvisational approach to toning abstract ideas into emotionally moving pieces of music. Pretty much makes her the personification of jazz whether she likes it or not. This is broken record latter notes for the digital age. I'm Justin Richmond as bronzes South Bruce Elleman Brooklyn to talk about the instinctual away. She makes Music Jammie with Joni Mitchell and aprases riding with the legendary Wayne shorter that set to be released next year while this list is really beautiful scholar. Good vibe and it's huge is actually reminding me how much I love to be in the studio. It's been about a year and I think that means it's time to go back soon. You haven't been in a studio in a year and was for that that was for twelve little spells for the four bonus spells. It's actually a sixteen little spells now because because of some of the finagling that one must do when you're dancing to the music industry which wanted sixteen originally but they don't want it twelve grand for there to be. Ah Second Wave and reason to talk about the product again I was asked and encourage more songs. 'cause apparently I'm I've yet to grow into the awareness of what it is to generate music as commodity I. My first instinct is is to figure out a way to just release it big in around and wide So I wanted to release the twelve little spells one every day at twelve twelve leading up to my birthday and I wanted to just blast them out because I wanted the the effect of the spells to reach as many people as possible But that's it's hard to capitalize on that approach some in collaboration with the label. We came up with the idea of well. Let's make former bonus balls and then there's a reason to go get the record some now. We should explain little spells. Which was your last full album. Yeah was they were twelve songs now sixteen but they were based on different parts of the body. Did the concept come first for that or did the songs come I? It came as a hit almost like an instruction manual I can remember I was in transit. I don't remember from where to wear but I know that by the time I got home to my apartment I had written out the outline of the whole project that it was twelve little spells in the title and what the title was saying which was an announcement of what this work is as an interim peace before the next big project so the titles. Twelve little spells. Tide you over till the next full thing touch and my touch in mine. The longing deep down you have to dance now. No all limbs are readying to rise dancing the animal with others and it was A. It's a sort of poem explanation of what this product is until the next project which is about dancing and movement and dancing that the wild untethered free forms of dance with structured presentation Yes so tell me I got home here. The song titles here were their effects on the body and I had my instruction manual and then I spent a month in some changes just assembling that structure assembling that entity from the instruction manual. So you roll that on the subway. No I wrote it all in a castle in Italy. Okay but The Dow is sounding better. Yeah that was amazing. That was amazing. Every morning I will be You know go from where we pick up your espresso on the morning of you so desired and they had me in the converted pig pen. 'cause I will I don't WanNA BE IN CASKS? I figured it would be extremely haunted so I would go get my espresso and walk. Around the periphery of the castle back towards my converted pig pen which is in another type Part of the grounds and pass as an Uffizi almost every day. Who's working on her book? And just that process of witnessing a master craftsmen sitting in witnessing the development of their piece page by page you know was the fuel part of the fuel. I think For making this happen because you know the creative processes abstract it feels sometimes like you're doing nothing. So it was so encouraging and affirming to witness another person in that practice accumulating that by that they came to work on thou dissolves the descriptions of you your prodigy or this year that. I would like to lean into the microphone now and Dispel those myths that hours a prodigy. Or inally I. I wasn't a prodigy. I'm I have a talent and music and I found my way early on but I have seen prodigies I know prodigies in a think. It's like A. It's like a subset of the species and I just. I partly want to dispel spell that myth because I think it's misleading in. It makes it seem like maybe there's something special or something different fundamentally above all you know my makeup as as an entity as a humanoid and it's not true in a there there are some folks who are in their exceedingly rare And then there are other folks who just figured out a way to get a lot of practice in early on. And it accumulates and then you can do things that other ten year old can't do but it's not necessarily because I was a prodigy. It's because I. I played a lot. You know practiced the will. Is that good? Because you know prodigies and being prodigy often is. It's it's maladaptive They don't it's if you're great at something when you're five often you doing the same thing at thirty five and four. You know. There's always those this great classical musicians. Who are you know who are described. As the fifty year old child prodigy Can't get past What what they did a certain age right and I the part that I hear resonate with about that quote unquote prodigy. Part is simply the part where nobody can explain why you can do what you can do. and I I think. Part of what sets prodigy apart. Is that for the same amount of time that their friend in the music school puts in this kid gets more done. Somehow somehow there's able to do more for reasons that nobody can explain and at a certain point when you want to expand past what it is you become good at but you don't remember why you can do what you do. That is intimidating and stressful. It can be and I can appreciate why you wouldn't when lean into that territory And there are some aspects about you know my practice that I'd cycling. Before the divination there are some aspects that. I'll know I'll know how that happens. How it works but when I try to apply that to a new. Let's say like riding on opera doesn't work then you just like Okay there's a process here there's a there's a skill set that must be developed to yield the same results over here as I'm able to yield over there without having necessarily mastered that skill set so Jason I have compassion for the fifty year. Old Child Prodigies Mount Their What was your first experience of music than what do you remember? Well it would be my mother singing and the House and making up little songs about whatever was happening in the moment song. She had this one. She don't need cry cozy. Emma is by Yama who love him on oven. The leave you. You don't need the crackles your Mama his you know. I'll know where that comes from. But she should always have this little soundtrack happening to life It was a wakeup song. There was prepping the meal song And that is my first memory music. My first memory of music Out There Liz. Hearing you'll Ma Amazon neighborhood like that so many times in my life but it was in your Ma Ma hearing the buck cello sleep. I don't know if it was a Omar. Is the bacteria sleaze by the way he was the vehicle and Mister Rogers neighborhood Mister Rogers neighborhood Which also the interesting piece about that episode is. After Yoma performed they went to make believe land In that episode. The next thing that happened is lady. Aber Limb was dressed as an upright bass and the other woman character was playing upright bass and I don't have a conscious memory of seeing that but that again was like the download that all came at once and then it's a humbling recommend. Oh I'm again just. I'm just following the programming that I didn't even realize I received you know what five memory on Mister Rogers Neighborhood Nevada? Actually have this really interesting it since. I only know that that happened. Because I've seen it since I don't have a conscious memory of seeing that in the episode. What I remember is hearing. I don't know it was about the time I can remember the trickling in the this Almost like pain. You know you such a deep sensation of attraction to something that I felt towards the music. That your mom was playing no conscious memory of seeing the bases but later when I saw the apples. I want all damn. I'm just I just follow instructions that all the time Those are my first memories of music. You can do worse than follow Mr Rogers men. I agree I think he did well. Angry and then you first was what well it would've been violent They didn't have any Half size of course as challenges at the program that I I S- enter. Music through Solo was fortunately or unfortunately violin and that now unfortunately didn't like violent didn't really like the. I like other people playing the violin but I will seeking that now. I will seeking what I heard. You WanNa Cello. I wanted the cello and thank God. Then I just get past the Tele Wont Right up right up to the next floor up to the base and then went. When did the base start? You know I don't know if the base has started yet it's such a immense territory and for all the technical facility one can accumulate early on a Yann serves uh very profound function music and I. I think that the older one gets more. One matures the better. They are actually being a bass player. So I don't know I don't know of base has begun Y- When you start playing. How much were you practicing? I don't remember really probably a lot. I I don't. I don't remember those early days. I just remember Playing by ear and suddenly hearing this music that I was told was jazz and having a very deep again visceral reaction to whatever they were doing you know having no understanding of what it was how it worked Yeah are you still at kind of instinctual player or I is. This is what scares people about jazz. It's incredibly complicated. It seems like endless. Scales it All that theory you know all that stuff now even though thumb. Yeah Yeah and and it never ends because the invites because I don't feel authorized to speak on behalf of the Genera anyway because our say I`Ma jazz singer when I need to be and I can play Bass for the jazz musicians but the center piece like the center of what it is. I do isn't really jazz because of that practice and devotion that is required. You don't think you have it not in that way. Not In that way as an instrumentalist which is fine is cool because I can still support the instrumentalists who are in that. Devotional devotional practice. But that's how you started. You were known as a jazz bassist won best new artist. I think Grammy Ray that right right. Yeah and still. I wonder what the parallel is in writing. It's like you can support. You can be a part of something without actually being devoting of that craft Well most writing saw e e mean writing music or right. I mean writing word. So what do you know if I go on Youtube? I see playing with Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea. Yeah what are they a? What are you giving them then? the there's gotTa be more technically sophisticated players or at least more theoretically sophisticated players. They know you're doing this by instinct. What do they get when I asked you to come play with me? What what am I getting? You're giving listening and light speed response and some dance floor for your dance mom. I'm giving you a moving dancefloor And I have studied some of the theory. Just say partially. I like to re articulate this because for any young aspiring instrumentalists listening. I WanNa make sure that I'm speaking that truth that to be a quote unquote jazz musician. Like don't listen to me. Listen to Scott colley are You Know Ben Williams a Christian McBride or Linda old or the players. Who If you if you WANNA have a q? Into the expression of the jazz pedagogy listen to those bass players. I'm doing something that's valuable and beautiful and works and supports but it's not really coming from that kind of devotional. Space is very intuitive and very much in the presence Very much something that evolves in relationship with players you know so yes I can play hurry. I can play with chick because I'm I'm becoming what is needed in that moment with my technical facility to you. Don't come as my voice as my listening as my voice. It's almost like an active listening With players like that So they are. They cause your band leaders. Well when you're playing with players that are they kind of setting the tone. And then year respondent his add more call response with them. Yeah it's it's more like well with somebody like you know Herbie Hancock Geri Allen. They want to have the conversation that can only happen with you in the room is not like here. These ten songs. You happen to be the one here so yeah come getting on this and make this work for me. Specially with her we especially with Jerry is more like oh who are you. What do we sound like together and in that space it might kind of be an advantage not be too tethered to a technical historical pedagogical approach making the music. Because then you're free to discover what's actually happening in real time which might not sound like anything that that player did before. It's going to have their characteristic but that is my superpower. You know of being president going low what what is actually right now. Let's make it and it won't probably happen again and that was that you know Do you have to do to make eye contact with a player to do that? You have to see what he's doing does here really Could you blindfolded? Yeah of course really yeah. I don't look the instrument. I play your instrument of the combination of if you're playing with Wayne shorter here handcock there. Yeah that's a great day. I wish that would happen more. You know String quartets yeah. The players kind of have to see each other cues right. How important is that in? Mind when you're playing in a jazz combo while I'm thinking of and thinking a windshields quartet they are very much connected with each other looking at each other but I am. Positively do everything. They do blindfolded because they're they're co composing a scene you know it's like I'm sure actors could have a perfectly poet and coherent improvised scene blindfolded. Because you're you're responding to the reality of emotional response you you're responding to look comes at you at eventually. A momentum of the scene is generated and that is propelling. Forward as much as you're creating as you go. You know the that mode of performance co composition. Improvisation is like that okay. Next time you with Herbie Hancock I want you to blindfold yourself and see. See how it goes. I would never ask him to do that. But I'll think I'll just I'll hold it in the space and see what happens if I don't I mean I remember Dancing Tango a little bit when I was a teenager. And you'll the certain fundamental that you learn and is an improvisational dance form right. Obviously when you're dancing with a phenomenal dancer. Everything's kind of works. You and I remember that experience of being very inexperienced and getting on the dance floor and just like Oh damn I can do. I'm good shoot every twist and turn it. Kick him all kinds of then. You go dancing in the next partner. And it's like you know. It's like fumble a silverware drawer without a divider. You know So there's also something to be said for the potency of the master you know that partially just by playing with somebody like that the The immensity of their musicianship and ability to make everything work kind of high. End Your own capacity and shows what is possible. We'll be back with more from Esperanza spalding. After the break according ziprecruiter's research nearly a third of employers say they have a hard time filling open positions if you have a difficult role to fill no matter what your industry higher zipper. And now you can try Ziprecruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash broken record. Ziprecruiter sends your job to over one hundred top job sites but they don't stop. Ziprecruiter is affected that four out of five employers who post Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. Ziprecruiter free my listeners can go to ziprecruiter dot com slash broken record. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM Slash Biaro K. E. N. R. E. C. or ziprecruiter dot com slash. Broken Record Ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire. Hey it's Ben Henry and Marcus hosts of the last podcast on the left are shows dedicated to uncovering hilariously horrifying stuff. And now we're only on spotify if you want. Obviously we'd never force anyone to just blindly bad be crazy but if you like stories about doomsday cults who do exactly that and more please on spotify visit spotify dot com slash last podcast to listen free. We're back with more from Esperanza spalding. Before we jump back into the interview but see your song from Esperanza second op. Some two thousand and eight and much closer to the jazz compositions. She wrote and arranged early in her career. Here's I know you know from the album. Esperanza what's it like working with Wayne shorter? You talked about his his writing before. What's playing with them? We've actually only played a few times And it felt like visiting another planet. It truly felt like we've been living on one musical planet your whole life seeing different lands and territories and cities and towns and royalities and municipalities. And then you step onto what you think is just another land. You Know Music Star. Okay here we are and all the sudden you recognize. Not all of this is different. All of this is is extraterrestrial. All of this is expansive. All of this is is just more and different and shaped like the earth. Maybe the gravity is similar but it's not He is so incredibly adept at connecting seemingly disparate ideas In a room in a conversation and musically that is it's like it feels like you. You have to start listening at light speed to be able to connect what just came over there with what's happening over there That that is nebulous I apologize. It's hard to describe it but Is it scary with someone like that? Yeah sure yeah much though. Yeah in wise. It's scary. Why is Gary? What is scaring me in that context? Is it scary is carrying a sense of. Oh Damn can I can I hang? Can I help can I wou can I feel free? What is it of the of the most that I can bring into this space? Will it have a place? Will it work? You know you know. It's like sitting on a table and a conversations already happening and ULA. I don't know if anybody hears talking about but I'm being asked to come and speak so it's something a lot having the trust that your life is enough that what you've lived Endows you with insight in perspective and presence and that other people at the table actually WanNa talk with you? So it's not about I'm able to refer to the things that you all have studied in. No it's something about having the confidence that at any point in time we can find a commonplace to converse. You always find Jewish confident when you're playing with someone that you can find it. You ever feel nervous like disgust talking about something I really. Of course we don't we all I mean. Hopefully that's how you know you're expanding In having new tastes in new experiences. You know it's not always feel equipped like coming in Sleigh I don't mean that but are there times you're playing with someone on used shorter and and you just feel like man. I'm just disappointing here. I'm not contributing while listening as contributing. I mean that's so much of the gift of some of the WHO so full like a Wayne shorter just hanging out with him at the house. I mean just just listening is becomes dialogue and become dynamic 'cause we we need to heard to you know for all that poetry in Wisdom and philosophy philosophical playmaking. That one can do. It's not fun when you're just by yourself in the House I think he's looking at amusing himself but Yeah that's that's a valuable. That's what I mean by being the moving dancefloor it is. It's valuable it's valuable to very different artists That you like and I'd like to know more about her influences Joni Mitchell who god Joni. Mitchell is interesting to me because she has. She seems to have to audiences everybody likes. Everybody knows big yellow taxi and both sides now and and people love her veer for being part of a generation but jazz people really like her. What is it your hearing in her. What inspires you? I mean Jazz. People like creative seeking music. You know in general all the desk people that I know. Don't just listen to jazz music. They listen to music that seems to be reaching and finding new combinations of the sounds that we're all working with out here essentially So what is it about her music? That would you hearing there? I think if I actually try to articulate it is going to be a lie because the obvious that points that we all are drawn to leg the the poetic imagery and the unexpected way that she illuminates a scene and brings us into a place and a space in an emotional understanding of a person or relationship. There's just There's something magical magnetic which doesn't tell you anything but I the way where I feel the draw. I can't honestly articulate. I think part of it is the the attraction to somebody showing possibility that so far beyond anything that's been revealed in that genre or mode of playing before as a quote unquote folk musician as a color as lyricists slyke watching her. I can't explain it I should say when I even said Her name you serve. Yea But your hand up to your heart like slightly stricken and that's the that's the that's the Yeah that's the mystery. The mystery you can hear strands of the sort of thing she does in. I think particularly your emily album. Okay cool that's when I discovered music ozone right Have you ever met her? Yeah for sure. I jammed at her house a few times. Okay this year last year towing that story now well I I say very surreal. Experience actually was but backup. Tell us that story are you. Are you ended up there? Who was there well. The first time that I went to her house. I went to her house because We Okay I had the backup a step further glass dear. I move to La for seven months to be near Wayne and to be on the ground. Moving forward the development this opera. Because I felt I get a gut and stagnant. Somehow you know just the the logistics of work shopping in getting it off of the but page and out of the speculative into the real and I. I need to just go there. You know Wayne having some really intense health issues and I wanted him to feel like thing is really happening like we're doing this. We're doing this. So that turned into some very inventive. Approaches to making workshops happen. Orchestral workshops happen seen workshops happen at a time when he couldn't physically right he was suffering for metabolic tremor and so we had to figure out a way to get what he had written up into an orchestra and I thought that the most embittering thing for him will be to actually feel come back at him what he had written so that it would feel like an operas really happening here. We're doing those every week every two weeks and at some point it came up. Well Gosh Johnny her that you're doing Johnny Johnny. Mitchell heard that you're doing this and wishes that she could see it. But you know it's hard for the house will bulla and I don't know whose idea was. It was her assistant. So why don't we have the rehearsal it at Johnny's House so we did? We took a Sheva formal role in the opera or shown. Just just an. She wanted to hear. When was working on and thought it was cool so she opened her home to us so we brought a piano player and about five singers and a small little orchestra probably eight players we crammed into her music room and she sat next to. Wayne and I sat next to Wayne and Frank Gehry. Who's working on the set who will be making sets also came over and it was it was just a surreal moment in time that. I actually forgot about until you said it. Because it was so surreal. It didn't seem like a part of this plane. You know 'cause those I would say. Those are two of my favorite creators of all time. You know and a lot can be said about the moment partially was surreal. Because I was so dissatisfied with the the Libretto at that particular moment I was just cringing. Like like the master of words was. They're hearing. Why like unfinished words? So ridiculous But Yeah I was. That was biting my nails. You know for the whole time. I was at the first time you've met her now. I meditate before but I didn't stick. Yeah 'cause I was just drooling and you know so. This time forming sentence still dreaming drilling forming sentences but she said she liked my my life force suit and that is that the one you're wearing when I'm running out for US forces does and that really lifted my spirits. Yeah is it. Did you design that? Of course yeah. I wanted to Stay in touch with the The focal point of my work. You know I'm seeking ways to translate though the Po- I'm seeking ways to bring us into resonance with our unique and abundant life force energy and I also wanted a break from worrying about what to wear at events or just in the street or anywhere and I knew that it was gonna be a year of hard works. I made it work suit for myself to sit. So that's all you wear the ATHOL eyewear. How many of those do you have pled eleven twelve nasty like a superhero? You just get in the cost every day. That's the that's the goal. That's the goal. Be Superhero. Yeah Yeah I'm my version of it. Be a super me. You know so what I'm interested. What Joni I've never met Joni Mitchell? Oh you will I would love to. Yeah we're both Canadian after all fax. What did she say to you? What when when she heard what you're doing man I don't remember. She said all kinds of things it was it was out of body out of body but later. I did play some jam sessions I got to play Bass for her and I got to play an arrangement for her of the wolf. That lives in Lindsey. And she doug that I did did she. Was she singing when you were playing now? I just prefer yeah once. I played for her when she was thinking like living room. Like a session. Like this you know. She invites musicians and we play the song she wants to sing. And and people play song that she wants to hear our songs that they are working on that they've like so you talked about playing with with Herbie Hancock. What what's it like playing with Joni Mitchell? Well it's the deepest listening you've ever done in your life. She's the deepest listening ever is not about women. Play with Johnny. I am listening for what she's doing in that moment and where her voice is going and I wanNA offer the the the tones the rhythms that make it feel good for her to sink at that moment you know. How did it go was perfect perfect? She Sang Lover Man a couple of the tunes old Song Government. Okay Yeah there's she loves you know. Loves JAZZ CLASSICS THE STANDARD? She had trouble for a long time finding bass player. Show said basically didn't understand music 'cause YOU DID. I'll I'll know That's interesting you did okay. Yeah Yeah we'll be back with more brisk conversation with Esperanza spalding. After a quick break. We're back before here. The rest of Bruce's interview with US Baraza. Listen to a track. Offer Album Emily's de-evolution. We'll talk a bit more about in a second I. Here's the song change us then. A storm is already a woman club owned in the live. But then see you on the on shine and for some more share overly and David Ladder Ball. That affects your young. I no hey start kicking. You said you weren't that you weren't the prodigy and you weren't even now you you describe yourself as not you don't feel like you're fully part of the kind of jazz world you're not but it's I was just GonNa say you went to Berkeley which is spike the MIT of Jazz. Oh God it's not bless its heart. It's it's an incredible convening space For everybody passionate about pursuing a grim is a it is truly truly truly is but yeah. It's it's like those terms that nomenclature of what the music is. I think that the term refers to a very specific kind of devotion. So when I'm saying I'm not a quote UNQUOTE. Desma is just out of respect for for that modality of devotion. I'm devoted to making and creating and this. That's his own thing. It's just. It's okay with me that. I'm that I'm not. You know an emissary of that devotional practice and and I think it's something also about wanting to get out from under the signifier of being desma position because I feel like in some ways I used that or it was used to promote meazza creator and now out of respect for what the the devotional practices. I WANNA. I WanNa make sure that it were clear about what's you know. Okay but because you mean you do a lot of different kinds of music. Fanta mean re listening to emily. Which was your album before this one. I think the Alma for this one. You can't get this book. But that. But Emily was a a really. Those are really heavy. I wish our co host Rick Rubin was here because he's an old metal guy he would like Guitar Solos But what were you listening to when you did that album? Damn I was listening to I A lot of David Bowie Jimi Hendrix Cream at a lot of cream but listening to cream a little bit. I had seen the documentary by Ginger Baker And you were twiss. Tony Visconti. Who PRODUCED BOWIE T REX? It's got a lot of that. Good Dr Bennett. Yeah I'm like sonically the world that. Emily needed to do what she came to do. Had those elements that you described it. It was loud and it generated movement and it was about a power trio and it was a ball an expression of power and breaking out of whatever have been practiced and whatever had become familiar. Whatever have become fixed identity? So that's what? Emily needed to to burst into existence. And Emily was a real character. That you did you. It's my it's the lava of myself. It's was the middle character a me. It was also maybe more than your other work about the songs themselves to you. Written a lot of songs pitcher we tend to think of jazz is kind of a flow true true and this was more like a song like change us. Oh my gosh that's right. There's no. There's no reason that wouldn't it? Be a top forty hit. I know that's did you want it to be a top forty hit I mean I didn't I didn't want to not be a top forty hit but That hasn't I mean Damn. I asked Emily what she wanted to do. And those are the songs that came out and I didn't ask too many questions you know there wasn't a lot of what are the. What are the influences being this like? What do we want to happen with? What will it was just like? Here's the instruction manual from Emily. Let's build it. And as he will we get and we'll more from there. You like the instruction manuals. I do like the instruction manuals at trust that because you also did an album where you said. It was on facebook live. We're going to do it in seventy seven hours. Yeah and you did the whole thing. Yeah everybody could watch well that offering that performance was the performance of the act of creation. So how do you make an album of creation mimic an album of the creation process? That was the way that we figured out. We could capture or share my favorite part of making things which is a moment where you get the hit you think of this thing. And then you forge it. That process of forging it into the thing was the focal point of that project. as an act of improvisation actually is like I quote Wayne a lot. One of my favorite quotes as he says composition is improvisation slowed down. An improvisation is composition sped up mass with that project was. Have you gone back to watch that after you down? Thank you no no thank you no. I haven't went on while it's it already happened. You know it's like it already. It was a it was a thing that was alive in a moment. It's like a kiss or a or a dance unabridged who didn't expect with a stranger. It happened and the magic of it was that it was happening in real time and then it wasn't going to happen again and that everybody with us was with us in that moment at that particular spot on the continuum of eternity so yeah. I don't I don't I don't have any need to go back and look at it Would compare it to when I was watching clips of it was let it be. Which is that's what the Beatles tried to do. They tried to show people how they were making an album. Oh cool that's why. I'm wondering if you'd have learned something about how you made music if you did that. Well part of the for opening up that process was to share the Carla the ugly moments and the scary moments and the risk and the. Yeah the the the imperfections that go into making anything beautiful so to to let it be seen that most of the process of making the song working with something. That didn't really work. But you can hear how a seed of that then led to what it became and I felt like that was something worth sharing in a moment where so much of what we interface with is polished and complete and Kinda seems like it just like woah. Dropped Down Glistening from the heavens. I was excited to share. Who Actually am who we all actually are as creators that that's most of who we are. The majority of what makes us performers artists and creators. Is that process. The finish thing is only like the last one hundredth of the whole being in on but most artists. They WANNA protect it other ninety nine. They don't want that out. That's the ugly part. I've so why do you want that out? I liked that part. I wanted to celebrate that part. And you know that's my element. Also the same way that performers get on stage. Show their best stuff. They show like the best that they had to give to me me. Creating is my best steph. That's why I wanted to share that as the performance Which is kind of a jazz idea? I mean probably more than more than pop the SAM. When did Singing Star for you? I'm you know I was thinking I was like that really matter. I mean probably eight or nine or ten. I feel like maybe we could talk about. What's what's brewing. Now I mean singing started when I was it out in the world probably fifteen and I. I feel like this particular moment in my life as a creator. I'm less interested in like the origin and I'm more interested in now as an origin point. You know okay well let me reframe. I'm interested in. I'm interested in what's happened because I went back and read some early reviews. And they'd say oh. Her slender voice says she sings along. And then you listen to these albums and you're like no that's like a powerhouse gay. I don't really think about my voice. I have to confess it. Some I really I practice. You know I try to sing to build I. I studied to sit to build capacity in different TAMBOR's and all that but then you sink compose. I do think the compose so you're working on this opera. Oh my God. Thank you Segue I'm are you singing. Those parts are you. I will sink in some capacity in this odd. No I don't mean in final harm you in the final product. I mean the when you're working on it. Are you singing in your head? Are you singing out loud? Sometimes this process will make an opera is upside down inside out from how operas usually mate because it took me so long to get the little written that Wayne. Ardy wrote all the music. So now we're reckoning with this incredible body of work. Which is the music that he wrote sort of in these three acts already and drying story and language out from that So in that case sometimes I sing. But I'm actually trying to hear what an operatic voice would do with one of these lines And there's a lot of speaking because some of the passages the music functions as the environment and they're having conversation representative it's called or sometimes just spoken through thinking about or further unpacking that invitation to write what you wish for the opera seeks to interrupt the repetition of the same story being played out that's played an original myth and. I'm looking for a way that as a writer I can even interrupt the way. The endings are usually created What's the what's the is common method evidence? So she's the one who gets her throat slit while she sacrificed. So that the winds will return. And that Agamemnon. His brother in the fleet they've assembled to go recapture. Helen can sail across the ocean to Troy It's all it's the story before the Trojan Horse Story that we all know And I this process of Meghan Opera has unlocked question about who gets to tell the story even me as a as a woman in the twenty first century and is a time when voices that have often been in the background. Now get to come up. And and and direct new narratives. New Speculative narratives we get to bring to the to the arena are stories that have been silenced for so long even in this space. I'm asking the question. How do we how do I? How do we how do I break the cycle of tyranny of the individual voice of Storyteller and I I wonder what becomes possible in the telling of this story when figures people characters who are often scripted into storytelling opera? Singers musicians or actors. What becomes possible when they're voice activated in the actual design of the story in the telling of the story That is really really challenging to do. It's beyond my capacity right now but that's that's what we're reaching for. Who's telling the story now? Well I am I mean and Euripides told it and it's it's part of the Odyssey and it was surely a myth that had been passed on for generations before it got written down But I I am. I am really curious right now. What happens when the ending isn't prescribed and instead of barreling towards what we've been told must happen. We say no what happens if we leave space for an unknown ending to emerge from us. I guess co creating real time to. That's the sort of that is the jazz ethos isn't it? We're going to substitute chords. Were going to change it well. And all of those are just methods for approaching life in real time an improvising in response to what's actually happening you know it's not about like I'm GonNa change a chord because I'm a jazz musician is about while I have. I have access to enough Material that I can respond to with actually happening From a large batch of PAS movie I'm not I'm not fixed by what I've practiced. I'm not fixed by what I've learned is supposed to happen next aisle. That's it. Yeah I'm not. I am not limited to what I've learned as opposed to happen next. That's the key to how I WANNA break open ending of this opera. Yes right. I'm glad we're talking about this. He seems a perfect place to stop. Yeah Amazing Heart will thank you so much. Thank you thanks. That's spalding. For taking time away from crack in his story structure of her upcoming opera. To talk with Bruce you can hear all of our favorite. Esperanza spalding songs. By checking out the platelets for this episode at Broken Record podcasts Dot Com broken records produced help from Jason Gambro. Michelle Lee rose for pushing industries a theme. He's expect any beats. I'm just in Richmond. Thanks for listening.

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This Is Us Season 4 Episode 15

Paul and Caroline Daley review TV - Handmaid's Tale | The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel | This Is US | Westworld | Stranger Things

