24 Burst results for "Jonathan Van Ness"

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:12 min | Last month

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And I think that's really important. You said earlier at the beginning of the answer that you're not sure it's teachable, it may be something innate in you. But are there practices that you rely on to keep hope alive to use a little bit of a cliche there? It's joy. It's really hard to be hopeful if you don't connect to your joy. And I think that even when I wasn't in a place of recovery or even when I wasn't in a place of necessarily labeling it as a time of healing, I've always been like very inclined to find something that makes me happy. Like whether it was yoga or like collecting rocks as a kid or becoming obsessed with figure skating as a kid. I've always had a part of me that wanted to be oriented to finding joy because I always knew that if I like found joy, like get me away from like an unsatisfactory experience that I was like in the middle of and I've learned that from a really young age because I was very rejected as a young kid. I was very bullied. I was going through sexual abuse. I was like going through a lot of rejection everywhere I turned around so I kind of had to create a world of joy and hope that I could like connect to. If you don't know where your hope is and you're like in the throes of your darkness or your whatever you're going through, I think orienting yourself to like do something that will bring you joy. Even if you don't end up experiencing joy, but even just like building upon the act of seeking out the joy, even if you don't get it, I think that is how you can cultivate that pathway to joy in your brain by embarking on it in the first place. That does seem like a practice anybody can do no matter how much the situation in your life sucks. Knowing that the capacity for joy happiness, pleasure is still there and trying to exercise that muscle sounds like a way out of some pretty dark holes, potentially, much more with Jonathan van Ness right after this. Hey, it's David Brown host of wonders hit podcast business wars. You know, small businesses are ready to thrive again, and they're looking for resources to rise to the challenge. That's why Dell Technologies has assembled an all star lineup of podcasters for the third year in a row to create a virtual conference to share advice and inspiration for small businesses..

Jonathan van Ness David Brown Dell Technologies
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:31 min | Last month

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Okay, kids, we've got a wild one for you today. Buckle up this episode is hilarious candid, profane, meaningful, pretty much everything I like in life. Jonathan van Ness is perhaps best known as one of the stars of queer eye on Netflix, which is a great show, and he's great in it. Jonathan, or JVM, is a hairstylist by trade. It also a comedian podcaster and writer, Kevin is just out with a second book called love that story, a follow-up to the bestseller called over the top in which JVM went to public on some extremely private issues, including being HIV plus, surviving sexual abuse and recovering from drug addiction. In this very wide ranging conversation we talk about shame, body, dysmorphism, trauma, Jonathan's complex and contradictory feelings about shopping and we spend quite a bit of time on the subject of hope. Hope is kind of a tricky topic for me because it's often discussed in rather Gauzy and insubstantial terms, but JVM talks about it in a really raw and fascinating and practical way. I should say hope is actually the theme of this week. We're going to be following up on Wednesday with a researcher who has studied hope and has science based suggestions for cultivating hope as a mental skill. This is week two of our mental health reboot series that we've launched to Mark mental health awareness month every week we're pairing a mental health memoirist with a scientist. We've done sleep this week it's hope and we've got episodes coming up on loss slash grief and also on trauma or how to live with some of the worst stuff that's ever happened to you. So there are like 40 trigger warnings I need to issue before we dive in here. If you don't like swear words, you're gonna struggle with this episode if you don't like left leaning politics, beware. If you don't think grieving over the loss of a cat counts as real grief, might want to cover your ears. If you struggle with sexually explicit conversation, heads up on that and on a much more serious note, this interview also includes very Frank discussions of sexual abuse substance abuse and body dysmorphia as mentioned earlier. If you want to cleaned up version of this episode with the swear words bleeped, you can check it out on our website or on the 10% happier app. One last little bit of context here, you're going to hear Jonathan reference parts therapy or IFS or internal family systems that's a flavor of therapy where the therapist gets the patient to identify different aspects or parts of their personality and work with those different inner characters. We've got a whole episode with the founder of IFS that we posted a few months ago. We'll post a link to that in the show notes if you want to learn more..

Jonathan van Ness Jonathan Netflix HIV Kevin trauma Mark Frank
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:35 min | 9 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"L. e. Yes you better hit with that french name. Yes and i love tasha and they have really good creams. we interviewed. they're bound to us. Yes he signed. So have you ever used the foaming cleanser like powder cleanser that. Then you put a little bit of water in and it's like it's like their rice polishing cleanser so dehydrated like thick powder and yeah. I'm obsessed with it. I feel like you would interrupt you. I freaked out. Because i just feel. So what else do have you ever use their oil absorbing pads on the you've ever been early day in your life really like you ever delete. I love their like their absorb oil hats because they don't mess up your makeup. I've only ever used their cream. And the spray and dewey spray is really nice purple bottle. Yeah you hey. I love that story okay. Non to be one of those people that's like in my book but in my book a lot about this idea of like a lot of joyful especially like childhood memories and like adolescent memories becoming a time where like they also live next system like really big grieving moments moments. Were really hard for me. And i talk a lot about this idea that like sometimes the proximity of something. That's been difficult next. Studies really joy is like does it invalidate the joy. But it makes me have this voice. That's like deals some kind of way about experiencing my joy but it's like these hard times do not easy how and i just. Yeah so does. That's just like my thing is. They're just an e moments of like just joy or like victory that you thought. Stand out for you. Yes i mean. I always think of. I think of times in my career where i've felt very accomplished. That's always something that. I look forward to looking back on. But i think the moments where i have found complete joy and serenity like on my own outside of the industry whether it's on vacation with my best friends or it's watching tv with my family It's those simple moments that keep me happy and keep me saying to be honest because this life is so it's so full on in this industry and when i'm able to take outside of it and look at my life for what it is you know just me I realized that. I'm enough and that I'm perfectly you know A perfectly got on my own emergency of this idea of like just being present and being like feeling accepting of that idea that we're right we're we're meant to be. Yeah absolutely and that's how i feel. I feel like. I'm exactly where i i am supposed to be. You know i've been. I've gone for so much. But i also enable to look at my life and and think why i've had a lot of joy in it to hey rick carpenter like five like it's a really really fine when he was doing hair fulltime even more fun because then i could just like go do the hair and then like do their touch and then i could go home afterwards also aggressively like talk about myself like all the projects that i've been like and it's like and also i feel like maybe it's because i've never actually won an emmy in all the towns already been nominated i lost and i'm like you're hungry and you're just like really trying to eat some pizza. The pizza is just like takes our your life. I thought this was going to be. And is there anything that like. We as super fans would think is like really fucking fine but in reality like there is maybe not as fun and less that makes us down ungrateful because they don't mean a done agreeable career. They love them. Go away but indeed is those carpets ideas to it yet. I think the most common misconception about like the industry as thinking that award shows are like the funniest coolest thing then. they're fine. don't get me wrong. Most of the time you're at heels. That really hurt your in an outfit. That doesn't feel that comfortable places. You never knew you can sweat before sweating and places you didn't know could sway. You have tape and places that you didn't need taping you. It is just like it's uncomfortable and the hold. Every time i go to an award show. All i can think about is getting home to my dogs and my sweatpants and whatever food i wanna eat. Dogs i love. My dogs are so much better than any after party. I go to. How many babies do you have your name. I thought yes. I have batman and cinderella. All my older they batman is six and cinderella is for those earth. Such great ages flirty thriving. I'm obsessed with that Yeah i love puppies. Do wait when you lake travel and stuff. Do they calm or do they stressed out by now. I bring them as as often as i can. If it's like a quick trip. I don't really take them. I'd leave them with my mom or you know the dog center. Who else wants to watch them. But i yeah. I i don't know if it's like a longer trip like tour. I definitely bring them along. Okay every question ought to work this one time not to namedrop. I'm like a love chelsea. Ballerini who doesn't back and this one time. When i was shooting clear is she came to this concert. This place right next door where you're living and then i was like clean. I love you so much her and like come over here and then that was the first ever been in linked of fears ass tour bus because like it's been like a comedian tour bus. Even my rescuer might not because it was everything but honey musician tour. They're cute you. What's your favorite thing about like. Your favorite is to her budget. You ever been on. I think one time. I i had dolly parton tour bus over in europe and she had like a chandelier and a bathroom. Like an ab- an over a battle tab that like you had to go through the bathroom to get to the back right. It's making me cry and literally. Only degree waiver dolly parton. I'm going to have nervous breakdown. It's this is not about you. Let them talk. Your i literally have. I.

