14 Burst results for "Jonathan Terry"

"jonathan terry" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"I'm not telling them the bat left handed. I'm saying I bet left. They're not gonna get Are you lefty know that left here Not going to get better if you're going Lefty against them is our your dominant hand. Right handed? Yes. So you go up there and you make them learn and use their mind. Wiffle ball. What do you think He's throwing? They're not throwing curve balls. You know what? You figure it out. You get out there and you figure out how to do it. Can I tell you something? It's interesting. You brought this up because My son Alex, who's on a travel soccer team was winding the other day about one of his coaches. There's frequently scrimmage at the end of practice, one of the coaches Plays and he goes all out of Boorman. No, let up like the kids are trying to take the ball from him and he's you know, he's be played at a fairly competitive level. He's dribbling around them. He's sending the and you know why, but that's in practice, and he's their coach. I kind of understand that, but in a whiffle ball game in the backyard, you bet, Right? What? One of the sticks? Yes. One of the stakes here. Do you want your son to get better? Or do you want him to be satisfied with mediocrity? When my name my son? What if it's like the neighborhood kids and I all of a sudden, I just step up, you know? I'm gonna bat left handed. I'm sorry. I'm not. I mean, bad right handed. That's absurd. You're crazy. I used when we are you home ring when you when you when you're like this, So what does it matter if you had a homer, Lefty or righty be easier to do it right handed, But I'm I'm not saying I'm going up there trying to ground out, but I'm still trying to help them run. But at least I'm doing it left handed, for crying out loud. I mean, I am going up there. That was the rule. I am. So I'm swinging from the heels. What? Right hand What's the rule in the neighborhood? Wiffle ball game when the kids were playing and you come to the dish, Do you bat right here Love the You know, do you bat with from the off side? I'll say in case you're left handed hitter. Do you bet Right? You go stranger. When you're applying. There you go. Stranger. That's a good way to put it. Gyms in the city. What's up, Jim? Taken my call. Sure. I got a couple of things I'd like to talk about. If you don't mind. First and foremost, I actually went to the Cubs game yesterday. I'm actually not a cop stand at all. I'm think I went to watch the team that's gonna Maybe the 500 sweet, my beloved Mets. I'm disgruntled about a couple things. I'm gonna be honest with you. First thing is, I think I'm seeing the reemergence of Bobby Bania with this window or This guy's not even gonna bad his weight at the end of the year. The way he's playing, Jim, I love that. You think you're calling the fan right now, But go ahead and continue. I love it when you go anybody good. I think what he did being up 10 runs was disrespectful. He did it for no reason. He does the show off. Because the only person that did it the right way was Michael Jordan when he paid respect. When I saw him do that I had to turn the game off and it dropped. It comes down to another level. All right, All right, Jimmy. I mean, you're that's from a method and and boil indoor is off to a dreadful start. I will say this good news for you, Jimmy. Off. Bobby Bania will still be getting paid it longer than Francisco. Indoor your life What is that day July, 2035 only is on the way. There's a day in July, though, right where they have to send him that check. It's about Bobby. But in the days of July 1st maybe it's like yeah, like July 1st or July 4th. There's How do we not have a committee is also five minutes. It's not independent. July 1st. You're right. Look who's on the line. Jonathan Brush Stop! Big time. Big time. The brother Of Ben Brust, former Wisconsin basket. I've always said Jonathan's My favorite crust. Yeah, well, my too. I mean, that's obvious. Jonathan. What's up, buddy? Hey, dude, I know I usually call in the ESPN, Wisconsin. You know, it's become a brand. I got to support my brother Big Carm, You need to bat right handed. There is no mercy father of six kids. My kids never wanted anything. I want them to earn it. Yes, give it to him, and I beat the kids in basketball. I do do that. Well here. Here's the thing. Jonathan understands to write that at some point, they're going to be able to beat you. And you know what? They're probably not going to show you a whole lot of mercy, old man. Actually when they can be two cards. That's when you don't play him anymore. Yes, alright. When Ben was 13 Wouldn't How? How old are you, Jonathan? I'm gonna play basketball anymore. Quit playing my brother Jonathan. Once they're good enough, and then you got that level that you're always the best of their minds. There you go. Yes. How old were you? When Ben was 13? With them is 13. I was 22. There you go. I know Make fun of no, no, but it's a different level. Absolutely better Teach you is a 13 year old and you were 22. Yeah, well, that's what happens when you and then you know what happens if you go on to play big 10 basketball? I guess so. Yeah, it's not like he was getting schooled by somebody who was playing with a body so good and 13 tell you You guys have a great day. And your brother, Mr Terry Hanley and Cantonese. Let's give Mr Terry, Hand me a call. Send him our best. All right. CIA. Jonathan Terry handling the brothers..