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

This Is Us Season 4 Episode 15

"It's time for the daily review. Podcast dedicated to reviews and discussion of TV. Movies AND BOOKS LOOK FOR US. Daily Review on facebook and twitter and Daily Review Dot Com on the web. That's Da L. E. Y. Review Dot Com. This is this is caroline tonight. We're here to discuss the fifteenth episode of the Fourth Season of. Nbc's this is us. This one was simply named clouds. You GotTa title read. It is the name of Joni Mitchell's second studio album. Shut up Paul. You're good. I don't know anyone else's second album names except for Joni Mitchell. I use pulled that right out of your ass crack air like here. You go clouds by Jody Michelle. Oh my Gosh I love it. This episode had a lot going on in terms of pushing our stories forward. We're going to start off with Randal this time which normally we might leave. Randall to last because he tends to be so heavy and complicated but I want to dive right in to eager to talk about his story this time we have. That flashback of report card dame where we set him up as an anxious youngster wanting to make sure he gets the best grades possible. We had the little bit with Beth. Saying like you know Let's get going to therapy kinda thing right. But then the majority of his storyline is in therapy. Let me ask you Paul. What did you think of this therapist? What was just your initial vibe. The there's a lot of things going on in those scenes. My initial vibe was was shaped because of some of those some of those things. Okay talk to me. The tight camera angle on his face not allowing us to see the doctor shortening our our perspective to only be Randall. And then making the coffee sound. Be This thing that Kinda got to bug us as much as bugged him having been in that chair myself and trying to explain away my own problems to someone that doesn't know me all felt kinda familiar and in a in a certain way too. But what did you think about her? Like okay so you. So you've been in the chair fine but this woman says Oh. I know your story Paul. I've heard your speeches. What are you thinking of this? Actual therapist seemed like she was trying to get a rise out of him. She seemed grows and the fact that we didn't see her for the longest time until the very end. It weirded me out really weirded me out what was that supposed to do. From like a film standpoint what are we supposed to be disengaged from her or was she supposed to come off that angry sounding or just or what? I think it was that if you if you go back and listen to Randall's answers most of his monologue in those sections because he really was just kind of talking to himself really. It was all about how he knew everything. He was fine with what he knew. He was sure about everything and so the idea was that the his perspective was just closed in right around him. Okay I like that. And so the camera was reflecting that too okay. I like that a lot. Can we talk about the couple of things that really really bothered him? So I thought professionalism portion right. I understand that the camera didn't show. But what do we think about the idea that she had gone and done any amount of research and or knew who he was in advance? Do we think any of that is okay? Do you need to have in anonymity with your therapist beforehand or was that like just jarring generally? I'm not a public figure so I never experienced however I have seen the Sopranos and the same thing's happened in the sopranos which he calls out. Was that the therapist from the Sopranos when they showed the are. You sure sounds very similar. Not they showed her face her no. It's on her but I mean she did a dead on sound alike of that sort of monotonous kinda deeper voiced woman affect that she had. But it's not the same same person her name you looking for. Lorraine BRACCO and it's not her. I'm looking for your mom. Your mom. Your mom is the therapist therapist. She's not qualified for that. How do you know what my mom's qualified because they hang up the she has special office? You don't even know while you find that that that is one of the opening parts of the relationship between Tony. Soprano and Dr Melfi is that she knows who he is and the reason she has to explain that is because if he were to explain anything that were that was a crime then she would be forced to report that and so she wanted to be very upfront about not wanting to be involved with any of that and so he had to re tool his narratives in his sessions to not make any crimes Very obvious that they that they went down anyway. So the actress that plays that therapist is Pamela. Adlon from better things. I don't know her. I don't know her either. Shows a good doctor. Melfi impression though she does she really does. Do you think that this the setup for like entrapment in terms of the coffee maker making that his which was fucking annoying was annoying to me was going to you watched with the screener and I think the sound effects were temporary because it sounded a lot like someone was using one of those glade air freshener automated things. That's just out of control like in the microphone like Shit. I don't know if I was hearing the the final sound effect but it was nasty. Was like really like how could you let this keep happening wasn't entrapment like did does she let it happen to be obnoxious to see if the person snaps at a sound at a sound like an auditory sugar? The whole thing felt like a setup in a way which I don't under- I you know my therapist. I don't understand if that's actual approach to trying to break somebody down or not but right but what was the other thing like I mean. He walked in and felt very very confronted by that picture hanging on the wall. But did did you recognize? It was something that upset. You recall it. It was like a person over like a chalk drawing with a bunch of balloons. Kind of floating. I you guys I. He was so pissed about. Why would you hang that up there? Her like what the Fuck Dude. He's pretty tuned up. I mean Oh yeah. Speaking of therapy. What do you think about the idea that Jack is the one that taught him the running and he kind of treated the running as essentially a replacement for actual therapy? You're just taught. Just keep running and that'll it'll all work itself out of you. Just focus on this physical activity. That's good advice for a boy but doesn't really apply to a man or do you think it's just like not great advice. Well a so as somebody who has definitely employed in a therapist in my life for various family members. I think that the literal running is positive in terms of getting out that extra energy and feeling a little bit of fatigue and sometimes that can quite your mind but the metaphorical like you could. Just keep running and running and running and Shit's not going to catch up to you. I mean want want. No of course not like. It's definitely going to get you at some point this. Yeah Paul you should stop reading. I would I mean definitely. We've all seen people use exercise as a means to control stress and Ihnen does combat stress. It isn't a bad way to do it. But I think that for Randall. Even at a very young age it was very clear that he needed a lot more support than just the Physical Stress Relief of jogging. He really really showed time and time again. He was a very stressed and anxious person. Do you think that that might come back in these sessions where even though it seems like The doctor wants to focus on mom. Do you think we have enough time for them to bring up dad. I do think that Dad's got to be brought up because I mean at the end of the day this is us really does try to bring Jack into every storyline. So there's really no way to not have him be a part of this therapy. Although I was really surprised he came back to the therapist. Everything about that therapy session upset me like I didn't want to be in therapy. I hated this therapist when he says. If if it wasn't for me my family my whole family would fall apart because. I'm the person that keeps it together when I think back just taking at face value. He's the one that throws Thanksgiving and that's like the big one altogether. He's the one that was the keeper of the Pilgrim. Jack Hatton he he has that gluing the family together when his brother is off filming things his sister has had her own batch of issues and now does have a special needs child but she's always kind of had her own batch of issues he always was the one that cared a lot about making sure they were altogether and he kept on the tradition so when she says. Oh would they follow up our would they? As if to imply your family would be completely fine. Even if you weren't on the face of the earth is like what the fuck are you doing lady like I know on one hand? That's like a you can take pressure off yourself because the weight of this family is not on your shoulders and it is up to everyone to keep the family together. Okay I got that but the way to say that like Oh would they fall apart? Would they now is so ugly and confronting in a way. That's like are you trying to make me feel like I'm not important and I don't play an important role in my family. Like Holy Shit Lady. How many people walk off single walk right in front of a bus like fucking Shit? Yeah I thought that the solution was not that he not go back to therapy. I thought the solution was just finding more compatible therapist hails. Yeah I don't think I could have step foot back in that office. I'll be honest with you. I don't think I could because I don't think I could deal with a therapist. Who was going to have that edge? Inner voice you know like I feel like I would automatically be like what is your damage heather like. I cannot continue to look at you like this and you already are making me feel like very on edge that you know who? I am almost the way that she said it almost felt. I know this is off base but it almost felt like blackmail early like it felt like inclu. When the person's I I know who you are and I know who you work for like also like the fuck. I'm sitting in this like you. Know playroom of therapy office in. I don't know why you're talking to me like that. Why don't you just let me tell you that what my job is and what I do like why are you? Why would you cut me off to tell me something like that? You could see where she she would want to try to provoke away to get him off script so that he starts to say something that is new in and something that has been generated by fresh thought rather than running off script. Okay I can lean into that a lot the idea that like I don't want you to just keep telling me the same thing but wouldn't like ninety percent of therapists say it seems as though you've told this story before and perhaps it even is something that just comes off almost like rote memory for you. Maybe we could export in a different way rather than be like. I know who you are. And I've heard your speech is like it was so aggressive was. I don't know maybe I'm just being super sensitive. I don't know that first session with a therapist. If they're not asking for for that kind of information than you know they're just GonNa take you from here and move forward without looking back and tried to treat you is that that's not real. I just don't I don't know she really wigged out. If there's if there's therapists out there that are listening to this. Who SAY NO. This is like a real well-documented of very effective method of dealing with first time patients. You've got to shake him up. You gotta rattle them got upset them you know and then if they come back you know they're serious or I don't know what I'm not sure what this. Maybe this is a true method but boy did it bother me and I gotta say I'm someone who has Mesa phony. That's somebody who gets very irritated. Easily about noises. The hissing thing out of all right so the first thing we have to deal with. Is that noise where it's coming from. It has to stop and then if you WANNA talk about how we're going to make me feel better about. Sounds awesome but like that's got to stop. I'm going to turn inside out right now and I gotTa tell you I thought is he. Is Everyone hearing the sound or is it only randall? I thought that too. I got really nervous. That it was like is does he think people are like booing and hissing Adam. I don't know what's happening. So Weird. The tail end of Randall's story is him. I mean just before he goes back to the doctor goes to Beth and he's like it's not for me new and Beth lays it on him like the truth of it in. I was just wondering does that. Does that feel familiar at all? Does that does that ring true to you. I think that the concept of you have a responsibility to the other people that you share your life with to do your best to maintain your own mental and physical health is a real message and is very fair and very reasonable the idea of just neglecting yourself and thinking that will the only person I'm harming is myself is Is just not accurate when you're in a family and especially with Beth and Randall. Where everything she was saying was so real. You know that she was a part of a break into. She has fears and concerns too but she can't even share that with him or get much get support because he is he is so fragile and so is like the camera so narrow on his way he sees things right on his experience right like the fact that she chose to go to her. Mom's house with the girls. I mean that should have been a little flag to you and I watching the show as long we have the she's only dealt with her mom like one other time and she went with her sister so the fact that post burglary she opts to take the kids and leave the house for a while. I should have said something like. Oh Wow. That's really not something that Beth normally does. She is really uncomfortable with being in the house as much as she's verbally saying you're you know everything's fire and we have the cameras everything's fine. She is choosing to take breaks and be in places where she's in a familiar setting where she feels safe. You know that that is indicative of somebody who needs some reinforcement getting away to feel more comfortable. You know so. She is showing the signs but we just haven't had a big spotlight on how she's handling the burglary so I appreciate it every single thing that she did. I appreciate it. I think when it comes to you and I if you're asking me in a more like personal way I think that always I've any wife would want their husband to feel better and feel happy to to deal with themselves and in our case with three special needs kids. Yeah I mean I think that the the general sentiment of we all need you to be whole and healthy because there's other people in this House that we don't have a way to make them whole and healthy Anything any one of US can do to try to be more strong or or however you wanna say it more generally healthy. I guess is the word I want to say. I mean we all have to take advantage of whatever we can to to feel better. That make sense does does so. I think it was fair and I think it's a really good message for like this. Is US fans. Like you know if you're if you are resisting getting help because you think it's no big deal and you're not really affecting anyone else wrong. You're probably affecting everyone in your life. You do have some amount of responsibility to get help so that they can also you can also be a good partner or good husband are good bad or good son or whatever right right okay. Let's talk about the idea of being a good dad because that is something that is completely trying to be addressed here. How do you feel about this? Toby and Kate Storyline. And this whole idea that it was okay for toby to say the things he did because after all in marriage you should be able to say anything you want and it should be safe. I would probably say that I believe that more than you might expect. Tell where else is he supposed to get that feeling out and sort it out? If not at home he was just going to continue doing what he was doing. Avoiding his his actual life going to the gym goes staying at work. Whatever by saying what he said as hurtful as it was it was like then as damaging as it was to hear it was only then that it was like out there and needed to be dealt with some accents. I think so I will pull it back to the idea that I think that it's fair and safe to have any feelings that you have within a marriage and try to express that but I think that the way that you express that and the everything kinda surrounding that look the way that he had been hiding at the gym and the way that he did have this lady Kryptonite situation to kind of like layer this and then laid on for me was like no. Nobody's obligated to take that level of ugliness on whether your marriage or not you know like you. You had a responsibility to talk to her earlier than this point and or come to her and say I'm having a real problem. I have this awful feeling that the reason. Why I'm not bonding with Jack is because I am so upset by his disability that I just feel like it's a barrier between us but like the whole way that it all came out for me is like I I really don't think you can expect just to be able to say those kind of words to anybody making sense like the sentiment could be the same but people still have feelings and are not allowed to just sorta like implode than where he's supposed to do it. I mean He. I think Beth would tell you in therapy. And then you then you try to deal with people in a more constructive and not bust everything up kind of way you know. Let me actually. If you look at these two men had have issues and they were handling in very similar yet. Different ways Randall. Solving all these problems and he's running he's physically trying to get it out right and then you have toby going to the gym and he's physically trying to get it out and trying to kind of work it through and everything of course then you have like the the extra woman situation that is questionable because like you said in a previous episode while he might not have been the one to. Kiss Lady Kryptonite. What had he done? What messages vibes had he been sending her that made. It seem like it's okay to move forward with that. So he clearly was a participant on some level. Still I just yeah I mean I don't. I don't think that I don't think marriage is a free pass dumping ground to build a shit in the mouth of your partner unless she specifically asks for that she never does not this wave. That might be y'all's thing but it's not mine. So was this too little too late on toby in the music studio or was it just enough right in time. I've really WANNA believe in toby. I just want to hope that this was a lapse. Because I've come around up to the birth of Jack to thinking that toby was was a guy I could get behind this gesture and the way that he's he's now Jack's best friend. Apparently I really WANNA believe it. I'm kind of. I'm kind of with Kate on this one in that. I WANNA believe it. I don't know if I if I can because of what he said. That makes sense absolutely. Yeah even though I said. I guess that I want to believe that a marriage should should be an open space where you can say things. You can't enforce the things you just can't UN here things I I love that. That's exactly the problem. Right now is that you can't UN here things so you better be sure that whatever it is. You're GonNa say something that you can basically live with and that is why we've talked about this a lot about the going outside your circle. It may not be the best idea to tell your your partner every single thing you might need to like bounce off of someone else. A friend or coworker or a therapist or somebody further out so that maybe you can hear how it sounds when you say and then say. Oh Shit is going to be a doozy if I say that to her and she is not gonna be able to hear that whereas my co worker or you know my brother my whatever might be able to turn it back and say hey listen. I'm not even that close to you in. That hurts my feelings really bad so you might not want to say that. I think that's okay. I don't think that And I don't think it diminishes the marriage. I really like you saying that. Did you have any questions at nor concerns about toby in Kate? Well on there's just. Do you believe toby has a change of heart? That's going to stick. We saw the the flash forwards that the that the music room stays the music room and becomes a big part of Ajax Life. That is true and you know who I saw in the Music Studio Jack. Only Jack the parents never showed up. He kind of went from baby to garage bands of various stripes and then him as a artist right. I don't know what to think about it. I mean it. It does seem to stick around. You're right that going from baby to high school implies that maybe there's a gap when it isn't there that maybe it's brought back although you say that there was a a little boy ish age. I'm going to go with maybe like a seven year old. Who's like playing? The keyboard and Kate is watching him but only kate. I don't remember seeing toby. So it was like are just the first slide into the future is like a boy that I didn't even really recognize was supposed to be jacked because you didn't know you were slipping into a fast forward there but then you see her smiling and stuff and then it keeps going so that makes me wonder if it if it's like a like a flashing the Pan and then it's brought back maybe when they get divorced or something. The bill's future flashes. They manipulated us before into thinking that. Randall and Beth splits Fil Right. They chew right now. I would say that they're manipulating us into thinking that toby is not part of the family anymore and that he's being invited to these last moments with Rebecca because I guess to honor the time that he was in the family to make sense. That's exactly how it feels currently but that doesn't necessarily mean that's what it is but You know the they did. They did a lot of good work to make. It seem like that's what it is. You have done good work but I mean but they are willing to go all in like that you know they are willing to drag you down the line for an awfully long time and feel like Oh you know what is it that what what did we. Everything was going to be the Crock Pot. I'm I'm still going with at some point. Kate dies and that just sends him like down spiral that's how he kind of disengages from the Pearson family even though you know those are still his kids. Aunts and uncles and that sort of stuff but it but we know with his depression some like he goes much darker than than you might expect. Absolutely I I like the concept of the of the music studio and I think that it seems positive. I like the little play Penny area you know. I think we had those exact areas for our kids into that. All felt very real and very realistic. I don't know I don't know how I feel about toby. I I don't know if this is one of those. This feels like the right thing. I should be saying right now and so I'm GonNa do this. Or if he really has a change of heart taking it at face value at this point is I don't know just the only way that you can kind of stay sane right and move forward with having another adult in the house see now. This is a very important little portion. The way that she gets to this point is by having lunch with Madison going outside the the most intimate circle and taking it a step out listening to someone else from the outside say. Hey you know like what do you think about this? You know. He's somebody who knows you with no makeup on. He knows you as a real person and you know who else is. He going to discuss his deepest fears with without any kind of punishment that see now kate. I feel like is doing a good job. Like she went out she hers. Here's this other stuff and she's like okay all right. I'm at least willing to like float this as like. Maybe this is. The foundation of marriage in y thinks she should work out here so I'm okay with all that speaking of Madison. We have two little side note. Kevin what toby like when he was like. That's really funny. Yeah that really really funny. It's good that was good little comic relief there and like a little glimpse into old jobs in a way that made me like God damn it. You know. Because he's like permission react like they were in such a place that like. He couldn't even be funny for a second he couldn't even deal with it and it was like man. Just be your old self to be your own self. You know yeah. Did you think that Madison and Kevin are coming back in on the scene based on those things that she was saying? I thought that they're they're a legal couple already. I don't see any reason why they can't pursue things okay. I feel like this could be coming. And I'm trying to get myself geared up. You know who else wouldn't have food in the house. Madison eating issue and doesn't eat anything so she wouldn't have tons of food in that future. Kevin House right sessions not her. Good Cau- It'd be like changing gears shifting in a Kevin all right let's get into Kevin. Let's talk about this already. Kevin had a little bit of a different story line with Rebecca this episode. He has both a pretty. Weighty flashback with her combined with a current day outing how did you like how they were trying to kind of make a little parallel well and there was a third layer. It was they brought in the time that she and Jack went to Joni. Mitchell's house right or tried to find your Mitchell's house and they tried to try to stack that in there in that same same thing. Well was interesting about that for me. Though Paul was that they were there flashing between those two things. The person who is being flipped out was Kevin. Jack which is interesting because I was on a facebook page recently. A Fan Group and the question that someone asked is Kevin or Jack like who would you rather be your husband. Who'd you rather be your support person right? And it wasn't something that I really thought about that much And I was like. Oh Jack for sure but when I see this episode it's like the show is almost like being like owed see other. They have are playing the same role for Decca. Like they're being interchangeable like this. It was a weird feeling. I never put them in that type of interchangeable kind of feeling between the two of them they seem like very two distinct different people with very very different relationships and ways. They handle things with her. Kevin's not a carbon copy of his dad. He just has parts of him. One of those parts is that Kevin. Maybe it's part of personality or maybe it's part of his celebrity and it's turned into his personality. I don't know but he does to an extent live for the moment and he does he does want to keep things fun and exciting which was sort of the The flashback with the baseball cards was was I guess. Her kind of jazzing up the the event trying to find that last member of his nineteen ninety-one Baseball Card set kind of leads. Me To my my question about Kevin's section. It's not that she can depend on Jack or Kevin. Because Jackson not around. She's kind of stuck with Randall or Kevin so if you were going through this situation and you had steady Nettie. Who's WHO's going to make sure everyone goes to the doctor the right times and and is going to try to manage this process with you so that you get the best care or the Sun. That's GONNA try his best to get you to the doctor. But he's also going to take you to Joni Mitchell's house in the meantime it. You think this conflict of philosophies this could be the seeds of the rift that's coming in which would you rather have taken care a few more? What's interesting that you said steady Nettie because that implies that Reynolds offer the good and he's not I mean he could not show up one day because he's crying in his closet and no he he could break at any time so there's nothing about that that feels like a sure thing. I mean that feels like steady Tilles. Not that's you know. That's how he operates and so that's For me you know me. I am somebody who have four on a road trip and we're supposed to get there at six o'clock and there's puppies on the side of the road say text and say we all had to go to the bathroom and we're going to be there at seven o'clock because like we're totally driving through the drive through safari and like. I WANNA go to garage sale. So pull the frick over. So I WANNA go to Joni Mitchell's house and I think in Rebecca state of mind with the Carpe Diem. That is not Randall. So if this is how she's GonNa feel and this is what she's GonNa WanNa do think you're right. Her gravitating towards Kevin and his philosophy makes sense. But do you think that could elevate to the point where it's like? I don't WanNa talk to you anymore. Kind of kind of thing between the the siblings. I think it could. Oh I I completely because the way that Rebecca says sometimes making people forget about their worries or what comes? Next is the most important job that someone can have. I think that that's huge. And that is exactly what Kevin Offers Rebecca in this time of need for her. She seems to want someone who's a one hundred percent willing to check out. Joni Mitchell's house or who's GonNa be willing to put on their bathing suit and go swimming in the middle of the night at the pool. Rentals not going to be either of those two people he would have a hundred percent shutdown that idea and an Assad kind of way it doesn't have the Gravitas that Kevin has to actually get access you know. I know it didn't work but he was willing to do it you know. He's willing to like uses celebrity card to get into Joni Mitchell's house. I could see this. Were Reynolds say you weren't there at a certain time? You should have been there at a certain time Blah Blah Blah. You know those kinds of things. Now What's interesting is that you said. Should it be Randall? Or should it be Kevin and you never said should it be mcgill? Her husband Like why isn't he the one taking her to the appointments? There's nothing seemingly wrong with him. I mean he bowed out this week. He was like yeah. You're right. I suppose he said I'm going to bow out of the activity of the day. His excuse was he's he's there every other day and that he's been going on these like field trips every day and kind of wearing out yeah. Accurate probably very. Your point is valid this but this is not the McGill show as most definitely not McGill. Pearson right yes what is what is. Rebecca's last name certainly must be whatever Miguel's name is. Are you think she took his name? Probably I don't know I don't wonder if she kept Pherson to figure that out to look that up. I like the metaphor of Joni. Mitchell's house that the songwriter who is with Joanie at the time Graham. Nash wrote it. In order to She says keep an otherwise simple moment. That might be forgotten to be able to remember it right just buying a vase putting flowers in it just singing about what you did that morning. Creating a song out of it. There's something obviously the forgetting part. That's very very special. And I could see them using songs with her and in a very. This is US teachable moment. I know with Alzheimer's songs are one of the ways that people are able to recollect things that otherwise they can't Where when they play certain music they can suddenly remember certain times better so I feel like they're easing us into that that she is going to be able to remember Jack when they play certain songs or remember the kids when they play certain songs. Good call that feels right. I like how they're laying the groundwork because I think I could see this playing out in the treatment of this. Were you surprised that they gave it a name because this whole time? We've been like is it Alzheimer's. And they were like. We're not going to tell your. Oh the thing saying it's Alzheimer's Mandy Moore actually said Nope. It's not Alzheimer's. Remember at the end of last year. So confused because I mean maybe. It's a red herring. Maybe maybe they're going to say so this all signs point to Alzheimer's fast forward two weeks. Holy Shit it was really this tumor that we didn't see but she's done all the scans so I mean we all signs point to it seems right but also weird but then also fogleman's whole like I'm GonNa ever let my wife be in bed with right so okay. Maybe they're going back on everything right. What did think about Kevin? Going back to the baseball card shop and getting that card that they had been hunting for. What did it all mean? I think it means the dealing with mom. That day was probably once once. He dropped her off. It was like there was probably a weight that descended on him because he realized now what what we were doing. What's at stake? What's going on here? What what phase of life. We've just backed into basically getting that baseball card. Lindy kind of Is a way to relive that that memory with his mom and give him a reminder. I guess of the what she needs from him. Which is the the fun and the freedom portion of of life? So I think that's it. It's like a tangible way to be like. This is what mom needs. I really liked. I liked that I I had written down that. I really clued into the part where he asked her to blow on the pack for Good Luck and so I thought maybe it was like a little bit of like a good luck charm to put in his wallet. Like somehow somehow if you hung onto that there'd be some level of protection you know some level of mom blues on it you know and good things happen you know and so. I thought I don't know maybe it was just again. It was just a very tangible way to remember that day again. A simple nothing day. You know you want your mom to the baseball shop. That was all but it was like the song. It was like a way to remember very simple morning that you could have forgotten about completely. What did you think about the fact that so long ago it was gonna cost him however many M- dollars like Eight bucks or whatever to get the packs and stuff but then when he went and he just got the card. It was only two bucks. That's baseball cards. But is it fat or is it that the valuable nature of it completely changed even to the him as a kid like it was so valuable. It was worth all the money of his report card seeming free just the chance seemingly months of work for just the chance like I understand guys get cards change of I did. This is not my point. My point Isabel how valuable and then to hear because you could almost tell when he said how much is it. I don't know all of us. That maybe fifty dollars or something you know. And when he said two dollars or something so miniscule about that that seemed like wow it was practically throw away. The guy would probably be like shit you just have for free. It made me really wonder about the the value placed on it. I guess I not not making a good point right now but I feel like I know what I'm trying to say can you do you hear me saying I don't? There's something about like that. Memory was so valuable to him when he went back to try to even have a piece of the memory. It turned out that it wasn't really even worth anything. It was just the fact that his mom was there and they had that interaction. That made it valuable. Okay you like that. That's a nice way to go. I feel like I'm the only little nugget that we missed was the little flashback that we had with Kate and the Stewart situation which I thought was just again. You know you say like every episode. We have to have a Jack Story. We have to have some sort of moment with him. That seemed to be the way to do it. Did you feel like it was anything? What did we do that exactly to get the waffles story? Basically cake well. Whatever LOFTLAND BREAKFAST FOOD OKAY? But so what still be her first marriage is he the first waffle. Maybe she's going to have a better marriage with somebody else with Gregory or whomever. Maybe maybe toby's just a perfectly good pancake. That just needs a little more time on the on the frying pan. I don't know I'm curious because always we're supposed to have some sort of parallel right from the old story to the current time so or as she got dumped by Stewart in the in the flashback. And she's told well the first one is not always the best one sometimes it's the second one And I'm all like a good call. The totally flew over my head and now I see what you're saying. I mean I don't WanNa think that exactly but I mean what else are we supposed to think be definitely saying? Don't fight for Stewart. So what does it mean the toby? Toby is on the watchlist. Totally yeah on the FBI. Watchlist Oh my gosh. Well I thought that this story was good. I really enjoyed the Kevin Parts. I really thought that they did a great job. little boy. Kevin God with all this like Oh shit. You're serious. You think you're the fun mom. Nice call back to the. I wish you were like Sophie's mom. You know that was nice and God how long that story's been good. We you and I had only clocked that back to them. Being teenagers in Sophie's mom being cool shit. He's like eleven and Soviets. Mom is cool beans so okay so wait will continue to layer that on And I think we got little little tiny steps to Madison Kevin. Making a go. I think that's That's just seems real bill. I know even talking it up and I'm just saying I'd get a new therapist. I'm not going back to that Lady's Office. I would feel humiliated that she treated me weirdly. Burn fat that's not for me. I know it's TV but man I've I've been to several different therapists and I've found one. That is actually anywhere close to that level of trying to challenge you. The rest are just trying to ride out the our shit really anything so quite so negative. Elaine certainly therapy has been helpful right overall. Different scenarios just made big eyebrows. The one guy that I'm thinking of the that was challenging. Yeah he I found him helpful but very interest. I'm looking forward to Real. Hopefully we know he's going to have a breakdown though right like we just no one in our heart of hearts when he said I have break down like every decade end. We know he's about to turn forty like a decade marker. Yeah the wheel feel like. They're just coming off. I mean it is. There's three episodes left. There's plenty of time for something that go wrong back at home. He's a back at the office that this housing bill remember that he is dealing with housing. Focus on the housing bill. Where's my head? Been with the blind baby story when I should have been focused on housing bill right so we haven't even dealt with Maliki lately plenty of room for things to go wrong back at his house. They'd call good call. Well thanks. She goes so much listening. We WanNa your everything you have to say. Hit US UP ON TWITTER. Facebook let us know. What do you think is going on right now? Would you get a new therapist? Which get the Fuck Outta town? Is The music of room. Like last ditch effort was this. Actually something is Kevin. GonNa be turned out to be like a good time Charlie but like ended up missing medication or somehow do something wrong nose. Make bad treatment plans. I don't know or is he gonNA turn out to be great. I don't know what do you think Paul I think that's all stuff can talk about in a future. Podcast praise for listening. Thanks a lot. Join us on our new venture called Pod clubhouse come on over and listen to more podcast from variety of collaborating podcasters. Thanks for listening pot people. Thanks for listening to my mom and Dad. He wanted to go home. But you can't stay you. Just go home folks.

Jack Hatton Randall Madison Kevin Toby Joni Mitchell Paul Kate Storyline Beth baseball facebook Rebecca state partner Nbc daily review Kevin House Alzheimer US Jody Michelle
"Ladies of the Canyon" (w/ Ned Riseley & Rachel Wenitsky)

Las Culturistas

1:44:22 hr | 1 year ago

"Ladies of the Canyon" (w/ Ned Riseley & Rachel Wenitsky)