rick carpenter tasha Ballerini dolly parton europe
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:24 min | 10 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Amounts of or a certain rose or just standard at all. The mice or sandalwood trees are gone for the next. You know more than a decade just because we've depleted all the natural resources so that's in santa what is often used in. Skincare haircare like a standard hairspray. I used to like be obsessed with seeing the wooden it so synthetic means what Synthetic means you've you've been made it's something that's been made. I love that. Yeah so and it's really interesting. Because i feel like it always sometimes can have a little bit of a negative association but if you think about skin care or haircare we're not pulling stuff out of the ground to put it into products always require some kind of a process to make it suitable for skin hair so there's certain processes in both their what testing look like over the last. Gosh overly i keep kicking the thing under the table. Y'all don't worry but we've formulated like we've changed lots of formulas in our products. We've teams like consistencies sense. Like what's like scientific aspect of testing look like so once we signed off all the formulas we when we'd worked on that together we want. We usually send it out to a third party testing lab where we're doing a mix of analytical testing as well as consumer preference because we obviously won't real people using everything but the analytical testing is really critical so for some of the tests like in the nurture moisture station collection. We're focusing a lot on Almost treating hair just to really extreme conditions to make sure that it holds up like you'll put high heat to make sure some of the products are heat protective. You can shine. Uv on it to see how color safe products are you can do. Tensile strength test to see how stretchy hair is. So there's cool test points for all of these. There's one where you subject to four hundred fifty degrees to make sure that the product protects hair. So that's what we're doing for the instant recovery theorem. Love says that story really curious about how you came into this career. And i think there's a lot of young people who are listening to this or maybe not young people just people listening to this. Who would be really. Maybe they could chase it down till so how. Tell me about when you started creating formulas products. So i going back. I studied molecular biology. And chemistry and i stumbled across just product. Cosmetic chemistry formulations as career path was kind of like looking at what i can do that blends creativity with curiosity with with science and this just seemed like the perfect space to be in one of the First rules that. I did out of out of university was Working as a formulation chemist For a bunch of brands. I wrote thousands of formulas for hundreds of brands and spent quite a bit of time along that i made every single type of product. You can think of And it was really fun and it was just very interesting. I got i got a good. I'm a really good exposure to ingredients understanding how they work understanding how to make product and after spending some time to that i learned about bio. San's i was very familiar with the story behind. Bioscience and i was introduced to the company like twenty-seven questions orani can help you used molecular biology and chemistry and university so molecular biologist. You would have had to learn about like like isn't that kind of like humans dove to molecular biology. Yeah to learn about like the sound regulation that the cells. You're also the person who told me that. Our skin isn't the biggest oregon. It's the it's the other thing the other new oregon that they just discovered two years ago. The white connective tissue. And they're like like he wanted to dismiss but then there's like a geographical term. Whatever you studying molecular biology and chemistry and canal. What are the what did even. How do you study that in college. Because i think that's i don't even understand what that is well. I wanted to do something in the life. Sciences there's some kind of hard sciences because there are so many different career paths you can do. You can go into Something that's more. Primary research focus so all the stuff that goes on behind the scenes before you discover something or you can go into industry and what i wanted to do is be some sort of industry kind of taking what i had. I wanted to do something that create something. He love that story so now. Tell me so you come out of school you start working for this company work. You make the hundreds of products under the formulas and then you hear about bio san's So what are you doing. You're walking on the street in san francisco and then what happens so what happened. Was i learned about bio before biosciences even around and it was really interesting because i knew about scaling i used to use scaling as the formulator. It was just to go to for so many ingredients and there was this company that made a brand around it. Around their own sugarcane derived scaling which was really unique at the time because there weren't a whole lot of sources for you know the shark liver Story so what our parent company amorous was doing was just so innovative and unique and at the time they just launched the bio san's line and it was so small it was so new and it needs to be built out and then all of a sudden i found myself here. So as a literal product formulator slash come ask. Are there any things that you see in products. And you're just like i can't. I don't use that like wants us like for me. I like when i see sodium sulfate. I'm just like i don't want to the night here. Squeaky clean dry feel cranky. What's what are the things that you just like don't bucks with skincare haircare. Both people wanna know okay in hair care. I thought it wasn't a big deal to you. Silicones or not. But once i stopped using it i actually noticed a really big difference in my curl pattern forming again and it might be different. It works for some people doesn't work for everyone. But i actually found a big difference in a friend of mine once. Told me that if you still. Your hair collects dust which i thought was thinking. I don't know how science is. But i noticed the difference. So once i started switching to things them like lighter and molins and even just formulating hemi sailing. I noticed a big difference. I've noticed in my hair. Not that i'm like trying to catch a hardcore ad. Sales pitch for my own hair carolina. Talking their lead formula or leave. Formulator and chemists will say i fully care tuning Treating my hair they to carrying treatments coming here like every like i did like every six weeks for maybe like a year. Approximately twenty thirteen in the switch to like.

orani new oregon oregon San skincare haircare san francisco carolina
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Come. Do you feel do know about all that you do know about that stuff. Yeah sure is it all talk about yes. It's just ancient episodes or so fascinating. You never do it and an hour's time because there's just so much to cover but we do have a little bit more time than we can do that. But i just have this one more question with this. 'cause there's there's sculpture there's like you know kind of art in caves. There's also higher. Which in itself is kind of in art. It's picture but you hated me answer. It's like we can't impart like western understandings of it. So but there's artists and was like was a common artists and then also like royal artists was a different styles and obviously there was. There was different eras. I think you know what i love about. Studying mesoamerican art and art of the americas. In general before european colonization is that we see a totally different history of art and there are these new. You can't use terms like naturalism and realism. And you know they don't. It doesn't fit and what i love about. You know. Some people talk about the invention of abstraction and it's like no. We've got abstracts in the second millennium bc in olmec civilization. What i love about is the artists are clearly making choices. They're not choosing to faithfully represent. Say a jaguar or a puma their stylized. It in a way that's meaningful to them and that's these these these distinct choices that artists were making in. It's not that they didn't know how to natural mystically skull jaguar if that that wasn't meaningful to them so how do how do we get it those other questions. Why are they making these choices. So i'll i'll go back to them. The maya kingdoms again because that's again where we have. The most information and in that context is the only time we see artists signing their work. So we actually have named artists from classic maya monuments and painted throwbacks. So we know we know there are a little bit more than one hundred named sculptors and what's clear. Is that from certain sites. They worked at an telly type structure where there was actually a someone in charge. There was like a head sculptor and you have several other people working on the same monument. So you could. If you see a large standing money you can think of it as there were maybe like four or five different hands and you wonder like with this. The guy that was assigned to do phase this because he was really good at face is or was this. The person that did all the lifts all the hieroglyphs because they just were the scrabble you know artistic license to do the little phases and do the dates so they worked together on these monuments and even with the painted pottery because for example. Drinking cups like classic. Maya canvases were drinking cups. So you look at these beautiful stomachs and you see. That's where the painters are going to town with different supernatural narratives or porches the rulers or just tax. So you think about the and then. They signed their work. And it's about the the the it's not necessarily like just their name and there's a little bit of a title that refers to knowledge. It's about these are the keepers of knowledge and these are the recorders of knowledge in history. So back to your question that were there artists absolutely but did they have again like multiple roles in their communities. Maybe they were artists and healers. Maybe they were artists and stone carvers. They worked on more architectural features. So we don't know if there were sort of like renaissance type artists and patrons but we do know that they were clearly very important to these royal courts and they were valued for their talent and some in some contexts. They were actually able to to claim that he had by signing the work. So i mean. I have learned so much teams. I usually what i would do at this point in the podcast is i would give you like a yogi recess to like tell us like you just be remissed like to not mention over the last hour in ten minutes but i think you accidentally just got yourself booked on like second episode getting curious because there's so much more we have to go through and i think at that time i offer you a yogi recess unless there's something really genius that people should be reading about or doing the foreign comeback to really like get their mesoamerican knowledge wine before you come back. Yeah i would just say that. There are a lot of great popular tax about the history of places like mexico. And the maya kingdom. So you know your your listeners. Should be excited to go out and read that and i think in a post cove reality i would say. Get yourself to mexico. City go to the national museum. Go to con- goto guatemala and cd call and these places because there's a sense of all that's difficult to convey in conversation or just images it's when you're standing on top of one of the pyramids con- you just feel that this is such an important place. And there are such rich stories waiting to be uncovered that that's the. That's the exciting thing about working in archaeology. Right and thinking about what. What more can we learn about the human experience from these different places different people's at different times so there's a lot to talk about james zoya. We're having you back. I need to hear more about like literal archaeology. Like more of like look actually happens to hear all about the art eras in the phases of the mesoamerican art. James on to your time and coming on getting curious you thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Great to me and i look forward to our around to yes. Hey you've been listening to getting curious with me. Jonathan van ness my guest. This week was james doyle. A curator at the metropolitan museum of our. You'll find links to his work episode description of whatever you're listening to the show on our theme. Music is briefed by clan. Thank you so much for letting us use it. If you enjoyed our show. Please introduce a friend and show them how to subscribe. We do appreciate it. You can follow us an instagram and twitter at curious. Which are socials. Are running curated by emily bostick and what. We're doing there honey. As we are following all of our guests were following up on their new work their new projects. Also keeping you up to date on other news stories. we're watching. I mean really just giving you some behind the scenes of getting curious we love you so much appreciate your our editor is andrew carson and our transcriptionist is a leader shop. Getting curious produced by me. Erica gatto an emily boesak..

americas mexico james zoya national museum Jonathan van ness james doyle guatemala metropolitan museum of our emily bostick James twitter andrew carson Erica gatto emily boesak
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:06 min | 11 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"States around one eighty. And so they're not. There's not really one place that becomes the dominant sort of cool place. Do you wanna live And similarly in the maya region which is today's sort of saw the most other parts of mexico and guatemala. We have royal courts coalescing around these dynasties. I mean it's very very game of thrones because these these are people claiming divine connections and they are claiming parts of the landscape and claiming sort of subjects really and they are building up. These narratives of why you should believe what they say right. And then we see different ways. That people were coming together in america. And that's what i love about. It is thinking about. There's not one way to look at societies in the americas because there's there's always such a diversity and You think about. Maya kings and queens. They would have perhaps compare themselves to somebody in oaxaca but if they look over at uconn and it was more of perhaps it was more of a collective form of governance. You have a council of important families so there really is kind of these stories. We can tease out from the archaeological evidence that tell us different things about how people behaved right and how what what. Their hopes and dreams were as far as taking over things. You're really sticking out there claims of the landscape right so cantabile khan and then and then what spare crews so the gulf coast of mexico. There is a again a great diversity of societies there. That sort of didn't really fit into these models that we know and so We have similar traits like the ball game and things going on but we also see. They're developing their own art styles. They're developing their own architecture that is royal and dynastic but in different ways that we see in other places so that's the bare area and then my more south south of mexico like believes guatemala intense. You kind is right outside of mexico city right now. Okay and then really were all doing different things simultaneously in different areas. And at this time get wine blake. Isn't that there's other stuff going on all over which is kind of what you just said. But this is all kinds of existing and a bubble for this time because it's not dealing with like outside influences which is really cool but like is going on in europe right. Yeah you have like rome you have han-dynasty you have ptolemaic egypt. And at the same time you have a similar diversity of societies that have developed in the bubble as you said in isolation i do we call their written language hieroglyphics or do they have like a cute like mesoamerican specific name for their written language. Well we we call them hieroglyphics and that basically means that you're using pictures words and so that's kind of a larger term. We have different writing systems but they are united in the numbers that i mentioned before so people across counted dates in the same way back is so cool. I guess i always thought that hieroglyphics was something egyptologists. Coin but really. It's like i was wrong. It really just means using pictures for words fascinating. So can you tell me a little bit more. About like the game of thrones e people going on around one and then like like who came out on top like who is like you know two hundred light thought off suckers like we wind and no one even knows who you are anymore because we took the crown. Leo you're messo america's next top royal family. It's a great question and really. There's this long history of interaction between different competing groups that for example so among the maya kingdoms. That's where we have the most information. Because we have the most taxed we have the most hieroglyphic record right and it. You can think about it in a way that a little bit of propaganda right you have here i am. I'm this Queen I actually know her. Never watt lady. Walked sean how we can read her name. So here. i am commissioning. A sculpture of myself standing on top of a captive from one of my rival kingdoms. That i've already defeated and i'm telling you about that in the tax. We have that type of drama. Going on in the maya kingdoms themselves so you have marriage alliances. You have warfare. You have diplomatic visits. You have all the things that we think of in these dynastic really monarchs i mean. That's that's what they're claiming they're claiming divine status. And then so. We think about the interaction within the maya kingdoms. That's one thing but then for example to many miles away with such an important city. That there's a maya neighborhood. There's a veracruz cruz neighborhood icon. So it is really like the manhattan of it's time drawing people from all over mesoamerica because they want to be a part of that and so then you have well at some point. It looks like the people to to akon and actually this is a very specific year. Three seventy eight. Eighty common era seems that people from tier to akon march into the my area which they're recording their monuments. This guy arrived in this day and they they are having effect on the politics they replaced a king at a place called t. Call guatemala so somebody from con comes. Dan and basically axes the king as he call and puts a new person on the throne. So it's it's really we have this great history. We don't really know the new archaeology going on all the time in these areas to try and get more of that story because we sometimes we only have the texts and what they record so it's important to back it up with some of the physical evidence from our looking at you know are there is evidence that people for example used brought their own pottery with them or if they're they're making their own pottery in the way of the local people so teasing out. These stories of conflict and migration and interaction are one of the big priorities of archaeology. Mesoamerica these days. So the the most major light clean and time in the maya region like she would necessarily be like running teotihuacan shoot.