Michael Jordan Jonathan Terry Bobby Bania Alex Ben six kids Jim Ben Brust Jimmy Bobby July 1st July 4th Jonathan two cards Terry July Cantonese yesterday July, 2035 Cubs
"jonathan terry" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:09 min | 7 months ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Convict he announced earlier this year. He is not running for re election. So I'm promising news and the number of new cases of covert 19 in the U. S. New daily cases of coronavirus have fallen almost 23% over the past week as the vaccination effort ramps up more than 14 million Americans have now been fully vaccinated, and CDC Director Rochelle will ends, he tells Fox News Sunday. We anticipate by the end of the summer, we will have enough vaccine in order to vaccinate the entire U. S population that is eligible. Meanwhile, the investigation into the origin of the virus is heating up with the World Health Organization accusing China of stonewalling it's researcher boxes. Jonathan's Terry. The Navy says three sailors aboard the U. S. Has Theodore Roosevelt have tested positive for covert 19 last year. Massive outbreak on board the ship forced it to be important. Guam for nearly two months, America is listening to Fox News. W E Mail news at 10 02. I'm sharing Rairden. If you live in Maryland or own a small business, there are struggling financially. You may soon beginnings, the money from the state governor, Larry Hogan signed the $1 Billion Relief Act of 2021 into Law this afternoon Relief Act. Offers a real lifeline to those hardest hit. If you filed for the earned income tax credit, you'll get $500 if you have kids and 300. If you don't If you're unemployed, you won't have to pay state or local income taxes on your benefits. And if you own a small business, you could get a sales tax credit of up to $12,000. House Speaker Adrienne Jones. This is a big deal. Heather Curtis Sound W M A. L and W M a l dot com. Numbers released by Baltimore Police show that the city is averaging almost one homicide per day since the start of the year, the Police Department reported. 38 homicides is January 1st compared to 41 for the same period last year, and that was before US 16 year old was shot and killed inside an apartment this morning. Police say there have been 70 nonfatal shootings, this dear backed up from 65 in the same period when compared with last year and frustration is building following the latest CDC guidance on reopening schools. What we expected was that when the vaccines rolled out, schools would start opening up, and instead what President Biden and teachers unions have done Has pulled the rug out from all the families were ready to go back. Worry Cooper, a parent of three, Fairfax County elementary aged students, tells w e mails mornings on the mall. Even after everyone's vaccinated. We might not get back to normal school until maybe 2022. Cooper and his schools can't open safely. I can look just down the street to a private or parochial school. That's open five days a week in our own neighborhood Barber Britt W. M a. L and W m a l dot com W m A L News time is 10 04. I'm sharing rairden. Now Here's your W. M mail, traffic and weather from the Hadeed carpet cleaning traffic center over the capital Beltway between Central Avenue and Richie Marlborough rode at a stable vehicle blocks the tooth center lanes for use Extreme caution. Traveling in that area. Now on Mary Field, the ramp from the outer loop to west down 66 is narrow toe one lame through that long term work stone and eastbound 56 between Sycamore Street in Fairfax Drive. An accident blocks the right lane and in Northeast D. C. Sheriff Road is closed between 51st Treatment Eastern Avenue because of Iraq. I'm r J McCready now from Garage Door Repaired Calm. The W M A. L ABC seven Storm Watch Forecast Rain tonight Low 36 Chance for rain again tomorrow High 52 When the Great Aretha Franklin recorded respect, it became more than just one of the greatest phones of all time. The song took on monuments to the Africans. You wanted Jim people, dignity and respect and you want to receive the report didn't just she raised her voice for civil rights or entire life. We salute recording legend Aretha Franklin during Black History Month 2020. Cumulus media and W M A L Celebrate Black History.