"Hi, everybody before we get into this episode. We have a little bit of a question for you. And that is what standing between you and happiness is it you our own feelings or block preventing you from cheating. Your goals if you thought about talking to someone but aren't certain or unsure of where to start while better. Help dot com. Online counseling, isn't there for you better? Help makes it easy to connect with licensed professional counselors carrying professionals, specializing in the issues that you wanna talk about depression stress and anxiety, trauma, grief self esteem and other issues that are kind of you know, stuff we're all dealing with. So connect with your counselor in a safe and private environment and get help on your own time in at your own pace, you can schedule secure video and phone sessions or texture therapist. It's all included worldwide and you can start communicating and under twenty four hours best of all the truly affordable option for Las Culturas this listeners. Get ten percent off your first month with discount, code ding Dong. Yeah. That's discount code ding, Dong better. Help dot com slash ding Dong. The promo code again is ding Dong. Because if you've been wanted to talk you gotta get started today, so good a better help dot com slash ding-dong. And simply fill out the questionnaire to help them assess your needs and get matched with the counselor. You'll love and one that you could always change and maybe even marry accounts. I guess that's not that's not an ethical another. I can't do that. We can talk to them in the can help. Yeah. Oh, I see. And look over there is that culture. Yes. Lesko chinese. Theresa's calling. Listen. Here's the fact we were over here on the car, and we think thinking and talking about our guests. Oh, we said what are we even gonna talk to them about nothing now? And then we laughed and let me laugh because what a joke that was because there is a wealth of things to cover when I sat down I had a thought and actually told everyone in the room that I had a thought, and I said that I would wait to say the thought until the podcast, and it's now started, and I can reveal the thought that I had please I'm very excited because I can talk about our land on this episode when what forbid you don't. -cluded you from talking about early in the other one. Often we have a guest that's not an Orlando bitch. She this is an Orlando field that one of one of our guests. Are there are floral guests ministers? This don't claim to think our soom. That's just because someone comes on this podcast that there in Orlando bitch. But I know for a fact we have at least one Orlando bitchiness rude when you're not on Orlando bitch in you sort of know that were we are really into bitches, and I feel like the potentially non Disney bitch of the two of our guests should have should have known that. But I think they have I think they have a very I don't want to say they have a theme park energy. But I can picture the other guests who's not the confirmed Orlando bench. I can picture them very vividly anything park. Yeah. A nice time. Chomp chomp on a Turkey. Maybe not too scary. I find this person is very sensitive until and I wouldn't want to put them on a ride. With like a loud sound that might be a real thing to deal with later on would scream. He would scream it's actually real culture number eighty eight when loud things happen. People may scream I think that that is so true. I have to reveal something to you. And this might be hard to hear but one of our guests and right after this. I'm gonna bring them in. And she can explain herself to you. Okay. One of our guests. The Orlando bitch has begun to start plans with me. About going to Disneyland together. In Los Angeles, California, stop doing that. That's my that's me crying. That's the sound of my tears hitting the floor. Started this claptrap. You're heavy heavy tears. And unfortunately, you will be in another state and join us is why would you do the because she s look it's fine. Like you. And I have different relationships with our the confirmed his Orlando bitch like you guys get to go to Disneyland. Together. I am on a text thread with her called club asks formerly titled asks births where we update each other on our daily poops, right? And she is a Huron. That's not the kind of fun. I like to have a huge part of my life in and you're asked life my life. And then the other guests the unconfirmed Orlando bench. I have loved since the first time, I saw him to be honest with you. He's one of those people that you you just. You see him? And then you ask what do you? What's the deal with him? Like, hey, let you find out loving relationship. Lonnie move on. And you move. And how was that for you easy? Yeah. Not that. I don't think he's fantastic is just like, you know, tell me twice. But it doesn't surprise you. Right. You're of course spoken for. Oh. I wasn't surprised at all. And it just doesn't like hit. You it isn't. It's not like a kick in the gut punch into guy. You're like, no. I know it was like a tickle on the shoulder. Like it was like he has a boyfriend. I was like, okay. Yeah. For Fisher checks out. You know, so talented so talented, not just one, and then the confirmed Orlando bench incredible Mary to one of our favorite people change, my life, change them. And then she changed my life. She didn't she. And I were we'll we'll talk about this listen and not like not like reference, these people in terms of in violation shoe their partners, their significant, of course, they have full complete full lives on their own, and that's confirmed this and we're going to hear some songs today. That's the reason why we're back in hunt engineer Ronnie studio we and the to DO the studio we're gonna. Here it their songs, I love their music so much. And can I say something what do, you know? How every time we come to hot engineer Ronnie studio. He's always playing like a really good jam. Yeah. He wasn't planning a good gym today. But that's because the guests were one of their jams. And so cannot were still we're still we're still in that space. Yeah. I remember hot engineer Ronnie played Ciza control like the week came out. And I was like is this new says it album, and he was like, yeah. And I was like it's really fucking. And then of course, I asked like still and you were like, no, no. I was like, okay. Cool. Mmediately like Awani plays like Carly Rae. Jepsen song. I was like his. What is he has a friend at off friend Dorothy, inclusiveness is he in? Keen society is in the medical society is he a Barbra Streisand ticket holder. They now we're back to clueless. Yeah. But brawny is not no just fine. And I love that. And celebrate love all my citrate. Friends. Now, I love the music so much from our guests. I can't wait to experience our guests. I've in the studio musically, and you can listen to their album friends who folk it's self titled album. Spotify tunes, apple music or ever streaming half. They perform all over the city. Yes. They are called friends who folk please give it up for Rachel ski and Ned rise Rysley. Kooky insurer. Kooky. It was so up and down and all around. I felt like I was on a dark ride. Now, you had there you go behind my back and plan. Now, did you know about this a know about this? Disneyland trip that oh, I did not know about it. Yeah. I've I am not an Orlando, which I will just say, well, you never be. You don't have to be nervous about saying. It could be I think I could. I definitely have enjoyed Orlando. But you know. Doubled haulage. What was the last time? You went. I think I was I was little. That was mistake. Well, I don't know. Yeah. I haven't quite seen as an adult. So I don't know what my response would be. I'm giving Bill on a knowing look when I see kids at the park sites. I think they're gonna regret being kids. Just in general. I recently not hunting kids at the magic kingdom. I don't think they should be there. I don't think it's for them. I feel like this is where maybe we disagree because I feel like magic kingdom is the one place that is for kids and the rest of them. I like to describe Universal Studios as a theme park Ford. You're not sure that's an accurate. Have you heard about the new Harry Potter coaster that they're building of no? Because now mental say it's going to be there's going to be a coaster. It's one of the most highly female. It is supposed to be really. And I think it's going to be like the mummy ride. It's going to be very that seven launches seven. I'm just telling you literally be as much of a freak as I am go on YouTube. Really excited about it. And that's the thing is so proud of you proud of you, the trades are abuzz, the trades are a buzz. Wait. Can I ask you a question? What what's keeping you from going back to Orlando now? I don't think. Yeah. It's not like an act. I don't think it's an active aversion to the opportunity just hasn't arisen. But if you guys invited. Right. I know deli in February we will go to all the parks. That's the plan is that we're going to go winning again. I three weeks a fab. Okay. So we're definitely going. I wanna do Disney. I went to knots berry farm last. I heard that's fun. I well, it's like it is as another airy theme about their weight. It's hoping berries. Yes. So fruit. I don't like that at all get started. It started. I was like a pie shop, and then there was a really really long line for the pie shops. So the guy not Mr. not, I guess was like. Don, Don, Don. With like, I'm gonna put up some attractions to keep the people in line for these berry pies at my wife makes busy and then it and the Disneyland open, and he was like, oh that seems like a good idea on just grew into a theme park. Yeah. Surpassed me as the bit. Well, only God the guy without a shirt on his back. Huge. There is a guy across the street from us who is a purely naked. And he was. Yeah. Bouncing up and down in bopping around. Are you guys? Exhibitionists? Okay. I mean in that I have been naked continue to be naked in my own home. I wouldn't want a stranger to see me are you in my wind. Are you commonly nude in front of the how in the house in front of your partner? Like look at me. Look at me. No, no. I mean. Yeah. When I'm nude, I say, a avert your eyes. And I yeah. No one's ever seen me fully nude. I always have one very sort of thin like a really thin silk scarf. That's draped drown. Just so yes, I I always have like a like a like a light film over me. Oh. A dirty. It's like an extremely dirty. Extremely dirty very light coat. Dirty enough to never be new through. Really, really? There's no reason for me. I love like a dirty gown dirty night guy thirty nine I love. I actually love that. You do that. Definitely do that. Do you know my mom got me for Christmas? What a bathrobe? Nice nice. Yes. She wants you to experience luxury. Yeah. And I have been is it like a fluffy night or like a cloth? It's lux. Okay. Actually says it says on the it's man, what's what's the name of that place for the council? Slow. Am. Her husband cheated on her at this place. I have no idea the Marriott. No. It's like. But it says the name of of the that that hotel wondering Orientale cut that. The knotsberry farm. We can float away from this. I don't remember k hostile. I'm just saying it's going to be very hard to be there with Rachel and have to you know, I'm I don't want to you. So I don't want. I want to monitor my while. We're there though, I'll keep you apprised of all my shits. Yes. So Rachel threat together. I didn't update the threat about the time shown to the plastic bag though can't embarrassed he knew what I realized is that so bone, and I are also doing whole thirty together. And we're on a whole thirty text threat. But now, we're we we text each other for everything that goes into our body. Not a lot. Is that too much? I don't think so do you do you? Are you someone who talks about their poops? Ever since I've met Rachel definitely sign about boop style. Widow side Rachel's are very FICO person. Yeah. I really respect when someone just talks about their shit. I always think it's a really cool. I think it's bad. I deeply I just took a shit. But then why don't you do it for yourself? I do you know, I just have to wonder, you know, have to become trusting. Yeah. But I wish I could just be like balls to the wall the walls shit this shit. Right. I'm not like I wish it could be like the guy across the guy who just took his shirt off and took a shit in the window. What if we took our clothes off for him? I thought I thought you were kind of. I kind of discussion that we all kind of do some strip poker. Crazy listeners. We didn't episode where when Josh and Aaron came for their first episode shirts. Shirley. It was because we at that. Everyone was wearing hats. Oh, yeah. We we. I think you your first time because you're too time guests now. And so the first time that you were here we were in. We did we demand that you were a hat. I don't I don't think we wore out of the picture for the picture. Yeah. And I mean, the I live I don't think so any was a hat. Yes. That's reverse still very much part of the brand. Yeah. I looked so bad in that hat. Oh, I would disagree with it was a big lake musketeer hat. I think you would look stunning. Yeah. Yeah. Now, tell us about how you two met and the journey that brought you to friends who folk. Plenty of as ever, folks. Please tell us well similarly when I met NAT I was like what's his deal? And then everyone was like you're in a long term relationship. And I was like oh. And that's the only reason the only reason. Yes. And we met at at the Williamstown theatre festival in Massachusetts. Hot. Whatever I say that. Up eater. It's very esteem in various steeped festival. We were both in in plays. And yeah, we we were kind of the people who like wanted to drink the most I found. Yeah. The sign of Reagan drink their people, but you guys really wanted to drink. We we wanted to take it a little less seriously. I think high of grad school actors. My body is a temple. Yeah. Bless them. But yeah, the their with a lot of respect, and we were kind of people who wanted to absolutely destroy our bodies and from that reach was like you should do comedy. Yeah. Oh, yeah. You had never done comedy. And I was like that's crazy comedy is the most lucrative. Yeah. Yeah. There's a lot of money in comedy. I was like it seems like you're kind of on the track to become a Broadway, actor and things are really going well for you. I don't use start doing musical standup. But it's truly the best thing that's out there in my. I think it's the best thing that's out there. And I feel like we should just expose the listeners right now. Let's have let's have Rachel Ned. Sing a song. And you sing us a song? We would love to you. Well, this is from is this or is this not not on the Alpo? It is it is from after we released we released an album a few months ago, then wrote the song as soon as the album was done. Well, the creative process never stops. Never stops. She will cover number on ninety three the creative process. Never stops. Never stops never sleeps. No. And so tell us tell us, but do you wanna talk about the song starts? This is this is a song about self care. We love that great. We love that align. And this is friends who folk. Nice can be hard sometimes to live. I haven't end routine to clear my. I turn off the silence. This is time when I. And then anything I've ever done. Everything. Ever done. I remember. And then finally. What do you think about it night? I think about the time in second grade when I threw on the our table was showing us what we were going to draw ninth wrote on her picture, I could have on the floor. But I on the picture instead MRs. I'm sorry about jar picture. It keeps me. Then. Close. And then I I've ever done about everything done. Pass. Rachel. Time girl in high school told everyone that she and the reason that I was Sandra Bullock in the move. I did wrong that is something she did wrong. But I'm the one who thinks about that everything. I think. Things can't control and. Good. I think. Things that can't be try. Them really hard. And then I think about anything. For seven hours and go to work. Still feel really bad time. I think time I slept with a guy who I knew for. I'm not the only one. Because the world is. How changes I think about the military-industrial complex? Thank that fifty percent of white women. It is. This is my favorite song truly phenomenal has your question. This might sound weird. How does it feel to know? Like, you are so talented. I don't know. I could ask you the same question bid. Dare I'm not I'm not I'm not in the hot seat such great voices. Such great writing. I mean, it's all there the musicality you so much. I think we initially like nerd it over our love for music, and then it became like funny are are interest in like we both when we were first friends like would laugh about how we knew really like obscure Joni Mitchell songs whenever we saw each other. We would sing a little bit of ladies of the canyon. The canyon grew out of like, a really genuine love of folk music. Yeah. Also, like, I I'm such like a study pert like I love to like be really prepared for things. I love like, I think that's my stand up even though I did it a few times in enjoyed it. It was never the thing that I wanted to do because I love to come being so prepared like little her mining Grainger. And this is the thing that I know that we can put a lot of work into and that it pays off because the music is good and not like Shiva comedy music. That's always going to be a known quantity wherever you go. Right. Which is like that. But that like is just a testament to like your writing in this container. Which is like it's a song. It's good like the jokes are landing in the right places. It's hitting the audiences ear in the right places. That's why reason reason I liked to music too. Because I know what it is. Yeah. It's not like it's what you're saying. It's not like. Literally the word I want to write a knee. Bruce can't be I don't know. What you're trying. Drunk little you do it's not a need. That's what I've always said. What is it? What what I try to? More. I know you I feel. Do it's not a more. It's in Ebros. Wow. You believe numerous could be a word your first and only. Like, really recently. I was trying to think of the word Bertha Starace, and I kept just thinking pictionary over and over. Stupid idiot. I need. I need a new word for this. I need to look it up. Are you looking at neabry us as a word? No, no. No. Pulls her phone out. This stupid fact, she was literally just exit. Living her life. Get on. This is a a word if not we need to call someone and making a word, I think the way you define inebriated is to be able to be drunk anywhere. I'm not I I I would say that you're in. I've seen you drunk in lots of late. We've been across the country together we have Chicago in Canada in Austin. I didn't often have been we went off and didn't go back. I didn't know that. I was very. In Austin, every time I go we Ned we're have you ever been drunk in Allston? I've never been to Austin, and I don't drink. No. I do. I think I think Ned is on his way to being a neabry us. You know, what I'm saying so much I learned so much about myself, I'm sensitive. I don't like loud noise people. I'm on my way to they've kind of contradictory. God wait people asked what you're dealing. We've we've put a lot on that. I think we have to ask the question. Yes. And workers so Bill or we're gonna say we're gonna put more on you. Okay. So we've already talked to her about this on her episode. This with her later though. Well, you can do whatever you want. It's your show. But what I wanna do is ask the question. Yes. Go on. The question is what is the culture that made? You say culture is for me. It's the pop culture in your life that was defining. This could be any form of culture. And it really is very open to interpretation how you answer this Ned a movie. Yeah. I think actually Jodi Mitchell is like a weird end like a weirdly early touchstone. Yes, me like I was like an eight year old who loved Joni like it was it was your Vizor. It was very strange like I knew all the words to blue. When I was like like, I was and I was wearing like overalls and I had like a neck. I was already a lady of the Kenyan and. So I think that was my way maybe not into pop culture, but into some kind of that's pop called Jared is maybe a good title of this f would be ladies of the canyon. Oh god. That'd be a dream. Come. Or focusing focusing neighboring? I love on his way to a nearby that Joni Joni a little bit. What's your favorite Joni material? Joni what's my favorite Joni outpost, you love like older Joni lately or I got offer for a bit too. Because I I d- d- right scary. I found him. Yeah. This sounds really scary. Rachel what happened when you found but men had over overdosed on Joni Mitchell, tell us, well, let's do the whole thing. Well, just as the disclaimer this joke is in really bad. Really? It's about to be more in bad taste. But just the fact that it was made in the first place. I think on my part, very bad taste. But as we said, this is Howard Stern. Before we start in the vibe is rolling. We began rolling began rolling. Let's say something super problematic. They're only twenty six minutes one bucks. But yeah, I just like walked in on Hugh. He was like on the floor in a pile of his own throw away. Joanie? I never told me that. He was he was just he was was because he had listened to a bunch of later. Joni after. Gravelly voice at once had really taken over. The newer version of both sides now. Really beautiful beautiful. It makes me kind of sad. It's very sad song. Yeah. When she wrote it it was like, okay beautiful song. And then when she did it when she was older. I was like okay now, you're on the other side. Yeah. You got to the other side. He was also really formative for me. And I think I feel like the way that Jodi Mitchell to me like was my pop culture was that being a huge Joni Mitchell Crosby Stills Nash and young it cetera fan as a very young kid was like this solidifies that I will not be like the other girl. I was like I'm not going to be cool because this is what I like to listen to. But then, you know, found my people there, you go Joanie is that thing though, where it's like, it's it's like a north star for a lot of people. I mean, it's like it's. Yeah. It's like you said earlier like it's how you guys you guys each other. And like, I think she just my favorite thing about Joni is that she. Makes you makes you more human by listening to. Yeah. She definitely is. It's it's she's a poet. Unrivaled so good and California. Yeah. One of my favorite songs have alternate. Beautiful all all of Korten spark almost all of ladies of the canyon. We are. I just like cannot overstate how much I love. And and it's a funny song. We've just sing like really dumb lines from that aren't other like. Fat and. Did you? Start writing your material while you were w town or two that continue because what happened was your theater festival ended. And you said we must stay in deep touch. Yeah. We stayed in deep touch. Who doesn't know Williamstown? It's like, we're touching physically very nicely. Both like Joni would. But Williamson is like what three months shown a half months. Haussmann gone for a long. Yeah. You're sleeping like an on air conditioned dorm room at twin size bed and you're with the same like fifteen people every. Danner is there? Who else who like hookah was there Cynthia Nixon was there? It was like the weirdest year legal. I'm at the local car shop at Cynthia Nixon. But you get like really close to people. And it's crazy. And then you come out, and it's like you've been through a war. There's which halts like, yeah. It is a cult. So we got out and we're like we got we got out. Yeah. I got asked to do a show that was about like political stuff. And I was like I was like come right along with me about politics. We'll sing our song about politics. And then it went well MIR like keep doing this happened accidentally. Yes, someone was like what are you called? And we had to like think of name can you explain the name friends who folk it's a pun pun on fucking. Oh, and. It's like friends. It's like neighboring. I'm sorry. I'm getting a little belligerent and then Hebrew. Sorry. Matheny because he's just drunk everywhere. Everywhere at this moment, ACM pictionary you, but then you my favorite focusing. Pun is focusing lessons, which I think was would name of only God that was our own. Only twenty km and Bowen and Bowen was the only person laughing. No, let's sewed such a good show. But that was the most generous thing that a friend has ever done for me with home to my show where truly the only people there were like, my mom. For their or their and weirdly like a table of industry. It was a great show. And it was so nice. My favorite step. I remember the first time I saw it wasn't even called frenzy folk at that point. But it was YouTube video up on Facebook. Have you guys singing we are friends, but we don't have sex. And I was like this is the funniest thing. I've ever seen there. My favorite was the first thing we did. Yeah. And then like, but then like the friends who folk as as it is iterative now is like through that political show. I think so. Yeah, that was like when we wrote it. And then when we wrote our first song, and then we just came in writing. Yeah. Was like people asking each of us to do shows and popping on. Yeah. We would have. Yeah. Started with a political song? We just start writing dumber and dumber songs until here. We are. Of course, we all have a roots and writing dumb together. Before when was very young. You haven't even been born the last show when I was three years. Feels like actually another lifetime. We have. We are not the same people. Which is I saw you guys that union hall. I do think it was like late in the deli. Get full band shows. Yeah. You know, what's crazy that those those popular shows that we did at union hall were never like crazy. Well, attended. I know I go to shows I feel like every show I go to at union hall now is sold out like an I'm like. Did you know pop off in the last two years? I don't know. I still I we always do our monthly show at you need HANA love that venue so much. Also, we've done shows there that had a lot of people in shows where there were truly. No. And I don't know what that just might be us though, I did a show their year ago with Sam Taggart and five people came what show was that was dimes derby. And it was we were not clear about what the show, and then we screen we patched together at the last second and was a crazy show. I liked that. I I liked that you guys announced that you had a show called derby. And no one. I. Thing of creating a show that doesn't have an identity and saying tickets to this eighty Mona cadets that I love her. She loves schilling announce like high come to my new show my but smell like my smell like shit like. Feels very our brand is my my my butts Mel like my shit. He's amazing. He opened up you were there. But she opened my last Christmas show. She did the funniest character. Speaking of openness for my Christmas show, also. I I was on the side thinking, this is the comedy that you I want to see in the world for me. That seven times out of ten I really care about the way. I look and like the other three times I thrown at Christie's sweatshirt that's had to be in the laundry for four days. I don't care. If anybody clocks me, I don't care if anybody's steps to it. But ten times out of ten I really really care about the way, I smell and this is true. And I'm sure this is true. For a lot of you guys to smelling decent is very high priority. Very high key for me and with sent bird. I find a way to have great taste without breaking the Bank. Whether it's for Sachi or Gucci Oregon bone, center dot com me smelling. Good month after month. Centered is a luxury fragrance subscription service where you can mix up Colona perfumer teen, and it's greatly for you to discover new colognes perfumes without buying entire bottle. 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You'll love and one that you can always change if necessary. So that's better help dot com for slash ding Dong with promo code ding-dong. I okay, I need to ask. We need ask we need to talk. More about Joni Ned Joni Joni over Carol Joni Joni over going over care. Yeah. I love Carole king. I'm doing this thing that we're I'm paying. And it is toxic. Right. You're right. Never mind. The musical beautiful. I did. And I did. Beautiful is the Orlando theme parks of Broadway show. How dare you say that when King Kong streets over I wanna see. King kong. Then most told me it's scary. A white guy heard. It's scary. The congress big big huge fucking com. That's. I heard the congress, absolutely. I even hear the Kong's so big and so unwieldy that sometimes the Kong will malfunction. Conrad this. It's a is it a puppet, I think it is. It's like a puppet flash animatronic. It is. It is our. You've done the reign of Kong universe. Skull island you've done that. Right. With the big ask King Kong end. Yes, that's Geigy. That was the the the that will. That will be back com. Was so big. Hugh. I don't remember the Kong. It's because you were Nibras. The rest of the writing do it for me, though, Betty screens have too many screens screens and also the car is. So big the van is so big that you can be sitting in the middle of it. And then he like you out the window. That's the thing Juelich Star Wars Ned. I do you know that Disney world's getting Star Wars land. Yes. Yes. Maybe. Get on the millennium. Falcon, that's what he wanted to do since. I was a little bit. I bet I bet being a fan of Star Wars. I'm ready. Yeah. You're right. Yeah. Honestly. He's taken. Over it. A little on the shoulder. Have you done avatar? Oh my God. It isn't. We'd have you seen the movie of of course. Okay. Great. Sigourney her star making about should be famous, especially culture, number eighteen Sigourney. Oh, I absolutely could not get through that movie without feeling so motion sake. So disgusting movie. It's very sitting. There are three movies. I've had to walk out of because they made me sick to my stomach because of how shaky the camera wasn't how sit I was. No because I saw that on own await a having on a plane had to go you. Ring. No the three films though are. The big short why. Because it's such a shaky Cam made me feel so sick avatar, which I would like to leave. I and precious. Oh, sitting so close to the screen, and it made me feel so sick because it was such a camera. How are you with the favorite all that? Like Josh was far enough away from the screen. That's good image you fail. I wish I could do movie reviews somewhere where they're just reviewed base on how motion sake they made me. In the front row of every movie reviewing it. As an Orlando bitch. You. Thrill. Okay. So the the rights that really make me, absolutely. And I'm sensitive. Inside. I thought it was going to pass pass away. Away on that. My I yes, I feel like we need to apologize to Ned. Yes. It is perfect. No. I am very since you said that my way into pop culture was Joe need. We didn't say we didn't mean sensitive in the pejorative at all what's pejorative negative. No, I didn't even pejorative at all I did not mean that pejorative love sensitive not is really Sunday actually, very since being. We weren't being pernicious. I know only gosh what a word hall. Love. Mitchell. That's great that you were able to be so dynamic as to contain the multitudes of Joni Mitchell, but would like to ride and maybe even drive the money with love to drive. Yeah. It'd be my honor. Now, you guys started writing new stuff as soon as the album came out. We have a time line on the next release. Oh my gosh. The next album released album. Yes. Well, we have to keep writing. And then we also have to just raise capital they say in the biz to pay for an album. Does it all just go to studios stuff? Yeah. That's we recorded efforts album at a studio called the relic room. Well studio where we also record the story buyers, podcast and. We just like one in the same vein of like winning the music to sound like a music. We want it to be recorded. Well. Oh, great studio. I'm. Greg Tonio rate. I started to realize that asking people about processes like impossible. Basically, all you're asking is how oh I read this. I read I read lesson. Like, it's I love did you love. Did you read it to read it? Read it. I think Matt beat at mount would fucking love it. I think you would do what is it about it? A game in it's about this game listening gay author to is turning fifty. And he's having this like a bit of a midlife crisis around lake aging is like a gay and then his ex lover is getting married. He starts freaking out. So then he goes on this book tour around the world in order to scape that and like think about what it means to like go into middle age. And then it's a really beautiful meditation on that. It's really funny funny to really funny. I love that. It's a book about what it's like to feel sorry for yourself while also recognizing that it's shitty to feel sorry for yourself when you have a lot of privilege. Oh, yeah. I think it grapples with that very well where he's like, I don't matter. And I don't deserve to feel this way. The thing is like I this is something that I've sort of like come around on his like, no, we're not walking around thinking. Well, I shouldn't feel bad because I'm so privilege. Right. It's you're still in a lived in experience. Like, I'm going through shitty time. Yeah. The has for the most part might not have to do with my identity. I mean, maybe it's that actually is more harmful to say, let me nor my feelings because it's it's because because it'd be worse. Yeah. That that's I think you make yourself sick. Yeah. Yeah. Well, that's exactly I do think that like the complexities of all of that is what that book is about. And also, it's funny and sweet at the ending. Incredible love story. Every sexy. It's pretty sucky. Yeah. They're moving. It's not like. It's not what Rachel it's not fifty shades. But like what happens in that book? Yeah. Inner look at like privilege and. Yes. Your vagina famously we went to go see fifty shades of gray when it came out with an address in on Valentine's Day. Address. And I'll never forget the moment when three quarters of the way through the film after eight hundred sex scenes, a little boy in the theater was Danny? I need to go to. All. Like, it was it was the most started thing that we've ever been apart. So funny area. Everyone was horrified. The I love nothing more than a gas permanent. The it just loft over the whole audience. It was so fabulous. Terrible. Fabulous. Speaking of washing over an audience. I think that it's time for you to wash another song over us your audio, but a dream. The thing about this song is that it's incredibly Mitch don't trust me. What is it because I always said knees, and then people say knit. No in the Tunisia people. We can tell you that. It's neat. When people as constantly told by TV networks, and that you're two neighbors. Yeah. Which means gay? It's niece. Got it. Got it come out. Snee-? Two years ago. Did you have a hard time like accepting that you were like they've done. I was need. It was harder than when I came out. It's gay. Yeah. We're sending you to an ex niche there. In Colorado Springs, and it's like really informed by. Adult. Tell us about this new song. Well, I don't want to say too much about it. But it is a prayer and are very religious extremely religious part of what we do. We haven't touched on that. But we're both like a very Christian. Gods real not real and. I hope you're ready for us to take you to church. Thank you. This is. She sips the dry my teniente corner. Gene. Then smiles. Kendall cross. Who? Patty. Nine. It's been. Wednesday night. Just. Losing too. So. Limply gifts away to friend a dining room. That is the. Nine. Well, i'm. A poll on in nineteen forty nine. She grew. She's been in everything. From. The most important the. William law and order. Just kind of homophobic for musical theater star Patti LuPone, excuse me. You're calling me, homophobic. It is actually extremely sexist of you to think that woman could be homophobic. Plus, she's very known for law and order like she has a guest starring arc on SVU. What's her character's name? If you're such a fan how? Ruth Miller ADA bit. They. Around the by it's time to pack it in she turns friend, Sean at twenty four year old. And she says if there's one thing that I have learned in Mike, it's calling me fucking cab. I'm Patty love. Nine. Everybody. You thinking with us. Choice to do that. They forgot the words for a sec. But that's the magic of live. Where does that come from? Did you actually observe Patti LuPone her natural habitat of Sardis? I actually did see patio opponents already. It was actually one of grace celebrities. I like it was the most predictable actually to see front. It's already full. But meaning, but I was like I'm usually not that shocked by celebrity in New York but seeing Patti LuPone in a bowler hat at Sardis. Well, you know, what it is? It's what I think about when I see a celebrity. I Mike have I. Have I seen this person in a room with hundreds if not thousands of people where we're all focused on this one person? Now, am I within feet of them? If the answer is yes. And I'm like, this is crazy. This is so overwhelming someone who has been so I've that I've seen so on display. Yeah. Suddenly, I'm like within feet of them. I'm like, oh that's nuts on. No, that's my. That's my weird thing with slow. It feels crazy to see famous people like at all some like I've seen famous people where I'm like. Yeah. I mean, obviously this famous person exists and others were I'm like it's actually impossible to me that their flesh and blood person here. Pat is one of those people when you see a celebrity multiple times like in person, you're like that's not the same person. I saw but it fully is I've seen Kelly Clarkson person ten or eleven times. And I think she my kept beekeeping replace God fearing, but it is. Every time like Levin. In Los Angeles. Do. And she was fully different. And she, but she was the same Kelly Clarkson that we saw at the view, and yet there she was she was just crazy out there. Living a life right now. Because I love gets to I know opponents doing something right now right now. That's so in Orlando. Are you guys potty fans? Oh, big big her. I'll say this. I'm a huge Patti LuPone fan. But the one time I saw her was a matinee of gypsy. And I felt like it didn't live up to what I wanted. I loved her gypsy inside twice. Someone told me her in something and she had a cold and Chesney. Oh, yes. Okay. Then tell the story I see. Gypsy on Broadway twice and the second time, she had a cold, and she held a tissue the entire time. Incorporated it and she famously like doesn't ever like she never calls out of shows. So she was sick and still went and she just incorporated this tissue into the and kind of like blower knows. She made it work and have a rose. Sick thirty years. The beginning. Mother owes stop taking pictures. I just love her so much. She does the most iconic performance. I think at that Kennedy Center honors Barbara, cook only. Yes. I'm gonna live you. Nobody loves you. Come all comes. I didn't do it. Right. Amazing basic, she she's you know, what the best part, but my favorite part about how my favorite thing about. How is that? She's amazing and interviews behalf lease and incredible watch. What happens live interviews where she fucking Madonna. Madonna movie killer. So. S or something. Yeah. She described the first time they ever met. And and the she said that Madonna only said to her I'm taller than you. Oh my God. I saw in war paint too. Oh was for paint with. I felt that that was the story of me and Bowen. Yeah. We we were show called nights. That was very. Yes. Actually, I saw the first night. So and okay. Well, I anyone I hope. No, one listening worked very hard on warpaint because I will say nights soap with like good warping. I felt that even though I didn't see. Doing the whole time. In nights, soap where more memorable than the songs in war paint. We're not any song fight scene. There wasn't with break with breakaway. And space go out again. Show was amazing. Thank you. I believe we did it once for like seventy people wait, Lois nights. Soap was a play that I wrote for ours Nova and fest two years ago where yeah where we played two women a warring matriarchs of two chocolate dynasties. I was Barbara Hershey. Also, the actress Sharon Inc Nestle. And basically, what happened was they were old old old friends who came up with a patent for a chocolate that could be edible in space transportable and edible in-state thing is like their husbands were constantly having conflict because they were Mr. Hershey, and Mr. Nestle, and so they were like, well, let's get together, and like sort of figure this out because the men certainly can't and over the course of the first scene, which is the first act, you find out that was I was fucking your son fucking fucking her son. And then then the communication breaks down. And it's not until second act in the Al. The album oversee each other again. Swish LA show was so funny, and it's truly I keep saying this. It's the only thing that I look back on that. I'm like proud of that like. Read the script. I read this going. I was like this holds up you think so. Produced and then of course, the third act. Spoiler alert takes place in space, and there is a fight to the death. And we have a full spe. There's a body body suits. And then there's a twist ending that I'm so proud is a huge twist ending people gasped. I was shocked because you guys do it again. Or maybe that's your. That's what you that's your niche pitch to networks jazz pet literally. One company I will not say, which I described idea, and they were looking for they liked to I'll tell you who it was later on. But maybe it'll be on some sort of Nisha network near you. Sometimes they'll keep it. This is going to get me into my thing before we talked about less, and this is actually great segue into your guys is writing process, and like the thing that they say is like what else is there to ask writer, except how like I feel like do you guys have a streamlined way of like writing your staff, or is it like more like just like you guys are playing around with different ideas. Both. Yeah. I feel like it's often. It has often been that. We we have like an idea and kind of with that idea like John or were like that's a ceremony Lachlan's or whatever it is. And and then we kind of riff on that. But then we also there's also been ones where like we have an idea, and it's a little more fully formed, and then we help the other like bring it to life, but it's often like really just at guitar and with a computer open like improvising stuff did alling. It's like sometimes it'll be me being like I wanna write a song about about. How like treating like staying up all night. Worrying about stuff is a is a type of self care. Like, let's write that. And the most underrated or it'll be Ned being like can we write a song about the movie step moan? And then we'll do that. Or like, we just did. We just wrote a song about Marie condo. That was literally because I was like making fun of me for doing. And he was like, I think we're doing whole thirty and Marie condo. Which is like, you're you're saying. Thirty. Yeah. But, but then I also believe in you. I'm trying to change my life, and you were actively keeping. No, I want I want. I really want you. We all does Rachel for life. But none was like I just like think that I just want Maria condo to come over and scream at. And then like we're like, well that's the whole song. And then we wrote it in. Everyone wants marine condo really liked Dom should be able to do that. One. We try on Murray. We try to do it right now. I'm gonna forget the words would, sir. Them to us. I want Murray we me. And that I've been about bull. I want Murray condo. To my parents and. Messy piece of shit. I want Murray Tondo to convict crime. I didn't come. Head and me jail for my whole lines. I want Murray Kandal to look. Dead in me is and say don't spec jars donate tuning. Hugh, I want. Scream, and may that I've been a bad. I want married to drive me to dump and. Oh me down. And then. Free. We've sort of. I like that news friend who folks on. Also, I vividly pictured someone looking. I think it'd be a good reality show. Marie kandebow with friendships. So. You have to look someone you've decided that out of your five friends three of them. Don't spark joy. Tell them. Fearing. Oh excited to do. You have friends, but you have too many. I think that's called boundaries. I love I love. This ivory conned in my room to. About it. But I do believe I believe it works. I think the way you're living spaces organized as direct reflection of your mental state. And it's it's helped. Yeah. I just like I did the whole thing. Right. Put everything on my bed. Went through the stuff. I wanted to keep. I'm honestly thinking that like all these Goodwill's in churches in in places, these donation places are like overwhelmed right now. Yeah, I'm just Hosni in the trash is that bad. Yes. I I don't want them to go to. I think at the end. Is not the way to go. Utica for protection. Yeah. I feel like the soup kitchen like they're getting a lot of monetary donations right now. So I'm just taking my money and I'm burning. No, this is the thing. It's not that. I'm bring if I were bringing money the thousand dollars there stayed goods snow. I understand what you're saying. I think that it's fine. Because I think I think it's fine to take stuff there. Even if they are overwhelmed. I think a lot of those places have the means to recycle. Sure textiles and a lot of these plays. A lot of the Goodwill's. I hear just toss. Most just throw it in the do. Do that's very performing a service. I am h annum. Recycles gives textile. Right, right. I oh, I should have done that. I think it's fine. I've definitely thrown like old underwear like it doesn't matter. I have a on my old underwear. I throw it in a basket. For dinner. For dinner. Poll thirty. The whole whole third eating because. I'm eating thirty pairs of underwear this month. And that's. Glowing. That's sometimes it gets really late at night, and I fill my stomach to rent on. I'm like. But you can't because it's one day. I have a service coming tomorrow to pick up all the clothes that I marry condo. You're very conduct. I did it with my clothes. I did. I did it before anyone was even talking about it. I did weeks ago. It's a reality. Starring Marie Yahoo. Is I think stunning I she is stunning. I think she's the nicest shoes sweetest soul on the planet. Doesn't judge anybody. Yeah. Is like she loves kids loves kids. She's like, okay. We'll work through this has helped helped this gay couple. It was so oh my God. I love that the show. Speaks in Japanese, which I love I love it. It's like you're gonna watch subtitles. We're not like forcing this. It feels very like unamerican thing to let foreign person to speak their native Tony in a popular show. What also feels very un-american about it like the week it came out last week. Like all these people. I was talking to all these people are starting to like it just feels like it just feels like it's the same thing over and over again. There's no conflict. I'm like, yeah. Okay. British it's British. It's very Asian for this thing to be like, you're just gonna watch these people improve their lives and not put up a fight. Right. They're just gonna like be like, oh, yeah. It's just as easy as folding your clothes specific way in putting it right? And like putting our papers in a box. Great. And then like, that's and they're happier. Americans love to be traumatized by television of drama. Get nuts me like I love that's me to be food traumatized. every time I watch TV. But if a nice rookie. Do you like trauma? I think twenty nineteen big. It's gonna feel great. I love like hard dramas to t-, we know trauma. Just. Yes. Come. Are you a fan of trauma? Do you like comedy drama or Trump? I'm actually writing a new hour long drama. Trauma? Trump. Doing. Yeah. Are you really dig deep and then right like a whole show about your butthole or no. What are you guys going to have kids? Who says we don't oh we had kids together with the first part of the collaboration. We said if we're going to do to create something. You know, I'm in this place. Now where I saw some I sister with with my beautiful needs. And I was like niece gorgeous needs. One of the top five nieces or the Tom Mason. I I'm like, I don't think I want this. I I literally the other day decided I didn't want children was the deciding factor for you. Okay. I watched like a parent and his son on across the street and the son like accidentally like ran a little bit in front of his dad and his dad knocked him over and the kid on the ground and the dad did that thing of like freaking out because he does the kid might have been hurt. But the kid was absolutely fine. And then he freaked the cat out and the kids started screaming, and I was like God. I can't do this. Oh, my. Getting my kid over all the fucking day. Get outta my way. Yeah. I'm going where I'm going. You never walk in front of a star. Don't walk in front of the star. Yeah. That's the thing is it's like I would want my kid to have their daddy be a star. I feel I feel like really crazy that if I have kids their parents will work in her teen -ment, I don't if you have had kids like I just feel like parents are supposed to be like accountants, and lawyers and like actuaries, which is like what my dad did like a very boring job that I never could describe or understand. And the fact that if I have kids they're going to have to be like, my parents are like writers or whatever makes me feel sick to my. That's interesting. My dad does most fatal murder. May actually host the onion podcast which is in its fiftieth season. And he makes a million dollars a second. That's my dad, you know. And yet you still try for baby. Yeah. I'm con. I'm trying right now. We're trying for the air this whole time. Yeah. Thing of trying to, you know, make make it could get there. Swim. I talking. Animated sperm swim of open the door. Oh, one of the great songs. Classing neither. Well, it has a disgusting animation. It's really bad. It. Inception of a me bring. They call when you get pregnant and Nibras inception. Not pejorative. Ethan. Oh, no, this really are you guys married? No engaged. Maybe someday has been together we've been together for like three and a half year. Really? A year. Get married. Beautiful. Very joni. Yeah. That was all about not wanting to. Yeah. I don't know. I definitely want. I like love kids, and I I often see kids, and I want them like pathetically, but if I actually check in with like, the nitty gritty of what having a kid would be and I have nieces and I love hanging out with them. And then giving them back. Yes. Yes. And I think that's enough. I told Sudi I was like I will be like d the very fun on goal of your kid. We were talking about this the other night we were all hanging in Saudi. We're we're watching TV, and we were saying like I told that story about how I watched this kid got knocked over by his dad, and like the dealing with that emotional situation is not something I'm wanting. And it's like I feel like now like I'll be twenty nine like, I think at some point. If I if I really wanted kids like I would've started thinking about it, more and Sudi someone who's always known. She's children. It's like, no deep downing heart. You want them or you don't. Yeah. Nikki Glaser joke that I think is really funny where she's like everyone. It's a kid. But like you need to tell people that like get cute babies just gonna be like a guy named Doug. That's the reason why they're way we exist is because their parents were like we want a kid we want a baby baby. But they just become a shitty adult. But then you just you don't realize that. Yeah. Yeah. But then, but then like most babies become like the dot. But isn't that real? There's something real about that where it's like, right? You're putting out a life into the world. And then like that you're so responsible for the way that that person moves through its? Yeah. Crazy or your baby could grow up to become Glenn Close owning. That's like always the antiabortion people though, they're always like. What could win a golden glow? Or the way your kid could cure cancer or win a globe. I would love to have a son who is obsessed with me though. I. On. No, I I said, no, no, no. This is in. The family the family stone. No, I would love any sort of child who was obsessed with me. Yes. No. I truly think we would all make great parents. I think I would raise the child together guys would be a good father. But it's you know, it would just mean a lot of sacrifice of corden took every oh, but there is this thing with rate with ritual saying it's like, I don't know if it's fair for the kid for for us to be like we are. We're fucking idiots and we're. We. Yeah. Your father, and I we make we make a living like just Dicken around being on podcast. Yeah. We're gonna living off of intent. I'd be like this is this is this is no hope for the future. Everything anyone who says, you know, struggling forever. He'll son. Here's the most successful thing. I did when I when I've been doing comedy called hottest female up in whoville. I think about that song every. It's so good so good. But I was just thinking about the fact that like having to explain to my offspring. Doing maybe they'd be proud, maybe alternative kids. Kids are obsessed with Grinch jokes. I'm thinking getting into the alt- kid world. Got their finger on the pole. Yeah. Kids are. So we'll now like that's the thing is I really the the generational divide between us, and our kids is going to be like somehow even further than our parents, and they will have grown up with the internet, and they're going to be so cool, and they're gonna make us feel shitty about being so old. But meanwhile, we're the ones. Scopes? Yeah. Sure. Like, isn't it crazy? It's like all our lives. We thought we were the ones really like the coolest on the most advanced how it happens with every generation, but it's like in terms of technological advancements is like I thought we were the ones really at at the frontline surfing the web. And also acknowledging the fact that we aren't the people who are like up to date with what's going on in technology. Right. You know what I mean? Like, right or knowledge in your out of touch anyway, like defected, like we did we were at seek treatments show last night. And they have this whole bit like what's post Malone? Like, I don't know what post Malone is. But you know, who does millions of and it's hard to it's hard to. Famously very young. I saw into the spider over. So I know so did I. So did I felt like a kid all kid? Like there YouTube stars who like have who make millions of dollars a year in. I've never heard of them. It's really it's really spooky to be a sold. Two. No. I really do. I I see what you're saying though. I think it's very true. Did you find out what alone is is a singer Diab? He's larsen. He's kind of freakish. Look a lot of face tattoo. Yeah. I liked his song. That was in into the spider verse though, oh would have had to go its sunflower. Oh, it's the one. That's sounds like M I as paper planes, but is not that's fun. Yeah. That sounds and. Spider verse. Cool. It was really really fucking beautiful own you question. So there was a Rolling Stone article which was the number like the top one hundred most influential songs of. Two two thousand two now pop songs are like any John Rao? What do you think was over one like the number one most respect, and it was like a Rolling Stone article? And it was like they asked music journalists and musicians and everyone in the music industry, like they all voted, and what do you think the number one was all pop it was pop Rb country. Like, it was all songs that have come out as like major releases like since the two thousand. Out has was but it was paper planes was really up there too. And there was I think we're both in the top five. Feels was it hit me baby. One more time. No. It was crazy in love. Oh, I said that actually is a really good. Son because even the Turner to Connick. I love that song. Isn't it that that was her very first single? And yet it kind of pretty much still is her most iconic song, I think it is. Well, I mean in terms of this article, they say it is. And I think that if you were to announce. Kid kid would say formation which was also on the list never heard of crazy in love who's beyond a really a really annoying answer to that question will be someone. That's like irreplaceable. Uncondition? What say no people would they would do it to be fucking annoying. Dr annoying especially rule number forty people in this really annoying. And they would say things like that. I mean, maybe it's just like the white year did crazy in love come out. I just three three. Yeah. That makes sense. I feel really nostalgic for like time for that for that China. Yeah. During nine eleven. It was great to be a thirteen year old post nine eleven. Let's go around where were you? When when. I told my nine eleven story about how I demands it. My mom, take me to the fucking store outlet or. I told her I was like I thought she took me out of class early because we were going. Excited. I was I've been talking about it for weeks and the glittered out McComb out that day. And I was like, okay. They were like Mavericks for just minutes on. I was like that's weird. My teacher was like, and I went downstairs, and I was like this. Glitter glitter. This before this hour is it was nine eleven. It was after the after both had hit and my mom came to me. And then I told this on the pot this this is the little hole, I'm gonna poke they didn't just dismiss all of you guys know my school either. No, that's not the way they. Long island. Didn't tell the kids at had happened. Thing. We're relieved out they got out early. They didn't tell us. But they were like everyone to go home. Found out because I went up stairs. I had band class. And I left trumpet in my homeroom. And so I go up and then the TV was on. No one was in the room. But it was people running away. From the second tower being head. And then I just was like, oh my God. Something is happening. Yeah. Did not tell us the that was a controversial thing that people were talking about in the weeks afterwards. Whether or not they should've let everyone know. But the fact is. They didn't want to say anything over the loudspeaker because because honestly, I would from Long Island, and it's very possible that someone could have had someone that worked there. Then you panic. Yeah. I think that is the right thing. I think it was the right call that is trail. Yeah. They didn't tell us. But then everyone was like I heard because we weren't like on locked in there. Like I heard that there's a dead body in the dumpster outside of school. And then everyone was gossiping about that. So then when we all found out what really was happening. I was like that's so shitty. That everybody was getting excited about a dead body outside the school. And really it was so much word. Sorry. Actually like. In how? Is tie. So highly. We. We're gonna alley. So I don't think so Honey is our little segment of to take one minutes ranting at something in pop culture that we hate and loss coteries is going on tour without on. Thanks, honey. Tickets are on sale now online, you can go to my website under the shows page and also the last culture this page, Mat Rogers comedy dot com to get tickets to our shows because we do not have a website, and that's cool. And that's. It's really neat. Where you could sensually go to find us. Okay. I actually have a thing. I could do this is Matt Rogers is. I don't think. So Honey time starts now. I don't think so Honey that you can't eat before you go to bed. That's feels the best. And that's what I'm the hungry. I don't know that you, but I wake up at roughly two thirty PM everyday. And I am not hungry. So that means my lunch happens at about seven, and then my eating dinner at eleven thirty pm roughly, and that is also when I smoke, so I don't think so Honey that smoking you so hungry, and I don't think so Honey the whole situation because I feel that that's when it feels the best is when you can eat a lot and then lay down in your little bed and make yourself so warm and feeling warm and fuller, great combination and also high. So this is what I like to be together. But now guess what is turning on me my body? So I have been in the, unfortunately, it is credibly difficult to lose that little tiny. In the belly because I have no impulse control. And do I don't think. So Honey that my body is not a teen. And that's one minute. I'm just saying it's fucked up that you can't eat before you go to bed you can. But it's not right. It sucks that like the actual best thing to do for bodies. Stop eating at seven because the most luxurious armed eat is like midnight, and you know, many places in Europe, the they're saying a very late at. Spain LA CENA Fania. Culturally. They have a large dinner at like ten pm. We just went to Spain this year last year, and we would make reservations at like eight thirty being like, we're very European and then get there, and they're the restaurant and the culture is very late. It's like at five o'clock the restaurants are like all German tourists and then at like eight it's all good. Funny one. Are they going to get the national news flash? That that's not good for them. I don't know. Maybe their bodies are just like evolved. Have you been eating I eating late at night on whole thirty. I've been trying not to you know, what was the real kicker for me was when we. No say post me we had. Post mated McDonnell to the. How is the best that was made best idea? One in the morning. We were we were at. Act. Have you heard of Christmas? And then we were like I haven't either. And then you guys left that bag of McDonald's up the fucking only with me. I threw it out s- people drag Queen was making fat name. The drag Queen was like. Fat if it was called. That's from thirty rock that with Tracy Jordan's movies fat. He played a dog. Well, we got stuck in a drag show, and then I'm left really fast, and I did leave the McDonnell was left to deal with the bag. Bag full of my dignity. I just want to eat McDonalds a gun last time, I did loss. Coach we were eating taken. We ate the whole episode long famously hate air because Bowen Yang chomps and slumps, right? We are tricking thirty there. They're made. They're made our bed. Thirty x joy underwears whole thirty. So is garbage. Say so it's time for bone Yang's. I don't think so Honey bone Yang's. I don't think so Honey on this episode with the friends who folk his time starts now. I don't think so any lip balm lip balm rash. And it's it should be the same across the fucking bored. And yet we have all these different types of lip balm. Give me birds bees that should be the one and the only I don't need all this other chapstick Medicated chapstick high Tensing moisture bitch. It is all a graft for marketing, and I see a bitch big lip balm. I'm going to destroy you this year in twenty nineteen I'm taking down big lip balm. I'm releasing my own line of lipoma, and it is unbranded just one kind of lip balm. Nova Reidy it's the one that works for everybody. Because all lips are the same say with me. Our legs. Day. Stop. Now, if you are going to I will start I will actually start a go fund me to make a new lip on that is the bomb and. I bet you can bet your at one I will. Minute this year. I think that you should have the bone Yang lip balm. And I'm gonna have my fragrance case on by. Jason. And then don't you have like an an for this. Yeah. It's going to be an ad for my fragrance case done. I love that understand them, but you can smell like him. The sent it smells like weed and. Oh my God. Okay. That was fabulous. I don't know though. I feel like I see us lip balm free. But that's also probably why you love with bomb think they're the marketing around is insane. And there shouldn't be so many different varieties. When all are the same. Okay. This is okay. Let's we're gonna we're gonna go to all. This is Rachel when its gaze. I don't think. So Honey her time starts now. Okay. I don't think. So Honey stool. Are like the evil bitch step cousin of shares which are far superior genre of sitting furniture. I have a big gifted and talented has. We does not fit on a stool. Their ten minutes into sitting on a stool. My ass is going mill. Thank you. Couches sofas Hsieh's lounge. Fainting couch. All yes schools. No. You know what? My ass makes stools stools is another word for shit. For me shit is a yes. But unfortunately, stools, no tools our terrorism. I'll say say it now making a fat bitch. Is. More than goofing, gifted and talented as. Listen, you were incredibly fecal. Woman have a lot that was actually alignment in nights, soap you've fecal. I do feel that way. That's good. That you feel to be clear for everyone listening, though, if anyone ever overheard me shitting, I would be fucking mortified. Oh, if you ever want to get over someone listen to them poop my God. It's on them send you a tape you ever want to get over just realized that they have poops. They have poops. They're not gonna wanna give their botany more after that. Now. Those. I wanna say. It can't believe it. I don't. Now, you're issue that they don't have backs is that the main don't have backs which is so uncomfortable them slow go off Queensland love to go off on stools. I'm five foot eight if my feet don't have anywhere to go on stole your stool too tall drag the tall stools are the craziest. There's no. So badly, and there's just no way to not slouch on like it's so much effort to sit up straight on a stool that doesn't have a back. And then if you're still does have a back. I'm like fuck you. Why don't you just make a chair on my God people who sit on her and see their cops or coughs? Thank you. Rachel that was real important. What you that was really important. Live my life in. Yeah. Thank you neds. Read. Yes. I don't think. So we have never done. Ready? Very nets debut. I don't think so Honey has time starts now. I don't think so honeyed the masked singer. What is it? Why does it exist? You're hiding someone in a Liberace animal costume. And then once they take off the costume and reveal their identity. I still don't know. No one wanted to know what it would feel like if Donnie Darko could sing living, Vida. That starved for waste distract ourselves from the slow death of civilization that we have to pour millions of dollars into kinky. Parlor game struggling celebrities. Jenny McCarthy is an anti vaccine. Second hand said he is a proud of how Kevin Hart handled the Oscars controversy, Robin Thicke made lines. How did this happen? The mask singer can only have been created by people who are deeply sexually unfulfilled. The people who created the singer. Furriest resisting their kink, and it's going to ruin their lives. I don't think so hunting the mast singer. I will probably watch it at some point. And enjoy it taken in by the thrill of. I will wait out the apocalypse watching Mr. bean emerged from an energizer bunny. Very good. Messing last night for the first time. I would say we discussed it on another. It actually is the dumbest actually bad you want. You wanna like it for how bad it is? But my kind of loved it, though is Rachel you fat. Very bad taste too. And I'm telling you, like, even I couldn't get I liked it. But I was also like this genuinely feels like I wished that they unmask the singer, and then murdered them in front of an audience feels like a rusted. On game. If feels like the hunger games, so why not go the extra mile? I wanna see the the star get brutally murdered the religious argon. And I can't believe Robin Thicke is on rob. I we right off the slope. We're recording this in January. But yeah, I mean like maybe by maybe by next month, it'll feel like it'll get to a different cultural place. But like right now, it feels truly insane. Gus so funny too because they're like, I'm sensing like beyond. Yeah. Guess last night where I was like they're not oh like it's Jimmy Buffett. I know it it's like he just sang for us. And it's like, you know, that it's not. I would love. Jimmy. It'd be Joni Mitchell, it'd be laughing. Tony. This whole bit with clues. They give out clues. Bets package. We think one of them is low Toya Jackson, and I think one of them is alien Ricky lake. When I was reading I was reading rumors that one of them was Tori, spelling. A lot of sense to me. We love this show. We're going to right. We do. We're gonna be talking about it though. It will be a topic of conversation. It's going to be watercooler talk. It's and it's going to someday as the friends Ferdinand assassinated. Yeah. World War Two or three dress like France for. I just can't believe the costumes to customs. There's one this one. There's a river that Margaret show is one of. No is like the the pink proving thinking all so, you know, who knows she does sing she. She's she's I mean, she's got she's book work though. That's on them asked. It's on the mess thing. She's she's on high maintenance, she's got a thing coming out there working. I mean, all this being said like I'd absolutely love to like write a packet and do like at stopped on the mask thing season two. Writers to do on that show. Yeah. Well, there we go have had all think honeys disgust thing. We've had so much we found out neds coach colts, and it's time and we've heard three songs including one world debut for the first time. The first. We've created new words, which is something that we do it. Last culture that's in Negros now on the cultural lexicon as we've created a many many over moments in new rules. And now, I think that we are left with no choice, but to hear one more song from the friends who folk, but before we get into this where when are you guys performing what the hell's going on? So we try to do a roughly monthly show at union hall in New York City, baby. I believe we have a show the next show after this airs will be marched seven at eight pm. Union hall, and we also do have an album and an Instagram. We're trying to get our onstage more on the gas. That's good. That's good. Yeah. Yeah. You should be pictures. Twenty nineteen is all about picture. Thank you. Well, tell us about the song take knew it. So this song is about being in love making promises. When you have. Thank you. I have been the same since. And. My own when I am with you and love. Guy. I have a very simple. Make sure the minions to at my funeral Manx minions. Make sure dominions funeral would be really cool. Your cy. Again, thin until I. Swedes your hand with dime breath. Remind. I always. Insist that the minions down sat my. The minions. Say is my funeral and really cool. Characters in show. But I know that the minions are action menu. Menu dance can be super simple. I don't want them in years to learn Corey it's mostly dressed arm stuff lawyer in my well. They should have won hers. So. These have movie minion should be. Please have the minions. Really? Makes you. That would be super cool. Voca me me hoping folk me. Folk made me please folk me, I hate. A little reminder better health dot com forward slash ding-dong. That's where you can go and put it in a little promo code to get therapy. Online fast. Now better help makes it easy to connect with licensed professional counselors who are caring professionals who specialize in the issues that you wanna talk about. We're talking about depression stress and anxiety trauma, grief self esteem and other issues that we're all kind of dealing with that, you know, we want to reach out and get some help for and you can connect with your counselor in a safe and private environment. Using better health dot com slash ding Dong. Of course, yes slash sting. Of course, you want to use our promo code and get ten percent off. You would use the promo code ding Dong. We just wanted to stop in here in the middle of the episode and say just say that to schedule secure video and phone sessions or texture therapist, all included worldwide, and you can start communicating and under twenty four hour, and maybe you can even marry that we've been through this. You can't do that. It's not appropriate. I'm ethical. Another one. Yeah. Okay dot com, forcing.