Maya kings guatemala mexico cantabile khan oaxaca uconn americas america queens gulf coast watt lady mexico city blake rome egypt europe Leo sean Dan
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:36 min | 11 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Type of person that would do well in the middle of nowhere without wifi without my hair. Straighten are like this would not mean great setup for me so i decided that maybe dogs would be right up my alley and that being said i always joke that I ended up having to move to australia dogs for my phd because there were no dogs in the us which goes to show you that sometimes your opportunities will take you halfway across the world. That's fun okay. So then i two more questions. So how understanding of dog behavior evolved over time. We've talked about that a little bit but is there any like overall overall arching things that like if you haven't checked in with dog behavior conditions and flight what do we know now that maybe we didn't know before yes so actually. This field is super new. So in comparison to a lot of other fields don cognition has only really been around for the last twenty twenty ish years so it kind of feels like we've done a lot but at the same point in time we have so much more to explore so i would say that if you you know you checked in dog. Cognition like two thousand and two thousand ten. We've we've like increase. The number of studies like five times. It's crazy this. This field is booming. And so now we're doing fantastic stuff like fm research. So training dogs to sit still and fm machines to see what areas of their brains light up when we show them certain stimuli. We're doing really cool touch screen things where we train dogs to like. I say boop their snoot just like there on a screen to tell us you know which one is which thing is bigger the other thing So we're doing a lot of stuff that kind of goes beyond what kicked off this field and what kicked off. This field was kind of the that dogs are really good at following. Human given social cues so things like pointing. Your dog will follow your point which seems really easy and really sort of simple. But it's something that even our closest living primate ancestors don't do they don't follow human given pointing and so it was really unique but we found this dogs and so this kind of started. The storm of of what is now dog. Cognition behavior i think the cool thing moving forward is that we're seeing less lab testing so and by lab testing. I don't mean like dogs that are kept in lab. I mean things like where owners bring in their dogs to places like the thinking dog center. So we're seeing actually less of that or at least a divergence from that to actually steady dogs in their own home. Which i think is fantastic. Because now we can reach the dogs that would not be suitable to come here. So like maybe doesn't wanna come visit us in new york city with games at home tonight. Where you yeah. We're an honest. We're in austin texas anymore anyway. Actually do have a few more questions. I'm sorry one of our trainer said that like you know because we were always like my husband. And i talk to each other and it's like really annoying like we're still in love voice like there's a lot of that noise and she was saying like you know if you're speaking to pablo and like a high pitched noise and a high pitched voice. It's like they don't understand english. Obviously so if you're like although you like you're a little baby let me so much. It sounds like you might be a her dog. Ended up signing more like lord never at ease so is that like the whole high pitch voice and like no contact. So i contacted many animals. It can be seen as like a threat display so like with primates and things like that or with wolves. If you make eye contact can be something. That's threatening in dogs not the case. It's weird because we as humans make contact right. Like i look at my screen and i see you and i look at your eyes like. That's where my attention goes and it's actually really cool. We think that this has sort of evolved in dogs as well or at least we as human selectively bred also for this attention to is and so the eye contact is not necessarily a threat display. Sometimes it can actually increase oxytocin so this love hormone In your dog and also in us so don's actually use. I contact like we use. I contact and there was actually some really fascinating research that came out that certain dogs especially newer breeds have these amazing eyebrow muscles to like move. There is to invoke the whole puppy dog eyes phenomenon. The ideas that maybe they did this because they would get more snow humour treatment us because yeah puppy dog. Eyes are super cute right So maybe they're actually like taking advantage of their cute puppy dog eyes but the speech thing is really interesting because i have not heard that before as as an explanation. Certainly true that if you use a we call this mother ease and so. It's that infant directed speech or dog directed speech where you're like doing baby talk. Essentially if you use that it can be really over a rousing in stimulating right so like use it when you need it but actually dogs have a preference for that type of speech over any other type of speech so usually it's a great way to get their attention and it's a great way to talk to them because they pay more attention to it interest. Espn why does pablo fucking hate our pool. Like if i jump into my pool currently swimming he is mad. He doesn't like the water. He's like very like nervous about the water. Like then i feel like he's you know he's running the perimeter. He's doing checks. I feel like he's album. He asked protect me when i jump in. The pool is pablo. He's twenty pounds. He's only knee height. I mean so tools kind of scary for little dog. That's true maybe it's just like a big watery thing and it's like it's like the noises like he doesn't understand the noises like he's like what the fuck or these noises like the splashing he doesn't and it might be just over stimulated. You're probably have a great time. In the pool lounging on your floaty slashing around laughing giggling all this stuff as someone who also has a dog who does not like new things or who doesn't like you know really would love monotone environment where everything was the same all the time yes. This can be quite over stimulating. So maybe he's just rable. I mean. I don't know a doctor thera- i don't know if i have the other questions. I feel like you have so thoroughly. Like quenched like curious with oprah dogs. I feel so much smarter. I'm obsessed with you. And i feel like are your new resident. Cognition behavioral expert. You time anytime. sign me up. Think i'd love. Thank you so much for coming. We really appreciate you. And then we're going to put all the place where people can follow you. Find your work in that description and we're just so grateful for you coming. Ain't you for having me. You've been listening to getting curious with me. Jonathan van ness may guest. This week was sarah elizabeth b air. You'll find links to her work and the episode description. Whatever you're listening to the show on our theme music is freaked by quin. Thanks to her for letting us it and you enjoyed our show introduced and please show them how to subscribe. Follow us on instagram and twitter at curious j. b. n. Socials are running curated by emily. Our editor is andrew carson. Getting curious is produced by me. Erica and emily ethic are consulting producers for this episode. We're pablo elton. hey man..

pablo australia new york city austin texas us don Espn swimming Jonathan van ness sarah elizabeth quin andrew carson instagram emily twitter Erica pablo elton
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

01:37 min | 11 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"The exact.

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:29 min | 11 months ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"As a sensitivity warning. This episode does discuss intimate partner violence in detail. We hope that centering. An episode on this important topic helps to bring awareness to survivors experiences and the incredible work that sonia and other advocates are doing through organizations like free from welcome to getting curious. I'm jonathan van ness. I'm so excited to welcome our incredible guests this week. Who i learned about from one of my very favorite people in the entire world. Aloke our guest this week. Sonia paseo who is the founder and ceo of free from a national organization working to dismantle. The nexus between intimate partner violence and financial insecurity sonia. That's like a major paragraphs also favorite people alok. I mean i think most of the best things that i know about the world has been like vis-a-vis aloke so i'm not all surprised. I found your incredible work in your incredible through talking to elope so are kind of overall theme here is what is intimate partner violence. I think so often people kind of take for granted like what intimate partner violence even is because it has so many different ways that can show itself from you know. Physical verbal financial emotional. Like your space sexual. There's so many different ways that we can. People can experience abuse. So i kind of want to break down even just to start. What is such a great question. Because the way that our states define intimate partner violence is so limited so basically every state just defines intimate partner violence as physical and psychological abuse and within psychological. It includes emotional within physical. It includes sexual. But there's all these other kinds of abuse that are not included it so you mentioned financial abuse. Financial abuse is essentially controlling another person's finances or their access to finance and financial abuse occurs in ninety nine percent of all cases of intimate partner violence. So that it is not included in our states. Definitions or a federal definition is extremely problematic. So let's say for example you go and you get a restraining order against the person that is harming you and that person is checking your bank accounts every day as a way of tracking you physically locating you. You're restraining order. Doesn't cover that person not being able to check your bank accounts because that's financial abuse and the courts wouldn't recognize that as being covered by your restraining order because the definition that they're following is physical and psychological. Now of course you can. We can very easily say tracking my physical location through. My bank accounts is psychological abuse or is physical abuse in a form but courts are not that nimble in the way they interpret the law another big form of intimate partner violence is litigation abuse among all the time and in these situations harm doers. Particularly where there is family courts involved. Maybe there's a divorce. Maybe there's custody issues will use the courts to terrorize you whether that is filing motions on every single part of the process forcing you to come to court at We've worked with survivor. Once who her honda was tracking her through her through her technology technology abuse. Another form of abuse so always knew what was going on always knew her emails always knew when she had a job interview and he would file emotion in the court every single time. She had a job interview in a way that it would conflict with the job interview. If she didn't turn up in court it would default adjustment to him and so he was making it so that she couldn't ever go through a job interview process by dragging her into court. So who growth. We we he. That story gross who who commonly experiences intimate partner violence in the united states. And really just you know anywhere. Yeah so it's what part of ireland's really doesn't have any religious bounds any socioeconomic bounds. It happens to everyone but it does disproportionately impact certain demographics so one in four women and one and two trans folks in the us will experience intimate partner violence but within those statistics bypass folks and lgbtq. I a. plus folks are even further disproportionately impacted. So forty one percent of black women will experience intimate partner. Violence up to sixty percent of native indigenous women will experience intimate partner violence. One in for gay men will experience intimate partner violence sixty percents of bisexual women forty percent of lesbian women so that one in four stat for woman is is worse for women of color and for queer women and the stat for men in the us is one in seven but one in for gay men is proportionate betting effecting gay men and then wanted to transfer folks and we never ever talk about that one into trans folks we have no data right now on at the extent which it impacts non binary gender fluid gender non-conforming folks one of the things that from actually working on his is gathering that data. Because of course if we don't know the data than we don't address the problem and so that we have limited data is a huge problem. Scientists obsessed obsessed data. Do love data. Even if it's on hard stuff. I think is a really common question that really. I imagine there's going to be difficult but for people who have people in their lives that are involved in an abusive relationship. We i think we've all known someone or been someone who's involved in an abusive relationship in some way. Why what makes it so hard for people to leave such a good question. It's the question and it is so hard for us to not judge people that are in these situations to not judge folks for staying for not judging folks for not leaving soon enough not seeing the signs and part of it. Is we misunderstand. The problem in the first place. The way that we in our society are thinking about intimate partner. Violence is a case of bad luck or case of bad choices.

jonathan van ness Sonia paseo sonia honda united states ireland
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"You know they don't know their rights and they don't sometimes they don't speak the language to even understand what is being explain to them what they're being asked to signs of for example. I worked in a situation in which many of the individuals were indigenous and spoke indigenous languages. They didn't speak spanish so even the information is being told to them in spanish. It wasn't their first language until they didn't understand and so they're being presented documents designing english or in spanish. They don't understand those and so To people on intentionally sign away their rights. You know they might take what's called a voluntary departure and they might say that. They're willing to be sent back to their country. It's a very very complicated. And you know. I'm not immigration attorney. I represented Immigrant workers in worked on things like some human trafficking cases in cases on behalf of victims of of crimes. Because much of my work has been on behalf of a farmer. Cohen and other women who've been victims of sexual violence at work earn entitled to certain so in that context. I've worked on a species. But i am not generally in immigration attorney. My hat is off to those who are immigration attorneys because the volume of cases if they have the complexity of the law you know the the very specific facts that have to be presented because a worker whose visa was taken away from them who who gets detained like they might not have the the knowledge or even the words to express to a immigration officer. The fact that they actually are here. Lawfully in they have rights frightens. They'll that is that responsibility falls on the immigration advocates. Their jobs are just immense in. Its really important. Particularly is during the trump administration. We saw huge uptick in Action against immigrants immigrant workers across our country In you know..

Cohen
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"I'm jonathan van ness and i sit down for gorgeous conversation with a brilliant expert to learn all about something that makes me curious. This week were re-releasing instagram. Live conversation recorded in june twenty. Twenty sort of my very favorite conversations. All time with ashley. Marie preston who has since become a very very close close close close friend of mine. Who loves so much breaking task her. What does it mean to you. Hey kyri wine. We are going to have a gorgeous crank conversation with ashley marie preston so as marine preston. You've been not had the pleasure to know who she s. She is an award-winning media. Personality commentator award winning journalist she also the first open out transmit to run for state office. And also there's one other gorgeous you are besides my friend in person who just like to so much This gorgeous morning. Also you started your central. Which is your new organization which is so important organ. talk about all of that on. I fall coming from the west coast nine in the morning giving all this glamour. Why glamour listen. I spend most of my day star. And i take that star bob and blue pat and these earrings carrying all the way trust. We never parts you honey. Those are so pretty. I'm for the met of. Shell thank you so this is basically kind of what i wanted to ask you about today. On this gorgeous live which is kind of what we were texting yesterday. We got to really meet you and get to know. You are a few weeks ago when we did the new york city pride kind of virtual fireside. And since then. I've gotten to know you more like behind the scenes which has been such a such a pleasure bat. I i know that. So many people this pride we want to celebrate and celebration is worse than it spun comma. When there is this deluge of things to process as we head into election as we head into one of the most pivotal times in our country's history and every day we turn around. We've lost someone. We have a new a new law. New thing coming into kind of like i can just take the wind out of a sale ceo. There's so much that just take such a weight of energy to process. And i think that for so many people that are new to that to this aspect of like did have awakened enough last month to being like wanting to be on the front lines wanting to be on the fight. It's like this is not like a three week things. If you thought that things were going to go to a normal and three or four weeks like first of all what was normal and second of all now. So it's like. I feel like you are someone who has been in this fight and has been talking about this since it was way before mainstream way before people were like talking to the level which with which we are now and i feel like you have. I don't think i've ever heard activism fatigue. Come out of your mouth like you like you enjoy. You're able to process everything that happens and you still have. This is how do you do that. And how can how can people get maintain this pride energy three sixty five years or three sixty five busier. I think for me. The understanding that joy is an active resistance. It truly foods to truly truly truly as you think about what is meant to do is mental. Break you from the inside out and so it's meant to crush your dreams. Your hopes your rations. Any vision of what your could be is meant to destroy you just every aspect of who you are in some of the way you combat the head is by reminding yourself constantly who you are surrounding yourself round. Others are willing to pour that light into year and also understanding that. It's a game of divide and conquer in. It's also divides our congress of south. And so just reminding yourself who you are what you're about understanding how gas lighting words understanding that the objective of gas lighting in dismissing the reality of. What's happening to you. It's mitt to create a thorough psychological warfare. Knowing that joy has to be the core of my dean it has to be my ultimate objectives. So i think gas lighting is such an important phrase to understand and i think is so hard for people. Can you just give us like what is goth leading catholic. The actually are come from this. Play from the late eighteen. Hundreds like intimated by maybe made a movie about it in their nineteen hundreds and it was about this man on mobile mccaw gaslight and it was about this man who i stand his wife. He wanted to get rid of her. But i guess like this. Kelly in oftener micalizzi boarding or something. It's not easy but the way the here rehabbing that story. Sorry yeah so. He basically just decided that he was gonna remind. Maya baker go insane so that he could get rid of her that way and he would do things like move things in the house and they make her life second guessing. What a minute. that doesn't bear on. I thought her d- did you hear this everything. He would like damn the lights back when they had a gas lamps than they were dimmed. The lights it would flavored. It will just do these patterns against the wall things that will literally drive right safe and so fast or gas. Lighting became a term to describe the way that our government our institutions and structures that participate in anti blackness or bigotry. They play these tricks on us to make a second. Guess what we're really seeing what we're really hearing and eventually it's mid to break down from the inside like i'm here to neural your soviet style that you don't have enough samuda to continue the fight. So that's gas lighting that term. But i do feel like. I like you explaining things like you're such good. Explain our natural concert going to in her so to academic ideal i think. That's the other disconnect missed opportunity. Get me wrong. Like i will up on c. To give them very much l. Was harder campus. You know whatever but the thing is that. That's not what people so when we talk about these issues. We have to make festival to everybody so speaking of accessibility for everyone i feel like there is such a I guess i wanna be well. I guess i remember to be really transparent. So i kind of have my own experience with coming to terms with like what my complicity role and privilege was in like two thousand sixteen and seventeen when i started hearing about some of these. Some of these ideas were and i had such a knee jerk reaction to it in such a classic karen sort of way like Just really feeling. Like i knew these terms and i knew that these things happen that we do need to change our education. But like it's just like. I was very much one of those people that was like and you just explained more calm like i feel like i would be able to afford it.

Marie preston Kelly today new york yesterday jonathan van nineteen hundreds june twenty Twenty instagram ashley three kyri three week This week last month marine preston four weeks late eighteen Shell
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Welcome to getting curious. I'm jonathan venice. And every week. I sit down for a forty minute or more conversation with a brilliant expert. Learn all about something that makes me curious on today's episode. I'm joined by david e where i asked them. Do beauty standards need a blow up. Hey thank you for creating this writing this book for taking me on that journey i was moved. I was enlightened. And i'm so excited that you're here so without further a deal. Welcome david e who is the editor and founder of the beauty website. Very good light which we love must follow you to be into it and also the ceo of the personal care brand good light their new book pretty boys legendary icons who redefined beauty and how glow up to as out this month. Welcome dave ed. Thank you so much jadeveon. I'm super excited to be joining today. I'm so happy that you're here too. And i just have to say. He look so gorgeous. I mean who are obsessed with. What is this skin care. Honey i guess we all really need to just be like really following in reading all up on very good light and we will find out for ourselves. Well i have to shot out like honestly. I was using all late products today and is from our line that launched two months ago. It is cruelty free vegan. It is easy you clean it. It is just dewey and it makes your skin barrier function. That much more robust. And i'm using it all and it gives me that nice doughnut glazed glow your skin gorgeous moisture barrier is doing that good work today. I've just wild just a beautiful actually leave anywhere but you're beautiful. We're just obsessed so. I wanna just dive right in. This book is incredible. Your research your approach to the world. We love we. We just love. I almost said we stand. But then i felt like it's twenty nineteen. I'm not saying that anymore. We say simp- we sent like the younger cooler thing to say can you because now that i'm thirty four. I don't know. I mean we're the same age and so i'm trying to keep up with z to sipping is just really being someone's like overall obsessive fan kinda like stand two point zero but we use simp- now and that's just the stand because no one should ever been clothing in the first place. The never was the gm and it's always been about samp. It's always been exactly exactly so now. I'm going to go into a literal. This is like one of those like npr moments as journalists. Like i have to ask a question. I already know by love that story because everyone needs to know what can you. Can you tell us what is a pretty boy. Yes so say. Pretty boy traditionally as someone who's confident enough to own. They're pretty they're truth. Authenticity their inner and outer beauty stepping into their light but according to my book because they're mean to be a thesis and it needs to be very focused thirty boys. The definition is people or folks throughout the history and time who use makeup and or cosmetics to amplify their power whether politically or socially. So can you tell us like if this was like serving you. Nine hundred ninety nine. It's like casey kasem top ten. Who are some of history's pretty boys. And pretty gender fluid and third gender gender non conforming people who must we know. Oh my goodness this is so difficult. This is just like asking who your favorite child is but we really no one had the favorite child. So i will be breaking this down the top ten. Great ramsey's iras alexander neanderthals who ground up rocks like pyrites for high lighters and foundations of out the vikings who actually these growth and strong men super fears but they were obsessed with their grooming kits and assess their beards and their hair the run of the seventh century korea. These were korean warriors. Assassins who beautified us cosmetics as a spiritual practice the macaroni in the seventeen hundreds the british influencers. These came before the tiktok influencers. But these guys they totally use makeup and bigwigs and stickers and patches and they redefined what a man could be. I would say king louis the fourteenth i mean hello created the whig trend just like regina george created that cutout boob trend in mean girls and there are so many more like third gender folks around the world. I would like to talk about the. He's ras of india and talk about two spirit individuals in indigenous cultures around america. I would like to talk about people in history of hatshepsut who was a third gender gender non-conforming nonbinary ruler a pay pu who was a spy who seduced a french official to give over their country's secrets interest so many join chocolate. Those gorgeous corrine. Hot on yes. Who what's their story. We must we must go back in the six hundreds. They were indoctrinated with towers shamanists and buddhist teachings and they were selected for being beautiful so back in the time. There's this king king hung and he wanted to overtake the entire korean peninsula and he believed in the spirit called mitra. Who was this dude. I'm and the buddha was set to be the most beautiful creature the most beautiful handsome and pretty god of all and so they believe that when my died his spirit went into all the pretty boys in the land and so it's kind of like it came pop competition in the six hundreds were. He chose these beautiful men because he believed they had an other worldly spirit of mitra. Who's going to join my assassin chip my army if these party boys because i know if they're pretty they have that spirit within them and so he went around for three months he went around and gathered his troops and was like we need to have an audition we defined the prettiest people in the land and they did and eventually the wahdan came in. They were indoctrinated. With all of these teachings they learn swordsmanship and they learn how to ride a horse and they also learn how to beautify and it was a spiritual practice channeling mitra who was that buddha that big buddha energy and they really wanted to empower themselves with his spirit and were really fierce really fierce in their expression in fierce in in an offer. The on and off of the battlefield. Do you know about like what was their t like. Was it all about like a snatched high pony was it all about like was just light contour. Was it like a strong nude lip. Did they empower each other. Ever buy empowering needs other. If you know what i'm saying okay i do know what you're saying. We don't have information about that. There's never enough information about mortgages empowering sexual empowerment and like in in like in history and early history. There's agreed you will get to very much sexual things later on because there are examples of that. What was the name of this gorgeous group of athens people again. They're called the dengue which translates literally to the flower boys which translates to pretty boys. So no like empowering sexy times necessarily in the record but what do we know about their like beauty routines like specifically at that time here. They were actually supposed to be very much. These stoic warriors who pretty much didn't have relationships outside of what.