Orlando Rachel Rachel Ned Joni Mitchell Joni Ned Joni Joni Las Culturas Joni Joni Hugh Disneyland Los Angeles California YouTube partner ding Dong ding Dong Jodi Mitchell Bill Turkey Barbara Hershey
Wonderful! 123: Nasty Jupiter

Rose Buddies

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

Wonderful! 123: Nasty Jupiter

"Hello this is Rachel mcelroy hello this is Griffin mcelroy. And this is wonderful. This is the podcast that The everyone's talking about it was recently profiled in a New Yorker and smart people business insider business insider had it business. Outsider was all over it That price we got the big prize from the publishers clearinghouse. We wanted to McDonald's monopoly game or doing we're just we're we're blowing up right now. Yeah we're blowing up right. Now we're blowing up right now. I want to see if you'd say yeah third time and you know we're so glad that you're going on this journey with us now. Does that mean that? We're not GONNA take part in Amax Fund drive later this month. No we are going to. We are going to do that because we still need your support in a big way. But you know it. Things are changing around here. Rachel's got a big gold tooth now. She looks like the bad guy in home alone and Griffin as you all know or may know if you follow. His other shows likes to rip his clothes apart while he is recording. And that's you know that's a hard habit to keep up without your support. Runs the tally up for sure. Hey Do you any small wonders? I do actually I thought about making this a big wonder but I figured I would keep it small and talk about the Zamboni driver that filled in for the goaltender unbelievable. I didn't read the story. I just saw the headlines. The Carolina Hurricanes both goaltenders got injured during the game in February and they had nobody else to back them up it has so happened that these zamboni driver had a history of playing goal He actually had a pretty successful hockey career and then he needed a kidney transplant and his career got derailed and so he was helping the Toronto marlies which is a affiliate team right. He served with her practice goaltender. So I think they knew like oh he'd be able to do this and so he came in around the third period. They had a three one lead when he entered and he stopped eight of ten shots and so they ended up winning six. Three Carolina. Clearly the dominant team right game. But he also eight of ten shot at a free good man for man that was in his forties and doesn't play goal. That is so good so because I guess he played this role he gets per. Nhl Rules five hundred dollars. And he's and he's allowed to keep his Jersey over K Harry cash right show. Yeah so nice of you. I'm going to say the worst idea of all time. Podcasts I saw the these are our friends and Co hosts on the the toll that show but they have started doing a miniseries wrapped it up because it wasn't mini series called my week with cats where they watched the cats movie every day for a week and just dip back into to that and sweet sweet. God it's still. It's still makes me laugh very hard. This show. These two boys pert themselves with bad movies and I enjoy hearing that happen. A great deal more timely than some of their previous ventures would sure. We're less focused on movies. That are currently yes exactly phenomenon. Hey you go first this week. What are you This is so we are recording. Some of these Batch because we are about to travel right so I was Kinda struggling to come up with things since I reached out to my good friends. One of which Our OUR FRIEND. Grace who is just just a brilliant young woman and she suggested Jupiter the planet the planet. She's Jupiter is a super bowl planet. You should look into it. Yeah I mean it's big like fucking beat it for size right yeah. It's so big. Yeah do you have any Scott's about how big it is Hun? Oh of course I do. Were you trying to set me up right there in a little bit? It is three hundred eighteen times as massive as Earth Goo. Wow that's a that scares me to think about. If you combine all the planets it is still two and a half times more massive. Nice try guys. But Jupiter wins real big guy. It takes only ten hours to complete a full rotation on its axis. What's not always? It's like super big. It's real fast pinning so fast. I think I didn't read this. This is why am I friend. Grace suggested it. She said that it like keeps our planet safe from a lot of like asteroids and meteors and stuff because it pull so much energy towards interesting. Yeah it is not only big and fast is the third brightest object in the solar system after Venus and the Moon so you've probably seen Jupiter in the sky and not realize that's what you're looking at. Yeah I hate to jump in here disagree with science but I think the sun is one of the brightest things in our solar system. I mean probably. Yeah but you can't see this on at night can you? Yeah that's a good point thinking about Jupiter also has ring systems so saddened gets all the credit for the rings. Jupiter. Hasn't too yeah. They're pretty faint gassy right. It's a gassy. Yeah I mean. It's a gassy thing. It's like material that was ejected by moons just kind of orbits Moon Duke just floating around and that's Gross Jupiter. You Nasty you. Speaking of Moons Jupiter has sixty seven confirmed moons. I thought it was like seven in the seventies that sixty seven confirmed moons. Like as of as of now I o is one of them. I didn't write 'em did you think. Maybe I knew. All the moons Titan I think is one of sure it has over two hundred natural satellites orbiting it. So maybe that's why okay. Yes I do. I know what makes something a moon? I don't know but the rest of them. I think we agree. I just space trash. It spinning so rapidly that it is flattened out a little bit it's it's polls and bulging at the equator super. Around kind of a dummy thick asks this the last time we saw Jupiter. Nasr's new horizons made a fly by in two thousand seven. So who knows what's going on up there? Yeah locking change thirteen years. Gosh I mean what were we doing in two thousand seven you know. It was a different time for for all of us. I was still in Chicago. You're still in Chicago in college. I was in college. Yes I was in college. This is two thousand seven so this was like George Bush was president. You know what I mean like. Shit was wild pretty sure the song drops of Jupiter had been out for a long time by then. Yeah maybe not. Actually who knows? That song feels immortal in a way that I really want to say about Jupiter. I just think there's a lot we don't know about up there and I've never been particularly space person. Yeah you know I. I never had a desire to go into space I've never been particularly fascinated with it. Didn't realize how big Jupiter was out there. Yeah it'd be kinda interested in space more. It's one of the things I remember like in school talking about the scale of different or blake celestial bodies where like the thing was like Oh man earth can fit into the son like one point five million times and like it was like something like you can fit like thirteen earth's in Jupiter. Something something like that. But that doesn't seem correct. I think I'm just made that. There's for example so there is a red spot on Jupiter It's butthole. That's what I always every time I look up at I'm like Oh yeah you Jupiter That's not that's gross. Jupiter put that away. What would you call? It's rings then if if the red spot is it is it like it's Like ITS BELT. Its Belt Okay So that red spot Can contain two or three planets the size of earth in its diameter. So just that red spot alone and maybe a does. We've never gotten in there but maybe a couple. Maybe we used to have twelve planets in the solar system and Jupiter. Ate It all up. That's a good point. Yeah there was actually. I saw online that if If Jupiter were more dense it would start pulling in on itself then Jupiter Stop. Yeah Jupiter Shop. You're good as is. I love your big helpful. Frankness safe I guess from asteroids and the like but please calm down because that would be bad if you if you imploded. They don't change things. Don't change a thing. Don't slimmed-down no God no no. Don't just just just right as you're right as you are is really really good. Just maybe put that butthole people are looking. We've maybe you don't know this because you're wicked far away but we've invented telescopes so we can see that nasty like we know what you're doing up there one day. Saturn is going to be like Oh Shit Jupiter. I think they got telescopes Jupiter. Like Oh my God this whole time this whole time my bungs been just out. And what's your first thing? My first thing is the greatest breakup song of all time weird. That felt very familiar. I feel like we've done a song where we said like. Oh that's the greatest breakup song of all time like we've talked about. I can't remember what it was anyway. It's a case of you by Joni Mitchell. I don't think we've talked about Joni Mitchell on her lower. Because we talked about Judy Cell. And so like it's a pretty obvious comparison there but The album blue by Joni Mitchell is like Fronta back one of the best albums. Yes it's it's one of my. I like treasured record albums that I got And I was sort of a late late comer to it but the song a case of us off that album and just like widely regarded as one of her greatest songwriting accomplishments. I'm a just hilariously uncultured fella. And this was especially true before I like moved to Austin and in many in the first time I heard the song was actually at a concert in Chicago from the December assists and Colin. Meloy did like just a solo acoustic cover of it after the after the encore and it was like so I was like man. This song kicks ass. The December is added again. They're big and then I learned it was a cover and that is like when I got super into Joni Mitchell like that that you're living in Chicago because man that's good wintertime music to holy. Shit I just I. This song is so gorgeous right musically speaking we can start there. It is just these really rich. Guitars like layers and layers of guitars and steel guitars and just like gentle sort of Alz. Percussion tapping and Joni Mitchell's voice is like really explores the space which is a very Joni Mitchell thing just launching her pitch like just all over if you've never heard it before I'm GonNa play a little bit of it which play because it's very efficient song and all of it is really good but I. Here's a little bit of a case of you taste so we K- Still beyond my happy. Why would still be on so like the music is kind of sad and lovely in a really nice way like it's among my favorite songs of hers. Just because of that that I ever really realized its breakup up song well we. It's funny because I was listening to our wedding playlist on spotify and it was on our way playlist. But like super is a break-up Song I I don't know maybe you can interpret it as some other way but the lyrics of the song. Oh my God like she's like she's a brilliant lyricist and I think she's firing all cylinders on this song. There is ongoing metaphor about sort of communion in this one The chorus obviously is. You're in my blood like holy wine tastes bitter and so sweet. This idea of love being this visceral physical thing having it be embodied in that way is such a powerful way of of writing about love and this is like for me the iconic thing about Joni Mitchell is if you read it like a breakup song which is how I do it There is a sort of like humor to it as well. Just the first verse. It paints this image of like somebody sitting at a bar by themselves drawing a map of Canada on the back of a coaster just like in a dark bar illuminated by blue. Tv screen light and then just while they're doodling like that like absent mindedly like drawing the face of lost love like that is such a Lake. Crystallized like such a clear image. Such a clear seen that she like paints like that and it's like the kind of thing that she is so fucking good at. Yeah you believe like she did or witness or happen to her. That's authentic about Joni Mitchell. Is that like any time? She sings anything like oh. That must've actually happened to her right. And she's actually saying about it and she has a quote about that She was interviewed in Rolling Stone by Cameron. Crowe and she was talking about blue and she said the blue album. There's hardly a dishonest note in the vocals at that period of my life. I had no personal defenses. I felt like a cellophane wrapper on a pack of cigarettes. I felt like I had like mazing. Lull drawn. I felt like I had absolutely no secrets from the world and I couldn't pretend in my life to be strong or to be happy but the advantage of it in the music is that there were no defense as they are either so like not only. Do you have to be a brilliant sort of person? A poet to great stuff like this. You also have to be like extremely vulnerable young to tap into the kind of stuff that this song taps into and I mean then you could get into the kind of difficult conversation of like you know suffering and art and The whole concept thinking about this a lot lately because I found it a lot easier to be artistic when I was unhappier. Sure but on the receiving end of that like I think it is easy to say. I think maybe we talked about this with Nick. Drake to this idea of just like yacky suffered so much but the art came out. That is such a way of thinking about. It's not that I don't believe that there is a way to to create art from a Happier place I feel like it's something that like you and your family members do all the time so yes I do. I respected even more. Because I think it's like it's it's difficult to be vulnerable when you are not feeling particularly vulnerable. I guess yeah romanticizing somebody else's suffering for the art they create feels like gross to me. But like doing it for yourself as a way of reclaiming. That time like reclaiming those like Shitty feelings. That you that you had when you were feeling low. I think that that's really really strong. If you're not a Joni Mitchell fan like I was not until I heard the December cover her like this song and I feel like blue as a whole just like listen to that front to back. It is such a like good sampler issue because I will say like she is an artist that was always kind of experimenting with her style. And so you may find some of the later albums. Like not as pleasing. Yeah but I feel like Blue Blue as you can recommend that anyone. Yeah go go dig it up. Dig It up from the bone yard. That's what she calls it. Oh yeah she calls her body of work the bone y'all so she would say like a cellophane wrapper on cigarettes gum. Also it also come out to Joni. Journeys Bone Yard and listen to my tunes. My new mixed eight. She's got a great sound. Can I steal you away please? I'm really excited. Talk about this sponsor. Oh Yeah me too. Is this for all the for the kiddos business for the little ones? This is key Waco kids are born. Innovators love exploring learning and creating. So why not inspire them to do just that? Kiwi CO create super hands on projects for kids to make learning about stage you to make learning about steam fund. Steam is science technology engineering art and math. We have done this with Henry before we have. It's wonderful it's great stuff. It's it's always age appropriate. And it's the kind of activity that he has enjoyed doing over and over again. Like not just a one time fun and done kind of thing but like a a real good time and a real learning experience over and over. Yeah Kiwi Co is a convenient portable way to encourage your children to be anything they want to be. There's no commitment so you can cancel anytime for our listeners. Go TO KIKO DOT COM SLASH. Wonderful to get your first month free on select crates. That's K- I W I Z. Oh Dot com slash wonderful everyday counts when it comes to making a difference. So don't miss out on this amazing opportunity again. Go TO KIKO DOT COM slash wonderful. And get your first month. Free THAT'S K. I W is C. O. DOT COM slash. Wonderful Rachel. You know I love this feeling of biondi's on my body wherever it does happen to find its way onto my body right yes I do. I'm not telling tales out of school. I love this off. Stuff that meanders provides me in those. Like superfund prints too. By the way they have fun prints which are soft on the is. Did you also know that? They have an undies membership. It did oh well can I still tell you about? Please deal well. Anyway they give you site wide savings and free shipping and new undies delivered to your door every month. When you sign up any undies membership and the unease I know you're wondering are these. The ones with the micro fabric a sustainable soft as heck fabric made from trees. The answer's still yes. They got a range of sizes extra small to four. Xl they got lounge. Wear they got a micro Modal Lounge. Wear not it's like a future suit. If you're going to lounge why would you lounge in anything that is not extremely lounge -able to be like a comfortable future space person you can get fifteen percent off your first bear mandates you can get free shipping and you can get one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee if you go to me? Undies DOT COM slash wonderful. That's me on dot com slash wonderful. Hey jumbotron message here. This one is four. Daniel is from Noah who says ever since our first date. You've always been my biggest wonder. I've loved getting to know you a little better every day. I'm honored that you've let me into your life. I still get a little choked up when I remember that I got to marry you. Here's too many more snuggles with the dog. Yummy drinks at Epcot. And a wonderful life with you I love keeping that romance going. Post wedding people are just like well. I'm done now. Seems like these two not not Daniel Noah keeping it up there like let's go get fucking faded at Epcot together. Snuggle with that pop into it can read the next message. Yes it is for Haley. It is from Dominic Haley. I love you more than I could ever put into words. Thank you for introducing me to this show and this good good podcast family with luck. We are listening to this one together. Whilst snuggled up with our cat OATMEAL. I have no idea when this is be read and if it means anything. I bought it the day before Valentine's Day does that mean any I guess so it's close to the loveday. Yeah that's the loveday right there. It's the loveday message. Came out after love day but doesn't matter. I'm so charmed by these these Louise Lovely Loving jemo trans. I love them too. But don't make cat OATMEAL. That's inhumane. Hi I'm Laurie. Kilmartin and Jackie cash together we host a podcast called the Jackie and Laurie show. We're both stand up comics. We recently met each other because women weren't allowed to work together on the road or en- gigs for a long long time. And so our friendship has been unfolding on this podcast for a couple years. Jackie Constantly Works Rhode I write for Conan and then I worked a road in between we do a lot of stand up comedy and so we celebrate stand up and we also bitch about it. We keep it to an hour. We don't have any guests. We somehow find enough to talk about every single week. So find us. You can subscribe to Jackie. Laurie show at Maximum Fund. Dot Org. Or wherever you get your podcasts gay by what's your second thank. You don't have to get angry and punched the microphone about it. We've talked about. Don't bring your rage into the studio on. That's where my passion comes from nine now. How passionate when I've raised so much. Great Art when you're furiously trashing. The office this I think is going to be a fun one. Oh boy you pneumonic devices okay. Yes yes yeah. I took me a second. I thought you were talking about Onomatopoeia. That's not how it said is on a monopole. It's spelled that way but I people say Onomatopoeia on monoply. Why can't I say that work? Give her the. Oh onomatopoeia. Sorry Mnemonic devices are devices used for eighty memory And they come in all sorts of forms which I didn't really think about. I'm more familiar with the with the initials But there's all these different memory tricks that are considered demonic devices I think you may have just said demonic devices a little bit. That's cool without a mean you can find it in Joni Mitchell's bone yard. Yeah Mnemonic devices are actually. I didn't realize it goes back to philosophers which surprised me a little bit like to me. It just seems like a like a hack. You know something you'd find on buzzfeed but it's like something that like Plato and Aristotle where like all upon I believe it was aristotle who invented my very energetic mother just served us. Nine pizzas bright. See that's the thing about doing Jupiter as I was like. Oh this there. There's this story about a poet named Some entities in fifth century BC who is credited as being one of the first ones to come up with demonic device. But this is more of a visual thing so initially when demonic devices wore kind of put together it was a way to create a visual picture in your head and then use that to remember something. Okay so the story with him is that he was performing at a banquet hall. He left the banquet hall was destroyed in like an actively violence and then they couldn't identify the people that were killed during the destruction and he was able to remember using a visual picture. This is horrific origin story. Yes for this. Yes that is not like my very energetic. Mother just served US nine pizzas now. Now this is an idea that by using locations and Pictures in your head. You're able to remember things okay It was only later so go forward until Like the Fifteenth Century when people started saying. Hey let's use letters of the and people that could do this. Were often viewed as like sorcerer's which was a problem so there was a German poet named Conrad Celtics or Celtics Huge letters of the alphabet for associations rather than players He Kind of took off with this idea and then later in that century there was a A man named petrous to Ravenna who brought such astonishment in Italy through these Vanek vices that he was believed to be a neck romance. Sir This is guys so people demonstrate this thing like have credible of his vice asked me these questions. Let me show you. I can do it and everyone's like you are okay. So it's just their incredible memory. Recall why they thought they were a source for not the fact that they could create like look at a list of objects and then combine the first letters of all the object names and then come on a demonstration of it. That's so wild wiser sorcery in sixteenth century. Lambert's nickel who taught mnemonic people in France. Italy and Germany. demonstrated his ability and was denounced. As a sorcerer. Okay all right I guess so. Here's some of the other monarchs. So the first letter thing is the one that a lot of us now yes There's also the idea of like music. Monarchs like the ABC's and you create a song. People remember the alphabet by the way I had Henry. Sing it to me this morning in the car. He wanted songs and so he wanted a number songs. I didn't number song and he's like I'll do a letter songs that good and it was so fucking out. Does he still do? He Does A. B. C. D. F. and G. and then he was like spider man. Go on vacation on one horse been sled that's incredible. It's really good song. And then he doesn't know his letters three the right time. There are a lot of Niemand ix with letters and That I just I never knew before like talk for all the Great Lakes people learn homes. Yeah Yeah did you know this? I feel like I never had to learn the Huron Ontario Michigan Eerie. And Sir. I'll man Oh my God superior superior yeah ever had to learn Great Lakes Rodney biff. All Yeah and of course There are a lot for math. Oh Yeah you remember. Please excuse my timber foil of we doing like outside inside laugh and there are some for foreign languages that I thought you would like. Ooh So apparently to remember command verbs in the U. Slash to form in Spanish people say vin diesel has ten weapons. I don't know enough about Spanish to like know what all those Stanford Diesel has ten weapons I mean and not only is it a good mnemonic device. It's true definitely true at least at least ten weapons on at all times in Music. The the lines of the staff every just fine. Yeah in between that his face When I was taking classes last year and starting from like basically the beginning. It'd be so embarrassing like my teacher would point at a note on a scale be like what's that. I'd be like all cars gas. Oh well that's g right. Oh yes that's for piano. Well that's the base class the base class set of things. Yes yeah that's fun. Babe sourcres but it is a kind of magical power if you think I find it so useful I like I have a really bad memory. It's always been really bad like I remember in fifth grade. We had to memorize all the presidents. I just couldn't do it and I would watch all these kids. Get up there. Because the teacher had a lot of time to kill and had each person get up and recite all of them in front of us for like a week and I just watched everybody do it and then I got there and I just stalled out man. I remember there was a game show. I don't remember what it was called because I think there are a few game shows like this where For a million dollars a contestant will be challenged to do something like impossible and we'd give them a month or so to like prepare episodes was doing like the first hundred digits of Pi. And they were. They brought the person into the studio gave them that. Challenge sent them away for a month and then like the rest of the episode. Just kind of focused on what they had to do to memorize the first hundred digits of Pi And like the number of pneumonic devices that they came up with was like wild because he tried to boil it down to like thirty demonic devices. Like okay that's the birthday that's the last four digits of your social security number. That's the yeah and then you need like nest them because you have to have pneumonic devices to remember the order of the monarch devices like it was it was really wild. There are a lot of spelling wants to like I before. E except after C. Yeah Anyway I can't remember all of them but I just I think it's it's Team TNT teenage mutant Ninja Turtles. Tell you remember that well just getting into acronym tear. You know but sometimes I'll mess it up I'll be like oh those teenage girls. Ninjas Ninjas Means Mutants Turtles Hey my second thing is a bit abstract and I apologize and you're you may recall at it at first thought but I promise I'm GonNa Keep Loosey Goosey a place that you will feel comfortable playing all right. I want to talk about the sort of Shire aesthetic. I liked the aesthetic of that. Shire and I know you. You inspired about from the week that we talked about My Lady of the bracelets a little bit. I was inspired by that And I was inspired by a news article that I read about something wonderful that I will get to the end of this segment. I guess I'm talking specifically about Hobbiton. Which is the focal point of the Shire as seen in the Lord of the Rings Trilogy and I'm not going to talk about the whole of the Lord of the rings because that's there's a lot eight pack. They're down but whenever I would watch those movies which I used to do very regularly after they came out I would always just like a door at the beginning of fellowship of the ring the first one because it spends a lot of time in Hobbiton in the Shire and it's just such like chill ass vibe. It is such a good vibe. I like looking at and thinking about a lot. Is it now the you know that I'm pretty unfamiliar right? But I picture a lot of Moss. There's a great deal of Ma. If you've never read the book seen the movies the sort of thing you have to keep in mind. This informed like a lot of fantasy sort of staple ideas moving forward is that a lot of Lord of the rings like races other than like the the humans all sort of lived among nature. In a way that fused this idea of civilization and nature right so the dwarves all lived like in the mountains in these minds that they would carve out down to the heart of the mountain or the elves like lived among the trees. And the hobbits sort of. Did that idea. But just like in the planes like just in grassland just among sort of like empty vast hills and that is how you get this aesthetic and like the most sort of conic thing about it are the borough houses that they build into the hills with like big circular wooden doors and windows coming out of them. You look at the hill from a different direction and the house is completely invisible to you. And then you go inside and it's just like nice and warm and nice wood floors and rafters above and it's just all just so nice and rustic as fucking there. I like I like it. Cozy and on on the outsides of the houses. You get just like flowers all of Gardens. Us little wicker fences. I just I always I like Loni roof right. I think that's the real life interpretation of the aesthetic dig- like whenever you see a this is not common in the states. I feel like this is sort of what you're referencing right now. Talking about like deep cabin deep rustic like Norwegian vibe of like actual like dirt roof with grass on it like actual like you are growing some actual sort of flora up on the top of your on the top of your cabin. That vibe just really does it for me. I liked that a lot whether it's in fantasy or you know she like she like David. The no I love David the GNOME I mean. That's a different VIBE. They're like now you're talking. They lived in a tree right. I think they lived in intrigue. Gummy bears Linden Tree. That's fine but that's just like one. I always liked like this idea of just like living in the hills by living in just like and then you get like the shit they were doing there. Don't get me wrong. The habits were a deeply prejudiced folks with lots of lots of problems amongst themselves but they were just kind of fucking chilling in these Little Hill. Houses that you would go inside and they'd be like hey come on inside look at all this dope food we have. Do you want to smoke? Do you want me to smoke you out. Getting Zero Whiz. I WANNA smoke out with this wizard. In My Hill House. That has a circular door. Like how do you not down with that now? I'm into it? I'm actually surprised that there haven't been more like Harry Potter style. Universal Studio Opportunities. Oh Day you set you up for you to use that me up real nice. I was going to talk about like the inspiration for it but like tolkien grew up most of his life in England and so just like English countryside. He lived in this village called Sarah Hole in Birmingham. That was just like why? Open like planes and That it had a corn mill on the river which is also a part of the geography in Hobbiton. But in like my vision of what it looks like. Didn't come from the books which I think I read after I saw the movie and it comes from the movies and like building. Hobbiton was like this. Huge undertaking built on an actual working like sheep farm and like obviously had excavate a bunch of Shit and do all this stuff but they shot all of this in New Zealand on North Island and they didn't tear it down like when the when they were done. Hobbiton is still bear. Oh man and you can get a ticket and go visit it. Go Chill there and go to the Green Dragon in and get yourself a food and drink you. Can they do like events there? The winter solstice is Coming up I think in June and they have a special event planned around now and that is very good. Should do this for your fortieth birthday. I never have been like. I know. There's lots of people who feel this way like I. I really like those movies but I was never one of those like it is my life's dream to fly to New Zealand and go on the helicopter tour of like all. There's the mountain that they climbed up on. And do all this like. That's never been my jam but like the thought that this thing exists on our planet and makes me feel pretty good. This is real nice and again it's not limited just to like this. Lord of the Rings Thing. I'm talking about the aesthetic from what I understand. The Studio Ghibli like Park in Tokyo is also all about like this hidden little zone in amongst the Mossy rocks and shit like ooh ooh. That's good for me very good. That's good for me. Thank you. Thank you moss. Shot up shot up. Tomasz to like right like none of this would be possible without moss. Moss is doing a great job. You don't want it on your roof unintentionally. I think it's supposed to be pretty bad. Collect a lot of moisture and then just kind of like keeps it. They're not great for the roofs integrity. Unless it's intentional. And it's like Oh that Moss isn't eating my roof it is the roof and just frame F free mind. I guess you know. I talk about Moss for hours. Good because here we get locked in. Hey can I tell you what our friends at home? We're talking about? Yes I wanNA talk about Sean. Who send us an email and also made video showing us the the message in a bottle that they have made for us of. Ucla Tube. Tobe you don't. There's not an amount on it. You just kind of like I don't know I said. Hey hot tube Love it so much and Sean has built an actual bottle that whenever I open it up. I get to hear that little happy. Thank you sean. It's going to be in our Po box this week. I think so. Let's keep an eye out for it and Marlow says I love cooking Spaghetti Squash. It looks just like a regular squash when you cut it open and it looks like regular squash after you've roasted it but then you drag afford through its insights and it falls apart industries just like Spaghetti. It is the most satisfying thing I've ever cooked. They had some of that. We made at once. We got very excited about Spaghetti squash because we saw it in a video. I think we're looking for sort of more side dishes really really easy to make. But we didn't do a very good job of it if memory serves so I think I think we're just a recipe we use bad but the texture of it beats ass tasting good. Yeah we'll get another shot. But yeah thank you Marlowe for the inspiration and thank you to bow in an Augusta so these are theme song. Money Won't pay. You can find a link to that and the episode description and thank you to maximum for having us on the network. Yeah thank you. Maximum for hosting our show and so many great shows that are funny and topical. And you know make you laugh. Make you cry make you cry. Maybe maybe maybe we know some people like that Adventure son show put a little bit of that cried juice on that And Hey if you really like Max. Fun You'll have your chance to support it and support us here in a couple of weeks when we have the Max Fund drive which we're GonNa talk about when it runs for for a couple of weeks but we're GONNA have all kinds of cool stuff going for you. We're going to have a bonus episode for you for for new members and it's just a lot more more will be back to talk about that later. I think that's it and you gotta go back to work at home. Junor is that what does that what you said hold on. That's what I put on my calendar. Tell your boss that you were doing. I put on the calendar. Neuner at Home Bay. That's a doing thing well wrong. Maximum Fund Dot Org. Comedy and culture artist owned audience supported.

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Episdio 20 - Os (novos) 500 mais

Ouve Isso

26:30 min | Last month

Episdio 20 - Os (novos) 500 mais

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GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 226: Interview with Alan Orloff

GSMC Book Review Podcast

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 226: Interview with Alan Orloff