jadeveon regina george america david e seventh century india today forty minute dave ed thirty boys two months ago three months fourteenth casey kasem two spirit jonathan venice korea twenty nineteen british Nine hundred ninety nine
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"I'm pro- i'm So this is kind of a rare case was say that this kind of social status changes but in terms of other dancers performance. doing no. This was a big part of the cork life that plaguing all sorts of musical instruments and dancers and serving of the aristocrat in Banquet in even sometimes in these ritual performances festivals. And we'd know very little about the individual was except in these exceptional cases. I was wondering about like a upward economic mobility in thinking. That probably didn't happen. If so many jobs were hereditarily passed down. So that's interesting that we came across an example of a happening so then i know earlier. You said that there's indirect examples of homosexuality so from like from one of these dynasties with there have just when you say like would there have been like a poem written by like an emperor may be about like a male dancer and his core. That's like not talking about explicit sexual and it's like that's not how bros. Talk about each other so they there must have been something going on sort of a thing right and in fact even in in standard history what would be recorded a war one would be deterrent. I think people use that. I think probably would i. I think the the standard term would be dante's sell of some of the emperors would have male companions. That's actually open secret if you will. I don't. I don't even think that secret. That's clearly was pervaded. So and sometimes we also i don't think i cannot think of Example of that space. Let's say i'm purchase of female companions but the male of ira so crowded and particularly emperor. We do know that they are. There were recordings about their relationship with other men. I mean i hate how this like. Gay patriarchy's seeps into like queer stuff. Now like the second ancient time were ancient lesbians that i know of did not get there and you know that there is some cute lesbian. Maybe like catching the glance of another lady and they were just like ooh. Let's meet in the back behind the platform and make out. I'm sure that that had have happened at least once but i had like ten more questions than we have to keep asking him. So what about like. Because i think you mentioned this time last time like more like nomadic people which makes me think about like traveling and that also makes me think about like what if you were born as like. Let's say like a crass person but then you like fucked up your local kings statue like he paid you commission it and you fucked at. You made his wife look like a nightmare and u-turn and you're like i'm an face local ruin. Could you like get on a horse or like some other means of travel and like get to another town and like maybe try to change your identity like not get caught like. Is there any story of anyone doing something like that and getting caught or like you know identity things from this time absolutely I think web way now. From instance legal cases and legal code so There are legal. Stipulations about the particularly. Where would be caught in technical terms as bonded servants so basically slaves. So slaim stu away and then the slave owners and then some of them were actually they were. They would be caught official slave worked for the state that worked for local government. They work for all levels of government and then they would Try to catch them right. They will try to recover that way. I truly hive disputes about slaves for incidents substrates runaway and then being sheltered by another person and there were lawsuits between the. Oh okay so now. There's this kind of like a bummer of a question to end up on. But i feel like..

ten more questions dante one second ancient time at least once these dynasties many jobs
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"That's the that's that's the terra cotta army. Right we failed to this entire underground palace. Tom for himself that i took about ten years To build so he he actually started out very early on and and based on the limited acceleration where hide. Now it's just extremely luxurious so that you can imagine. Almost anything would be Would be considered as luxurious rear. He has a huge quality of that. He took that to the afterlife with him. So so again. The caveat is whether or not underground of barrio. What when people think about. When i how i wanted to be buried What that a reflection of to what extent that was a reflection of the actual life. But i think in this case is probably reasonable to say he's actual. I probably wasn't too too far of from the luxury he was. At least he was capable of enjoy whether or not that was the case. We do know. Interestingly we know very very lehto about the first time pro but later the han dynasty because honda is more an preuss. Know more about them there were and peres war living in extremely lavish Lifestyle rayleigh troy and goods coming from afar. And from you know. I'm tired. I'm player was big enough and those emperors. A lot of times would be criticized by stories court historians of the time sometimes but mostly later stories as these emperors who were not focusing on gardening all being a good emperor but too indulgent who is like one of the most indulgent emperors that from the han dynasty time. There's actually one example. I don't know if he would be the most indulgent but he certainly was the most interesting. What the also. Because we just recently find as tune and he's life story was intriguing. Technical emperor of the heightened dynasty but he was under throw only for twenty seven days so he and then he was deposed and then he was demoted. The next i'm pro was very suspicious of himself. Kind of put him almost a way like house arrest to to really monitoring And then later relocated tool a very remote corner of don pyre so kind of the next emperor was also this was during the time that the succession was very fraud so to speak so so the next. I'm pro was not so leyla to speak that he was not a direct descendants. Th this whole thing started out. The i'm pro who die. Tied-in hive didn't have air. And so the next emperor has to be selected by the region by the powerful Generous of the time from the other leauges and this particular one His name was and he was selected as a seventeen years old as the next emperor so he was caught up hong he lived in the east Quite actually quite a good life and then he was kind of getting involved in these palace intrigue these political struggles as a seventeen years old and then he got caught up to the capital. And be you made them perot and then twenty. Seven days later he was deposed. And the the i brought him up was because the facial raisin of his he was deposed was because this is rate and in the han-dynasty all facial history was i of him being extremely indulgent that He was Matere rolling in and who was morally decadent he was not fit..

twenty seven days don pyre one example Tom leyla Seven days later about ten years one seventeen years old first time han terra cotta army twenty Quite honda lehto
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Jonathan van ness and every week. I sit down for gorgeous conversation with a beryllium expert tiller and all about something that makes me curious on today's episode. I'm joined by professors waco. Where i asked her what was everyday life like in china. You welcome to getting curious. I'm so excited. We have a return guest today. Who is so fascinating. Welcome back professors waco who is a social and cultural historian of early china and a professor at barnard college of columbia university. Welcome back professor. Glow how are you. I'm good dan. thank you for having me back. Your area of expertise is so fascinating to me. Just give everybody recap. We add dr globe on a few months ago and it was really about learning about early china and my coal and that was to figure out what was like a day in the life of someone who lived in early china but then i realized that i knew so little about the specifics of really the area and the time in which i was talking about. We almost kind of didn't give there. And so i do want to just give people a quick little recap though if maybe they didn't hear that episode so professor guo. Can you just tell us what time briefly what time period we're talking about and what geographic location. We're talking about. I assume lay so last time. I think when actually a little bit young what we are going to focus on today and so so last time..

Jonathan van china today barnard college of columbia un few months ago waco professors
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Hello jonathan so. I'm a huge fan of queer eye and of yours personally because you're radiating joey all over the place whether it's watching you learn to figure skate on i g or your daily morning coffee boogie you. I really just love all of your content <hes>. And virtually officiating a wedding. That was also very cool during quarantine so cool so we're really honored to have you on breaking beauty. Podcast tell us from your perspective like what is self confidence. What does it look like. And why is it important. Pay attention to. Oh that's a really good question. I think for me. Self confidence is so important because it will competence is like one of the central tenets of self of like being centered self and what that means is in the therapy that i've done so much of is like we wanna be self led like my idea. Being sulfide is like the person that like. Even if i'm late or things of kind of gone awry like i can still be calm. I'm not reactive inaugurated you know. You're centered selfish. Very like calm clear compassionate courageous. It's like really like the best version of yourself and so confidence is part of that in so when you feel confident that's like a really good indicator for me when i feel confidence a really good indicator for me that my centered south. I miss. i'm not in an a people pleasing my personality. I'm not in a irritated part of my personality. I'm not in like a overly work mode part of my personality. I'm like you know self-led fled so accurately talks about that. There's a lot of people in virtual eaters and spiritual thinkers who think who talk about being selfless. So confidence is such a big piece of that. But i think the thing that people miss the most often about confidence and i know that for myself i did too is that you can be competent and you can have a part of you. That feels really confident about something but then also really insecure about something else and can happen at the same time <hes>. There's parts of you that feel confident but then there's other parts that you know are insecure about certain things and so the trick is is wet part of yourself. Can you identify with. Can you hear from that part. That might wanna change something or maybe doesn't like something about yourself and say look i hear you like i get it. I understand why you might feel that way about yourself. This is like you talking to yourself. Maybe we got those ideas from society or like something. That doesn't really feel organic to us. Like while i hear what you're saying i need to get in the back seat because actually centered. South is here. And we're not going to be berating ourselves today about that like expectation of beauty that we know that part of me has for how it's supposed to him kind of china mores in it by with this parliament industrial confidence about you know my heart may essence. What i do for my friends what i do for me. The only or feels like super confident about my face. I have i will say this. Maybe i am maybe really competent. But my face is like one thing. I've never been self conscious about like. I've always thought like a really pretty face like i've cobblers. I like i've always been like work. There's other so. I always looks like something. You feel competent. It doesn't mean physical thing it can be a piece of who you are and then just tried to identify with that. Because i think there's anyone who feels completely competent about everything all the time every single thing. Yeah i read in your bio that from a really young age like forever. You were out and i and i think about back then like what gives you the confidence to express your authentic self. Even from a young age. I say the include ryan episodes of like you know there really was like i could really be in a closet if you had like is in ears like if you were in my presence. You were very much like okay. Like i was fully fluid in nancy. Kerrigan kristi yamaguchi oxana by all geos zodiac sign. I also knew about everything about the electoral college in the presidential election of nineteen ninety-two. I really wanted to talk about i. Thought ross perot is actually. When i understood. I understood like the words. I didn't understand the politics of his leaks. I was i was really engaged in the world around me also just extremely feminine and i wanted to wear tights that i wanted to her off the shoulder. Things and i wanted to like run up to my dad's best friends like push them in runaway. Be like it was just exactly how i am now but if i do is coming out of the closet officially linked answering yes to the question of our i was getting asked if i was gade called gay and like just was asked to from such a young age that i think by the time it was like in sixth grade. It was like by fifth grade already done. I'm buying and pamela anderson's. I watch being watch like i you know but really it was david hasselhoff that i get enough up. He was such treatment in the nineties. Yeah until he started rapping. Of course you started rapping. Did i miss a diva rap. I'm pretty sure he was a big rapper. In germany he had an act german moment. I did knows because of rapid wisit wrapping. Am i making that up. Okay i'm going to have to google it after our call

jonathan van ness jonathan van nest jonathan mark peacock new york times jill emmy Hello jonathan Jonathan austin guinea illinois joey abc
Building Confidence with Jonathan Van Ness

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Building Confidence with Jonathan Van Ness

"Hello jonathan so. I'm a huge fan of queer eye and of yours personally because you're radiating joey all over the place whether it's watching you learn to figure skate on i g or your daily morning coffee boogie you. I really just love all of your content And virtually officiating a wedding. That was also very cool during quarantine so cool so we're really honored to have you on breaking beauty. Podcast tell us from your perspective like what is self confidence. What does it look like. And why is it important. Pay attention to. Oh that's a really good question. I think for me. Self confidence is so important because it will competence is like one of the central tenets of self of like being centered self and what that means is in the therapy that i've done so much of is like we wanna be self led like my idea. Being sulfide is like the person that like. Even if i'm late or things of kind of gone awry like i can still be calm. I'm not reactive inaugurated you know. You're centered selfish. Very like calm clear compassionate courageous. It's like really like the best version of yourself and so confidence is part of that in so when you feel confident that's like a really good indicator for me when i feel confidence a really good indicator for me that my centered south. I miss. i'm not in an a people pleasing my personality. I'm not in a irritated part of my personality. I'm not in like a overly work mode part of my personality. I'm like you know self-led fled so accurately talks about that. There's a lot of people in virtual eaters and spiritual thinkers who think who talk about being selfless. So confidence is such a big piece of that. But i think the thing that people miss the most often about confidence and i know that for myself i did too is that you can be competent and you can have a part of you. That feels really confident about something but then also really insecure about something else and can happen at the same time There's parts of you that feel confident but then there's other parts that you know are insecure about certain things and so the trick is is wet part of yourself. Can you identify with. Can you hear from that part. That might wanna change something or maybe doesn't like something about yourself and say look i hear you like i get it. I understand why you might feel that way about yourself. This is like you talking to yourself. Maybe we got those ideas from society or like something. That doesn't really feel organic to us. Like while i hear what you're saying i need to get in the back seat because actually centered. South is here. And we're not going to be berating ourselves today about that like expectation of beauty that we know that part of me has for how it's supposed to him kind of china mores in it by with this parliament industrial confidence about you know my heart may essence. What i do for my friends what i do for me. The only or feels like super confident about my face. I have i will say this. Maybe i am maybe really competent. But my face is like one thing. I've never been self conscious about like. I've always thought like a really pretty face like i've cobblers. I like i've always been like work. There's other so. I always looks like something. You feel competent. It doesn't mean physical thing it can be a piece of who you are and then just tried to identify with that. Because i think there's anyone who feels completely competent about everything all the time every single thing. Yeah i read in your bio that from a really young age like forever. You were out and i and i think about back then like what gives you the confidence to express your authentic self. Even from a young age. I say the include ryan episodes of like you know there really was like i could really be in a closet if you had like is in ears like if you were in my presence. You were very much like okay. Like i was fully fluid in nancy. Kerrigan kristi yamaguchi oxana by all geos zodiac sign. I also knew about everything about the electoral college in the presidential election of nineteen ninety-two. I really wanted to talk about i. Thought ross perot is actually. When i understood. I understood like the words. I didn't understand the politics of his leaks. I was i was really engaged in the world around me also just extremely feminine and i wanted to wear tights that i wanted to her off the shoulder. Things and i wanted to like run up to my dad's best friends like push them in runaway. Be like it was just exactly how i am now but if i do is coming out of the closet officially linked answering yes to the question of our i was getting asked if i was gade called gay and like just was asked to from such a young age that i think by the time it was like in sixth grade. It was like by fifth grade already done. I'm buying and pamela anderson's. I watch being watch like i you know but really it was david hasselhoff that i get enough up. He was such treatment in the nineties. Yeah until he started rapping. Of course you started rapping. Did i miss a diva rap. I'm pretty sure he was a big rapper. In germany he had an act german moment. I did knows because of rapid wisit wrapping. Am i making that up. Okay i'm going to have to google it after our call

Hello Jonathan Joey Kerrigan Kristi Yamaguchi China Ross Perot Gade Ryan Nancy Pamela Anderson David Hasselhoff Germany Google
The 50-30-20 Rule

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

02:18 min | 2 years ago

The 50-30-20 Rule

"Welcome back to getting curious Jonathan. So if you're someone who's like new to investing Ella Ella vest is there for you. which is what's your? What is your advice to young investors like moving forward start early? Start early You know my kids are just beginning. Just getting into the workforce and you know the the advice we give is is what you WANNA shoot for is is of your take home pay fifty thirty twenty okay all right. What does that mean? Fifty percent of your take home pay goes to your needs. You gotta pay the ranch. She gotTA Commute to work. You gotta buy the first suit. A thirty percent is fine because Jonathan. Who knows you know? You GotTa have fun like life is for living twenty percent goes to Future U. I named my future me. Her name is asked her. She's a very old lady. And I gotTa Pay Esther And that twenty percent and you know it goes to my 401k or my investment account or my savings are paying down credit card debt or paying down really high interest rate loans And so that's that part that can compound and grow for you You know some of your listeners. Saying I can't do that. I just can't do that We'll try one percent percents future you. Let's go for two percent just begin to do it. Slowly on the other thing I would tell folks so bef- you know as you think about fifty thirty twenty on is you're starting starting out on life the order in which you WanNa do things once you graduate from college and Begin. adulting Is pay down that high interest rate. Debt your credit card debt you want. You GotTa get rid of that stuff and I know too. Many people have money in the bank and then credit card debt is like take that money in the bank can pay off the credit card debt. The interest rates are high. It's very expensive a number two do if your company offers a 401k program. I know it seems boring. I've got it but start putting a little bit of money in their particularly if there's a match because that's free money right in that begins to work for you on a tax advantage basis. The third thing you want to do is an emergency fund right three months when you're young one month to month three months up to six months when you're more mature of take home pay in case of emergency and then you want to begin to invest so it's not complicated Is just remembering these sort of set set of rules to help you get started

Jonathan Ella Ella
'Queer Eye' Star Jonathan Van Ness Makes History with Cosmo Cover

On Air with Ryan Seacrest

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

'Queer Eye' Star Jonathan Van Ness Makes History with Cosmo Cover

"Jonathan van ness from the queer eye show on Netflix has made history with his Cosmo cover he's the first non female cover star in thirty five years in the photo the grooming expert wears an orange silk dress as well as athletic socks and sneakers a blurb on the cover reads the yep we did it you're totally

Jonathan Van Ness Netflix Thirty Five Years
'Queer Eye' star Jonathan Van Ness makes history with Cosmo cover

Tim Conway Jr.

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

'Queer Eye' star Jonathan Van Ness makes history with Cosmo cover

"One of the stars of the rebooted queer eye reality TV show is having a milestone magazine moment Johnson that NASA is on the cover cosmopolitan UK he's the person on email to get that our sins boy George thirty five years ago van ness who identifies as non binaries wearing an orange tulle dress I don't know what that means and the sneakers on the

Johnson Nasa UK George Van Ness Thirty Five Years
"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