"Golden state media concepts bring you book review podcast haven for Bookworm of all ages and the whitest genres from mystery to memoirs romance to Comedy Fantasy Scifi. If you love to read. This is a podcast. It's the Golden State needed concepts Book Review. Podcast and welcome. Gmc Book Review. Podcast brought to you by the GMC. Podcast network I am your host Sarah and it's Tuesday. I don't always know date is but I know today is Tuesday. I double checked. Make sure that I would get this podcast out on the right day. Yeah how're you doing? Are you doing in isolation Anybody else feel like. It's slowly sucking their brain cells out. I feel really stupid some days like the simplest tasks take monumental effort to figure out things that I've done a million times. Suddenly I've forgotten how to do I know I'm not the only one but Share your stories with me at. Let's commiserate I would love to hear how I'd love to hear all you're doing anyway but Tell me tell me how it's affecting you. Hopefully you are taking care of yourself. Physically mentally emotionally spiritually all of those ways so that you are staying healthy In in all possible ways during this time and one thing we can do during. This time is read and listen to podcasts. So hey here is a podcast about books. Seems Perfect Ripe Today? I do have an interview for you. Today I'm speaking with author. Alain Orlov about his new thriller called. I know where you sleep. Even the name sounds chilling right. I mean nobody wants to hear. I know where I just picture at Here in my head in a really creepy voice you know I know where you sleep. Well Yeah I don't WanNa hear that. Let me go ahead and give you the description of the book when Anderson West takes on the Pro Bono case of Jessica Smith a twentysomething restaurant hostess being stalked. The last thing he expects is for his investigation to spiral into breaking and entering assault and legal threats from the suspects and the victim. But that's what happens when you run a private investigation firm with your rule breaking loose cannon and sister at your side while Anderson spends his time deducing an interviewing possible suspects Kerry handles interogations in her own unique and personal fashion. And it seems like everyone is a suspect. There are Jessica's ex boyfriend and current boyfriend her incredibly creepy boss and suspicious reverend at her church. Who definitely seems to be hiding something or someone the closer Anderson and Kerry get to an answer. The More Danger Jessica finds herself in her stockers notes. Become increasingly more threatening trading the scary phone calls and text messages for terrifying photographs and notes at her gym. Work and home to make things. Even more complicated Jessica's backstory begins to unravel and the secrets of her past could potentially solve everything. If only she'd let Anderson and carry in with time. Ticking down will the brother and sister investigative team be able to solve Jessica's case before she tries something foolhardy like place like facing up to the nation's Lou tenacious bastard on her own armed only with a handgun and a prayer apologize. I don't usually use language on the podcastone. That's not too bad of a one but took me by surprise that is description of I know where you sleep by Ellen. Orlov it is a thriller. We talked a little bit in the interview about the fact that it is more more suspense than you know how I I I don't like the gory or the really really really. Like violently scary Alan says he doesn't. This is not one of those books with a an. Hbo See a High Body Count. I I got a new acronym draw from this interview so learning new things forgetting things too but learning new things here and isolation so I always appreciate that. This is Definitely a page Turner. If you like this sort of story with just suspense and the unknown tra- mystery obviously Anderson Kerry trying to figure it out what's going on. Who is it. Figure IT OUT BEFORE ESCALATES. Even further than it does and it also has. This book also has really great dynamics between Anderson and Kerry Between Anderson's children and his mother his mother lives with him and his two children. So there's some great family dynamics in there as well in addition to the story in fact it would be great. I think if this had a series because I think there are some characters in here that I would really enjoy watching how they develop end where they go when how their relationships evolve throughout the course of a potential series. So let's go ahead now and turn to the interview with Alan again. The book is called. I know where you sleep. Hi Allen Welcome to the podcast Sir. Thanks so much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. I am very happy to have you here to talk about your book. I know where you sleep before we get to the book though if you could share a bit about yourself That would be great sure. Well I've been writing fiction for maybe fifteen years and I write both novels and short stories. I know what your sleep is. My ninth published novel and You know just keep keep working to keep writing and publishing trying to stay above. Water sounds good so Give bit of an overview of I know where you sleep which I mean even the title. You can tell it's going to sound. It sounds ominous wannabe with over right right and if you see the cover you'll know it's going to be creepy Exactly broke DAD's When inspire me to write it really was I've always been a big reader and I started reading in high school. I didn't read the classics You know the stuff that was a sign in our English class. I didn't really get I didn't understand it and I didn't had no interest to me so I would read a lot of science fiction and then I moved onto horror and I read a lot of that into my you know into my twenties and I was working in Boston and I had a boss. Who said you know Alan you like to read and I said sure. We'll have you read a series about a detective a private eye in Boston and it was it was. The guy's name is Spencer and I said you know I'll give it a try so I read the First Spencer Book and then I would just I loved it so much just dougherty. So I've always had sort of had love for the Spencer type of private eye book and I finally my ninth nine books. I finally had the opportunity to write a private eye. Novel saw is very excited about that. the book itself really is about a brother and sister team and the brother is were the lead private eye. He owns a firm private eye firm. And he's sort of taken his sister because no one else will give her sister job and she works in the office She's not a full fledged private. She kind of thinks she is and she's got a bleeding heart and she's got her own set of issues. You might say Sean. Anger Management issues specific so in this particular novel Appointing young woman is being stalked. And she comes into their firm wanting help in solving the problem. So that's sort of what kicks off the action and throughout Anderson The Guy and carry a sister have to sort of Attempt to find out who the stalker is in front of a way to stop him or yeah and of course. There's it's never as simple as it seems. There's always hidden secrets in books. Like this and of course I won't go into them because we want people to read the book. Let's let's not a little bit more about Anderson and Kerry. They're very very different their siblings but they're very different What about each of them you think might resonate with readers Okay sure Interesting as more of your Prototypical private I know. He's he's a tough guy He's not I wouldn't say he's exactly a rule follower but he tries to keep his antics checks. He's concerned on the firm's behalf of not losing your licence playing you know not breaking any laws At least none of that can be caught for And sort of he believes that hard work and diligence will get the job done. You know if you follow. His private eye instruction manual. He will they will find the culprit. Carry on the other hand is rooted to is exactly the opposite. She never met a rule that she didn't WanNa break. I'm so where do you consider Anderson to be more of the EGO? Perhaps carriers pure in all the way and you know as a writer writing her. Her parts was so much more fun than writing from Anderson's point of view so I had a lot of fun with sort of letting it all hang out and you know what's the the craziest worst thing someone might do in her position. And you're getting a chance to write it down. Where so that was kind of fun? Yeah you spend a lot of the book going. Oh man what is she going to do? Now right really you Kerry and a lot of ways is one of those characters that makes you feel a little better about yourself because she makes such odd seemingly crazy decisions and you're like well at least I'm not doing that She's she's very interesting and I don't know she's exactly likable but she keeps you engaged for sure. So we're going to go ahead and take our first break of the podcast and when we come back we'll be talking more about the voice of the book. It's written in both first and third person so stay tuned you're listening to the GMC Book Review. Podcast and I will be right back. Are you tired of the same Old News? Are you sick of the seemingly endless political spin and negatively the Diaz? Mci BARRACAS DILL Beautiful. Pot is a weekly news podcast covering all the top positive and uplifting news stories we cover stories that will inspire uplift and remind me love good in the world tune into the golden date media concept. America's still beautiful podcast to get all the great and positive news stories of today. Download the US. Nc America's still beautiful podcast on Itunes Stitcher Soundcloud. Google play or any podcast. Just tight just MC in the search bar and welcome back to the MC book review podcast before the Break Allen was speaking about Anderson and carry the siblings involved in the PR- private investigative work in this book. And we're going to talk a little bit more about why he chose to write them in different voices In terms of their voice. You Right Anderson in the first person and Carey in the third so what prompted that decision to write in the different in the different voices. Yeah well I think that writing a first person kind of brings the leader much closer to the character. You get that sense of intimacy which is really going for and and sort of the first person. Point of view style is Maybe I don't know if it's typical of a private eye novel but it's very common in a private but again I'd also wanted to show things from Carey's perspective and I figured I mean a lot of books do have more than one First Person Narrator but when I read books like that I get really confused so I went to have a little distance between the reader and carry maybe want readers to get into carries for what might happen to them but I thought it'd be interesting to sort of you know. Have the main narrative in first person from Anderson's point of view that sort of a secondary carrying in third person. I hope I pulled it off. Okay I think I do. Yeah absolutely And I agree often when there's more than one character speaking in the first person. If it's not done well. It can be hard to figure out as you start eating chapter. Who's WHO's speaking So their relationship is complicated Their siblings worked together. They are vastly different personalities. How that relationship help to Fuel the story or Progressive Story Yeah well I mean. They raised from the same family. And I do show some of them. What another thing I enjoyed writing was sort of a family dynamics. Anderson is is widowed. And he's got two young children and His mother and I had a few scenes where Those four are in the scene along with Kerry and sort of a different Ways that they sort of approach Just family dynamics what that was interesting. Too But Both Carey in Anderson have the same goal. They very much want to help. Help this poor woman who's being stalked insomnia case. So part of the fun I hope for the reader is to see how two people with the same goal is very different means which even So again no Anderson was more of Doing things in the routine sort of typical way. When might saw case where carries more of the out of the box thinker she? She's willing to take a lot more risks than Interesting was so I. I hope that the counterpoint between the two proved to be interesting as well as you know Anderson. Not only does Anderson have to worry about Solving a case he has to worry about keeping Carey in check before she does something to either be rash or something that would be That would hurt their chance to sell the case Thank you for that How much research did you do for the Book Well typically another big research guy. So you're not gonNA find me writing those big Fix historical mysteries. Because there's just too much research dimmer like history in school. It's just really wasn't my thing I'm more of what's going on the president or the future you know science fixes pretty interesting they But I do WanNa make sure that my books are accurate. Unbelievable I really striving to get verse militant so I do whatever research takes me. Kinda understand so in this case I did a fair amount of research trying to understand stocking You know what the characteristics of a stalker might be the kinds of feelings that You know I hate to use the word typical but Stalking victim might have And you know I I mean nothing in this book really autobiographical and I've never been stocked. Thank goodness but once I did have a situation for someone made me uncomfortable with some unwanted attention and I think most people certainly most women have probably experienced something like this but I have to tell you it was pretty darn unsettling and now in my writer's imagination. I sort of maybe started there and say what happened. What would have happened if you know this had happened and then if that had happened and if I respond this way and there's other person responded that way what how how far down the line we have gotten with this With this so I mean I sympathize for anyone who's gotten you know unwanted attention been stocking and it's it's terrifying absolutely yes. I'm grateful that I have never been to that extreme as well. But like you said I've had experiences that have left me unsettled and Yeah I think I think. Even if people have not been full on stock they're going to be able to relate to the CHARACTER JESSICA. Who is the one that they are trying to help who is being stocked in story so I think most people have had some extent. Come across someone. Who has you know you know? Sent their Hackles up at Some weird vibes from and dial up ten or one hundred times what it might be like to. Have you know a true honest going to stock or after you my goodness right right and the book does escalate? I mean things it starts out with just phone calls and then moves on from there and again. I don't WanNa give things away but It it does escalate. And so you know that it's not just. I don't WanNa say that the calls were not that threatening but you know it. It it escalates to to more Personal more frightening More immediate dangers Throughout the book. So you have that building tension Rogers always good and it was really exactly and unfortunately that's a fairly common pattern talking. Which again during my research. I sort of come out out that You know things can escalate very quickly and unfortunately very lively So what is it about writing? Thrillers that appeals to you You know I love reading thrillers. I let the head my my Heart pounding and try to turn those pages as fast. I can't see what happens you. My heroes are going to be able to South Situation And really it's that simple for me. I like to write stories that have people turning the pages of fast. Can I know once in a while? Get communication from reader and say you know darn you Allen I I you know I I stayed up to three. Am because I had to finish a book or Stuff like that so if I hear Something like that. That's sort of the ultimate compliment that people have put aside what they're doing their regular routine and they had to keep reading my book. That's kind of what the goal in trying to achieve Yeah the the Staying do do you get the you get the the I stayed up until three. I'm because I couldn't sleep because if you're coming well know I haven't. I know it's mostly had to finish but the other thing would be much much just as much of a compliment to me. Yes Yeah I've had that bad bad dreams. Yeah and this is definitely More toward the suspense side of thrillers. there there are some incidences that disley violence but It's not it's not Terribly graphic or or violent in more of A. I don't know what I'm trying to say. It's definitely on the side of my body Cam. Yes thank you sometimes writers talk about the HP see the high body count So it's definitely going to Give you nightmares. Keep you awake from the suspense from the on. My Gosh what's next rather than from just overt violent or or the high body count which type thrillers I prefer I'm not great with a lot of a lot of blood so thank you. You're welcome. I am getting braver about the thrillers that I read. But I'm still kind of a WIMP when it comes to this type of book. Let's go ahead and take our next break when we come back. We'll be talking about whether or not Anderson and Carey will be making a repeat performance in another book so stay tuned you're listening to the GMC book podcast. And I'll be right back. Tired of searching the vast jumble of podcasts. Now listen closed. And here's this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching. The Golden State Media Concept podcast network is here nothing less than a podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast covered from news sports music fashion entertainment fantasy football and so much more so stop blurted around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to build that podcast is whatever it may be visit us at. Www DOT JESUS MC podcast dot COM. Follow us on facebook twitter and download on itunes soundcloud and Google play man. Welcome back to the GMC book view. Podcast before the break I was once again confessing. My yield factor too when it comes to thrillers but I am growing and learning to appreciate thrillers more than I ever did before. Let's go ahead and get back to the interview with. Eleanor off on the cover. This is listed as a Pi thriller. And you did talk a little bit about Wanting to write a private investigator novel will there be others with Anderson and carry or will be others with other. Pi's what are your thoughts on writing more thrillers in the in the Chandra? Yeah I would love to ride another Anderson West thriller that'd be a TI novel filler. That that would be great But you know publishing sort of a very odd duck as a business and a lot depends on if the publisher would WanNa see another in the series but Yeah and I had. I had a lot of fun writing it. And like you said you know. I got my first real opportunity to write Private eye novel or series and You know I've already got an idea for the next book kind of mapped out. I've written the first chapter so we'll see where it goes. I mean there's nothing contract with at the moment but You know you never know so. Yeah hopefully and as far as Other Pi you know. I I probably write another Anderson West novel before I noticed more private eye characters. Yeah probably Well I definitely think there's room to not only have more stories but also to see how Carrie Ann Anderson grow as characters throughout the series. Yes you know. That's the key. I've heard that comment a lot. Like wow it'd be great to see what happens with Kerry next yeah I for some reason and maybe it's not uncommon that Secondary character because sometimes you can write them a little more Vividly that makes sense there on screen. On on screen there on the forefront a little bit less typically so you can have them do wilder things like. He couldn't have a book of just the main character. Just doing crazy things in time. That would be Kinda goofy. I think but sometimes a secondary character can stand out more And I think it's definitely the case with care as much stronger personnel. Let's without I think Anderson does One of my early readers suggested that I just write a book all off from Carey's point of view and forget Anderson just go. Oh my God that'd be. That'd be intense. I think but I think it would be. Yeah Are there any of your other books that you would like to highlight or mention at this point? I'm sure that's the opportunity You mentioned sort of a different kind of thriller so my previous novel I think he would classify more of a high concept pillar with a much higher body count and it had a much more of a a save the world kind of Prentiss whereas I think you correctly identified I know sleep is more of a suspense. You know the stakes are very high for Jessica Victim. Society at large are probably not that great but in pray for the innocence The stakes are very high. So let me just give you the sort of apprentice In the shadow of the Pentagon just takes place in DC There was a a secret. Dod Department of Defense Experiment on brain research that has gone terribly wrong so Won A special. Ops trained soldier escapes from the lab believing he is a Russian terrorist straight from the pages of the nineteen eighties Spy Novel and he's on the loose in the fence. Have to figure out how to catch this guy and they had they turn to the only person I can. And that's the The author of the book who wrote in the nineteen eighty six now a retired professor. Who's a reclusive? Wants nothing to do with this so while there's a sort of a kicks off with sort of The science fiction twist at the beginning. I thought that was pretty cool. Prentice or a novel and it was fortunate enough to win. The last year's Thriller Award for best original. So I got the idea. You'll you'll appreciate this. I got the idea for that novel apprentice I woke up with. It is where I am and it was practically fully formed my head which has never happened since in fact when I wake up. I don't have an idea like that. I'm a little bit disappointed every morning. Right it was crazy. It was crazy. I've never had never happened before in the past and then I'm guessing they won't happen again but it was nuts anyway. Did you write it really or did you remember it? Yeah no I I wrote it down and and and I remember the next morning the next Sunday more so the next day. Call my agent said. You're not gonNA leave this. I woke up with this amazing prentice of this idea for this novel. what should I do and she was like okay. Well put aside the novel. I was working on a novel time. That's about halfway done. Put aside the one. You're working on. Just write this one so I did and You know came out pretty much close to my vision and Yeah got cannot pretty good so let's please and and and it got no word and so it must have been a really good for him dream. You had that that Up and yeah yeah. That's really cool like that happens. And I While I'm talking about books that got a couple of stories in the anthologies policies that just came out the spring both pretty cool projects one is called the swamp killers and in it. They were fourteen or fifteen of us. That sort of tell a novel in stories so each of us tells the story and they're sort of loosely connected to tell a larger narrative our and this sort is a follow up of An analogy much. The same group of writers did two years ago. Call the night of the flood and So that's kind of an interesting project to see Have warned that story told Just GonNa say Did Ed Aimar work on that? Yes yes okay. Okay Okay Yeah. He's he was on the podcast a while ago and I remember him talking about the night of the flood. So that's really cool. Yeah yeah it was very cool. Both I mean both. They're not your typical anthology. Let's put it that way you get different voices and different tones and styles. Kinda telling the same story that's really. That's pretty cool and then another very interesting project. I'm probably is An anthology where all of the stories are inspired by Joni Mitchell songs and that's called the beat of black wings which is the title whenever sauce. And that's just came out I don't know three or four weeks ago and I'm really honored to be included because the roster of writers is just a who who's writing great short fiction the mystery community so if you're Joni Mitchell Fan It's at least cool to see sort of interpretations sort of jumping off points where different writers The avenues they took sort of you know based on her story based on songs to come come up against pressure for their stories and that was Kinda cool to follow up questions on that I what Joni Mitchell Song did you write about? Well I picked. I'M A. I'm a pretty big Joni Mitchell. Fan I picked mine based on the title. Most of the other writers picked on the song and like the saw war the lyrics whatever. I chose mine almost exclusively on the title because I might. This song I picked was sex kills and I thought that would provide me with Many opportunities to come up with a great story so yeah that was pretty cool and then my second question is how on Earth did somebody. That's really fascinating. Somebody is just listening to Joni Mitchell and they think I should get a bunch of writers to write stories based on her songs. How did that come about you know Well I'm I'm pretty good friends with the the editor. Josh packed her and he has a story where he had come up with. A short story with the With the characters name was killer. Kyle which is an Joni Mitchell song from From one of her saw one of her songs and he tried to place it he couldn't really and then at the same time he noticed that there were other policies based on or music. Like there's a bruce springsteen anthology and there's a steely Dan Anthology go-goes Anthology and he thought you know what why not Joni Mitchell? So that sort of idea was born and Yeah I've read a few of the story so far and they are just terrific so I'm looking forward to the rest of them. Yeah and I remember that one. That's called the beat of black wings. Let me add one. Third of the proceeds are going to be donated to the brain aneurysm fund foundation brain tourism. Whatever I think it's Sunday show Joni Mitchell had a brainers in a couple of years ago years ago which she's recovered from So we thought that would be nice to donate to When it's not yeah absolutely. That's great I always love hearing where people come up with ideas for things like anthologies or really ideas for anything. I'm just fascinated when they have an idea. And then they execute that idea and it works. And it's great. I feel like I have ideas. But they just swirl around in my brain. I'm sure I've done something with an idea once or twice maybe of thinking about that. I'll get back to you. Let's go ahead and take another break when we come back. We'll be wrapping up this episode and Talking about Alan's alter ego so his pen name at any rate stay tuned. You're listening to the MC book re podcast and. I'll be right back. Pets bring such joy to our lives and the GS MC pets. Podcast is here to share. In that joy. We'll tell stories of pets finding their forever homes acting in unexpected ways being helpful or just being silly whether you love dogs cats llamas reptiles fish or you'd never met an animal you didn't like the DS MC pets podcast is for you. Welcome back to the MC Book Review Podcast and my interview with author Alan or loss. You also write as Zack Allen. So can you talk a little bit about that writing Are there differences in the writing style? Genre Etcetera Etcetera. From what you write as yourself as Elliot. Yes that's that's the real me Yeah y you know that sort of came about I had written I guess three stories my first three stories with Publisher called midnight ink and they were fairly traditional not too violent Didn't have high high body counts wasn't there wasn't a Gore on the page really Mysteries and I had the time I come up with this idea for you know all my agents hate me because I don't write in one John Right sort of bounce around a little bit. Which makes it a little different difficult to find an audience and build an audience. But at this time I had come up with this great. I thought it was a great idea then involved cannibals and so I wrote this novel. It's it's a Har- novel and I'm sort of writing in writing just coming up with crazy. Gory discussing things that made sense for the book and I'm realizing that the people that really enjoyed say my first book for the day which was I'll award nominee So traditional mystery. They probably may not be the same people who would like a cannibal book which was called the taste and I wanted to have some way to sorta signal to to those loyal readers. That might be a little different. I didn't want You know a lover of gentle mysteries to pick up the taste thinking. Oh look another Allen ornoff book. Let's give it a read and then for them to get you know twenty pages in. I'm like you know it'd be really. La Yeah exactly now. Hopefully it's obvious from the cover and the title and the book description the back. What kind of look it is. But I didn't WanNa take anybody to take any chances so that was sort of where the Zack Allan originated. And then I had a couple of other books that were Also a little warrior probably than my typical so. I thought well I might as well put those up his Published those Cowan. At some point. They may go back to my backlist. And just make them all Allen. Orlov's I haven't decided but there probably won't be any more. Zack Allen coming out unless I think another horror novel and then maybe you just never know that might be your next four revelation exactly What are you working on right now? I'm working on now. Well I've got a book that's finished. That's making the rounds. editors reading different publishers. And that's You know it's another. I would classify that as a suspense novel. And I'm in the middle of kind of revise Another book that's about what a family of con artists. And you know I wrote. I wrote pretty much an entire first. Traffic and I sort of realized just didn't come together the way I wanted so I'm now in the process of going back and trying to revise and move things around and rigidity everything so that's kind of what. I'm what I'm into now and I'm still you know right writing occasional short story. I find something that's Interesting one I just sorta short story to Alfred Hitchcock Mystery magazine called Gator Palooza which I'm not sure when that's going to be published hopefully within the next year so I got a lot of things going on. Yeah you do So when did you start writing Is it something that you've always wanted to do? Have you always written or Did you start writing later in life? How did that work for you? Yeah well I mentioned that. I didn't like leading some of the classics and High School English. Well I should have said that I didn't like high school English period. Much to the consternation. My father who was an ex English teacher in high school I was always a numbers guy. So I went to Maryland as an Undergrad and I studied engineering so I never had to take an English class. I never had to write creatively whatsoever I could engineering for a little bit. I didn't really like engineering. So went back to business school. In which case I didn't never had to take an English class. You never had to do any creative writing and so throughout most of my career. I never had any Creative writing I never took credit running class. I didn't know anything from anything. So maybe twenty years ago. Ten twenty years ago I Sorta look to my wife and I said I think I wanna right and then I had a. I had a bend over and pick her up because she had fainted revived her and she's like okay. Well whatever so being was. I wrote a few proof of concept short stories and they weren't horrible but that's kept me going. I took an adult Ed class at the local high school an introduction to create a writing or something and as part of that I had to write a short story and it didn't Stink and the instructor was complimentary. Said you know what this is not so terrible. That has some promise. You know first thing you do need to get rid of all the semi colons that used but otherwise. You know some potential. So I kept at it. And I took more workshops and I joined up with some critique groups and kept working on my craft and you know kept writing nothing writing now remaining scripts and so many of them and trying to get ages on so the typical way that A beginning rider tries to break into the business and You know I just kept kept asking. I didn't give up and and Got An agent and I sold a book and so on so no. It's not something I always wanted to do. Some came to me rather later in life Sort of I've always been a big reader though I think that's what's propelled me forward and in terms of reading than You mentioned like the classics in High School You preferred or thriller is that does that tend to be your go to genre now or do you have Favorite genres authors. That you like to read for yourself Yeah yeah well. Most of what I mean. Honestly most what I read is In the mystery thriller a crime fiction genre. You know how I have a lot of friends I've met at. He's at peace conferences expansions at various events. So I like to read. There's we either work and support them so I read a lot of friends books and so I'm not gonNA mention them because I'm sure I would leave somebody else I do like to read read. Stephen King I'd like three horror when I get a chance once in a while. I like to read science fiction so it's sort of same and I've been reading those all my life Once in a while I like to read Some young adult fiction to know coming of age story. Something like that but I don't read a whole lot of nonfiction and like I said. I don't read a whole lot of historical stuff. Although the as I get older what I think. Is You know things. Things that are historical. Changes Right I I. There's a great series I mentioned James Disconnects. The great series the Ellie Ellie Stone mysteries at set in the nineteen sixties and in some classifications after historical mystery right. But you know I don't want to date myself at seem like so historical. It's not like regency or something like that. Someone someone was saying that they wrote a short story that took place in the eighties. I like what I make now but he was talking to the nineteen when I go yeah. It's the same with music when you hear songs that you grew up with on the classic radio station. You like. Yeah go jumping back in here so we can take our final break of the podcast when we come back. Alan will be giving us some advice if in case you are an aspiring author. Stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC Book Review. Podcast and I'll be right back the GMC live in happiness. Podcast TAKES YOU ON. A Journey of exploration. We'll discuss try to true methods alongside the latest trends of how death of your life to its fullest. Unhappiest from psychology to meditation science to self help books the genus MC lagged unhappiness podcast. We'll help you to discover what makes you happy and how you can live like being the past you plausible download the jazz. Mc Life and happiness. Podcast on Itunes soundcloud. Who play or anywhere you bind podcast tight Dempsey in the search bar. News Talk Welcome back to the DMC Book Review Podcast and the conclusion of my interview with author Alan or loss. Okay good Do you have advice for aspiring authors from your own experience. Oh yeah sure so. I mentioned they took these workshops so there was a great facility. Great Resource in Bethesda. Maryland called the writer center. So I took some some workshops there you know ten twelve years ago and ten or twelve years later. I have gone back to be an instructor for workshops so it sort of went full circle and I noticed Certain things that Many of my students They'd have they'd come into roadblocks and one of the biggest piece of advice. I can give someone who wants to write a novel. For instance is to finish to get to be able to write the two words and the and I've had encountered so many writers who they want to write a novel so the right of first chapter and they'll go back and revise it in the revived. Little hone it and they'll tweak it and spend weeks and weeks and months trying to get that first chapter just right thinking. We're believing that they need to have a good foundation to build our story on so they work on the first track. So then they'll move onto the second chapter and they'll spend a lotta time writing it inviting and polishing it and tweaking it and so on and then they'll look and they'll say you know what this chapter is really good but there's some the what I've written has made me want to change things in the first so we'll go back to the first job and they'll tweak and weekends bigger and then they go to the church and so on and so on. I never get to the end and what I've found is by getting to the end. Then you laid your entire story out and more often than not once you've written your entire story. It's different than what your plan. Your entire story can be when you're first starting out. So for instance those first two chapters that you spent maybe five months polishing and revising and so on that might not even vary Britain. That might not even be where your story start just might start in chapter three or might take an entirely different turn in which case you have to revise chapters one and two anyway so it does not work for everyone. You know when I'm the first person to say. Hey if you're doing something and it's working stick with it. Don't listen to advice on somebody else's not in your shoes is not interesting on your on your keyboard right. You need to do what works for you. But there's so much value in getting the end. And and knowing that you have the wherewithal to write eighty thousand word or fifty thousand word one hundred twenty thousand word story that somewhat makes fence and we all know that good books aren't written. They are rewritten. So no matter. How great your first draft is GONNA BE? Odds are that you're GONNA have to go back and revise fixed for two matches your vision that you have the book so that would probably my biggest biggest vices to get the end and in order to get the end. Some people need Some sort of routine so whether it's daily quota by word count or you know a time you know right two hours every Saturday or whatever. It is as long as you're making progress and gets the in much better shape. Thank you for that. I know you have a website If you could tell people where they can find your website and where they might be able to interact with you on. Social Media website is Allen Orlov Dot com and I try to keep it updated fairly frequently now that on virtually every single appearance and and Convention and Conference has been cancelled for this year. Sadly I probably have to go back and advise my events page but you can kind of keep up with what's going on There there's links to my books and so a million dollars I think are all up. There will be shortly and you can find pretty active on facebook and it's Allen on off and maybe maybe it's Alan Esau anyway it's the one that's the writer and don't think you need to be a friend of mine to be you know friendly on facebook. Most of what I write is just For public consumption anyway. And I'm on twitter at Allen on off and I'm on instagram. I'm not as active on instagram. I am I. Don't take a lot of photos. Sometimes I'd be right. Always forget the minister. Those are probably the places I'm online the most. Yeah I'M GONNA be doing A virtual nor at the bar. And that's if you're not familiar with that that's a bunch of crime. Fiction writers will be leading. And usually we do it at a local Bar But with The social distancing in the bars aren't even open. We're doing it virtually so it's sort of like I think it's on crowd cast as the platform and this one is on May eighth. I believe I'll be promoting on my facebook page And then we're also. I'm also doing a on April. Twenty six a virtual thriller how to write a thriller Three three authors that have stories in the beat of black wings. Which is the Joni Mitchell Anthology? I was speaking out or each gonna give ten minutes tips on how to write Fillers and that's on April twenty six and again. I think it's GonNa be on Zoom. You'll have to go to my facebook page to Get the details on that. So I think that's got planned Training there's something else. Yeah Well I did look at it is L. S. or LAV I thanks thanks but it came up either way when I typed in your name. So you're not. You're not hard to find Halloween. I'm sorry I was just say. We've talked about a lot of different topics but is there anything that we haven't covered that you wanted to mention in terms of the new book. I know where you sleep. Or writing in general No as a also pleasure for me to work with the great folks down in Al Books which is the publisher of. I know where you sleep. There's a Not One of the super large guys but they do a lot of really excellent crime fiction. they do a lot of our stuff. A lot of technical books do a lot of these apologies And so if that's your thing visit their website. They've got some great deals going on and they they ran a covert nineteen sale. Where they had just. I don't know thirty bucks or something for A Buck Ninety nine to ninety nine or things in there And I'd say support your local independent bookstores Again with Being physically shut down some of them are GonNa have some struggling to to survive. So if you WANNA help support them go go online and order books and I'm sure that'd be happy to shipping out absolutely yes And you can help them out in that way because most of them are still doing online online orders so yeah well thank you so much for taking the time to speak to me I really enjoyed it and I appreciate you talking to me about your new book. I know where you sleep. Sarah thanks so much for having me. It's been a lot of fun and I will see online. I hope not. Yes thank you. Thank you again to Alan for taking the time to speak with me. Thank you as always to you my listeners. So very much appreciate you and would love to hear from you. Feel free to hit me up on social media and give me your thoughts on the podcast the interviews the books etc. What are you reading especially now in isolation what have you been reading? I would love to hear from you. So go ahead and check out. Gmc Book Review Facebook Twitter Instagram. And let me know how you're doing. I do have copies of this book to give away so keep an eye on those social media pages to find out how you can win a copy of. I know where you sleep by Orlov. If you are a fan of suspense you will definitely want to check this one out. I know I've said thank you a bunch of times but really gratitude. I just feel grateful for the authors that I speak to and You my listeners. So once again thank you. If you are a fan of this podcast please do give us a nice review. Whether that's written or five star. We would so appreciate it. Follow us on social media. You know do all those wonderful things. Like retweeting and sharing and All those great social media thing things social technical term social media things that help our podcast get out to more listeners and readers lake yourselves. Hope you're having a great week. I will be back on Friday with another interview. This one a dear friend of mine who has written a children's book with a dear friend of hers. And that is called Morris somewhere out there so please join me as I interview. Penny Wally about that book have a great week. Hope you're staying safe staying well. Staying Sane will do whatever it takes and I hope you have well. It pretty sure unless you are an essential worker. You have plenty of time but you're taking the time to get lost in a good book. Thank you you've been listening to the Golden State media concepts book review. Podcast part of the Golden state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at. Www DOT G MC PODCASTS DOT COM? Download our podcast on itunes stitcher soundcloud and Google. Play exist typing G. S. MC to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast network from movies to music throw sparse to entertainment and even weird news. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program.

Carrie Ann Anderson Alan Esau Anderson Kerry Zack Allen Gmc Book Review writer GMC facebook Alain Orlov Google Carey High School twitter Book Review publisher Joni Mitchell Sarah Jessica
Muses EP 103: Laurel Canyon

Rock N Roll Archaeology

53:31 min | 1 year ago

Muses EP 103: Laurel Canyon

"Tonight on a very special episode of rock and roll archaeology Ahmet Zappa does a promo. I'm feelin podcasts presents from Toronto Canada. News is and stuff with your hosts, John Kerry and link. The fountain network of. Loser. Culture. Technology. Rock n roll. So grab those dock stage passing. Let's get to the show. Great. Okay. Hello, everybody. And welcome to another episode. Yes of this podcast. But you're listening to. All about the muses. So how are you doing? I'm okay. April is starting off better than Martinez. I'll be completely honest March was very difficult for me. Yeah. For those listening who are in a cold climate to cold and grey climate. There's this little thing called seasonal affective disorder. Oh, yeah. There is sad. Actually, just watched the broad city episode. I don't know if you've seen it. But she gets a sad lamp, and she like keeps having to go to it to like reenergize, and then it starts to like not work, and she needs like more light more late. It was the most relatable episode. I've ever seen. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So it's been it's been really difficult. But it's starting to get blue and sunny here not every day, unfortunately, but we've had a couple we can see that spring is coming just cluele slow. You wouldn't believe the amount of books and podcasts, I'm listening to to just change my mindset as well. So for the most part just having positively and like getting on the bus and looking the bus driver in the eye and be like, thank you or like walking down the street, and just, you know, sending blessings to everybody walking by me or just trying to like sprinkle magic dust on. I don't know anybody that's like working at a cafe or helping me out or anything. So I'm really trying to stay positive. But then like sometimes it just gets to a point where the gas tank just on empty, and there's nothing else left to do. What does that clay? Yeah. But we're we're slowly climbing out of it. Yeah. So we have a lot of really fun things to talk about one of them being that the newest member of the pantheon family. Yes. Guys. Miss P miss Pamela. Dip bar has a podcast. Yes. Miss pamelas pajama party. Yeah. What a great name and the cherry on top of all that is that she's on our network. We're keeping this whole thing in the family. She's got her first episode up her first guest is miss mercy. They got some great stories. She's a great. I guess I was laughing at loud on the bus listening to it. It's a great one. I can't wait to see who she puts on as guests on her show and what they get to talking about. Yeah. I mean, I there were some stories that I'd heard before. And then they were brand new stories. There's one point in the podcast when she says mercy that's private and then mercy's. Oh, sorry. Like needed never told anybody that. She's like. Well, I guess it's a matter fifty years ago. But like you you're learning new things. So it's really fantastic in that sense. So if you haven't checked it out ready, go check out. Pamelas pajama party. Also have some exciting news coming up for meet the music here. Yeah. Yeah. We are building a patriot. Yeah. So patriotic is a place that you can go. And if you loving what we're doing. And if you have been loving what we're doing and you want some more of it than you can go to our patriot. And you can get access to bonus episodes. There's going to be audio. There's going to be video we can send you stuff in the mail. We can Skype. We can do all these things, and it is going to be for whatever tier you decide to do. So it might be five dollars a month that might be graciously ten dollars a month or more. If you have more new are this like, you know, that you're abundant in you wanna give more than we'd love that. And remember that money is currency and currency is energy and anything that you put into us. It's going to come back to you tenfold. Exactly. I'm really excited for this. We've been working on some of the bonus material having so much. Fun doing it. That's certainly been a light in these dark ages of winter. So yeah, plaza gave us something a little bit new like a gave us a new take on what we have been doing. Because a lot of the times when we're presenting an episode to you we get right into it. We have a lot of stuff to cover. And so we're like, hey has going cool and we jump right in. Yeah. Whereas with these episodes, you get to learn more about us. Yeah. They're more fun laid back, but still very informative and interesting. Yeah, we good balance the ourselves little bit kind of relaxing and let loose and it's fun. Yeah. So I think you guys are really going to like that. It's not up yet. We will let you know when that happens. We wanna make sure that we're building it and that it's a quality thing, and it's ready to go. So we don't launch prematurely. And then you know, there are problems. So no for sure. Okay. So links does not know what I'm going to be presenting today. And I've kept it a secret just for funsies. So I'm gonna tell you why chose this topic. But I want to tell you the two topics that I didn't choose. Okay. So this episode was originally supposed to be about digit about dole Brigitte Bardot, and I even bought her book and everything, and I send links message, and we're going to do I'm going to we're going to do her. I'm going to do her. I'm going to present her episode in the future. But the reason why couldn't get to at this time around because she's kind of problematic. Yes. And we want to address her with. Thoughtfulness? Yeah. Essentially, that's it. Yeah. I wanna have all my bases covered. And if you know debate comes up about it afterwards, I wanna be fully and mentally prepared to deal with that needs to be a very well rounded episode, exactly. So and I haven't and I've been feeling the opposite of that. Like, I haven't been feeling well rounded for the last month I've been burning the candle at both at both wicks or both. However, you want to say it, and so I thought to myself. Okay. Well, why don't I just do something smaller keep it shorter? I was looking through myspace booklet spend the night together for some inspiration on all of the muses. And I was like, oh, well, you know, we haven't done Laurie lightning yet. And so I'm not doing her either. Because when okay. Yeah. Like, she's cool. I can't wait to present. Whoa. That's the thing. In like looking at me like we did that already. That's where my brain is right now. That's where my brain is right now, I wanna talk more about her. But I think it's maybe because like I want to interview her. Yes. And so before I even maybe went forwards and even start thinking like we've done that already. I was just like, I'm I'm not in the mindset to talk about thirteen year olds right now either. Like, I mentally can't handle this debate. Right. That's a heavier top. So let's shelve that. And so the reason why I'm presenting the topic that I am today is because it fills me with joy and it fills me with inspiration. And it's on my vision board, and it's not a person. But it's a place is laurel canyon. Yes. Yes today. I am presenting the story of laurel canyon. All right because it's a place that is amused. It's inspired many people has inspired many people. And so I have had this book laurel canyon the inside story of rock 'n Roll's, legendary neighborhood by Michael Walker for like ten years, and I've never read it. I have this book as well. And I read it like ten years ago. Yeah. So it's been a while. So we're gonna go through the story of laurel canyon, and my mostly just used this book on his Lee. And the thing is with like putting this episode off. I'm going to be completely honest with you guys again like you deserve it. We've been doing this for over a hundred episodes. I kept put I kept trying to start Jesuit. I couldn't do it a cab looking for other things I couldn't do it. So I honestly read this book and a couple of days. Yeah. It's a good one. And firing. I typed up the episode in another day. So here's the thing though. Is that I wanna be putting out quality episodes every time. I don't wanna make mistakes. I don't wanna get my facts wrong. However. And we know what happens when we rush. Right. We do we have to do corrections. We have to do these. So I just want to let everybody know that. I tried my best and I'm not a music historian. But I did read this book. I tried to get the facts right as much as possible. There's little things that you know, I got wrong. Go ahead. Let us know. Tweet us to us an Email, and I'll try my best to correct it. But essentially. Moving forwards. I'm going to be dedicating myself to this podcast. Totally a that's great. And you've dedicated yourself for one hundred associates. I mean, give yourself credit. Yeah. So I gave my resignation no longer going to be teaching. That's so excited. I'm finishing off three more months. It's going to be strong. I have a fantastic class and wonderful school. But it's not fair to have one foot in the classroom and one foot in podcasting. And so we're going to move forwards and a new adventure way. I'm not going to be sending the episode last minute to our sound engineer being leagues laureate. So sorry having such a hard time. You know, it's time guys. And maybe we'll talk more about that in like a patriot. Like, a more, you know, how it's been more personal thing. But let's get to the episode. Okay. All right. Let's go. So I've always wanted to go to laurel canyon. I've never been to California. I've never really been west you. You haven't either. No, not I- laurel Kenyans high on my list as well. Yeah. You know, we've talked about places that have been inspiring like Greenwich Village. But it was because we were talking about a certain person, and how that place influence them at the time, but never just the place in general. And so this place really like inspired a kind of movement movement as well. Yeah. One thing that you'll be interested to know is that Pamela, and Michael debar have hons of quotes in this book. So I'm wondering if they know the author if Mike Walker the debars him for sure, yeah. Are are buds. So yeah. This author's written a lot about popular culture. According to the about the author of the book, he still lives in laurel canyon. Nice. Yeah. One of the things that I found funny in this is an aside from the book is that one of my favorite current artists. Father John misty spent some time in laurel canyon. But he only ended up there because he thought he was going to panga canyon. So he has a song called. I went to the store one day, which is written about how he met Emma, his wife, and so he was buying coffee and cigarettes, firewood and bad wine when he met the love of his life is a beautiful. So I really like how it kept on inspiring as as, you know, not just a sick thing. Yeah. For sure fun. Fact, I found from an article in the citizen is that Jennifer Aniston used to work at the canyon store. Oh, yeah. I actually was thinking about doing. Just like the laurel canyon store as the music solve and like that's stupid. It was going to the whole the whole place where my mind was so David it's cough of the New York Times. Book review calls his book, a winding inviting portrait of bohemian quarter that played a prominent role in the foundation of rock music. Nice. It's like are women. No, absolutely. They played prominent role in the foundation of rock music. Absolutely. Yeah. The books fairly linear. So we kind of start off in nineteen sixty eight and to set the scene laurel canyon described as the slightly seedy camp lake neighborhood of serpentine one lane roads. Precipitous hills fragrant eucalyptus trees and softly crumbling crumbling. Bungalows we have lookout mountain in the heart of laurel canyon a house owned by Joni Mitchell where Crosby Stills Nash, I hang together a mile away at that time was cast Elliott better known as mama Cass of the mommas and. Apas not too far from one another. Yes. So as I mentioned, Josh Tillman father, John misty was certainly not the first one to write about this magical place. We also know that Graham Nash wrote our house about living in Jones cottage with her and Joanie wrote ladies of the canyon about this strange bohemian Netherland. Yes, it was a place where the right musicians. The right artists gathered at the right moment in music history. And some of these musicians were transplants Joni Mitchell's Canadian, right, and then other people would come to stop by Mickey Dolan's lived there of the monkeys the Beatles would stop by. We have that fabulous story about Marianne faithfull and Mick Jagger stopping by the Apas. So lot of people have stopped by hung out there over the years musicians who have lived there include Frank Zappa. And we talk about that a lot in a few episodes. Specifically, the Pauline butcher bird one because she was a secretary who lived there, but Jackson Browne Chris Hillman. Roger McGlynn Glenn fry Don Henley, Mickey Dolan's list goes on Jim Morrison. Well, this book says never said that he actually lived there. But maybe. Yeah. Okay. Because Miss B has great story about wandering in the canyon. Yeah. We across was that his home though, or was just like maybe it was pamelas made day bar. Yeah. Walker says the musicians flocking to the canyon at night, caterwauling coyotes and hooting AL's made you marvel that you were only five minutes from the noise and the neon of the sunset strip. Jackson Browne said that it was like a tribal life living there. It's exciting. Imagine being there in the sixties. Well, that's what I did. When I read this book, you know, I just really tried to picture myself there. Graham Nash felt as if he had reached nirvana he was in love with Joni Mitchell had this budding relationship with David and Stephen and they were living and breathing music. So yeah, like what time? It definitely attracted a certain kind of people and back, then it's my understanding that it had a reasonable rent prices every per back in the day at a reasonable price. With happening. So there is an incredible swath of popular culture, which is created in a very short time. And I really liked this, quote, he said that they're Sarran dippy was spun into gold. Yeah. Yeah. So it was a place a time when a handful of history's most willful and self absorbed. Young adults made such beautiful music together. In nineteen sixty four. So I guess I'm going back a little bit. Chris Hillman rented a house on Kirkwood drive. He would have no idea at the time. What an impact his music or his band would have on rock and roll history. And so the folk stars of the early sixties would become the new Rockstars, Mr. tambourine man was a hit that maybe got everything kinda rolling up on that mountain. Some might say, and then there would be that LA sound perfected by Crosby Stills. Nash eagles that would come later Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt, and then they would dominate for the next decade. But Walker the author says that it all started in nineteen sixty five with the birds. So the book provides a great great back story. So for example, where Chris Hillman grew up and how he got there. And so because we're going to do the canyon like as an overall muse we're not going to go into quite specific details of every individual artist. But if you did want to know that and you wanted to get into the details of things go ahead and pick up the book I recommend. It was a good book was a great read. So Hellman was inspired by the Beatles. And this was at a time when the music industry was run by guys who were music guys, right? There is no corporate monsters. Yeah. Eating everything up. So it was an innocent time. Walker says it was the mecca. So it was in Los Angeles in the mid nineteen sixties that laurel canyon by unconscious lottery of the hip became the place where every heads up young musician just knew he had to live. Or or she we had some ladies. It was perfect for the musicians who wanted to live away for all from all of the hustle and bustle, but still be with their kind the like minded people. The rent was cheap yet helman's view stretch from downtown Los Angeles all the way to the Pacific. Wow. You picture that? Wow. Kim Fowley and early L A rock producer notch per Noor said everyone else in the folk rock community decided they move up there too because you could smoke dope and get laid and be an asshole with your Porsche, convertible, convertible out of the prying eyes of the man. All right, Kim. Yeah. John Phillips of the mamas. And Papas was the one to pen the lyric young girls are coming to the canyon. And boy did they so Pamela makes an appearance in the book within eleven pages. She's she's begun being quoted page eleven honestly, this is maybe where I read her name for the first time. Now that I think about it because I bought this book when I was in like early university before I had known about her. It's possible that I saw her name for the first time in this book. That's where that that just came back to me, and she's described as a seventeen year old proto groupie have we ever discussed that word before. No. I don't think we've ever heard it or set it before. No, proto groupie. She was the she was the group the first making model. Yeah. So yeah, that's new word. We haven't discussed which is kind of fun. So she would hedge hike to laurel canyon from Rosetta. And this we've told and she's told it it's an her book, but she used to call it God's golden backyard. And like you said excellent stories about Jim Morrison the back bend in the living room being governess to the kids and she would just find the addresses of Rockstars. And just go there this show up emotional roles where you could just do that. And be welcomed. Yeah. No. That's the thing ever almost welcoming back then too. Yeah. Michael do bar called it the yellow brick motherfucking road to Oz. Swear, he's such a word Smith. Yeah. And a lot of these artists ended up getting very famous and making a lot of money. It's interesting how in almost every kind of John Rao or decade there is that place. You know? In New York, like the punk movement has CBGB's Mexicans a city or you can go to Seattle for the grunge movement. You know, it's interesting. Yeah. And then this is like, well, we can say will this had the whiskey ago and like the rainbow, but it's I think what's really special is that it's like it's a neighborhood. Yeah. Homes houses. So I'm gonna read you little passage laurel canyon. Meanwhile, still in its idyllic phase as for the moment, the nascent peace and love aesthetic obscured. The mercantile distractions beginning to visit more and more of its inhabitants, the canyons rugged granite, walls and cool quiet night air sweetened with jasmine and acacia blossoms said that right only five minutes from the mammon of sunset strip provided a reassuring physical and psychological barrier for musicians steeped in the tally and eras e gala -tarian ISM of folk music and lately the back to the land ethos of the hip. 'these Hillman has an double memory of coming off the road in the winter most likely after the nineteen sixty six tour and supportive, turn turn turn and RIA climbing himself to the canyons rhythms. It was like January February and had just rained in LA. He recalls the cab stopped, and there was a eucalyptus tree down across the road. I literally had to climb over the tree with my bag to get down to the house. Wow. Yeah. So while it's beautiful idea. Like all these things there's a lot of fires in laurel canyons history as well. And hillman's house was one of the houses that burned down. And he goes into interesting detail, which is for music buffs about specific dates and about Hillman specifically like when he joined gram Parsons, the fine rito brothers. And if there's any young people listening who are like who are the flying burrito brothers. You should check them out truck of you should like go to your art school and be like, hey, guys wanna hear something cool. And then you'll be the coolest. So how'd y'all can't get his name? Well in nineteen ten in engineering speculator named Charles Spencer man, sold house lots half way at the canyon the steeply slopes. Land was thick and with shopper, all sycamore and California bay laurel adjustment. Like flour mix sense. Yeah. I love the name laurel. I think it's like a beautiful name except one time. I had this boy friend. And he started hanging around beautiful girl named Laura and I was like I think you like her and he was like, I don't like her. She's just my friend. And I was like, but I think you like her it was like, I don't like her. She's just my friend. Did he like her? We broke up. And then they started dating a week later. He liked her. He liked her. Of course, he would. She was beautiful and laurel in nineteen sixty eight the twenty eight year old Frank Zappa paid seven hundred dollars a month to live in a log cabin with a bowling alley underneath how much are you seven hundred dollars a month to live in that big log cabin. Yeah. Wow. Yeah. We'll wait till you. Remember, what Gail says about it? We know people would crash there. They would play their Walker says, but in that brief moment the log cabin as it was known to every freak from Sherman oaks to Hollywood rages a rock and roll salon and denies and playground. Where groupies were gentrified into recording artists and talents. Is imposing Mick Jagger, and Jeff Beck, and as whimsical as Alice Cooper were stabled jam session fed and full lated while the undisputed master of the house reigned as freak daddy of the whole show. Yeah. It's hard to guess his tone because artists is in quotes. And then just being like, you know, groupies being gentrified fed inflated. That's interesting for share. It sounds like fun house to be in. I mean. Yeah. Yeah. So it was huge cavernous. There are no locks on the door. Gail Zappa describes it as having the oldest eucalyptus tree in southern California. That overshadowed the property and also that it was insanity. Yeah. For sure there was never any parking. So people parked all the way up the canyons. But the cops didn't really seem to bother them there at that time anyways. There are a few pages of description of the GTO's and veto remember him. Yes. Also known as captain fuck and a lot of the same things that you can find miss piece book. There's a lot of overlap. Okay. Side note, there's a new book out that haven't read. But I've heard that it's almost exactly like miss piece book, but it's like fiction, and then there's reviews about it being late daisy. Yeah. And somebody picked it up for like a movie. Oh, yeah. But it's about like a female singer. I think okay. The details were technically musicians as well. Yeah. Oh, hell. Yeah. They were if you listen to miss B's first podcast. They play a lot of the GTO's music, but won't read the holy man. We should read it, and we should at you on it. We should and but it's being hailed as like this like new in like innovative and all these things and Pamela is just like hollow while she's still inspiring people. She's the greatest muse right Kalua. Where was I? Okay. So. Pamela, describes the kind of people that were hanging out there at the dime and talking about the freaks, and you know, that's like a good word positive. It was positive thing. Just groupie was a positive thing. So a freak with someone who put a lot of care and intention into their appearance. We need to do a photo shoot. Like, you said freak photo shoot photo shoot. Yeah. You know, lace and hair hair in clown makeup. Before the GTO's had that name. Do you? Remember what they were called? I don't the laurel canyon ballet company. Oh, yeah. That's right. They would wear diapers bids. Dress up like trees, and then you know, Frank them together. And he was like get you organized. Yeah. Let's make some music. And like, I said if you have never checked the music, do it. It's amazing. If they were playing music in two thousand nineteen people's heads would be exploding in a good way. So let's go back to Gail Zappa. She says laurel canyon has historically attracted musicians and people very highly involved in the arts. Yeah. For sure thinking we should stay there in laurel canyon. Yeah. And sorry was like I wonder if they have Airbnb, and they went I hope they don't have Airbnb must. They do. I found a place for ninety six dollars a night Canadian. Ooh. Yeah. All right. Yeah. We'll go apparently once Frank Zappa left his place air burden of the animals lived there. But the grounds ended up becoming seedier the drugs got harder. Things got louder and darker before the house eventually burned down nine hundred eighty one on Halloween night. Wow. Pamela, talks about how sad it was to lose that place and how she can still picture Frank up there. His striped shirt and flowered bell-bottoms with cigarette in his mouth. How fun would it have been to like got to hang out with Frank Zappa, though? Only in my dreams at this point. You know, apparently you couldn't time. Yeah. The subconscious mind doesn't know the difference between. Reality. Yeah. So I think if you just patriots it yourself there, then you're there. So the author gets into the culture of the nineteen sixties going back to like the modern revolt of the moderns revolt of the twenties comparing them both as rejections of Victorian past saying that the sixties where a slap in the face awakening, the slumbers of the fifties. And of course, rock music was the glue that bound this generation together again, like the Connectik circus in Chicago, the Fillmore New York in San Francisco and the whiskey gogo in LA, the musicians of this generation knew that they were in the right place at the right time. They were this book is really great for going on about how various members of various bands met, for example, the mamas and Papas like if you don't know how they got together. This book explains it, but since again, sober all conversation. We won't go into the Pacific details. But let's talk a little bit about mom casts. Let's. So her house was a neutral place which. You know in a place that many of the men like their egos were just kind of getting larger and larger and they were trying to sleep with women who were there whether they were fans or musician's themselves or like, Michelle Phillips or groupies. But because this is what he says anyways. Because mama Cass was like. A motherly figure the place was neutral ground. Okay. Interesting. So it wasn't a crash pad. Yeah. People couldn't just show up unannounced, but she always had food in the fridge and clay in case anybody wanted to drop in and people like David Crosby often did so she was respected as an artist and a singer. But also bringing people together she was one of those people who knew who needed to be introduced to whom and who would good sound amazing singing with amazing yet. There were of course, photographers at hung around. For example, Henry Dilts who did a lot of Eric burdens album covers so many of the count- encounters where serendipitous, but I'll tell you. But particularly star studded barbecue that mom cast had for air Clapton. She invited. David Crosby who invited Joni Mitchell and make Dolan's does of this. Where did we see this? Because this is exactly what I was going to say, I've definitely seen these photos. Okay. So I was going to mention that not only we seen photos. We've seen Mickey Dolan's is videotapes not tapes. But like he filmed some things, but the thing is is like in the background. There's like Joni Mitchell, and Eric Clapton and he's off to the side, filming flowers. Any and then leaders. You know, what I might even a hundred percent sure if it was him or if that was his Jewish in because we take in so much content. Honestly, it's hard to remember exactly what Jack. But I seem to recall like somebody had a video camera didn't think to capture the tingles jer. But it's like, oh, these flowers are so nice. But that was them just being in the moment to probably high and also. Hi, yes. Yes. So the next thing that I'm going to read is just a little bit about the passing of. Mum candlemas. Yeah. Her voice was so incredible. Yeah. Her death was devastating to those. She had nurtured in the LA rock scene in a canyon filled with footloose, emotionally dysfunctional young men and women she had fulfilled. Wittingly or not the role of indulgent matriarch, albeit a hip and acid tested one. Laurel canyon says burden was a place in the middle of this big city that people escaped to many of these people didn't really have families scenes of their own. They'd never had the experience of a family. I think people found in those early days the family that always wanted. Now, the bosomy mother who tended to them all wiscon-. Yeah. And then Nash says it's very interesting that she really didn't take care of her own relationships with the same kind of care. She took care of other people's relationships whenever things were not going, right? Or when they were we'd go over to cast his house. I was just drawn to this woman. She was a magnificent creature. Oh. Cast. Yeah. So Graham Nash says that it was because of her then he met his wife, and you know, how does kids. Wow, by nineteen sixty eight is becoming harder to embrace the sex love drugs and rock and roll lifestyle because of everything that was going on in the world. Yeah. Warned Vietnam assassination, Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King junior and like full-on scale like riots things were starting to get darker. But I wanna remember Hillary canyon was and so we're just going to end the episode here the end and just getting. Will go on even though. So at this time laurel canyon seemed like it was a retreat. It was physical and spiritual place from the increasingly troublesome world LA was a hopeful place at the time celebrities were walking around everywhere. It seemed tain -able people could get a record deal. Even if it was only for one album, and it seemed doable. Yeah. So marijuana was really popular. And then LSD became really popular. People would take it make music go down to the store run into someone smoke a joint go to a club. The just followed their nose so to speak. Depending on who you ask. There are people in the book who called the artist's elitists saying that they were there were clicks. And that among all of the eucalyptus, you just had borne people with egos. They're. But on the other hand, you know, you had the bunk keys hanging out with turtles hanging out with the doors, and that's pretty cool. Doing here. A little bit about the day in the life or please a day in the life in laurel canyon, right? As these discomfiting social agendas, evolved. The canyon still offered the compelling daily pleasures of leafy surroundings unstructured lives and the new present fog of marijuana. Everybody would be in the living room with the stereo turned up full blast and wind bottle candle burning over the spool coffee table every now, and then someone would try to get the candle to drip, where it needed more wax. We'd pass around the joint someone would say. Oh, or somebody was it. They were hungry and we drive downtown where they made bagels, and you could go at five in the morning and get them. Hot Fowley sneers at the hindsight of beautiful sunsets. Lovely mornings with the secular smell of jasmine the meadows golden dreams, never ending. It's funny because I always picture Kim Fowley as like crazy rock and roll, dude. Like cr- help create the runaways. I don't picture him as this like lure canyon beer, you know, because he had many different phases in his life as well. Yeah. If we want it, and if you wanna think like, okay, what was the Royal Canin like before everybody moved in. Well, there is a couple of people in the book who talk about having grown up around laurel canyon and that the free loving unconventional lifestyles like weren't invented by these musicians. It was so secluded in full of nature and caves that you could just walk around naked. If you wanted to so. These days sorta found this place that was already special they make it special. Yeah. In the sense of like. It was always this Hedin. And then, of course, with every Eden, you know, changes so seventy spring also grew up in this area, and by h thirteen it was just another day to see Janice Joplin or start driving acid and she actually worked in the music industry, including electric goods and said this in nineteen seventy you could still hanging out at the canyon store. Sit on the wall smoke cigarettes and talk. There was always a Qatar. There was always an all night jam. Take me back. The author even talks to a young Rhody who at the time like just showed up and laurel canyon one day and was totally invited in the young Rhody says that one night he was outside the whiskey and a young woman appeared out of the strips nightly carnival. She just took my breath away. She was the most beautiful girl you would ever seen in your life flowers in her hair, gorgeous and sweet. He was Pamela. So there's a picture of the sky in the book, and he's also super cute looking and the GTO's ends up taking him in and hung out with him. And he was just like a drifter who found himself in the right place. And I like the idea of thinking about him as a Rhody because you tend to think about like Roti is like as like older. Dude. I'm so tired. Fielding soon when he stayed is. But they always have a heart of gold and knee who. Yeah, he says the trees would hang tough so tired. You could tell. Qaiser? He says the way the trees hang down with their big long leaves. It would be hazy smoggy with the golden light coming through the branches that hovered over the whole thing. It was just as magic as could be. I swear I saw fairies flying around laurel canyon because everybody had wings. Oh, so Walker toxic book the ever Lucien of the hippie manager to actual business people coming in and changing the music industry. So again, if you wanna more in-depth understanding of how music industry changed, you know, the record industry all of that. It's in the book, he has specific names, he has specific dates who's interesting had to leave it out as we know Graham Nash Joni Mitchell, Mitchell how to relationship so there's that romantic side of making us together being in laurel canyon together and just the camaraderie, the camaraderie of everyone else going up and around the canyon and just playing each other new music. Joni Mitchell has said ask anybody in LA. You know, where the craziest people are. And they'll say laurel canyon, and where's the craziest street lookout mountain? So there we were Elliott myself in a whole lot of us strung all the way through the canyon. The eagles came in later, and it was quite a neighborhood. Yeah. It was have you ever wonder what Joni Mitchell's house might have been like, absolutely? Well, I can tell you, please. Maybe it's a little bit different than what you would imagine. Maybe xactly what you imagine. But anyways, here's Mitchell's house was set back from the street against the hillside with the smaller cottage in front the exterior was covered with cedar shakes painted pale. Green the interior sported tongue in groove. Knotty pine ceilings and floors, a reporter from the New York Times visiting in nineteen sixty-nine described it as lovingly cluttered with two cats soon to be immortalized in Nashes our house, a Steph elk's, head stained glass windows. A grandfather clock given to Mitchell by Leonard Cohen, a king's head with a jeweled crown sticking out from the brick fireplace. Votive candles blooming. Zali is a Turkey made of pine cones dried flowers old dogs Victorian, shadow boxes, and an ornamental plate from Saskatoon Saskatchewan. Yeah. A reporter from Rolling Stone visiting the same year painted a scene of counter, cultural, domestic bliss Nash perched on an English church chair in the living room while Mitchell busied herself in the kitchen making crust for a rhubarb pie yet for two intense personalities on the verge of literally fame and fortune living in what was for all the Hanson hippie accoutrements a smallish gussied up hunting shack, the atmosphere was increasingly cost her phobic. Yeah. The Nash kinda goes on being like we shared the piano. Like when was it my turn than it was her turn? And yeah, it's lovely right. And so at this point things are getting like a little bit darker, and this was immortalized in Jodi mitchum song ladies of the canyon because she's getting richer Reich. Kind of everybody is of course, now me I play for fortunes and those velvet curtain calls. I've got a black limousine and two gentlemen, escorting me to the halls and play if you have the money, or if your friend to me, but the one man band by the quick lunch stand. He was playing real good for free. Interesting. Yeah. Point in the book the author outs into Charles Manson crew. So he provides the brief brief biography as we know we have the Tarantino movie coming out, which I'm really excited about and I won't go into the details. But just you know, this what did they have to do at laurel Kenyan they I forget the name of the canyon mighty start with a b Kenyon or something. But the family was. I guess committed the Libyan Tate Murray not too far from this. Okay. Plus a lot of them had had run ins with him. Yeah. Or like member, for example. Had an encounter like like a tiny little romantic count encounter with one of the boys in the family. So they were kind of around, and you know, this was while people left their doors open. Everyone was invited to parties people could just drop in. And then, you know, this guy who couldn't break into the music industry char- who still had followers took people to really dark and terrible place. Yeah, I guess it doesn't necessarily have to take place in laurel canyon to incite fear and all homes in LA at that point. Yeah. Areas like that. Yeah. Once Manson was charged paranoia increased and like a lurking dread appeared. So also like the darker times came like there was all to Mont cocaine started getting big eager growing testosterone was raging. Everybody wanted something, and it was Pamela is quoted as saying cocaine ruined. Everything. Laurel canyon never really recovered from it interesting. Yeah. Yeah. Different drugs. Incite different emotions in people. Yeah. And because laurel canyon was built on social relationships. What happens when people do cocaine does that really do much for social relationship, NAT really Michael debars was saying that at one point the drug dealers. Laurel canyon had valet parking have you ever seen the movie wonderland about? Yeah. Yeah. That's a good movie. John home. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And Val Kilmer. Plays him. Excellent soundtrack. It is. Jackson Browne actually, performed a different version of cocaine that went like this look at me now, sharp attack except for few billion, brain cells wouldn't mind having back. There was damage to the body damage to the soul damage to the quality of rock and roll cocaine. More Ghana Welsh say the right makes an appearance in this book. I don't know anything about her. Oh, I have her book. Okay. Do episodes. Well, one hundred percent I'm like do an episode, but it was fun to learn a little bit about her. And what I did learn about her the author describes her as white stunningly attractive over privileged and under supervised. When she got on the scene, even though she had looked up to the GTO's. And they were did you choose her inspirations? She considered them old and has-beens. So she was like seventeen she was sort of part of sable and lorries group. Yes. Yeah. So she was like seventeen Pamela was like in her twenties approximately I'm saying, and then she was talking about Laurien sable showing up who were even younger, right? And so funny enough because I was like, oh, I don't want to get into it. But then I'm reading this. And she's describing things in a really interesting way. She talks about the competitiveness, and that I contact photo of sable on the left Laurie on the right? Robert plant kind of middle. More gone. It had just taken a puff of her cigarette. And apparently photographer had gotten kicked out for taking that picture. Oh, really? Yeah. And then she was surprised to see like years later on somebody's living room wall. Wow. Yeah. So that photo was never supposed to be taken. And apparently Laurien sable jumped in at the last minute. Interesting. That's pretty funny. And they were saying like, oh, we'll rob Robert plant is looking at happy in it because his wife saw that photo. Yeah. Yeah. So that's pretty funny. So I'm going to read you a little bit just about the groupie path. But she had a real like a lot of really awesome and interesting things to say, yeah, she is a book cold Hollywood stories. I think we'll just based on these like couple of chapters. I want to know more. So she says that was the place our appetite Scott wetted, I think three dog night was one of the first bands we ever came in contact with the teenage fair and one of them went off with my girlfriend. So it was a place where young girls could get their look at Rockstars. And Rockstars could get their look at young girls that was my initiation into the potential for being a groupie that it was a viable path. Three dog night. Must have had a lot of groupies because my dad has told me a story about a friend of his back, then who was a huge three dog night thin and she had a goal of sleeping with the whole band. And should. Oh, wow. Cool. I'm gonna talk a little bit about. More about the groupie culture to and about the younger generation that was coming in. And this is the author writing. These new groupies as often as not barely out of outta leci- were aware of their complicity in the contract. And at least at first welcomed it. We loved the decadence says Moore Ghana Morgan a-, more Ghana. It was kind of economy because we knew in some ways we were very innocent. And that's where the whole sex thing came in being very sexual and willing to experiment sexually. There was a power in being able to provide fulfillment to fantasies of these men in power that were older than me. Sex was used as a power play and the more you had the more. You got. Interesting. Yeah. Definitely. We'll check her out somewhere and Michael Barr says at this is what America Pitta sought a pit him is to him. She also talks about how Led Zeppelin was attracted how attract how Led Zeppelin attracted the women in droves. And even the waitresses would try to get that. Of course, like they was spilled drinks on the other girl. She would get them found st- and more Gana said it was cut the wrote. She says it was territorial. These guys were big prizes. Yeah. So let's move on a little bit. Just like let's kinda start wrapping this up into the seventies early seventies. The glam seen New York musicians got laurel canyon drug dealers moving in post Manson pre-punk, but the musicians from the cannon were still doing amazing nineteen seventy four Johnny Mitchell had one of her biggest hits with Gordon. Spark Linda, Ronstadt had heart like a wheel and seventy four and Jackson Browne had the pretender in seventy six I guess, you can only really have that come rotary when you're not as big, you know, when you're not altering at the same time, and you know. You know, when you're younger, and you don't have families and everything you know, that was a special moment they that was their youth. That was you know, as they were building up something it nothing can last forever. Right. You got that? Right. So the music industry continued to change continued to change quickly, the peaceful, easy feelings of the eagles. I records group aggressively darker so people either pull themselves out of the CD's or moved in deeper, and like you said it's impossible to stay like that forever. People need to move on like Joni Mitchell could not keep living in a tiny cabin. And then as we know, you know, in the early eighties new generation of post punk Elliott bands began frequenting the sunset strip the whiskey, and I'm pretty sure Knicks lived in the canyon for awhile Gunson roses claimed rainbow. Yeah. But Walker says laurel canyon lives on and that to this day. It hasn't changed much it. Neither overindulge is. It's past nor calls much attention to its present. It simply is and we will end on a quote by Michael Michael Barr. Laurel canyon is a consciousness rather than a physical place like the Chateau more Mont or Karna. Street it transcends geographics. That's beautiful. Well, let's go there. Okay. Well, thank you for that. Those good no problem. It was it was fun to read. I just cannot wait for that sunshine. And so that was a big reason to I just like just tell just tell me about the lifts again. Yeah. When you read books that only the trees. Yeah. It's just so beautiful. It takes you there in you took me there. So thank you. No problem. And so hopefully that inspired a few people, you know. And I just I love you. I love you. I love you and love all of our listeners. And I think it's time to just go sit in a nice Epsom salt bath and stay tuned because we got some really exciting things coming. So we really do thanks for sticking with those things sticking with us through the good times and the bad. Now, what has it been bad? You know, how it is guys? It's life. It's life. It's a life. All right. Thanks for listening. See you next time. News. Toughest produced. Hi, sean. Tell them and being solar. Find all of our shows notes social N links at WWW dot pound field podcasts dot com or wherever you listen to great podcasts. All songs have you found for purchase on itunes Spotify or Google play. Please purchase. Great an important trucks, thunders on Facebook at the our in our AP, we are on Instagram at our our archaeology tweeted. On and off or he'll.