13:23 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan van ness" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Hey welcome getting curious. This is jonathan van ness. We have n._y._u. Associate professor myth broussard tita journalist researcher and author of artificial unintelligent. How computers mis misunderstand the world. I hope i can find my hair after this episode because you're really blowing it back but like i appreciate sheet that so basically this compass algorithm was something not the journalists whose name is julia angwin. Julia angwin did and basically found that nationally there or is this like horrific algorithm that was used in the computer databases like across the country for judges to reassign for judges to assign sentencing which was was. I'm like not surprised but i'm sad shocked yeah. Tell me about tell me more so we can actually use this i- this compass situation as a lens for thinking about other places says where this might be happening. Is it still in use compass thing god. I don't know <hes> definitely a lot of places. Have <hes> have suffered effort ties <hes> but i know in philadelphia last year. They were trying to put in a similar system. I mean this. This compass system was not unique. Nick like there are lots of people out there trying to get more computation used in <hes> in the justice system will anything that would make it faster because at the end of the day whether it's private leone the prison or if it's publicly owned isn't it in their interest to incarcerate more people because doesn't that put more on their bottom wine exactly so anyway to like make the system for streamlining putting people in their facility. They're going to be in favor of in the name of efficiency exactly exactly you are now thinking like data journalist. So how do we do. We just need more reporting on this problem and how computers actually we like. Make the problem mass incarceration worse we do <hes> we need to have more journalists <hes> we need to <hes> pay them really well so we have a problem and data journalism where <hes> people will get a lot of technical skills in the newsroom. I'm but then the lee of for industry because they can get paid more <hes> working for facebook than they can working for <hes> the washington post and so that's a problem and we should also think about that issue on the k. through twelve education side. We need to pay teachers more because right now teaching a very low paid profession if we want people all to be really really well educated about i the sort of sophisticated computational issues and society nowadays we need to infuse that it through the k. through twelve education system and so we need to <hes> pair teachers more so we can keep teachers in in public schools and private schools but so how do people how do people of color and people who are marginalized by this algorithm bias rise above public. This world isn't getting any less technologically integrated so because we're already so immersed in it like what can people do to try to get at some leverage or power in this situation. I think that people can push back against technique. Chauvinism people can say no i. I don't think that we need facial recognition at airports. I don't think that we need facial recognition for people to get into their houses. I i don't think that you know self. Driving car is better than a car driven by a person we can. We can kind of chip away at this at this bias self. Driving cars is a major one. Oh well please. Let's talk about striving. Yes all right so first of all self driving cars do not work as well as the marketers would like you to believe they're not coming anytime soon. <hes> i've been saying this for years and there was just a big article in the new york times about it this week. I was like yes finally the times's catch up i so they don't work and one of the things i did in the book as i did a really deep dive into the code and the data us to create self driving cars because actually the first time i wrote an assault driving car was in about two thousand six almost killed me was terrifying so i i already did not really trust that. The is like kinda crazy. Engineers could actually make something that would not kill people and as i learned more about the code inside self driving cars and i thought about the unconscious bias embedded in computational systems. I realized that the problem of who gets recognized as human by a._i. Systems systems by computer systems is really an acute problem self driving cars because the image recognition used in a self driving car is the same as the image recognition. That's used in a video game system which is really really similar to the image recognition. That's used in say a soap dispenser okay and have you seen the viral video about the racist soap dispenser no all right so i- white guy comes up and puts his hand under under the automatic soap dispenser in a men's room and <hes> the soap comes out and then a guy with dark skin comes up puts his hand under and it doesn't work and you you might think all right well maybe it's up to spencer broke but no the guy with dark skinned takes a white paper towel and puts it into the soap dispenser and it works and then he puts his hand on and and it doesn't work okay so something as simple as a soap dispenser okay like what was wrong with the soap dispenser where you like pump it okay and and so it just it doesn't make sense to me. Sometimes that people are trying to replace perfectly technology with technology doesn't work <hes> <hes> and i don't think that the creators of the soap dispenser said to themselves. Oh i am going to make soap dispenser. I think that they were very a homogeneous group of people with light skin and they said oh works for me. It must work for everybody and so that is a kind of unconscious bias yes but in technology that gets perpetuated it so the soap dispenser technology is the same as the technology in the video radio game systems which are better at recognizing people with lighter skin then people with darker skin okay. We've known this for years and then that's the same technology thickets embedded in self driving cars right because it's cumulative so let's think about who is going to get recognized as human by self often cars and who is not and is there going to be a disproportionate impact. This makes me think about when we interviewed melinda gates and she wrote a book called <hes> the moment of lifting. It's about empowering women like when you think about the statistics of silicon valley and so many tech companies and it's like so disproportionately white white man and when you're saying that the reason that you let computer science in the beginning lease visit because the sexism situation is so bad and when you have all of these algorithms and all of this technology written by mostly white men is going to lack an amount of sensitivity and awareness because the population is that white men and actually increasingly it's becoming less so so we'll be seeing ourselves like less and less reflected. It's actually way that like the patriarchy can mft continue to flex its muscle because they are staffing it so thoroughly. That's why we need more diversity so much attack absolutely so melinda gates actually said this incredibly interesting thing one time she was talking about the apple watch and how it launched with all of these health features but it didn't have period tracker and she was like listen like if you had had more women on the team. Somebody might have noticed that hey if you're releasing a device. That's supposed to have health all tracking like you should have a period tracker as default as opposed to like having to put it on for sure yeah. It's literally at least half the people half the people yeah yeah like so how can we so how can we do better like. Is there anyone doing any better or do. We really need so much more journalists to start. Shed more light on this. We need so many more journalists. I we need to have conversations like this. We need to just admit that when we're when we're creating technology we're not just doing math. I the technology is not the right solution for every social problem. I and we need to push back against <hes> against decisions that are that are foolish event technology to questions and then. I think we'll probably be at the end one. Is there anyone any computer scientists trying to like integrate anymore of that nuance into their tax or no like. Can we as a possible so this <hes> that's a really good question and this is a good time for a kind of blossoming interest in these issues <hes>. There's a very robust conversation going on around a._i. Ethics around computational national ethics <hes> about the role of technology and society so a couple of resources that i really like i mentioned virginia eubanks book programmed grabbed inequality <hes> there's also a book by ruhollah benjamin called race after technology abolitionist tools for the new. Jim code interests interests. Yes it's fascinating definitely pick it up. <hes> there's book by safiya noble called algorithms of oppression how search engines perpetuate racism so we can. We can educate ourselves about how racism sexism able as classes. This isn't how all these things are embedded computational systems and how we can build better more inclusive technology systems. <hes> one on really simple thing that we can do to start is to build technology using more diverse teams. That's the thing that screams out. The most is that we need more because what you make is so who is behind the making of the product is so reflected in the product itself. I also realized that i like an extra extra question one this one so like enter you know like the whole movie the like like did you see that one with hilary swank where like mother annette like alex wehrley. The robot is opposed apocalyptic world war like we're we're like run by robots like a scare scare robot world. I sometimes can't watch robot movies because they make me too crazy as a so like as someone who's like a computer science expert slash journalism expert. I don't need to be scared of killer. Robots right like you you so do not need to be scared of killer robots. Yeah i so a killer. Robots are coming. Be nobody is ever going to make a computer that thinks like a human men or a or replaces a human <hes> and also likely the computers are not coming your job. Why unquestioned question two in three. I need to write these down to love the one the second one was why unpack for me please. Why why are we replacing ones that are more humanlike 'cause. Isn't that a goal to by incorporating the nuance like wouldn't that be part of making it more human. Here's the thing thing if you want to create something in your own image have a baby. I don't wanna do that well then. I think you're probably walk as hey. Tom cat foundation there. We go okay and the cats are going to do like their own wonderful thing but it's really foolish to try and make a machine in. That's like a person because we can already. Make people think we already know how to do that. Oh i get what you're saying but however however and i think we can agree while people can be great. People can also suck oh so you can make your own person. That was like yeah see. I feel like i should all right the next robot movie. I would probably would probably shelia come and watch your rhythm. There'd be gymnastics. There'd be probably rhythmic gymnastics. There'd be so much. Let's be amazing is that the one with the ribbons yes and the betim batons and <hes> like baraka looking things and the and the hula hoop so my ultimate question was this us and this is really pertinent to artificial intelligence which everyone should really read <hes> and no but it's like how can we push back against this tech chauvinism. <hes> i think one of the things that we can start with is we can start with being really clear about the term artificial intelligence read. They get really confused between hollywood images of a._i..

melinda gates julia angwin jonathan van ness Associate professor facebook new york times researcher assault washington post Nick philadelphia shelia apple spencer hollywood hilary swank safiya noble
Understanding Obesity Among Native American Populations

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

13:21 min | 3 years ago

Understanding Obesity Among Native American Populations

"What can getting curious this jonathan ben us so excited to welcome our guest this week dr brittany chocolate. Welcome thank you so much. I'm very happy to be here so i'm so excited to have you <hes> and tell me you are dr. Your doctorate is in public health and social behavioral interventions which is so interesting testing and also i see that we have a gorgeous middle name that i wanna know more about yes so my mohawk name is wanna sell your sta and that means and she makes the day beautiful full translation. Thank you often named around the events that happened on your your the day of your birth or things like that that so yeah very lucky so you are a doctor of public health and you're also part of the i say mohawk try. I'm from queens us now which is a reservation in upstate new york so shout out to aqua sna which we love and you've you've taken your cultural heritage in europe pearling into your life's work which is so cool yeah thank you an amazing and i just want to say <hes> before we get too far into our interview that i want to acknowledge that we're on the traditional territory of donna elena leonova people and i want to acknowledge their ancestors and people <hes> the past president future and an acknowledged that we're on their land and you know benefiting and surviving on this land and from the waters in this area so sending my thanks to them love that thank you so ver you growing up. Where did you grow up so i grew up in upstate new york. Yeah fears on the on the questionnaire reservation so what was that like <hes> so for me. You know why i got interested in <hes> obesity and chronic disease prevention is <hes>. There's a lot of <hes> <hes> there's a lot of obesity and chronic disease due to our history right so there's been a long history. <hes> you know hundreds of years of food disruption gin and <hes> policy is that have affected our access to healthy foods in our traditional food systems <hes> so i really got interested because you know i could see that <hes> <hes> you know growing up that education wasn't all that is important for obesity. I think that is often what is emphasized right but <hes> also we need to think think about access to healthy foods are healthy foods affordable are they close by and that's that's definitely a struggle and a lot of rural communities across the u._s. Especially true i know of like i learned i interviewed <hes> cynthia nixon when she was running for governor and telling me about like buffalo and syracuse news and just a lot of places like rural upstate new york that have like really severe issues with poverty specifically which like you wouldn't think of considering that new york city has like so much wealth and there's so much like an abundance of wealth and you you just wouldn't think of there being like people having issues with getting access to food food in this place right yeah so but i think that it's really beautiful that you coming from your culture. Took this interest and took this initiative in your life and your profession. I think it's so cool thank you but i also think you know it's like when you think about like the cultural pain body right like oppression yeah yeah indigenous people have how do i see that as a white person correctly like edged a person like how do we say like what is the appropriate appropriate thick indigenous people of yeah so it's a very good question so commonly people ask you know what's the appropriate term is at native american or american in indian indigenous people you know it's very confusing and to over generalize. You know american indian is less and less the preferred term. Unfortunately we still have to use it quite often because that's a census term. I'm so it's really institutionalized but <hes> a lot of native people find that to be kind of an offensive term so more in general i would say more people tend to prefer native american or indigenous people since you know. That's the the term american indian. I'm sure you're aware comes from you. Know columbus was lost basically and he found himself here and so he dubbed us american indians and that's where that comes from from so do really a complete miss misnomer. You know so it's it's just completely inaccurate but i have to acknowledge that i think the best thing to do is to ask people. <hes> you know what tribe they are and ask them you know what they would prefer to be called and so i i would prefer native american or indigenous person <hes> rather than then american indian. Yeah sure yeah but i you know i understand. It's also a complex topic and it's always better to ask and i also think that just like a lot of people will don't literally don't know like in my in my hometown greg. Come from like i don't i wasn't i didn't get the honor of getting i mean it. It was just a very small amount of diversity in my hometown like so. I think that there's a lot of unawareness which is so much of the issue right but when i think think about you know what the but the cultural pain body is of native americans it is really just intolerably taller ably off all like what what what people have been through but when you think about like from a food disruption standpoint ora lee but there are so many things does that lead into that food disruption so a lot of the work around traditional food systems is looking at well why do people move away from their traditional food systems and some of the reasons why they are around environmental contamination reduce cultural transmission to youth and that is a huge factor. A determinant of health for indigenous people is in the u._s. and in canada residential and boarding schools were a big part of you know taking away our culture and systematically clearly so i'm not sure how much you're aware of that but you know in terms of generally the boarding schools <hes> essentially forced indigenous people to indigenous and his children to go far far away from from their lands toe to these schools where the the explicit purpose was to kill the indian save the man dan and so it was to completely rid people of the children of their culture and not only that they were undernourished they were often abused <hes> and and so it has had a profound impact but i also want to reiterate that you know we're very strong. People and you know despite these issues is that we continue to thrive and still hang onto our culture. It's just amazing so there's both right. It's <hes> acknowledging that troubled history and especially for a boarding schools because you know other countries like canada and australia <hes> they have. The government has issued an official apology for that in their role in in the boarding school in residential schools but that hasn't happened in the u._s. It it was done informally by the obama administration about two thousand thousand eight and it was kind of like hidden away so people don't talk about like yeah super publicly right and one thing. I think it's important when when people are looking at current contemporary indigenous issues whether their health issues are not that we need to put these issues into context right so there's hundreds of years and i think one of the most it's important things is that i think people need to really educate themselves and unfortunately people don't learn about this history and in their education system right so it really means that that people need to get curious about digits history because that is really american history and i you know one of the interesting things about my tribe is i think it's really really surprising because i come from people that have had a profound impact on this country and i think it's true for indigenous people across the country but <hes> i i'm from <hes> mohawk nation right but we're part of a confederacy called the hunter schone confederacy or also called iroquois confederacy and so we've had a big impact in terms of the u._s. Constitution on being the inspiration for that the american revolution and even feminism and lacrosse that came from our tribes so it's really a profound the impact and i think there's so much you know depth of <hes> area for people to explore so i wanted to ask the ah gorgeous try that we gave things to acknowledge when we first started because this is their native land yes are they like are they in that same solar different distinct tribe tribe so actually that's a really good question. I think there's really a diverse number of tribes <hes> so just for example <hes> so in the u._s. There are i five hundred seventy three federally recognized tribes in the u._s. And each of these tribes is very distinct history culture language <hes> so yeah we're so <hes> you you know the the mohawk people and the hunter schone confederacy where throughout a lot of new york state but the low pay people were separate from us yeah interest at different tribe yeah so five hundred seventy three federally recognized tribes so i don't know as much as i should. I want to know more <hes> because this is america and it is american history and <hes>. I think that it is i mean it's literally genocide like his one thing that i learned from our episode on getting curious about the armenian genocide is that typically what governments do when they commit genocide is it's about forced assimilation. It's about removing in culture. It's about removing history. It's about separating generations. It's about and then once all done then. They denied that ever happen so i'm not surprised that i i didn't learn about these schools and not surprised as a child. I was learned that like the indians and the pilgrims like all got along like a gorgeous dinner and that was all there was to and like everyone lived happily ever after after right so but i wanna. I didn't even know that schools existed so please give us give us give us a crash course on that please. So in in terms of the schools will just in terms of what essentially happened. I mean native americans were like literally here like cultivating the earth or culture meeting like this served like living their lives like and then we came here and we literally like oppressed removed from their land force people into schools right like forces simulation asian upon people like all through the eighteen hundreds yeah and just to be super clear because my training and expertise in public health you know i'm not history albert perfect of course because this is an important determinant of health it can of course be able to give you some highlights so in terms of the residential or boarding schools <hes> native american children were forced to attend these schools sometimes hundreds of miles away and they often experienced physical sexual emotional abuse <hes> and completely undernourished there were several reports done in the nineteen twenties and the nineteen sixties that <hes> you know were saying how horrible the conditions since where there are basically you know doing labor it wasn't even education and the idea was i mean the <hes> purpose they were saying it was education but but these reports were saying you know this has nothing to do with education. It was highly militarized. <hes> in terms of making students stand in line and <hes> be very strict discipline <hes> so if children were speaking their language they were often <hes> you know severely punished <hes> they. They and i think what's really important. Is that these these experiences have had broad impacts rate so if you're if you have to go <music> hundreds of miles away from your family that means that there's so many impacts on that right but when it comes to even obesity are like food systems systems or being able to eat healthy which are traditional food systems were very healthy. They are sustainable. They were local of course <hes> so but the way that our education education systems worked was intergenerational right so learning and doing these activities with your family with your community and tribe so if they are going away that means means they can't they can't learn how to participate in the food system how to go fishing how to hunt buffalo how to grow the three sisters corn beans and rice. Sorry corn where'd beans and squash so squash corn beans. Those are the three sisters so that's the staple foods from my tribe in a lot of tribes in this area and and they they grow interdependently <hes> so they are grown together so there are are staple foods so this really has just profound impacts than i think. People don't understand <hes> you know this. These boarding schools aren't operating between the eighteen seventy s till as late as the nineteen eighties so it's really not that long ago what the nineteen eighties yeah and so this is like this directly. Actually we have sick a really quick break. It

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Jonathan Van Ness's 'Gay Of Thrones' Web Show Is Back

The Frame

05:50 min | 3 years ago

Jonathan Van Ness's 'Gay Of Thrones' Web Show Is Back

"Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. You've certainly heard of game of thrones the HBO series that is now in its eighth and final season. But what about gay of thrones gave thrones as a funny or die web series? That's been recapping game of thrones episodes ever since season three. The show is hosted by Jonathan van Ness. You might know him as the hairstylist and grooming expert on the Netflix show queer eye each week, a different guests like Gabrielle union or on a affairs sits down and Jonathan stylus chair for a pretend haircut and the to get talking about that weekend's episode of game of thrones with countless jokes and pop culture. References. Here's a clip from today's episode with actor and comedian Camille Johnny about a pivotal game of thrones scene between sir c and Tyrian. Lancaster? I bet you but evil no volume Carol Brady goes no dice. She's like, don't you tear us maternal instinct's against me. I am just as indicative and unreasonable as Amen that was recorded just yesterday, the funny or die studios in Hollywood where I visited a chat with Jonathan van Ness and Aaron Gibson the series creator and director, she's like don't you dare us. My maternal instinct's against me, I has been dictated and unreasonable as any man. She's like, don't you tear us nine maternal instinct's against me. I am just as reasonable. And I am just as and unreasonable as any man. When I sat down with Erin Gibson, and Jonathan van Ness after the shoot I ask van as how making time for gay of thrones works logistically with all his commitments for queer eye season. Seven shows the last season, I was in Atlanta shooting queer eye. So I would shoot queer eye Tuesday through Friday and get on a plane, and then come here do gave thrones get back on the plane, go back to Atlanta. And now this time I have said spoke to New York, and so Sunday mornings, I get up and I pop on a plane, and I get here, and then I come to show with everyone. And then I go home, and well, then I pitch all my jokes before everyone else gets pitch their jokes, which is really nice to me. So everyone's could stay up till midnight. And I tap out at night. And I'm like, oh my God. I'm so tired, which is the joke. But really I am. It's a lot like. We need you to be amazing on camera dies need to go to bed. What is it? Like when you guys are watching it is it like being Theodore everybody's talking about to the screen like, there's just constant banter. You making knows what does it sound like this new method where we're doing like one of our people will yell out the number. So it's like a scene one seemed to because we're all kind of writing while we're watching it. So there is some healing of the screen usually from me, but we turn the lights off we have snacks. And we right. We really are. There's a lot of typing are other tradition is that we always have ten degrees. We've had ten degrees every single year and shocked. Not sick of it. There are so many recaps of game of thrones. And what's amazing to me is how quick and how thorough they are? And when you're thinking about how you were going to both recap and episode and then do something. That's funny. How do you figure out? What is I? Because is it important that you get the story. Right. I and then at the jokes are what order they come in. I think it's always about serving the purpose of how Jonathan has regurgitated this show. So in my mind is always funny. I, but I do want this to be a cheat sheet for people who maybe don't watch game of thrones. And maybe one not feel like they're an outcast in society at work. So they do know what's going on. But first and foremost, it's about making this show funny, and allowing Jonathan to shine his very specific and hilarious light on a show. That is the most McCall thing on TV. The other thing that you guys seem to be really intentional about is making sure that you have the most latest pop culture references possible. So. So you just did an episode where you have a mayor Pete reference. There's a reference to the Boeing seven thirty seven max is that always like what happened that day that we can incorporate how do you think about what is and is not funny or worth including well, I have to say, you know, in in the episode from last week. It was all about Martina Hingis. This battle had more downs than Martinez. Hang stories his career. So I things are going great. She wins drilling open in ninety seven. Well, then she screws up at the French Open by serving underhanded, stuffy graph and gets booed off the court. But then she goes on to the lay at Wimbledon. Unfortunately, then she just positive for snow, which she denies. Let's what they love about. Our writing room is like it's really we are going to we're going to get an each we're going to go big. We're going to go niche gonna go. Now, we're gonna go eighty six we're going to go ninety four you don't know. Also, we might have a revolutionary war thing. Like, you just don't know what you're going to get last night we joke because we couldn't remember if we'd already made it, and it was a nodding hill reference, and it was. I'm just a dragon Queen standing in front of a murderous asking her to surrender. So how does the Martina Hingis reference come in? Because it goes on for like, two minutes. It's all of Martinez, tennis Greer the ups and downs. I forgot that she got popped for drug offence. There is a lot of research and detail in your Martina hanging story, we'll happen. There was as we air was trying to figure out a great analogy for something that has a lot of ups and downs. And we wanted to get through the battle scenes quickly because it was just a lot of carnage is a lot current and all the ideas that were coming up for something to had a lot of ups and downs. Just weren't feeling quite on the gay of thrones brand win all of a sudden Martina h'angus's underhand serve to Steffi Graf in the ninety nine French Open just leaped into my head. And I was like it's Martina Hingis tennis career, which when anything sounds like oh my God. It's Martinez tennis career

Salt Lake City Utah, Salt Lake Tam and Carson Lee discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

00:59 min | 4 years ago

Salt Lake City Utah, Salt Lake Tam and Carson Lee discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

"Now the netflix reboot of the makeover show queer is started second season tomorrow it was born on bravo in two thousand three as queer eye for the straight guy making a stereotype of al men into a badge of honor casting the fab five five gay men to give their pitiful straight counterparts more fashionable lives the netflix reboot is also a hit it stars culture expert kerama brown interior designer bobby burke chef antony perot ski grooming wizard jonathan van ness and fashion guru tan france who joins us now now he's the immigrant son of pakistani parents he grew up in britain a muslim he settled in salt lake city utah with his mormon husband rav and ten joins us now from ku er in salt lake tam welcome thank you thank you thank me you had an incredible first season of queer eye were you nervous at all you stepped into the shoes of carson lee who of course was on the first version of the program of the star nervous.

Salt Lake City Utah Salt Lake Tam Carson Lee Netflix Bobby Burke Antony Perot Jonathan Van Ness Britain