laurel canyons laurel canyon Michael Walker Joni Mitchell Pamela Los Angeles Frank Zappa Graham Nash California Jackson Browne Chris Hillman Charles Manson Gail Zappa Kim Fowley Ahmet Zappa eagles David Crosby John Kerry panga canyon
Pavement's Stephen Malkmus

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:27 min | 2 months ago

Pavement's Stephen Malkmus

"It's Bullseye. Thorn time now for the song that changed my life. It's a chance to talk with great artists about the music that made them who they are today. This week Stephen Malcolm s Stephen Mouth Mris, of course, the singer and Co founder of pavement when most beloved and influential modern rock bands ever. Glows. stage. Talk. Slow. Swan. Pay. The band's been called. One of the Great Act of one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety s they recorded so many songs that capture that decade perfectly cut your hair range life stereo. The band broke up in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, and miss has kept on as prolific as ever dropping nine records since two thousand one, his latest is called traditional techniques on it. Stephen offers his take on folk music. There's a little bit of Joni Mitchell, a little loudon wainwright, maybe some incredible string band. Churn rate and. MS. Van. Jazz. When we asked Stephen Malcolm mess about the song that changed his life. He didn't talk about any of those. Instead, he threw us kind of a curveball. Takeaway Steve. My name is Steve Mouth Miss and the song that changed my life is love will keep us together by captain and to kneel. Captains Neil for most of history have been not been known as a particularly hip. Band. I think. One of the reasons is a song called Muskrat love. Jiang. Flow. Snag, Musk read. which was one of their hits and the Muskrat. Love. Is, pretty, Corny, song and I can see. People. Looking down upon it. But. Song that changed my life is love will keep us together The first time. I heard captain into Neil. Probably was on one of my parents cassette tapes. We were more of a cassette tape family because we listen to music more when we're traveling on ski trips or playing dominoes though in the House I'm imagining that's when I heard it. I was probably eight years old something like that. Style. I think yeah captain. Antonio. I. Think it appealed to a young person the captain he wore this red suits and red shirts and his hat and kind of totally deadpan never talk and. The didn't look too different than captain. Kangaroo. Or? The banana splits I used to imitate him a lot. I would play. I would put on a captain's hat and imitate playing piano in the hang town pajamas. Body Mind. I want to reacquaint myself with visuals about captains neal's I'm GonNa look on my phone. Watch this youtube clip of them plane live. More watching I'm watching. CAPTAIN INTO ON A. TV show some sort doesn't say too much about where they're playing it has a classic Seventies. Backdrop To Neil's got a really awesome gold necklace on she's hamming it up like she always does a little bit. Always kind of acted out the songs. They're just in power tree I'M A. Both of them. One thing that's amazing about this television performance is that it's actually live. Playing a little faster and they're doing something that I don't know how to do, which is played keyboards with their hands raised parallel to each other. Sounds also, like captain might be playing That's he's little dabbling with ARP their. Captains dabbling with some modern keyboards, the kind of keyboards, bands like daft punk and air just their hearts go a flood or when they hear it. There he goes. You know it's almost got the sound of. Peter Frampton voice. I want you. I don't know I just that song is very sweet. Song to it has a A Nice message. About curling altogether. When you everybody's going to Eventually. We're going to decay a little bit but I'll still be there with the. And we are all together. Like they're having some fun there at the end. Did you hear that clapping. I don't mind that at the end of a song when you kind of add some simulated mirth. To, the to the track. Okay. Thank you. Thank you. Steve was Stephen Malcolm on the song that changed his life love will keep us together by captain into Neil. Stephen Malcolm Os's latest album traditional techniques is out. Now let's play another song from it. This once called the greatest own in legal history. Yes. That is the real title. Really. Got Spreads. The Sun one. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Bullseye is produced out of the homes of me and the staff of maximum fund in and around Greater Los, Angeles, California, a city which has turned orange. And Burns, your lungs when you go out of doors, my understanding from the New York Times wire cutter is that pretty decent substitute for an air purifier if you haven't got one is to just take an HVAC filter and tape it to a box fan. So that's our recommendation to anybody who doesn't have an air purifier right now here on the West. Coast our show is produced by speaking into microphones. Our producer is Kevin Ferguson Hey sue PROSCIUTTO and Jordan cowling are associate producers we get help from Casey O'Brien are interstitial music is by Dan Wally also known as DJ W. R. Theme Song by the Great Band the go team thanks to them and their label Memphis Industries for letting US use it. You can also keep up with the show on facebook twitter and youtube just search for Bullseye with Jesse Thorn I think that's about it just remember all great radio host have a signature signed. Bullseye with Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR.

Stephen Malcolm Jesse Thorn Neil Stephen Stephen Mouth Mris Stephen Malcolm Os Joni Mitchell Peter Frampton Co founder New York Times Musk MS. Van California NPR facebook neal Burns Memphis Industries Kevin Ferguson loudon wainwright
Robbie Robertson On His Creative And Symbiotic Relationship With Martin Scorsese

World Cafe

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Robbie Robertson On His Creative And Symbiotic Relationship With Martin Scorsese

"Hey you're listening to World Cafe Kaleo Robbie Robertson is a very busy guy. This year alone. He's released a new album. Cinematic re released the band's self titled Titled Sophomore Album which is celebrating. Its fiftieth anniversary and worked with bowel. Martin Scorsese on two different projects. One the score for the Irishman starring. Guys like Deniro Passion and Pacino and to a documentary once we're brothers Robbie Robertson and the band that talks about his groups seminal work in their relationships with one another and and recently debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival in other words. There's a lot to talk about including getting booed every night backing. Dylan's first electric tour. You're making music at big pink meal Freakin diamond. and Oh so much more. So let's get into it starting with something from his new album cinematic. It's once we're brothers here on world cafe. I'm invite goes out and you can't go wall as your breath. uh-huh now there goes doc northeast us for you're listening to World Cafe. That's once were brothers. It's from Robbie Robertson's new album cinematic. It's one of the many great things he's got in store for US including new. Martin Scorsese film the Irishman as well as the band's owned documentary once we're brothers and of course it's the fiftieth anniversary history of the band's self titled Album Robbie. It's a pleasure to meet welcome back to the cafe. AU thank you great to be here so once. We're brothers brothers. Where was that song in the recording process of the album will they were Doing this documentary That was inspired by my book testimony and in the course so that there was so much about the journey and the journey with the band And in that all all of a sudden I was feeling a very deep sadness about losing three of my brothers in in in the band in Sao One day when I sat down to write a song This is where it took me. And then in the documentary they they said Oh my goodness we have to. We have to use it in the documentary and we would like to even call the documentary. Once we're brothers. Wow Oh that must be very intense and we'll talk a little bit about the connection between you and the executive producer of the documentary wants for brothers in a little bit. But I I I WANNA talk a little bit more about your solo album cinematic particularly on a track that you worked with Van Morrison on the vodka titled. I hear you paint houses else's now for those unfamiliar with the Book of a similar title. What is painting houses a euphemism for will it's a mob expression expression and it's The movie the Irishman Martin Scorsese's new movie that I did the score for and worked on the music for it's based on this book and And the expression is you know when somebody in the mob needs somebody taken out. They know who to call and when they WANNA know if they're available to do this head there they would say I heard you paint houses and if the guy says yes. That's true I do that. Means he's accepting the job to go and take somebody out and the paint houses. I'm I'm sorry to say is about a splattering of blood so I have to ask because obviously this ties into the Martin Scorsese movie did did he specifically ask for a song song potentially with this title or did you just find in working with this. That title was evocative Andrew Towards writing. Something like that. Yes exactly what you just said. I was working on the score for it. And with this title of the book I don't know it just got stirred up in me and I I just couldn't help myself. I just ended up writing in writing a song about that subject matter and it wasn't even like Hey Marty have written a song. Can you put this in the movie. That never came up. I just wrote the song and now I've I've heard that at the very end of the credits. Let's on the movie. You hear. Some of Van Morrison in my vocal calling out. I heard you paint houses back and forth and what a wonderful feeling that was for us to be able to join together on this thing. I absolutely adored the song and I love the I love the verse. Chorus hand off From the album cinematic but also you will hear. In the Irishman. The new movie for Martin Scorsese see that Robbie Robertson scored. Here's I hear you paint houses on World Cafe. Don't that's I hear you paint houses from our guest Robbie Robertson Britain and joined by Dan. The man Morrison It is also Not only from his move not only from the album cinematic but will be featured featured in the Martin. Scorsese film the Irishman which is out now? You know you've had a long long working relationship. With Martin. Scorsese working in music and scoring and executive music production ings including our audience knows this casino raging bull gangs of New York color of money. I'm super curious as a musician whose gone into the work of scoring and doing executive music production had how this process for how you transitioned into this process. Assess how. How easy is it for you to put on the supervisor hat or the score hat? Yeah it's It's been an ongoing going Rich Paul Wouldn't Marty and I I work together on The last walls why we were making that movie we. We came to an understanding that he was really. You really Somebody who wanted to be closer to music. Then he's ever been and I felt the same way way about movies so we had a trade off here and he was showing me movies that I would have never experienced. There were mind blowing and I was turning him onto music that he may never have come across it. It just became a ritual in some of the music that I had turned turned him onto ended up raging ball too so it was like. Does this really nice musical movie relationship chef and so we did that and then we did the king of comedy and then with the next one and the next one the next one and here. It's been forty years slater and we're now talking about the next movie that he's GonNa Direct. That is really a big chore. Mark of museum music making for me. So that's what we do. It sounds it. Sounds like a very good evolving relationship relationship over the you know. The the Irishman is the movie that you're talking about that you've got all of this work to do on. Let's listen to the closing track from cinematic that features in the end titles. It's remembrance here on World Cafe from our guest Robbie Robertson back on the World Cafe with Robbie Robertson. Cinematic is the name of his new solo album. You can also hear his music. In the Irishman. The new movie from Martin Scorsese and he's also to Martin Scorsese's also the executive producer of once. We're brothers I if we had a chance to see a screener of it congrats on the documentary truly is a love letter to the band one common theme and obviously because of the fact that this movie was partially adapted from your memoir. This the the thread of the movie is you and I so I wanted to ask a couple of questions one About your family particularly your mom. She sounds like an incredible Human being in with such an important part of your life. Can you talk about how how influential she was. My mother was it. You know Not your typical mother Well first of all she was born and raised on the six nation Indian reserve observe and were from the Mohawk nation and And with the guys in the band we used to all live at at her house when we were in Toronto and she cooked for us and took care of us and it was an amazing setup and she was a phenomenal phenomenal cook And everybody just loved her and everybody all the guys in the band thought of her as their own mother So that really contributed to this brotherhood that we had I mean we were tied together their music and deeply personal. You met your first brother When you got your first break playing shows around Toronto opening for Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks came to town If I'm not mistaken it was a pretty important for you to be there right. Well I I I I witnessed running hawkins in the hogs I had a group in Toronto That open for them robby in the robots Oh bots and we were called and Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks were so extraordinary it was the most powerful aw driven rock and roll I had ever heard and so I want and you know they. They were from the south. Take the real thing and this was up in Canada so my God I I just wanted to get some on me. I want to the stand. How they could be so good at what they did and And they actually took me in in and let me hang around and then I wrote a couple of songs for Ronnie Hawkins when I was fifteen and then when I was sixteen ecksteen he brought me down to the Mississippi Delta in Arkansas that try me out to see if I could join the group and he ended up hiring me and I you know and I and I hooked up with Leon. He was the drummer in the in the group. And then eventually we hired the rest of the guys that would become the band at in the hawks. And then when we left runny Hawkins and went out on our own. Then Bob Dylan heard of us and he pulled us in and we played with him for a while as you are want to do. Oh you know Bob Calls. If you WANNA play I I love the fact that yes you eventually replaced everyone in the hawks. The southern band with Canadian Indian musicians. That's just amazing to me. And then you go off to your own thing ending up with meeting Bob Dylan and playing some shows What was your first impression when you when you met Dylan? Well we came from a different side of the tracks we weren't we didn't have a folk music background like a lot of other artists eventually. That would that would show up even Canadians. Like Neil Young Joni Mitchell and they all came out of a folk music background I think even the birds and you know it seemed like everybody you came from that but not us we were born a rock and roll band and and so wouldn't bob decided he wanted to do this world tour and he wanted a group it was just. It was smarter than in trying to find individual musicians in the beginning. He was just trying to get me to join up with him as a guitar player and I told told them. I've got my brothers here. I don't you know I'm I'm I'm not going anywhere without them. And then he eventually agreed to the. Have the hawks play with him. And so we played all over North America all over Australia all over Europe and people. Oh Buddha's every night that we played and it was it was a bit of a ritual. People came to the concert knowing they were going Tabu. It had had already been set because these were folk music enthusiasts. That didn't want Bob Dylan you you know becoming a rock and roll artist and And this was a direction that he just wanted to go in needed to go in and and there was no turning back we are talking to Robbie Robertson Let's actually get a little bit of performance of dillon with the band Live live at Royal Albert Hall in Nineteen Sixty six. Here's a live recording of like a rolling stone we're talking to Robbie Robertson of the band here on World Cafe Yeah that's a little bit of TV. Very divisive Combination of the band and Dylan Life Royal Albert Hall here on World Cafe. We're talking to Robbie Robertson about so. Nobody thinks cinematic is the name of his new studio album. He's also the subject of a band documentary. Once we're brothers which is executive produced by Martin. Scorsese here on world cafe so so I I have a question because there's so much brought up about And you talk a little bit about big pink in in the documentary you know. End Up in Woodstock. It's such such a mythic time music from big pink playing with Bob Dylan writing in the house. It is one of the most heralded and disgust music in rock and roll history. Sorry I wonder. What's a common misconception? That people have about that that they're completely off base on. Well I you know I. I don't know what people think about this And but wh what was behind that was that music that we made music from big pink. It sounded nothing like what we did with Ronnie Hawkins. It sounded nothing. Nothing like what we did. When we went out as the hawks in it sounds nothing? Like what we just played you know with Bob Dylan and and The band playing together and when we went into this what I call a sanctuary this pink house. This was a dream of mine to have a place a workshop where we could go and create and invent the music Keleti that we wanted to share with the world and really what it was a combination of music's that we had experienced that we had taken in from all of those years on the road playing the Chitlins circuit down south and all the way up to Canada. This was really pieces of Gospel. Music Mountain Music Ed rock rock and roll rockabilly rhythm and Blues Blues Everything under the Sun that we had absorbed and when we made this record record music from big pink and it came out the reaction was. Oh my God. Where did this come from? But one one of the things was after this record came out then any banned any group ever in history then then goes out and plays for the public. You go out and you do concerts new play for people. What people didn't know was that Rick Danko in the band? He had a bad car accident and he broke his neck and so we weren't able to go out on the road and it was like what's up with this. who puts out an album and never shows up so this mystique built up around this Of kind and we were living up in woodstock up in the mountains and and people were like what are they. Do Up there in those mountains just recuperate. You know speaking of talking about all of this. We definitely you know you. You say you're band. The band didn't sound like the hawks. It didn't sound like Bob. Bob Dylan's band and you created something completely different. I for people who haven't heard tears of rage from music from big pink. I think that's a perfect example of something that that shows the the growth side. Just WanNa play a little bit of that for audience. It's the band with tears of rage in a bit of tears. The bridge from the band here on World Cafe Robertson is our guest of the band he also has his new solo record. Cinematic out but I think it's interesting. People Romanticized upstate New York and Woodstock and of course the mystery of her writing those songs up there. Then let's compare that to where you worked on your self titled Album. Sammy Davis is Los Angeles Pool House. What isn't that have have the same kind of nostalgia and mystique actually? I'm just curious. What was it like recording there? This was an extension of this this clubhouse workshop sanctuary thing after we made music from Big Pink I came came to an understanding that with these five guys in the band when we were able to go into our own sankt thank our own `isolation and turn off the outside world. We could go to that deep place in music that really really we were. That was our sole. That's what we were about. That's what we could do that. Nobody else was doing. And so the idea of getting this house up in Woodstock at that time it was a it was so much snow and the weather and everything and we couldn't wouldn't get from one place to another and then the idea of going to where there isn't any snow and we could have a place is that we are all together in that we all live in and there would be a situation there that we could build our own world world our own studio so at the time when I told the record company this is what we wanted to do. They thought I was completely absolutely out of my mind. They're like why it they said it's not gonNA sound any good. Why bother? Why not just come? I'm over here a few blocks away to the recording studio to this great recording studio at Capitol Records. Why would you want to go to that trouble? And I just knew something that they didn't and so we got. We rented Sammy Davis Jr.. Junior's is house we all stayed in there and then we turn the Pool House into a studio and and we did what I imagined Agean we would be able to do and after music from big pink when the band album came out that that kind of cemented that changed the course of music even more and to this day I hear all the time with with artists and bands. I hear the influence of that music. I think I think that's very true. And one song. In particular that is part of the collective social consciousness justness is up on Cripple Creek. Let's play a little bit of it from the band's self titled Album released in Nineteen Sixty nine. It's here on world cafe with our guest Robbie Robertson off-and-on another table tracks headboard. Aw never get never get upset hearing. That's always mixed me smile up on Cripple Creek here from the band on world cafe. See you converted. Sammy Davis Junior A Pool House into a studio. Did you know did you. Did you convert it back when when we left there was only remnants remnants of a little pieces of tape or something on the floor Yeah leave no trace. Yeah that that was. That was our thing you know that it was like. I don't even know if they were really here. We're talking to Robbie Robertson World Cafe. His new album is cinematic. We all we all ask ourselves. Not to indulge too much On the last waltz as much as we love it. But we actually had one kind of like eyebrow raising question. which is it's like Joni Mitchell? Sure that totally makes sense. Van Morrison absolutely makes sense. But there is one name at the last walt that we all kind of were like. How did how did Neil diamond show up at the last waltz? I'm super curious. Well Neil diamond and we were trying to get people to represent different aspects of in this wagon wheel in these spokes us of music and so we had muddy waters for Blues and and We and Paul Butterfield and Eric Clapton and we had Dr John On for New Orleans and we had the staple singers for Gospel and we had emmylou Harris for country music and Neil diamond was representing tin in Pan Alley and this place where these songwriters came from. Where Lebron Stoler in pomace Shuman Otis Blackwell well? And all of these people in the Brill building wrote music and send it out to the world and so he and and he did it beautiful in these early songs that he wrote solitary man and Yet crackle and Rosie and some of these songs songs as they were like standards there were a certain kind of popular music rock and roll standards and I they had produced an album with Neil diamond. You know and everybody said well. You can't produce an album with Neil diamond and the more they he said that the more I said. Oh Yeah we did it. We had a fantastic time and we made a beautiful records together. Called beautiful noise annoys and so so anyway You don't just trying to accommodate all of these different people and Joni Mitchell. You know she she is still the you know the Queen Mother of you know singer Songwriter. A- and Neil young no flies on Neela Talia you know he is still one of the greatest and of course. Yes we would have to have Ronnie Hawkins our first fearless leader and Bob Dylan. You know they were all part of our our brotherhood so we needed to include everybody that we couldn't this and of course Eric Clapton needed to be there. Yeah it is is such an amazing. A list profile guests showing up at the last waltz because we asked about the neal. We're GONNA play a little. Pit of Dryer is It's the World Cafe with Robbie Robertson our guest circle to route. Got Got it. Maybe maybe Neil doesn't get as much love at the last wall to say some of the other guest musicians. We wanted to do that. Dry are your eyes featuring the band of course For the last waltz one of the Great Concert experiences and still just absolutely amazing hearing the work that went into it from less than a month's worth of planning correct. Yeah it it had to come together very quickly and underground underground completely because Martin process see who directed at which shooting another movie. And they don't like it when you go and make a movie on the on the side. When you're shooting a big Hollywood movie so complaint? Anyway we we had to keep it on the down low and we did it over the Thanksgiving giving weekend when everybody was taking a break and we snuck it in under the radar. Yeah that's really really impressive. And those who have not seen the last waltz worth going back and revisiting it will absolutely blow your mind. How many incredible musicians and up on stage throughout the night of that concert we're talking to Robbie Robertson World Cafe? His new album is cinematic. you did a very cool re released version of the weight featuring Ringo Starr Lukas Nelson Marcus King and a whole litany of incredibly talented worldwide musicians. It's it's absolutely beautiful. Can you please tell oh me how this came to be. Yeah these I you know. I've known about these people for a while and I've seen their work before it's an organization. Association called playing for Change. And they've done videos before that was incredible combination of the people playing music in different places and they put it together and then my son. Sebastian said I WANNA do one with plank for change. I WANNA do one on the weight and they went ahead and they got these people his people from all over the world countries all global. That have come together on this song and turned out so great. And I'm so proud of it and I'm so thankful to Sebastian for even thinking of this so It's just one more thing that I'm you know. I'm feeling very proud of these days. Yeah you should be I I. I'm not joking there were there were a few not dry is as we were sitting around watching that It's it's really incredible and I guess the the thing about the weight that I'm curious is after after fifty one years has the meaning of that song changed for you at all And if so what does it mean for you today well you. You've you've brought up something interesting. I've never known the meaning of that Song I wrote it and I thought I don't know that's you know that's one way to go about it It it did connect it did connect to certain things for me personally a that I was going through a period and I was. There's a classic movie director by the name of Louis Poon well and and there was a thematic thematic thing in this song that I would see in Lewis Boone well movies as well and then it was reminiscent to me of when I first went from Canada down to the Mississippi Delta in these characters these characters were right out of incredible southern novel just were everywhere and that had such a strong influence on my sixteen eighteen year old imagination at the time that I carried all this around with me and it kind of leaked out in when I was writing this song song. It's it is. It is a masterpiece through through. A lot of people are familiar with the band's version but I think in in light of this very cool Awesome new endeavor playing for Change we'd love to play The weight of that version. The brand new want to close out this interview. If that's okay with you Robbie that is a wonderful idea beautiful. Let's listen to it playing for change. The band's it's a classic way but performed with Robbie and different musicians worldwide. It is a thing of beauty. Let's listen to it. It's the World Cafe Iran. Okay in my bad that is the you playing for. Change performance of the weight originally recorded by the band. Robbie's there so is Ringo Starr. Marcus King Lukas Nelson and a whole host of an incredibly talented musicians as we look back at fifty fifty one years of that song on fifty years of the band's self titled Album and I know I was GonNa go out on that song from the way but I realized this is not all that you have going on and you have something special with the band self titled Album. Tell me a little bit about that. Box is a fiftieth anniversary collection. That that we've put together and then in this collection there is also the band's recording at the Woodstock Festival evolve and coming back and listening to that it just brought me back to that night and we we've played at nine o'clock at night on the final night of the three days of the Woodstock Festival and when we went out there the audience was going insane being there jumping up and down. They been there in the mud there. They want rock and roll. They WANNA go out of their minds and everything and we we started playing in. It was like a equivalent to somebody coming out and playing hymns all of a sudden the whole setting setting changed in so when I came back and heard this and we decided we were going to include that as a bonus in this box that that that was a great idea to me and there's bonus tracks from this album two bonus tracks that I didn't even remember existed assisted and there's another version of Rag Mama Rag that when I heard it I was like. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah I remember for that now and it's it's very different from the one that we ended up doing but I love this version of it. Ju It's just something that tickles. Let me when I hear well. Let's take our audience with it. Then Robbie was an absolute pleasure speaking with you. Thank you so much for your time please come back and talk to us again soon I will. I always a pleasure to join up with you guys. Thank you so much. That's Robbie Robertson awesome. Let's listen to Rag Mama Rag. It's from the box from the band. You're listening to World Cafe Way Okay. Good be relax me but oh you ownership ownership it's rag Mama Rag. The new Alternate Alternate Take From The fiftieth anniversary box. Set of the band's Sof more album Robbie Robertson has been our guest today. His new studio album is called cinematic. And you can hear his music and the new. Martin Scorsese film the Irishman which is currently everywhere and finally finally. He's also the subject of the new documentary. For Martin Scorsese once were brothers Robbie Robertson and the band. All all of those things are available to check out thank you so much for listening. And thanks to Robbie Robertson our guest and our line producer will loftus for his work on the prep and our producer. John Meyers for his work on the session. My Name's Steven Kallio contributing hosting so much for listening to world can

Robbie Robertson Martin Scorsese World Cafe Bob Dylan Robbie Robertson World Cafe Ronnie Hawkins Hawks Van Morrison Robbie Canada World Cafe Robertson Joni Mitchell Robbie Robertson Britain executive producer New York executive Bob Marty Woodstock
Performance Anxiety: Lucy Kruger (Medicine Boy, Lucy Kruger & The Lost Boys)

Pantheon

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

Performance Anxiety: Lucy Kruger (Medicine Boy, Lucy Kruger & The Lost Boys)

"Welcome to Performance anxiety proud member of a Pantheon podcast Network in this episode we welcome Lucy Krueger of medicine boy and Lucy Krueger in The Lost Boys into the performance anxiety family off. Will he tells us about growing up and becoming a musician in South Africa and when she and bandmate Andre Leo moved to Berlin? He talks about how her music has changed over the years and what she's been doing during this never-ending pandemic between what's incredible is that her music is also reflected in the album art and the the music it's all one cohesive experience. And on a personal note. There's something about Lucy's voice and her music that just grabs me doesn't matter what the band of the project is dead. And the only time I want my heart broken, so thank you Lucy. Thank you for being on the show. Thank you for your music. Give her a follow at Lucy underscore Krueger on Instagram follow us that performs Annex and if you like this another episodes check out coffee, that's performance anxiety and consider supporting us with a cup of coffee off. Now, let's check in on Lucy Krueger on performance anxiety part of the pantheon podcast Network. Okay. Hello. My name is Stacey Kruger and I'm a part of loose-fitting lost clothes and Medicine Boy song your listening to Performance anxiety know I'm so mad at that stuff. Really. I'm happy about that point. Okay? First of all, I wanted to thank you for joining me. And this is great. I mean having an Andre on a few months ago and that was really my first exposure to eating preparing for that show my first exposure to Medicine boy and I just been working my way all over the back and forth between medicine Boyd to be losing Krueger in The Lost Boys And I had to finding just recently the very Wicked and it's really interesting stuff. So it's it's really great wage your voice and Andres guitar together really really resonates with me. There's something about the sound it's it's just it really hit home to me. There's a I have a few bands and artists that I really really that are my go to the fat no matter what I'm feeling. It's Led Zeppelin it's dead. The verb black Rebel motorcycle club and now it's it's anything that you would Andre do whatever that's that's very fine companies so long and fortunately or unfortunately the only I've got so many related to each of those bands on the show at some point except for the Verve. I've gotta work on that the hell to get this off. So I do want to thank you for coming on. It's really great. It's been amazing going back and listening to all of the the the music that that you've created over the years. It's really interesting and I want to find a little bit more about how you got into music in the first place like for example with your family really musical or and when did she start with music? Do you share with an instrument? Did you start seeing it with singing? Yeah. I mean, I think my family There are Musical and also I suppose maybe even more important just very intense music lovers. So music has just always been an incredibly. important part of my life consciously or subconsciously and I mean my mom my mom is going to pin and she sang in choirs and my dad plays guitar. Okay, and but I was extremely obsessed with singing in a very annoying way home. We need to know how I mean all because I just really wanted to sing anything and everything and I was really asking when a woman I was very little I was asking to school as I could sing solos and oh, wow, I don't think I was very good. I was just determined just the exact opposite of me as a child. I was always trying to shy away from having to be out in the spotlight. Yeah. I know. That wasn't that definitely wasn't me? I mean I suppose not that I wasn't sure but I just really love the singing. I loved them. I mean I suppose I really love performing. I did other kinds of Performing as well the singing in particular and then I guess I started to I listen to all sorts of things and I copied all sorts of things. But then I think when I was a teenager and I mean, I think feelings always complex but in a particular team way I and I discovered Joni Mitchell. I guess my my sister-in-law who was off my sister and holds up when she was my brother's girlfriend. She had started playing guitar, and she I remember she used to do a cover of a case of You by Joni Mitchell song. Yeah. Yeah, and it was so long. Yeah, it just kind of I supposedly my mind a little bit and she was writing brownie with my sister-in-law was writing her own songs, and I really wanted to be able to do that cuz I could tell I suppose that would feel that would be a different thing and I would feel different and okay. Yeah, I guess I I wanted didn't want to copy any more. I wanted to try and figure out my own thing. Oh, okay. So I stole playing guitar when I was sixteen. I started writing from then I guess. Oh, really? Okay. And so at that point how did that when did that take the leap from just getting and seeing on your own to actually performing in in public in front of people. Well, I mean, I suppose I even from as soon as I started playing I started performing we used to me and my sister-in-law your system shows together and I also did some solo stuff. There was a little guitar. I I grew up in Johannesburg and they used to be a little guitar Club every second week and I would play there and then I played some dead. Just small shows here and there I guess when your own stuff at that point or large it was yeah, I I always played a couple of covers but I really started writing. I mean I wrote a lot actually I don't think it was very good necessarily, but I've always wanted someone that like, I know Sunday, for example he I think he really he wrote something and then it's really kind of ready and crafted by the time you share. So it's okay. I'm really clumsy and I'm a bit of a like a like if I have a son then I want to play it for somebody immediately, you know, okay my parents I think and siblings have to listen to So yeah, I suppose I started doing that from them. Okay, and then I went and studied. I studied theater at the University which is a little town in grahamstown. And I also started playing wage, you know, I was playing a lot there and was a really lovely way to kind of get comfortable because it's a student town and everyone sort of discovering and it's quite a gentle audience and I'll oh that's good. That's that's very nurturing imagine. Which what you seem like down there cuz I've never been to South Africa so I can't you know, I can only speak to really East Coast us. You know, I'm not sure what you know, is there are there a lot of places to play in the in in when you're Young University, you know, was it a a very supportive? I mean gosh, I suppose that's very specific because the place I played it's really a Tiny Town. I mean when when universities and other day, there's no one there. And so there's no there's not a lot of places to play but it's managed to clear because you know, it's not a kind of really competitive scene or how can you can play much more casually, which I think is really lovely when you're starting up because it's not such a kind of took over whelming industry driven thing, you know is a much more casual and in that way you have space to find a voice and I don't know I suppose development of the understanding of What interaction between audience and and and artists could and should be like, I don't know if that sounds very pretentious or something. And that makes sense though. And the reason I ask is wage. I remember when I was first getting into music. I love reading and I love reading biographies of artists that I like and and a lot of the artists our musicians wage. And so I remember reading about how competitive the seen the punk scene in New York City was in the late seventies and how band would go they you know, cbgb's was the place to stay and they would all go and sabotage each other because they're always record execs they're listening to the shows. And so one band would try to screw up another band set or play over their time or you know, just something was curious to see if that if that's just a unique that time. That type of music here. Yeah. I mean I often single night when I hear from my I supposed friends that I'm not from South Africa song. Out the creative seen it's it's always very interesting to me. I think that because it's so difficult to make there is very little industry in South Africa. The attitude is quite different from artists and it's really beautiful. I really wish that there was industry like that's not a choice. I don't want to glamorize not making money because it it's it's terrible for not just a community in a sense. They are at some point people have to stop or or really have to shift the focus because they have two jobs. But so yeah, I don't think it's but there is something when when when when there is really very little opportunity to make To turn it into something kind of corporate then the then you can only do it for the right reasons. Yeah, it kind of kind of it's kind of a safeguard against these things. But obviously that has a very difficult aspect to it as well. Yeah, but suppose I suppose what I'm saying is I think that it is very supportive because the focus is so much on the need for it and the need to create and they need to relax. Yeah. Yeah that makes them makes total sense. And I use I was a photographer for years went to college for it and my experience in college was not I don't want to say it was like the punk scene where people were sabotaging each other, but I went there thinking it was going to be this great open conversation about photography and it was more a big competition. I like sheep of Secrets. That's exactly what it was because I remember I remember specifically what we would do is we'd have to shoot a certain amount of and this is early nineties. So it wasn't even digital at that point. It was off. All shooting film still and I remember we had to shoot like ten rolls of film for each project which was expensive and then so I'm I my family middle class so I didn't get a whole lot of extra money. So I'm I'm not shooting ten rolls of film shooting like 6 because I gotta I can't afford to do that cuz you have to buy the film you have to buy the the photo paper fortunately the chemicals were basically free but everything else you had to buy and I remember seeing somebody working on something like that is really great. You know, how did you do that? I can't tell you why not because you might do something and I can get a better grade than me. I guess is not what I came here for know. I mean, I also think that Yeah, I guess there's so much to learn from one another, you know, and the kind of growth that could happen the community accumulate typically exactly. Yeah, and and to be fair that was mostly within the students, you know, the the professors were great. They were really open about telling you how to do things. Sure. I'll also was not the best about asking like, yeah, I was born in a weird space where I've kind of felt it wasn't mature enough to really take advantage of the opportunity there and I remember yeah thinking if I start something it was weird mine friend that I had that if I started something I should already know all about it, you know, I mean, I sometimes think that I mean I feel like now I'm ready to study. Yeah, because you know, I went through so much money, you know, like you say so much more kind of Clear about not knowing actually, I'm really being able to hope you like to point out unless I guess it's part of learning, you know, I don't know. Yeah, exactly. You actually wage have a solo album out prior to working with with Andre and the Very Wicked and Medicine boy and and even The Lost Boys. How did that come about? When did you when did you start getting noticed and get this record the Solo in the works? What happened was I am studying theater. And and I would I had did my honors in. And then I was going to do my masters, but then I sort of I mean I I really was really mm. Pretty much go back to University and then I just decided I don't know if if this is really Maybe because of this idea that I've I've been in this University environment for four years straight from school. And I don't know if it's better for me to actually rather try to step into the world a bit and do something else and then come back to the Masters if necessary. Okay, and then you know if I still felt I wanted to and then I decided I had so many songs at that point. I decided I want to make a record but actually I had a guess there was a strange sense of I want to work with I want to work with people that really know what they're doing because I don't know what I'm doing. I make make sense it does and it doesn't you know because I learned a lot in the process but I didn't learn really through making my own mistakes. I think it might have been more valuable to well. No, I don't want to say that it was a different way of life. Okay, and I think that I guess I learned a lot in that and I think one of the biggest lessons is that I think that the interesting thing one has to say is is really in like Carving out figuring out your specific whatever it is sound local. Well, that's style. But I guess it is what you want to say and how you want to say it and yeah that first records. How to say but I guess I just it was a really a big lesson and understanding what's what's important and what's not what is important? Okay, and I yeah home and it's not easy to find at least for me. So no. No, I think you're constantly. I mean, I think you you just that's the process, you know. Yeah, and it's dead was the the approach they did you were you approached to do to be signed by a label actually. No, I just I had a dog when I was thirteen when I was still in school. I had my family my uncle had a small kind of small Studio space and I went and hung out there for a bit and there was a family friend who is a shame who who plays bass and he also produces and he had said if I ever wanted to make an album, I should come and make one assemble. How cool and I was so at that point. It was the first time I'd ever slept in the room with me. Directions and someone I played my song so it was so. Incredible and I I I I really really stuck in my mind, you know, just one of those moments and so yeah when I wanted to make a record I did I didn't really know anyone or anything in the music world and I so I did just remember you said, oh man. Did you see some some interview clips from that that time. And a couple of tracks and and I've seen a few thousand live performances the the sound you had back then is a lot different from yes from what you do now. Yes it is. It's true. It's very strange for me too. It's funny that was speaking to a friend about this the other day somehow, you know, you feel you're going through a life and you carrying yourself and you feel quite steady or regular or something, but when I look when I see an image or a thousand myself Restaurants for about ten years ago. I can really barely recognize the person's friend. Oh my gosh. I touched your sleep you a Dream from off the sled person what you love and Omega ball game like the Blind Faith. I hate you if you got this solo album out and I've noticed something this is going to be just kind of a broad something noticed broadly. I guess maybe it would be the best way to say it every every project you you work on from specific more more from the very Wicked to now everything gets as you progress gets a little more pared-down little more sparse. Yeah. Is that a is that a just is that a specific thing you sure you're trying to achieve or is that just the way things are going? Well, I think I mean I think of it it both. I think that it's I think like I think the last solo record that I released which is sleeping tapes. Yes boss should have been the first record that I made. Oh, okay. That makes sense. I was I think I was trying to make too much of I wanted it to be I wanted things to be mold and they were which which did them a disservice, you know, I think it took away. It's just covered up the essence of something and I'm I'm here to see what I do next, but I'm like that or maybe I'll go extremely know I know I know what I'm working on. So I don't I think that it was kind of a necessary like pulling away of things off. If I didn't didn't even braver. It would have just been me but I wasn't wasn't quite that brave. That's the latest of sounds pretty some of it sounds pretty close to being just youth. It's no no, I'm there are actually some stuff. There is some there are some songs that are just all right, so that's true that it's gone backwards. So how did you go from from doing solo stuff wage being on T being out in the front doing your own music to the very Wicked? We're in the first couple of singles that I'm hearing and the first EP You're kind of you're more background vocals. And then the first the the full length that you guys did which is incredible. By the way that I've just listened to that honestly for the first time yesterday and it oh my God that the sound that you guys got on that. It's it's the feedback blast on songs like wash away when you're so it's that's just kind of stuff that I bought a I live by love that stuff. But you you were in the background for the first two singles in the EP and then you kind of get your right out in the Forefront for the lp. How did you how did you meet up with everybody? And then what was the process to get you out in front? Yeah. Well, actually I think on that the first EP it's not me. I'm not very I'm a very good job is and one of the I think a drop of water so it's called I mean, it's been a long time. Yeah, but then so you know, so I suppose what happened was. I mean, it's kind of a funny story but God. I mean, it's not very funny in my mind. It's between those are good story. I should never start a story like that cuz I don't tell funny stories regarding setting my birthday. And also when I when I moved from grahamstown Captain, I really wanted to play this with other musicians and I had no idea how to go about finding a band and the one of the same family friend that I'm speaking about his and had a band called the pretty blue guns and they were actually playing their last the last show and I knew that Lucas the drama played a few instruments. And I really I just got a little bit drunk and or maybe I don't know maybe more than a little bit drunk just went up to him after the show. And I said you want to play in my band home and he was super cool and he was like, yeah sure why not and so then we started sort of experimenting and he was really he was playing a better guitar but of drums for my solo project off, but at that point at that point him and under were busy working on the very record, okay, and they had another they wanted a a woman to sing and play keys, but I thought I should break use and they had somebody else but I guess it wasn't quite right and about two weeks before they launched as a live band. They asked me if I would show it and I had never played Keys before and I had also know that then I mean I've never been in a band and song I went into that rehearsal room for the first time and I was in a tiny room and it was the loudest thing I've ever heard of the whole world. Yeah, I was genuinely shocked off and I mean also cuz the boys at that point, we really like a joint, you know, now for example, I mean, it's still extremely well, but if we rehearse in a room, it's not that bad, you know, all of us have yeah. I'm always being magically I couldn't yes, I couldn't play I couldn't play keys and I couldn't hear anything. So it was I remember that first show. I thought it was all very overwhelming like, you know, but then but then I guess we just started spend time together personally and musically and under I started to play a little bit in my solar project. Okay, and then I started working with a really great drummer and then he ended up playing drums for the very record and then the basis for the very very good started playing bass for me and it just became this kind of And so I think we all just really developed some kind of trust in some kind of and all of us are writing songs. And yeah, I guess just as as as as a developed and I suppose I suppose it just became a more natural thing for me to sing a bit more and. Okay and and and hold space. Yep. And we're going with in the room can imagine and understand what a band is and how it up, you know? Yeah. Okay. Okay, so it's like I said that that is Amazing stuff and for you guys to be so inexperienced. It's that makes it even more incredible to me. It's I love love that. That's not my wish list right now. I'm going to have to pick that up as soon as I can't I know I can get a digitally I got to try to figure out how to get a physical copy cuz that's I feel like I don't own it if I even if I bought it, I just I don't own unless I can get the physical copy off. I'm going to have to hunt one of those damn. So was the band well received in South Africa. Was it because it's kind of like psych psychedelic heavy Bass music and it's and I know that's what Andre really does a lot of and these amazing at it is that is there a lot of butter a lot of places to play or the is the audience open to a lot of different types of music? Well, I mean, I remember when I when I just joined the band that's I can I'd had just begun as a collective, which is I know you guys spoke. Yeah, ten minute. I mean, I think that was kind of idea was that I mean these people love this kind of music and started A Wider Circle of people and they weren't really shows happening centering around that and I wasn't so easy to you know, I guess they weren't really being blocked by bigger festivals or and so they decided they wanted to start their own thing where they would put on shows that they wanted to see and they wanted to play. Okay. I started it was a really beautiful time. I think in this in this alternative music scene because they were really building something, you know, and people that got involved and it felt like It's good to say it's good to say I care and I want to do something about it and I want to go something and I'm not I guess has really grown into something very lovely because they obviously then eventually put on endless tears and George. Yes, very cool Community that's developed around that I've seen some of the clips that that looks like such an amazing V sort of beautiful. I'd really love to see if I could ever get to South Africa to see that I would I think I think it's definitely worth it. It's really special and really and the bands are so good. Yeah. I know they really are I was really amazed. Yeah. All right. So how does the very Wicked turn into medicine boy because very Wicked is is four people and medicine ball started off for five. Yeah, and and in medicine boy started off as just you and Andre. Yeah. Yeah. I mean I I suppose. If it's it's quite difficult, I mean, it's quite I think it's difficult anywhere in the world. But in South Africa to make a living from music and so it's quite difficult to carve out a lot of time to give to something. Okay, guys have to make a living doing other things. Okay and under and I really wanted to be just giving everything to it and we wanted to travel with it and we thought we started seeing each other. I suppose around that time and so we had time and we wanted to give it to the music and to each other and and so it just made sense to try something new home. Yeah, it's just really I guess it was at some moment. I can kind of remember the conversation. We were we were driving and speaking about how really wanted to travel and how challenging was to try and get everyone together just to just to you know, I know that everyone really wanted to do it and then I you know, I think one of us if our we should started to piece sort of as a joke then and then it happened it wasn't a joke know and Medicine boys is no joke. I mean that you guys are incredible. I I was introduced to you guys through from Paula home. Just amazing. I love Paula to death. She's the best but one thing I forgot to ask Andre is what's behind the name medicine boy. What did how did you guys come up with bad off as funny? I mean there was also in the car. I guess there's a lot of driving in South Africa under I was sort of He was looking for. I was things were a bit challenging and there was we wanted to run away to get some try out some kind of like home topic medicine and I was teasing in my thinking I called him medicine boy or something. I'm at the at the moment at that point. We were looking for the band name and I don't know if you've ever looked for a bad name, but suddenly everything becomes potential, you know, yeah, and then and then the other the flip side of that is everything's already taken to yes. No, I know it's very tight is really a challenging thing. But when we started then we kind of I liked it was of us. I think there was something in the feeling I guess that's about both those words and the combination that just felt kind of playful and a little bit I guess. I mean, I don't understand psychedelic in the sense of I don't know it had an interesting kind of Feeling yeah, it does. I know what you're talking about. I was in I was in one band in my entire life and we were awful because it was just it was three of us. None of us had ever taken a music lesson off in an entire lives. It was early to mid-nineties and we just wanted to make noise didn't even have that's great. If it was me on a on guitar off my and my my two friends and Scott kind of flipped back and forth between bass and drums, but I drums had no symbols. I don't know where we got this some kind of approached I guess is that's very polite way of saying yeah, and that was we kind of did that we wanted to name it we weren't ever planning on playing out and doing anything with it, but we did record ourselves. Just just to see how awful would sound it off came up with a name and it's not as good as medicine boy. We were super karate monkey death car. Wow, so again, super karate monkey death card to Monkey. I mean, it's pretty good. It's different. You know, it sounds like all of you want to do your input Thursday. We're Democratic band anything. It's just useful. You wouldn't believe there's actually another super karate monkey death car. Well, you know, I might actually believe it's weird. It's it's a crazy world off early days of the internet. We looked it up and there was one other band named super karate monkey death. I think I had heard it all from a sitcom. It was like, okay. I think you could I think that's what it was and I had heard it. It was like a fake video game or something that that there was going on in this in this crappy sitcom that like lasted one season, and I think I'm I'm pretty sure that's how I got it. Somebody else must have been listening at the same time. So anyway, so I know how weird it is and and and it's only worsted to to find bandage off. Bad, I know yeah, you know when when things were a little more less Global you could get away with yeah for sure without having the same name as a different favorite. You're the Old River and spine in the movie spinal tap, you know, we were the original then there was another original so then we had to have a new Originals so you can't get away with that kind of crap now. It's true. We'll be right back after a word from our sponsors. I'm trying to hit the timeline for me at this point gets a little convoluted and I'm trying to figure some of this. How did your smiling medicine Boys music is is incredible and it's it's definitely a like a concentrated version of the very Wicked to me. It sounds like they are two different types of songs in medicine boy, and it's definitely ones where I can hear more Andre influence and then there's one for there's more of your influence and I think and I told this to our yesterday I think you should hold a record for me in writing the most amount of songs that have broken my heart. That's what we're here for. I told my wife that took a clearing and I can't listen to them right now. I don't play them for me, but it's true. I mean I started making a list of the ones like dead. Whole for the time being a window. Home stays open about slipped disk strange in me. Those those songs are so amazing this and and a window really stick to the end and digging a hole right now, but we'll get to that in a minute. Those those songs are just so Achingly gorgeous and it's just the music but your voice is also just it's so soft and and it's nice but it's not always just if you've got this great quality to me. It sounds kind of like a like a Grace Slick meets Loreena McKennitt with little with it a lot more restraint and and subtle p and it's I don't even know what the question is at this point. I was just kind of cut off one of its thank you for it's very nice. It's lovely to hear about it separated compliment. Thank you. Do you figure out at this point? What was his medicine boy just released their last your last album. And yeah. And but at the same time you were working on music with a looky-loo see Kruger and the Lost Boys. Yeah. How did you determine what song would go for with band? Some of sometimes it was quite obvious. Sometimes I was writing specifically from Edison born. Okay, but I guess often you know, when I when I first started medicine way we were living together and off I guess I just I just write a lot as well. And then sometimes it would be you know, which other ones an Android may be connected to as well. Maybe using medicine boy. Okay. So really depended I mean, I remember one one song lashes which is on kind of like electricity. She was busy writing the song when I was writing the song and I think you kind of overheard me writing. So many was like, oh that's awful nice chorus and they made like kind of stole the course in that song and and there was going to be a Lucy song, but it doesn't really, you know, I mean, I don't think it's I mean songs can go so many ways. I think so many of them could have been both and then it just and then and then it I guess the production Styles shifts, but even even in even in that way, I mean there's a some wage on kind like electricity cold is it I think so beautiful blue. Okay. Yeah. So what it's called, I wish my brain dead. Well anyway, I guess the point is that there's a song that I wrote that under it just plays guitar and I sing and then there's one on sleeping tips. We're unrealistic guitar and I sing and I'm pretty sure that they could be in a way interchangeable. But I think that there's something there's something really powerful about which is why I really I guess we never really been a band that releases a lot of singles. It's really made albums. Yeah. That's I think that I really love the idea of if you are working on a collection of songs over a period of time something in this your decision making just in the wage. Are in a space that you know, there's kind of that energy and you're whatever you're feeling and and enjoying that time goes into that thing. And and if it's two P two people working on this one thing it should have something very specific about it and it becomes some of that's really conscious some of that. It just happens, you know, yeah there since I would just Subs in I don't know if I'm really answering your question, but not always so clear. Sometimes it was very clear as I was right before sometimes because it could I would see where the sun would go. I mean for the type for the time being was really I wrote that on my guitar thought I never I thought it was really nothing song. Like I can remember. Yeah because I think sometimes I think it was one of the songs that I was really feeling a bit sad and I thought I wrote it as a bit of a I don't know. It wasn't really I wasn't in a focused writing way. I was kind of just about probably a bit pathetic on my couch. And then I think a later I I was wanting to experiment with my boss at home and I remembered that I had this little thing in it at all. I'm going to try and and and use it basically just to experiment with the keys and then something about that way of doing it's like border to life in a new way for me. Like so you said oh my God. off And then it became the medicine. Anyway, I guess that they'd take they take very strange Journey sometimes well for the time being is my youngest daughter's favorite track. She absolutely loves that song everytime. I put on she's like oh very much so that so it's connecting with me with with my whole family package. It's it's some of the music with modes of the music you've written is incredible to me and it's like this is kind of a backhanded compliment. That's weird should say I'm not at all. So when did you guys decide to move to Berlin and what how did how did you choose Berlin and and I mean it was pretty simple. Actually we we wanted to be touring and it's very difficult to do that Africa and Europe was more possible. So we had started doing that and in order to kind of try and grow on that we decided we needed to move and because of our Visa stipulations off. Dylan was possible. It was kind of central it was relatively affordable. Okay. So yeah, I mean that's pretty much it. I've heard through a few people that have had Alicia that Long Island how open and wonderful it is for artists. So have you guys found that to be the case with with the with medicine board with touring and in that area and down there? It's interesting. I mean, I guess it really depends how you conduct your your your life and I guess could learn you can do it in. Anyways, I guess that's the idea of openness I am. I sometimes find it a bit difficult to use that openness somehow in the sense of I don't know. I guess I'm still just sitting in my room making a lot which is what I was doing in Cape Town, you know? Yeah, there's potential I think maybe I think you've got to be song old enough to tap into it and and touring you know, It's not that we're playing a lot in Berlin, okay. You know, I guess it's just it's it's idea is that you could be touring a lot more. I don't know what I'm saying. Of course. It isn't a very open space. I think that I think because There are so many different kinds of feelings and people and scenes here, but it's interesting. You don't have to be you know, you don't have to fight for you. I talked to but that comes with another kind of. I don't know if I have to figure it out, but oh. But oh, yeah, that's going to take a long time to show. I just have to have you back on. I'm sure I'll be just as confused I want you to do is just to kind of help me out with a little bit of this. This is the part of the timeline that gets a little confusing for me. Yes at the let's see a couple of years ago medicine Boys still active and then Lucy Cooper in The Lost Boys kind of tapes take shape. But Lucy Krueger in The Lost Boys is basically the very Wicked Memories the same people my right? Yeah. Yeah, it's okay. It wasn't sorry. No, no, no. No. No when this occurs, are you still in Berlin when you guys start with the Lost Boys actually, I mean the last boy is So the way that it happened was Lucas started playing with me and then Andreas wall and this is already the start of the Lost Boys And then I started working with, and we had another drummer for The Very Wicked but that didn't at some point. I guess we want things shifted a bit and Thursdays. We we decided to work with Steiner who was The Lost Boys drama and then you know it just then Calvin his who played bass was like I mean, I'm actually really started playing with him a bit before I think it makes so much sense in a way, you know, you develop these deep friendships both musically and personally. Yeah and Thursday. It already had some some kind of identity and you know, like I said the first of them I work with professional session musicians and that's a very different thing. Oh, yeah. It's it's it's not as easy to generate conversation music musically honest conversation, you know, like yeah. So anyway the last the very Wicked at some at some point in time then it was the same page as the same band and I I recorded a we recorded a I think this was an 2015. We we did a we went away to a family. I mean not a family friend of a friend's place by the Sea and he helped us record an EP, right? Okay, and then yeah, okay, and I'm just trying to pull some of this stuff up while we're while we're chatting. Yeah get the names of these of some of the stuff correct. So that was just called at that point in that EP. We made was just called basic Ruben the doc's place. Okay, and I think it was the start of some kind of sound. Los Angeles take me off and took a moment then medicine boy started and we've released I guess we released kind of like electricity. Okay. I didn't want to I Really there was something wrong our You know this there's a I guess it's just like a relationship creative or personal there's something that you developed together and has this identity and that's a really beautiful thing. But there's something that you can say on your own or I don't know I guess it's just different things that I wanted to say or Express and I guess end up some kind of thinking of Independence has been very important to me. And so I wanted to place carry on with yeah because as we were saying something together and and the security in the hospice, although there was a band the kind of I was I was writing the songs off and so different things, you know. Oh, yeah that was going to be my next question was how does the music differ as far as writing? I mean you you and Andre were working a lot together and on medicine board, but once once you add more people, are you still the principal songwriter or is no I mean I was very much so very much my songs. I mean the band as a as a stomach as a Sonic on Thursday. It was extremely collaborative. Okay, but they were my son's well, I mean whatever that means I guess the lyrics and the melody. Yeah. I was feeling like there's something you know, there's something that wants to be said and I find it quite difficult to you know to say it without it's nice to have some Sonic assistance and trying to really get something across, you know, yeah, I can cash it will not can I mean it absolutely does contribute to the overall feeling you're trying to get across to you. Yeah, you're on the boys are really a big part of that and you guys are familiar with each other. So you don't have to make a plane as much exactly your building some kind of language together. Right? So medicine boy just released their their final album. It's different than the other song medicine Boy albums. It's a lot more aggressive. Yeah, and the other homes was at it was it was it a conscious decision for you guys to really go in that direction that as your final album. I mean, I guess we didn't know to be open when we first started making it. Okay, so not it was a conscious decision but not as not because it was the final of them. I think, you know dead. I guess should always that always been a sense of it. I mean like, you know, if you had a very Wicked it's quite that always been a sense of it, but there was some kind of restraint I guess and and some of that came from the fact that we started with a drum machine. Yeah. And so there was a kind of feeling that developed around that but then I think at some point there was maybe a bit of frustration in the freedom of expression that the way that you can kind of push or pull when you're hoped down by a drum machine. Okay. I think we felt like in order for us to keep saying something in a honest about that expression there needs to be an unrelated. You know, I remember cuz I've played this in so many different ways now and I guess you haven't seen in place now, if you know, I I I've only this is as close as I've ever gotten so I mean, it's really I mean, obviously I'm extremely biased. Yeah, he's a really dead. Beautiful and expressive performer and there's a kind of wildness and that I think is sometimes quite restricted by the drum machine and that's also makes for something interesting. But like I say, there's like I think we had melted a bit for what we had I so we wanted to to like the clickers also can be such a metronome can be such a murderer choice and we didn't we wanted to and I think and I do feel that it's I feel proud that we did that though. We didn't ever want to be like, okay. This is kind of working for us. So this is what we'll do now, if it wasn't feeling allies, then it wasn't right. And yeah, I think we just there was a feeling of wanting to Let go of it and let loose and rage but I don't know. I don't know how to say it. Exactly about what idea there was just a feeling of wanting to yeah, I can I can definitely hear you. Like I was like wrecker, you know, it's just that's way more aggressive than and and it's it's I'm trying to think of some of the rest of the discography. I don't remember anything with Andre being that aggressive vocally. I mean, I know definitely some aggressive guitar work and some really in a psychedelic guitar work throughout. Yeah medicine point, but vocally he's really giving it everything on this one. Yeah. I know it's it's a super Supernatural truthfully and and it was really beautiful to see that's awesome here. I loved it. I mean, it's definitely my favorite part of little bit. This is I think it's local performances are super beautiful. I mean, it's it's like I guess there's so much that but it's really I mean, I remember when he was doing some of those workers and fuzzy. The guy that we worked was who mixed it and we work with all the time and the two of us were sitting outside of the vocal room obviously off and it was so intense to listen to and you know, it's such a crazy and it's too crazy process to hear this person performing this song and also, you know, we knew it was the last open there was such a kind of so much for such a cathartic thing. Yeah, very emotional. I'm sure at that point. Yeah. I mean, I think I guess there had been so many emotions. So then to have the kind of expression of it and it's really cool place to live for a few other people who need that off and you do some really cool stuff vocally nuts on the last album last night as in boy album take me with you and you disappear and the name Two songs. It's a ragdoll and half of a woman you do this amazing chanting thing at the end of each song. Hong Kong and that's really amazing. It's a lot so many layers in it is did you have that idea going in how you want it to sound or was it more experimental and just okay this sounds right. Let's leave it alone. I mean housing a woman was definitely quite intentional Ragdoll was I guess it was it was a little bit playful. I mean there was kind of I mean off the the final version of Ragdoll. I actually I did that I recorded that song in my bedroom in Berlin when I was extremely sick and a bit sad song. I try to redo the whole calls, but I actually just I think we all just rented one in particular I liked. a feeling of whatever was and then the end was yeah, I guess it was just No, it was pretty experimental. I suppose it really is. Yeah, and then we just kind of we just kind of liked how it came out and I really like the cuts at the end. Yeah, it was just kind of experimental I guess. I love it. I think it's it's really and then dragged all just kind of tried at the end and it that's really cool. So The Lost Boys in South Africa or they in Berlin and how he guys working together. Well, the last four is has become a table for whoever is brave enough to play with her. So it's it's it's more of an idea that I mean it was it was very much direction of was originally but it has become now something that it's depending on okay. Yeah, which is pretty cool. I mean, I would love to suck at some point. I'll definitely do something with the original boys again. Oh, that'd be great. If we play together all the time, you know, it's not like but but it's of course, it's just not good reason. It's not possible. Yeah. Yeah dead. One of the things that I really enjoy about your music is the coverage that you've done and I'm trying to look up a few I wrote them all down will not all of them cuz I thought that'd be to be pretty crazy. But the ones that you've done some amazing songs like Dylan Neil Young Nick Cave Velvet Underground Tom Waits vashti Bunyan ninja brown, I mean, but they all sound like you wrote them when you do this, it's it's you're one of the few artists that can really in my opinion takes somebody else's song and can really make it sound like something that you've written. CH in your life because I'm still in love with you dance again because I'm still in off pinky songs out because you love them or is it I mean, obviously you wouldn't cover song Hate but if yeah other ones, who are you like this? I can really make this one my own or more this this one fits my register. What what am I mean? I'm not. I'm really not a good I have I don't I'm trying to get a better at Guitar because I have very little knowledge around it. And then the best way for me to learn to love to learn and I guess particularly learn guitar, but then also to to read understand some writing a bit is to really get to know someone that you love and and really make it like look. I mean I also make my own because I can't at all players like they do at home. That's just the only option that I do think it's a very valuable thing to to learn scripture songs are such incredible songs, and there's such incredible songwriters and it's really sad, I think about this a lot like how wonderful it is to be able to in some way really slip into the hands of Hartville awesome writer such a low because I don't think there's so many art forms where that's possible. I mean, I guess painters can copy a painting but what could you know all those stick-on? I don't think there's a like a physical processing and rewriting lines that you love but when you play a game A song that you move you kind of feeling the Rhythm and you feeling the way the words are I don't know. It's really amazing. Yeah, it's a really amazing learning. I mean I just I mean, I just like I said, I love singing when I was little I just love doing that like I love to sing something sooner. Yeah, and you know, you're feeling kind of what you felt when you first when you heard this song something whatever moved you to to love thank you song now, you're kind of feeling it while you're creating it. Yeah. I'm coming to understand it. I think and like a new way. Yeah. Yeah, they the version of Harvest Moon that you guys did was in Crash. I'd love that and the the Diamond Days by Frosty bunion that is incredible. I I've came to know her know her but now about her only a few years ago. And it's it's me too. Actually it was a really wonderful Discovery. Yeah, Train song was the first thing I ever heard that it really that song really wage. The weirdest thing is it was actually the theme song for a TV show I was watching is so yeah. It's it's a very weird show called Patriot on Netflix. It's okay. Very first the first year the two seasons and they always threatened to do a third season, but they haven't yet. Okay. Okay. The first season that Train song was the theme song and it was off. This is okay. We've already pulled me in with this theme. Yeah. I know it's a huge difference and the the the premises it's about this like this Spike or Secret Service kind of guy who has to infiltrate some company to stop some reason but it's kind of it's a very dark comedy and he's just burnt out beneath the last job. He had he had he had the murder somebody or something. I don't know his his face and he's just a shell of himself and he's just kind of going through the motions and he's just the entire show. He just sitting there like sneeze. I don't know like he's nodding out or something during the entire season and it's whole it's the guy the actor is very good in it. The second is very talk really is and then they suck. They messed it up. The second season they used the Beastie Boys song for their intro. There's a reason for that. Yeah, but there's a reason for it as you get the sixties. I would recommend the Patriot if you like comedies and Jackie bunion as your theme song, so I've kept you for quite a while but I've got I had another question and I just lost it off. What is going on with my my notes Here My I told you my computer's active going crazy. Andre had mentioned that you may have written enough music for a whole nother a problem while you kind of been on on lockdown. So have you been up to have you been writing more music and working out some stuff? Yeah. I have been writing a lot. I'm working on something new. The thing I did want to ask you about is the visual aspect of the music cuz you do some amazing videos The Edge Photography and videography in on your releases from the the new medicine Boy album. The cover is incredible to the videos. You've done the video for digging a hole is incredible black spot that I love black spot that video is in just amazing. It's are those ideas that you have before are you is the who is is there an art director that that's helping with ideas are well, I mean it really it really depends. It's gone many different ways. But mostly I have just extremely talented friends. And and so I have I guess there's always a feeling develops around the songs on the music. For example, I actually initially for Summers not that simple I wanted to do I had some ideas for videos and then I I very quick off. And I said all of them were very much based around water. I have no I would I would really I would really just go with it. And then I I spoke to a few friends and filmmakers and I give I supposed to learn about those ideas and and then for example with black spot, I I didn't really know Jeff that were before I did that there was a bit of a leap of faith. We had metal music festival and instead he really likes stuff. He loves to do something and then when I had when I reached out to him and he lives in a different city, and he said well why didn't you because he he's got a whole lot of friends and stuff are whether I just come there and we make something and with for that month of the next part, I really just sit by just said yes, and I trusted his vision. Oh, that's awesome. That was very much his own sort of. But then for for example digging a hole a friend of mine was in Berlin and we just got together a number of times we decided we wanted to make something together. She had some images and and just came up with this thing together. They made it together. But but so it really depends but it's it's very at the feeling is always been very much one of I guess trust in collaboration and experimentation, you know, and it's it's never been back to pre. Yeah, I suppose a bit organic. That's what I'm saying. Maybe okay. Okay digging a hole looks that's everything. It's just it's really an interesting video Try. I'm twenty-eight. I'm terrified of everything and I'm quite sure everything else in the kitchen burning me off to Feel So Young don't you come walk backwards, you know only take to that strange how many times if you have to do that. It takes a very interesting thing to do because I really just had a minute Berlin for a long time and I really don't like falling in front of public audiences makes me very shy and I was just so weird with gold this white clothes like dead. Walking backwards through the learning but it felt very also I was very lost. I'd really just I mean in a in a an emotional way, I guess I mean just I I just moved to a new city and it was very strange and there was a kind of sometimes to do something that so much has your feelings is quite a relief somehow or I didn't know it was kind of an interesting exercise. It's very moving video. It it fits the song Perfectly. Yeah. I'm home. I really I really I guess more more. I like simple. I really like the idea of doing something simple that somehow doesn't change the whole song but just adds to a feeling or you know, ye and that that absolutely does and the ending of of black spot where you're just staring straight into the camera and there's silence. That's That's intense. I man that and it is hard. I got maybe I shouldn't say this. I was watching it at work. So so, hopefully nobody from Works listening like but I kind of and that's part of the difficulty sometimes when I'm losing and preparing for somebody who loves his music I enjoy so much is that I kind of get especially with with your music because it like I said, you've written so many songs that that giving me such heartache. I I sit there and at work, I like I like my cat my eyes are wet. I can't I can't die nobody's looking at cuz I'm at a desk and there's somebody next to me and put my hand up to my office like maybe pretend to hold in a sneeze or something. So but when but then I'll find that. I've got the video playing on my phone and I'm just staring down. And it and like oh grab my my worst somebody somebody's looking at typing again some the videos to me are incredibly successful in conveying in enhancing the feelings of the music. So it's thank you if you're working with somebody you're doing an incredible job of expressing what you want because it's coming through, I think I vote lovely people. I've it's also just a lovely way of yeah, it's just something. I mean, you've got this song when you made it in your country feel better seating and I think it's just another way for me to walk to play a bit. Somehow your famous friends. Yeah, and you you know, you've got that background in theater. So it's it is a small way to sort of incorporate my world too. But yeah, like I said, I've kept you for over an hour at this point. I wanted to thank you so much for explaining this cuz there were times where I was like, we're all right, where does medicine boy and so I thought The confusion it can be but it kind of doesn't matter because all the music exactly. I mean, I agree. How can people follow you. How can they get Jacob the the albums and what can we look for in the future? I know it's everything is still up in the air. But what are we looking at as far as long as their new album in the works during the demo stage? Yeah. There is a new album in the works. Definitely now and I mean, I'd love to playing live as soon as it's possible. I have a show in November. I guess. We'll see if that happens, but I'll definitely be I mean, I would love to be playing live as much as possible next year and it will be something there will be new music but I guess in terms of finding the music the usual places Spotify app Apple music and band camp and but I mean by encompasses the best. Yeah, I love band camp. Yeah, it's really great and I've been doing some great stuff by you know, waiting for several years. So yeah, I mean, it's super cool. Well if you if you ever get a chance to tour the states at all. I'm I'm there anywhere on the East Coast. I'm going to find you guys. Thank you so much off. What what's his social? Is there a social media for you for you? The band that that people can follow to keep track of I mean, I guess Facebook and Instagram when when there's new sauce differently announced extra. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you so much for spending so much time with me. It's been it's a Porsche. Thank you for helping me this really great. Sing my birthday song. Hey everybody. I'm Mike and I'm Jessie. I'm Aaron and all together. We are the punk tree off the show. We're going to share music that we love we're going to discuss how punk rock has evolved and different subgenres have developed. I'm going to talk to bands that have been influential in shaping the music industry and our lives. Sometimes we challenged each other to dig into bands and sub-genres that we may not be into on our own. We're a proud partner the pantheon podcast Network and you can find us across all platforms and on social media at the punk tree. We have a really great time talking about music and life with each other. So please join us. And everybody's going to be one of the biggest. Hi, my name is Mike shoe and along with Lucan responding from the band town meeting. We host the long and made you young podcast on the pantheon podcast Network. This is our Neil Young age where we mostly talked out of our we're going through a mystery. It's my page to where were Condon boy's friends and harvest and Livernois. We're gonna sit in one thousand. We're pretty sure it's the only podcast that covers Neil Young's musical catalog album by album in order of release. Why are we doing this? Because we have an eel problem. Okay, we've got the in-depth analysis historical context the bad movie references. They're all they're the long. May you young podcast check out soon because it won't be long before the pantheon folks figure out. We don't know what the hell we're doing.

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Sergio de la Pava on Literature and Law

At Liberty

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Sergio de la Pava on Literature and Law

"From the ACLU. This is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes a staff attorney here at the ACLU and your host this holiday week. We're thankful for all the inspiring guests who've come on at liberty to share their stories and their work. I'm so happy that today. We're bringing back one of my favorite conversations of the year. You're with novelist and attorney. Sergio fava we originally recorded this episode. Live at the Brooklyn Public Library and the conversation was an absolute gem. Sergio de ah when the PEN Bingham Prize for his debut novel a Naked Singularity in two thousand twelve and recently released lost empress a postmodern epoch. About football the ball criminal justice Joni Mitchell and just about everything in between Mr Dilip Pov is not only the author of critically acclaimed books. He's also a fulltime public defender having represented thousands of criminal defendants over the last two decades. We discussed both his literary and legal work as well as his approach to life. I hope you enjoy this. Deep cut from the Liberty Archives. Good evening thanks very much for coming out. And thanks very much to the Brooklyn Public Library for hosting at Liberty Liberty for the second time I just wanted to maybe start by asking Sergio to brief reading to begin our conversation tonight. Thank you for being here. I see you all right. Let's see what would education look like. If its ultimate goal. Were incarceration incarceration. Where would occur? There are many fertile possibilities for example in East New York Brooklyn you have Cypress Hills. Houses housing project made up a fifteen seven storey buildings that at times seems more penal than anything New York City Department of correction could ever devised locations like that. Where shots were once fired during a mayoral press conference announcing a crackdown on guns are their own kind of special training? Amy Nuno's from Cyprus and starting at age thirteen has extensively engaged in precisely the kind of conduct that generally results in incarceration. He has watched US pretty much. Everyone knows fulfill that expectation so he has over. The years spent significant time imagining what it must be like to be in gene and this has not been fanciful imagining either. But rather the kind that seems based on at least probability the expected result might be someone. For whom whom sudden incarceration would not be the all out electric-shock it would be others but there are events for which there is no such thing as adequate preparation and one of them is the suddenly savage restriction of your motilal because freedom is one of those things only adequately experienced in the negation as with its sudden absence that squeezing the president feels sensation of their soul. Dying the bus with new no rattles over the only only bridge to rikers island and forces himself to observe the razor wire coils only a certain way the DNA of the island. This is a darkness. And I said truly descends. A sudden desperation radiates from skin. He's being held and claustrophobia fills his lungs. This is low grade terror but still terror and his response is an agonize search for dissociation. Nuno thinks how. His only ally now is Rene Descartes. They car basically started that whole mind. Body dual ISM and this is the only out he sees right. Now if two things are separable than it stands to reason that one can intentionally separate them. You know he's going to do this. They can put him in rikers but they can't make him live there. There's two of him and only no one's going in thank you very much. Thank you very much again for joining us for the podcast is that was an easy. Yes I mean New York Public Library Aco you. I'm I'm not saying none of that. So thank you for the invitation. We're very happy to have you. I think the two things struck me about this passage one one. It stuck out because my wife used to teach in Cypress hills at eighty nine and the second was the justice position that you pose between the school all to prison pipeline and Rene Descartes the Seventeenth Century French philosopher and this seemed to highlight. You're sort of dual existence as both a postmodern fiction writer and public defender. So I wonder if you can tell us about how you conceptualize these dual roles. They two sides of the same coin or do they complement each other. I mean I think there's some complementarity there in the sense that I have illegal career. I'm but I've only only really practice law as a public defender which I think Being a public defender is a very artistic pursuit. And by that I mean whether you naturally inclined to be that kind of person or not. There's a certain generous openness openness I you need to have a public defender that I think also ends up to be a pretty useful thing to being an artist and by that I mean when you start out as a public defender. I think I was twenty four years old. If you start out from a closed position of a meeting this person not this person who's done a bad thing but I'm meeting a bad person. Then who is not worthy of my respect or dignity or respect for collaboration than you're not going to be an effective attorney in that context context and similarly I think if you set out to create literary art if the are you create is going to involve even invented human beings and there's probably a good idea to have some invented human beings in a novel you better bring some of that generosity to what humanity is what people are to with our project as well so I would say that a lot of the skills translate. Maybe it's a good way of thinking. Well it's interesting that you highlighted the need for openness sadness and we definitely get that sense from your literary work at your open to the whole world of ideas almost all at the same time I mean I think one thing that also so struck me is that few professions are more overworked than public defenders. And you don't exactly the kind of books that one writes quickly so so it begs the question. How do you have the time to do both? And why is it so important for you to continue to do both. That's a very nice thing to say because I don't feel particularly productive productive. I've been writing a long time and I have three novels and I guess if you look at the three of them stack next to each other it looks like wow. This guy's got a lot done but if you realize that it's been decades doesn't I feel that way from the inside looking out but it's probably true that I do like to constantly busy and constantly have something that I'm working on. That has has a kind of shifting goal line so my days made up of something to come across my desk and then maybe an hour later. It's resolved and that's very pleasurable Israel. I think most people would agree. But I also like having Something that's very incremental. That may be a good day. Is fixed that one sentence that was bothering me and having that overarching kind of thing have troubling me and bothering me is for some reason pleasurable to me. So I'm not doing this out of any any kind of service notion or anything. I'm doing it because I'm strangely need to do it. Well that does capture a bit of the duality in terms of putting out fires as a public defender under versus working on these epic tomes with public defender. You can't turn to the client and be like. Don't worry I have this overarching mission. You're just a part of it. They're not really that interested in that they WANNA. Yeah no like what's going to happen on the case you're representing them on so it's a very discreet kind of quick. Did we win or lose. You know they're not interested in your evolution as an attorney so much. They're interested in them getting off rikers island. Well the most recent novel that you publish this last empress which is fantastic and has been very well received. But it's quite hard to describe so as you. How do you describe the novel? I mean you've talked about it as both an entertainment and a protest I think the narrator at early early on in the book says so what we're going to do here. It's just going to be an entertainment. WE'RE NOT GONNA get too heavy and then almost immediately you know sections like the one. I just read pretty much intrude. So what happens to the poor narrator is he's not able to even fulfill that one minor thing that he wanted to do about keeping light so on the most overt overt level. What's happening is just kind of screwball comedy? Football farce is being juxtaposed with this country's mass incarceration program and what it means to be incarcerated but also underlying everything I hope is this notion. There are many forms of incarceration which I think Nuno is already driving there. which is you can incarcerate a a body or the body itself can be a form of incarceration for even people who are in prison? There are many other things that can imprison us. Because I happen in to have this kind of weird belief that I think most people have. Maybe don't come to terms with that. We're kind of like more than our bodies were souls and that were trapped inside our bodies. That's probably going a little beyond what usually has as the topic. But but I think that even the most cynical materialist most people on some level believe that and I have these debates with a lot of people because I have a lot of despite what you do a lot of free time and I had these debates. Hr people who are like. I'm very materialistic. I'm just accident. A life is just a weird accident that happened and when my body dies I am convinced thousand percent that that is the end of that and I say ah the fact that we are. You and I are sitting here right now having. This discussion is the most bizarre thing that's ever happened so I'm not too keen on just very quickly making making assertions like the one year making I'm not sure about that and then I just jump off from that and six hundred pages later. I don't know that I've resolved anything but it was interesting to me and very interesting to the reader as well. I WANNA pick up on several of the themes that run through your work but the criminal justice system is not just in this book but also in your other pieces of fiction. So what is the interplay between your life inside the criminal justice system on a day to day basis and the themes that you choose to pick up in your fiction no surprise I find the criminal justice system fascinating and that's not necessarily complement. I'm not saying it's necessarily a positive ositive but I do think that the criminal justice system is like so many things in this country that does search some really beautiful principles and then pretty consistently failed to live up to them. But at least it asserts. Yeah I don't know I mean that feels like something and then it also you meet a lot of people you meet and clients are really fascinating to me and they always have been so it would feel I would feel weird when I engage in novel writing. It would feel more artificial to leave all of that out than it does to organically I hope include included as part of just what I find to be fascinating about human nature of you know if you're a student of human nature of your in any way intrigued by the way human beings behave towards each other. You can do a lot worse than immerse yourself in the criminal justice system because you're seeing people under stress for things that they've already done things they may WanNa do you meet people who do on some level no the correct way to get their lives in order but then somehow keeps sabotaging themselves and I don't know why but I find that fascinating sedating on many levels because I feel like we're all kinda screwed up but here's where you can see it like undeniably in stark contrast. I know you've talked about the fact that you've had thousands of cases in your twenty plus years as a public defender and clearly it requires a great deal of multitasking and similarly the book includes Numerous stories within the one novel. And I'm wondering how you process was for crafting. Such a huge story with so much inside of it. I mean for those who haven't read. It includes in full a petition written by a prisoner it includes transcripts of nine eleven calls. It includes almost anything you can imagine. What was the process like to pull the actual book together and I'm wondering weighs in at about seven? Hundred pages was was the first draft longer or shorter. No I don't really do drafts. I mean what I do is. I'm just very careful throughout and then when I'm done I'm pretty much done. There's there's other writers that'll produce a draft quickly and then Kinda work off of that. I'm Kinda the opposite if I'm on. Page five hundred over six hundred page book. I'm five six other way through. Maybe it's the lawyer in me. I liked to be kind of methodical about it. But in terms of there's a low barrier of entry into the work is just because I think I'm probably a a curious person. I don't like cocktail parties. I usually kind of retired to the corner but if the person has an odd job I'll grill them for forty minutes. 'cause I just find I'm not fascinating. I paint billboards. I'm like Oh you're not going anywhere. We're going to spend an hour talking about what that means because I find pretty much anything about our society can NBA fascinating if you again with openness right the artistry and openness are linked to me and just being open to new experience open to letting things in as opposed close to going through life excluding things and and saying not me not my interest not me well again that openness and that curiosity certainly comes through very strongly but there's also a lot of facts in the book whether it's about theoretical mathematics or historical events. What role does research play a fiction writing? I think it's research that I've done out of interest independent of the book and now as I'm writing I say oh This thing that I happen to know about actually fit here. And maybe what'll happen when I throw it in is that somehow it'll deepen what is really the underlying message of everything in which is everything's kind of linked the way we are all kind of linked with John steinbeck would call the giant sold that produces all the little souls souls not using those words but that notion of an interconnected humanity and part of that is does notion that if you dig deep enough anything connections will start being made. So that on the surface Joni Mitchell's music career has nothing to do with an NFL work stoppage. But but then the challenge becomes to somehow make it so that they don't clash in the same key to use a musical formula well and there's a huge variety but it's it's also sort of highbrow and lowbrow also so your references include as I mentioned descartes but also you talk about sort of reality TV cooking shows. So you're talking talking about the things that interest you find their way into the book but it seems that your interests are quite broad. How do you think about filtering all those different kinds of inputs into a single novel? Part of that is just me because I remember when I first started writing and like getting praised and then my wife would look at me and be like this idiot. Watch three's company for the. I'm not that impressed. And there's part of that openness is openness to like really bad stuff that somehow can help I've I've I've been binging on Gilligan's island so yes the openness goes both ways is not just with the theoretical physics. I also just find like kind of low level entertainment entertaining But also in odd instances moving I can be moved by like a really corny pop song sometimes almost like two tiers. I don't know why that is but but it interests me enough to explore Joni. Mitchell is a supreme artists. That's not what I'm referring to but I'm saying that I have that openness. I think to the way that Gilligan's island might have some connection to the work that Alan Guth did on cosmology that is not as counter as you would think at first blush. And then the challenge for me as to when you're done reading that you feel somewhat like that and you talked about one of the main themes in this book is the NFL and it's not just the NFL NFL but also the NFL. The Indoor Football League which is like a minor league it's fictitious but it's based on Real Minor League football and you have another piece which I've found really extraordinary. Mary called the days sale. which was published by triple canopy and that addresses sort of mid level professional boxing boxing and and football are both sort of what might consider low brow or mass entertainment and I grew up watching lots of boxing and watching lots and lots of football and I find find myself now not being able to really watch either? So I'm interested in what continues to be alluring about those very violent sports and then I think something is also specific about not just the greatest football player ever or the greatest boxer ever. But you've sort of talked about your fascination with the folks who toil sort sort of almost semi anonymous gladiators who put their bodies on the line without the glory or the greatness. I respond to displays of. Will that have very little chance of success. So something like this. Indoor Football League team called the Patterson pork going up against the Dallas cowboys have won the last three super bowls and what appeals to me about that is not the game itself or what the result will be kind of moments before the game and it's referred to in the book. It's not a spoiler. I don't think I don't know I'm not great. At determining what is or isn't where the players themselves kind of know what's going to happen and they know it's going to be bad. They know that they're going to be embarrassed. They know it's going to be physically painful. But they go to the game and they still participate. I don't know why but that's always been fixation of mine. And so like with the piece you're referring to it kind of highlights. Two particular boxing fights that I thought highlighted that where the fighter would have been well within his rights to say not my night. You got this one. And neither one as pointed out was really like is level fighters. We've we've seen they were kind of like on the cusp of stardom and loss with an all that damaging to their careers and she wouldn't have been damaging you get paid before boxing fight. It's not depending on whether you win or lose you get paid the same amount you get paid before the fight but yet it's almost as if they were responding to some higher obligation that they had created a month themselves. It'd be like you don't quit in boxing. It's an invented thing that some people have decided but almost anybody in this room would quit in a boxing fight. You know like right away. So they've even turn allies some kind of code that they've also just kind of invented and agreed to participate in and then they feel a responsibility to answer to that and I find that very moving and the juxtaposition and the piece you're talking about is to Virginia Woolf Hawaii door and in particular to the lighthouse which is highest level level novel writing in English and Virginia. Woolf I think was fascinated by a similar thing in the piece you wrote about them off where there's just no real intellectual actual reason for what you're doing other than just kind of persistence in the face of damaging odd will persistence in the face of damaging. Is I don't think it's too much of a stretch to connect that to the life of a public defender or to the life of someone who was turned down by eight publishers and then self published the book. How much of yourself is reflected in this fascination with the person trying to climb that mountain in terms of just creating invented obligations obligations I think my obligations with the book referring to were to have a be exactly what I wanted it to be and have a certain form of aesthetic object and then once that was achieved? I'd never really tied my sense of self worth or achievement to what would then happen by publishers. Not to say that that wasn't intensely intensely frustrating. Because I had a view of what this thing was that wasn't being shared by literally anyone so that's frustrating but my version version of getting up was just writing and being like no don't compromise what it looks like don't fit into any particular categories to try to gain and then it was my wife who also also as a career long public defender. Who took that attitude with respect to getting it published and refused to say no one and kept fighting and really all credit goes to our in terms of that aspect aspect of it? I just do the writing. And she kind of figures out where it goes from there. Did the audience or the perspective audience figure in at all what. Who did you think would read your book? I think with a naked singularity which is the first book referring to. I mean I was really just sick and tired of these kind of very low level depictions of our world by our world. I mean attorneys. Who Do indigent defense work in big cities and if I say to you public defender and you immediately go to the Hollywood cliche? You think this is a person who is is not only overall by too much work but also just kind of on some level less skilled and the private attorney when in reality is not just that that's not true but it's really quite the opposite opposite and I say that I wrote recently points that out which is and let this be the free public service advice for the evening if you ever find yourself arrested. God forbid you're much better off with the public defender in New York City than you are with that guy who did your will or executed the closing of your house. Well I certainly want to come back in more detail to your work as a public defender under. But one of the things that's a sort of defining feature of your work is the ability to zoom in and zoom out get very specific to the experience of one of your characters but also make these not entirely intuitive linkages to these broader ideas. And I'm wondering what importance you put on location in terms of for your work. It's so micro while also being macro but then it seems also that New York specifically Acres Island Brooklyn New Jersey also feature. You're very strongly in your work. So where do you prioritize location. It's funny because I kind of have this half big feeling like I chose. It was patterson just because I liked the alliteration Patterson pork but then Patterson is an intensely fascinating person as William Carlos Williams and others has an remarkable literary history. Has this thing called. The Patterson falls which are like remarkable and also fits into this theme of this great industrial hub as fallen on hard times. There's decay so I wish I could answer that in a better one day I decided on this location or decided on this and it's a lot more intuitive and dream light than that and and then what happens is once it's in Patterson you can't imagine it being anywhere. But Patterson for example. You can't imagine what you were thinking not having picked. Patterson it feels obvious obvious afterwards so the location does function in that way it drives a certain things but ultimately with me anyway. It's about the people bowl. And how they're shaped by their locations rikers island. Being an obvious example of that well the characters certainly are at the forefront and you have created some really unforgettable characters you you sort of mix these intimate portraits of marginalized people. Whether it's a night shift nine one one call operator or other folks that you highlight in the book but then you also have these sort of as you said sort of slapstick very archetypal type of characters where it's very silly almost at some points and having represented thousands thousands of clients. How much are those stories? Informing your work in fiction. Imagine that the characters that you've come across over your twenty plus years as a public defender in the stories that you've heard from them can't help but provide fodder for your stories. Yeah I said earlier that I find them just fascinating fascinating. Part of it is almost all. I've had like really amazing experiences. That not only have I not had but I'm really far removed from and very unlikely to ever have so immediately. I don't know if it's a novel. Listen me but I really want to hear about them. Rela- what it was like and and I will tell you this. We were talking earlier in. The boxing context the average client. That I've had a lot tougher. Not just physically but emotionally than I am because most most of the clients I have managed to piece together kind of hard scrabble existence. That looks like contentment until this event happened that that is the reason reason. I'm meeting them. But they've overcome a lot more adversity. I mean I've had a pretty easy life I think certainly compared to the my average client so a great deal of what but I find fascinating about what I do by now. I feel like I know what the relevant statutes are and I know what the judges but every client is different because every client brings a a different perspective of different life experience. That's what changes. That's what kept changing for over two decades and what is allowed me to keep doing the work we hear about Bernard you will never burn out if it's about the clients because you come to work today and you need a different client. It doesn't matter if you've done that kind of case before you've dealt with that charge before if you've had that trump before you've never represented this individual joie before and that's what keeps it new to me and that's what I find thrilling about it and it's really interesting. I want to talk more about your relationship with your clients because I can't remember exactly where you wrote but you basically described it as a strange kind of relationship where there's both intimacy but also a lot of formality and you're not exactly friends even if you spend quite right a bit of time together and your relationship is both necessary but also part of this absurd system and actually one word that you use to describe the the space between your clients and the world that you live in is a chasm and in something that also came up in a conversation. We had recently with Reginald Dwayne Betts. WHO's a poet and lawyer as well so given that there is this chasm of experience between you and your clients? How much time do you actually get to speak with them? And how do you build that trusting relationship so that you can advocate on their behalf. I mean varies rights represent John a very minor charge that may result within at the first quarter appearance. Our interaction action. May If you put a stop watch maybe five minutes but I mean I had a recent client who I met in two thousand fifteen we resolve this case in two thousand nine hundred and I mean what. I'm trying to hint that in. That essay is that it did feel like a friendship but it was a weird kind of friendship because he he always knew that I'd never had to go through the time he always knew that. I got to go home every night. And so if you're doing the job right it should feel like a low level friendship but there's always going to be that distance of I'm the one meaning. The client is the one who was really facing horrifying future. You're not and that's true. And I'm glad I'm not facing horrifying future but that element is always there. The common refrain that I think public defenders here when you tell them. Hey this offer is really good. Oh yeah because you don't have to do the time true. I guess but that doesn't change the analysis here. This is actually a good offer. It's three years in prison but you should take it. And that's a weird conversation conversation to have with someone. This horrible thing that's happening to you but you should accept it because if you don't accept that something more horrible is going to happen and invariably I've been doing this long enough. I know what's coming you don't have to three years. That's why it doesn't seem like a long time understood. Think about every professional interaction. You have the guy who's operating on. He doesn't need his kidney removed. That's what it is a professional distance. Here you wouldn't want me falling apart the way you are because I need to keep a professional distance to do my job and hopefully convince the the jury to quit you are convinced just to give you a reduced charge or whatever. So that's what I meant when I said it's an odd relationship that we enter into. I think a public defender working in in Manhattan or Brooklyn would probably enter into it with three hundred people a year or something like that so it can be strange and you adjust again the plea bargain in system that we live in in this essay which is forthcoming. It's going to be published as a part of a collection of essays commissioned by the ACLU covering landmark cases in which we were involved in. So you wrote about Gideon which established the right to counsel for all criminal defendants and basically gave birth to the industry of public defense. Can you talk a little bit more about the plea system and how it seems so absurd and how it puts you face to face with your clients in a different from way plea bargaining. It's called a necessary evil or against listen we have to plea bargain. Have you seen the volume. What they don't mention as you created the volume that now result in this System these stats are familiar to a lot of people. I hate to constantly be parenting. But they're so stark you know if you who magically went back to like nineteen seventy-three I think you have fewer than three hundred thousand people incarcerated in the United States today. It's like two point three million so something like seven hundred percent. There's an increase in the rate of incarceration not the gross numbers on accounting for the population burst. So something went crazy in these forty fifty years. There's that somehow American society decided Yeah I think the solutions a lot of promises just to keep throwing people in jail so then the volume rose to the point. Where if everyone and there's this really cool novel set in the Seventies? I'm blanking on the name where a public defender Office I. We're now taking anymore. Guilty pleas at all and the system falls apart because if that were truly thing that occurred if everybody said we're not taking good to please we have a right to a trial. We're GONNA exercise that right. We're GonNa you you know. Every case is going to go to trial the system would not be able to handle that and so this artificial construct that we call the system knows that intuitively totally knows that its survival is at stake so then it does things. I create something called the trial tax. Now I don't know how do you WanNa get into this but basically the child tax tells you if you plead guilty guilty today. I'm going to give you this but if you make me go to trial and you lose you're GONNA get four times. So what happens. Is this like really fundamental right. There's really glorious thing which is a criminal trial. Trial is being cut off at the knees out of fear. Now you might say well that seems about right and let me tell you that I've been doing this over. Two decades and in the vast majority of cases what would be appropriate sentence for what the defendant has allegedly done is pretty clear. You know their history. You know what they're accused of doing. There's really no reason to enhance handset sentence because they exercise their right to a trial now. There are exceptions. I'm not saying that's true. In every case but in the vast majority of cases there is no legitimate reason to give a criminal l.. Defendant are far more heavy centers because they exercise their right to try and get that endemic throughout the system in the whole country. Whatever jurisdiction you go to including here in New York Brooklyn Manhattan wherever you go? That is just part and parcel of the system. And it's an outrage but it's an outrage. We've learned to live with so if I could wave a magic wand every criminal case would end the Notre and a lot of those would be convictions and be fine. Because I'm not doing the time. No not for that reason. That would be fine because there would be a dignity to that. They'll be dignity eighty to a prosecutor having a prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt and giving breath to our constitution everyday in these courtrooms instead of just folding over. Because hey you I can't take this case to trial so you've written three phenomenal. Books represented thousands and thousands of clients. What's the next challenge? What what are you most excited about doing next? I think I continue to represent clients in Manhattan and New York County Defender Services. But I'm also kind of splitting my time in which in my capacity at that office. I'm also doing a lot of work advocating for large-scale criminal. Justice reform mostly related to issues. That are most prevalent in New York. Doc you think New York is a progressive state. It's going to have a better system than elsewhere and that can be true in some limited areas but if you look at something like discovery which is the process by which we get the evidence that the prosecutor has against your client where like the third worst state in the country. If you look to recently raised the age legislation just passed them. We were really central central to making that happen by we. I mean the whole entire New York Indigent Defense Community Legal Aid Society ourselves and other organizations. And can you just explain raise. The ages raised the age basically basically up until October. First of last year you were able to charge. Sixteen year olds as adults for minor. Things like Petty Larceny and and so the age of criminal responsibility was sixteen and the only other state that had a criminal age responsibility that low with North Carolina every other state had at least seventeen most to them had eighteen. The notion being that what is the age are which even a minor criminal offense you should be treated as an adult was way behind the curve and through the work of like these indigent defense organization a lobbying and just pointing the fact that hey this New York combat company here. This year was raised to seventeen next year. It'll be raised again this October. So that's an example of where you don't need a law degree if you're a concerned citizen you want our criminal justice system to be there you can put pressure on the people who are in power for things like raise the age and things like discovery reform things like cash bail reform. Where whether or not you have? Money determines whether the writers island are at liberty and obviously all the ills that come with being rikers island. So this is a great moment not just in New York but nationally for those all of us who are starting to see this criminal justice reform work payoff but we need to seize on that and we need to keep pressing on that so I kind kind of divide my time evenly between that kind of stuff and then just also. It's a public defender office. Here's five people who need help. And how can we help. And what about on the writing side. What do you have on tap at the moment? If you use an expansive enough definition of the word work. I'm working on a book now. I know that feeling. I'm writing a brief now owns. Yeah well and I've written briefs and it's the strangest thing ninety percent of briefs Garrett and last week I don't know what it is is. The briefs have deadlines which is Nice. I try to create artificial deadlines for myself in Novel Rainbow. It doesn't work because I know you can't shake check yourself. Thank you very much for that conversation but I want to open it up. I think you've touched on so many fascinating things. I'm sure these folks have much better questions than I have so so I want to open it up to the audience high. I wouldn't say this is better question than yours Things like that but a question. How do your clients approach you differently when the note of your writers will? I've had a couple of weird stories about that I don't know what the Internet access as rikers island. But there must be some kind kind of it because it'll be kinda thing we're all meet a client and they'll be like e jerk you are the worse and then I'll come back the next time on the bill. Thank you for taking my case as if I had any choice. I didn't just. I was just coincidence. But clearly they've done a little of the website. I've been hearing a lot about Google. They've done more on that. I think they're just happy that they think that somehow able to parlay that really mild notoriety to their benefit. Unfortunately probably not true but anything that had makes you feel good about me being your lawyer. I'm willing to run with even if it's not based on the greatest empirical evidence around with it because and this is what I say to our new lawyers. It's like I had this conversation with someone recently whereas if you take the approach like I'm a lawyer all I care about is a statute. I'm here to tell you what you're facing you take that and new resist in any way any kind of personal connection with your client. You're not GonNa last at this job. You're not clients. Pick up on that. They can tell if you don't care about them at all as human beings so that connection that empathy is one of the things we stress at our office right from day. One do the empathy do the connection. I can guide you on what the statute is. I can guy join how to do this job. I can't do that part for you. Connect so to the extent that it sometimes house. It's good though. My first book had this weird life as a self published book. That's old like one Andrea copies that people knew about but nobody really know until one day one of my clients said. Hey you know I have your book. And he pulls out this Bradey self-published book that he said his brother had given him and his brother had given him the book and he was looking at it and he was about halfway through and he says the the author Tom it sounds familiar and he realized that I was actually representing him. I'm on a case at the same time and luckily we've got a good result on that so that was a weird thing right because it's not like a lot of books. Let's be honest here. So this guy bought like a third hand copy at thrift store and only about halfway through he was like. Oh this is actually my lawyer. There's a lot of joking in these books so I always always GonNa like recoil being represented by a clown. Because there's a lot of comedy and like you pointed out screwball type stuff but again it's usually to my benefit the other question I Do you believe that a young conscientious attorney who works at the. Da can have an impact in changing the culture of incarceration and prosecution and and if not what role do you think. That person can play if any well. I don't think a young long. Da can have much of an impact because it's a very at least in Manhattan which is the DA's office. I deal with so very regimented. Work Environment where everything has to be approved by supervisor. Everything it has to be vetted before they're allowed to exercise much discretion it's about prosecutorial discretion which I think among the many things that reformers have been able to cast ask the light on an including I think even John Oliver Chalon just how much control prosecutors have over how cases and so the the short answer is yes us. Prosecutors judges are in a position to make a big difference. Maybe in a bigger difference than we are but it still doesn't tempt me to want to do it because it's fundamentally flawed work because it doesn't partake enough of that generosity Rossi. I'm talking about not to say they're all bad guy and bad gals. I have friends in that office. I get along with them fine. That's not what I'm saying. I'm saying that what something is at. Its core will ultimately affect even a at a higher level of complexity so at the end of the day. You're still taking the approach that the solution at least too often. The solution in your mind is the locking of a human being in a cage age. And I'm not here to say that that may never be an appropriate remedy. I'm just saying that it's become too much of a default remedy in our society and in our system them but eight to be optimistic. I do I do think that there has been probably the last three or four years. There has been some progress made on that level of making them understand. Hey this case that you and I share. Meaning you're the DA on the defense attorney. This case is is actually a symptom of mass incarceration. And that's a conversation you can have today especially on drug case or that. You can have today that you couldn't wouldn't have eight years ago. So that's been a positive development but I've practiced in New York and I'm sure there are other parts of the country. I haven't seen no difference but here in New York. We have seen the difference in other question there. I was just wondering if you support the movement to close rakers and if so what do you think it would take to achieve that goal. rikers is a pretty vile play. So I certainly won't argue against closing it. The reason we support close rikers is not because we want to close close a particular facility. The reason we support that campaign is because in order to close rikers you would have to substantially decrease the number of people that you incarcerate. So when I started doing this job rikers routinely fifteen thousand people fifteen thousand people then. It became an average of twelve thousand five hundred and now I'm at the meetings. Where or the mayor's office is touting the fact that there's like around eight now let them tout their things? I the bottom line is that seven thousand fewer the people that are incarcerated than were at the height of late nineties and early two thousands so the re is not so much about this physical location which is believe me. I've been there many times you. You don't want to go there in any way. But it's about in order to do that you would have to substantially change the way you view. Things like pretrial detention member rikers island is a jail not a prison. What does that mean that? Means people awaiting trial who can't afford their bail or sentence on very minor things misdemeanors because because if you get sentenced on a felony you're probably going to stay prison so something like eighty percent of the people at rikers island historically have been. They're absent any kind of determination of of guilt there there while the system presumes them innocent as our system does which is again one of the beautiful things I pointed out earlier presumption of innocence. Beautiful thing it doesn't mean much of you're sitting at rikers island. 'cause you can't pay a thousand dollars bail perfect example of what. I'm talking about where we have these lofty ideals and on paper. We should be proud of them because they're not there in every country but then the reality comes in. And it's mostly indigent people color sitting rikers island in the absence of any determination of guilt pre-trial so yes close it but I mean if they closed it and opened another jail and put ten thousand people and I wouldn't feel so great. It's because what. I know that they would have to do to do that. Time for one more question. Thank you so much for speaking with us this evening. It's really fascinating. You actually just led right into the question. I had which was about idealism and realism. And I'm curious. You seem to be a student of human nature. And I'm curious if on a scale idealism to realism scale has your experience with the people that you have dealt with in the system or the people that you've dealt with his clients had more to do with your ability to remain somewhat idealistic. Because I think you have to be an idealist idealist somewhat to be a public defender. That may be a faulty assumption. But if you've been able to hold onto that and continue to believe that there's a possible possible good. Outcome has been more because of the individuals you've dealt with your clients or because of the system. I think could that you're driving to Maine spheres of things that you can be idealistic about. I can be idealistic about what humanity is what people are and then maybe by doing this job about would meet enough people who have done wrong things that somehow get stripped away or I could also be idealistic about. Let's say American criminal justice market. Say Wow things like proof beyond a reasonable doubt presumption option of innocence. These are beautiful concepts to some right to counsel and due process. This is beautiful and then I would go to work and then I would see how the actual sausage made and moved at idealism. I I don't think I've lost either idealism but I think the one that has stayed strongest is my belief that the average person will do some really bad things. But in many instances. There's a core there that is highly attractive and redeemable beautiful. But it's been perverted like the way if you had a plant and brought it into your house and you never gave a water it would brown and die and then you would look plan and say that's an ugly plant. Get it out of my house. You didn't give it water. And that's how I feel about a lot of the souls that I encounter in my work as a public defender is really critical moment of their life. They were just left there. They weren't given water. And if you want to the water might be love might be something like support or might be something like any kind of warmth. I knew people who have had just really difficult upbringings and I know what their upbringings are. Not The moment I meet them but once my social worker gets to work with them and put together a report and I start hearing these facts and then suddenly somebody who's done something admittedly horrible and vile. I have a hard time judging them because that I have not gone through what they've gone through and that's what the job is taught me more than anything and I think I translate that to just my everyday life. You don't have to be my client for me to give you the benefit of the doubt as a person it doesn't mean I like everybody I mean I don't but it does mean that that's a philosophy that carries me through. I believe the primacy of generous love I believe in that and nothing in twenty years. Doing this has hurt that not the criminal justice system data probably more cynical about. I know that the judge knows what these principles are. But I know that they're also into expediency and they're into punishment and they don't believe in it as much as I would like them to. I think that's a great note to end this conversation and I want to give you a round of applause for sharing your amazing ideas with us and also thank you for coming out on this Thursday night. Thank you very much you so much thanks. Thanks very much for listening. We hope you enjoyed this conversation. Special thanks to the Brooklyn Public Library and all of their staff for having us. We really value the partnership with the library and look forward to more live tapings of the podcast in the future. If you like this episode be sure to subscribe that Liberty Wherever you get your podcasts and rate and review the show we appreciate the feedback till next week piece.

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Getting Rid of Mosquitoes (w/ Timothy Winegard), the Sargasso Sea, and Leonid Rogozov

Curiosity Daily

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Getting Rid of Mosquitoes (w/ Timothy Winegard), the Sargasso Sea, and Leonid Rogozov

"<music> hi. We're here from curiosity dot com to help. You get smarter in just a few minutes. I'm cody gov and i'm ashley hamer today. You learn about how we might get rid of mosquitos in the future. You're with author. Tim wind guard then you learn about the one c on earth with no coastline and the story of a russian surgeon who removed his own appendix with satisfy some curiosity early. What should we do about mosquitos. Today's guest has some ideas. Dr tim wind guard is a professor of history and political science at colorado mesa university and the author of the new book the mosquito human history of our deadliest predator yesterday. You heard him talk about some of the ways. Mosquitoes had a major impact on human history. So why did it take us so long to actually do something about them. It's been only really really the last little more than one hundred years have unmasked the culprit. That is the mosquito so you know the late eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds depending on the disease vector from larry to yellow fever we figure out that it is mosquito and then we can start our counter attacks against the mosquito and those diseases if you will so really where we had a breakthrough is with d._d._t. D._d._t. d._t. Obviously it has some severe environmental ramifications on other animals including the health of humans but if we look at d._d._t. He specifically as a mosquito killer it was a miraculous mosquito killer and the rates of mosquito borne disease with the use of d._d._t. Decreased dramatically romatically in the late nineteen forties nineteen fifties. The problem is is that obviously rachel carson with her making sixty two books. I haven't spring <hes> eh made available the ramifications of d._d. Joni mitchell saying about the birds and the bees and spots on gimme spots on my apples <hes> believe me the birds the bees and their song big yellow taxi but what happened even before that is the mosquito had adapted to become immune to d._t. So before rachel rachel carson published her book there are already d._t. Resistant mosquitoes around the world so she so adaptable as our malaria. The malaria parasite is very adaptable and it's a remarkable creature that it's very hard and we haven't been successful in essentially tackling either the mosquito or the diseases because obviously they still exist and they still kill but there is some hope on the horizon with crisper gene editing technology. Yeah we all know the power and potential of crisper so we had to ask. Do we even need mosquitoes or should we try to make them go completely extinct well. I don't think the the idea i keep in mind that of the thirty five hundred or so mosquito species not all of them vector diseases the vast majority don't so i don't think the goal is to extinct mosquito. I don't think anybody would say we wanna wipe the mosquito off the face of years i think with you know i find the crisper technology absolutely fascinating that we can intrude on natural selection and start tampering with the d._n._a. Of of of any animal on the planet at our at our will to replace a section of d._n._a. With another desired section of dna genome that the goal is a two crisper mosquitoes essentially to make them harmless by making them incapable of actually veteran these diseases so you'd bring down the disease aziz but not necessarily the mosquito species itself <hes> to use the star wars were nacuer. I think there's a balance to the force and if we start artificially intruding on that balance we don't really know what the repercussions might be again. Dr tim wind guards. New book is the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator and you can find links thanks to that and more from him in today's show notes there is one see on earth with no coastline sounds like the beginning of a riddle so what's the answer and idiosyncratic. C._e._o.'s synchronicity hope you really proud of that. One is it was good. I'm really proud of that. One so the sargasso sea is in the north atlantic ocean roughly a thousand miles east of florida just southeast of bermuda and it's not defined by lands around it but instead by four ocean currents the gulf stream the north atlantic current the canary current and the north atlantic equatorial current these currents flow in a clockwise elliptical loop within the atlantic ocean and defined the constantly changing borders of the sargasso sea and if you're wondering what could possibly be interesting about an expanse of water surrounded by other water you'd be surprised the sargasso sea takes up two thirds of the atlantic ocean it gets its name from a genus of seaweed called sarcasm which which is a free floating brown algae that reproduces vegetative lee on the water's surface the sargasso gets pushed around by the current and the wind and it functions as a migrating habitat pat for an impressive variety of marine life. It's a nursery for turtle hatchlings and a spawning ground for endangered emails every year larger species like humpback wales sharks and birds make their migrations through the sargasso sea and they rely on a travelling seaweed for the easy prey that live within it at one point in time the sargasso assoc- was nicknamed the horse latitudes because it had a reputation for stranding sailors for weeks on end who would then throw their horses overboard to lighten the load these he's early explorers were afraid of getting tangled up in the thick sarcasm but it's actually the seas characteristically calm waters and wins the left sailors sitting around for so long there wasn't enough wind or current to push them around so fear not go ahead and hit your free ride through this fascinating see with no boundaries. Today's episode is sponsored. Advice skill share an online learning community for creators sculpture offers more than twenty five thousand classes in design business and more to help you find new ways to fuel your curiosity positi creativity and career you can take classes in everything from photography and creative writing to design productivity and more. I can tell you a secret. You might see qodian me start doing some video stuff again sometime soon. Code is an old hand at being on camera but i'm still trying to learn how to act natural when that lenses in my face stop. It's true so that's why i was super excited to try out the skill share class camera confidence mini course be better on camera. It's taught by a real television professional who knows what he's talking thing about and all classes are taught by real experts in their field or public motivational speakers. You can join the millions of students already learning on skill share today with a special offer offer just for curiosity daily listeners get two months of skill share for free. That's right skill shares offering curiosity daily listeners two months of unlimited access to over twenty five thousand classes for free to sign up go to school show dot com slash curiosity again go to skill share dot com slash curiosity to start your two months now one more time that scale share dot com slash curiosity. Have you ever wondered if a doctor could operate on himself today. We're wrapping up with the incredible true story of a surgeon who did just that and well. It has a happy ending fair warning that this is a story about surgery so it's probably not for you if you've got a weak stomach in the early nineteen sixties a russian surgeon on ant aunt arctic station realized he was facing a life or death situation he was experiencing signs of acute appendicitis and as the only doctor on the isolated station and he knew he was the only person who could perform the surgery he desperately needed and to make matters worse he had to get approval from moscow before attempting the surgery because botching it would make the soviet expedition look bad during the cold war yeah leonid rogov had to worry about politics on top of the fact that he was facing the prospect of literally opening his own abdomen to take his intestines out and at the time he didn't even know if that was humanly possible symbol but like i said this story has a happy ending roka's off assigned different tasks to his colleagues they handed him instruments held up a mirror and made sure sure nobody else fainted. Probably the hardest part of the job. He was very systematic. Ends prepared for all potential outcomes rogoff even administered his own in local anesthetic and performed the entire two hour surgery without losing consciousness when he found the appendix had a dark stain on its base meaning that if it had been left for just a day longer it would have burst according to the bbc rogoff returns to russia a hero and his unfortunate in a medical issue became fodder for soviet propaganda. Roka's office awarded the order of the red banner of labor and was even compared to the first man in space. Yuri geren operate on oneself versus head out to space propaganda aside in our books. He deserved the award. I'm not gonna lie. I feel like what he did is even more impressive than going into space new disrespect to space explorers but i mean can you imagine well. I can't imagine taking someone else's appendix out either so so unreal before we recap what we learned today. Here's a sneak peek at where you can catch this weekend on curiosity dot com this weekend you'll learn about four of the world's weirdest weather phenomena ah how lying makes it harder to read the emotions of others what the milky way looked like thirteen million years ago and more okay so now. Let's recap what we learned today today. We learned that d._d._t. Was humanities first major blow against mosquitoes but now we may have to turn to crisper to deal with them and at the sargasso sea has no coastline and russian surgeon removed his own appendix in the nineteen sixties successfully. I can't get over that yeah. The successfully part is really impressive. Join us again sunday. Learn something new in just a few minutes and have a great weekend uncoded golf and i'm ashley hamer. Stay curious on the westwood one podcast network.

sargasso sea rachel rachel carson ashley hamer Dr tim roka malaria Joni mitchell cody gov colorado mesa university westwood one north atlantic fever professor of history ant aunt arctic station C._e._o. russia moscow Yuri geren bbc rogoff