Larry Hogan World Health Organization $500 Maryland Aretha Franklin 38 homicides 300 January 1st Sycamore Street J McCready 65 Adrienne Jones Mary Field Central Avenue U. S. 51st Treatment Eastern Avenue last year 2022 Northeast D. C. Sheriff Road Baltimore Police
"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

"I have told people not to go into saucer replacement therapy for the reason i just told you. And they've gone onto sossamon replacement therapy and then they'd come back office. Awesome place maccabee to tell me. I should listen to you man. 'cause now my disaster that sixty and i have no money to pay my doctor and i don't know what to do. It's right here. So it's it's it's a no brainer. It's a no-brainer. Don't need them. You don't need yes programs way cheaper than not and it works better in its natural expanded. Lalas needles needles. I you know what i would put you know what i would put. I would put my my ten best offers against any other guy on testosterone. Could him up against each other. Trt workouts like like like like you know what i mean like like fitness. Whatever guys who are naturally to saas over fifty even against younger guys who are taking. Trt anytime our top ten days and alpha will crush anybody anybody hundred all young guys we would destroy them at guide like josie even come on no question question. Jonathan terry watch komo mountain. All you guys beast your beasts alpha camps can be sick to all my god two thousand twenty two now quickly to alva. Can't twenty two is going to be insane like guys. Yeah this is going to be getting. Whose forms isn't going to be a game changer. Eight really easily get eighty one alpha games. We already on twelve people very so they're already coming so anyways lots time to build hype doing lick. We got brian curl. How do you the munchies question. Big bc baby. Brian good to see you. Angry question workers more cars brian. One hundred percent more cars. It's a simple answer so let me give you the longer. Just not too long but a longer so the reason. Why you're having munchies could be a few things number one us just not. Eating enough calories was the reason. For the munchies. The disease longer. There was a cannabis gif. So he's like maclear. Those kind of munchies munchies. He has candidacy is asking for a brother. Oh okay yeah. If i were. Medicis related munchies. All can sorry my so. I didn't get that okay. I didn't see that in the question. Okay asthma comments from ryan or are we just. Yeah okay okay. Great great great question because actually this is a very good question and we need to start talking a little bit more about it because cannabis's legal it's most places in the world and it's something that helps a lot of people and you know have seattle. I'm not a can of i was never any. I never smoked. People would would through throw it out of my hand. Because i had no how i never smoked and i don't know how to smoke so they were just knock it out of my hand because they want me to my lips frigging up like do not give it anyways..

sossamon Lalas Jonathan terry komo mountain brian curl josie maclear Medicis Brian brian asthma ryan seattle
"jonathan terry" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Mac Davis is character was like Snake and Actually was probably more flipped. Nick Nolte's character was more Like Like Freddy Bullet? Yeah. But then if I remember right going, I haven't seen this movie A while. Nick Nolte's character, like really had the booze problem, right? Or was it? I can't remember. I'm not voted. It was was Subodh Matuzak. I mean, there was something It was so realistic. So what? Math Davis was a big country and Western singer was this was his big head. I don't that I do not know what I'm out. Judge Music guy talking Mac Davis Davis, just from North Dallas, 40. Remember what is big it? Wass isn't he Wasn't the one who wonder no Don't cry, Daddy a little less conversation. Baby Don't get hooked on me that was thinking that maybe that was it hooked on your side of the bed is I don't know. I just like that. You said something would say about Daddy. I just I just think that drop is great. Yes, that was a great drawer. So he said some about Daddy. You know, we gotta watch nor tailors for. That's what I was thinking. We don't have any time We got eight baseball games in the finals tonight. Sorry, Mac. It's gonna be you know, it's trouble. Eso this happened in. Where did this happen? This is a Domino's pizza delivery driver. Guy's name that ordered the pizza is Jonathan Terry. Hey, ordered the pizza on Sunday night. He was, Let's see did it with this? Let's see his girlfriend. That's he So he checks the footage from his ring Doorbell app. He's getting a domino's pizza. And the driver. I guess there was some dessert that he had ordered a CZ well. And he rubbed a tub of ice cream on his crotch before handing it over to the customer. But he did it on the porch of the customer. And the customer has one of those, you know, doorbells. That you can see. And so he saw the guy do it. So what did this guy do? You brought a pizza. First of all, what do they have A delicious desserts of dominoes. I guess it's I guess, Leader you ever order I can't remember the last time I ordered of dominoes. I have the right in front of me. That's disgusting. It's just one of those tiny. It's not even a tub. I wouldn't call it, you know, like a Ben and jerry size, maybe even smaller than That's what it is. But why did he do? He didn't take the lid off. I'm looking at it. They have the the outside because it was so hot. You just He takes the ice cream while he's on the porch of the guy. And he grinds it in there pretty good, and he's rubbing it in his crotch and then down. What's his motivation here just to probably a jerk, and then he rings the doorbell. Today on they had like a GoPro go. Yes. So here's what happened. The guy is he's home with his girlfriend, the girlfriend out later just briefly afterwards. He says he was home with a friend because my girlfriend was out and we decided to order some food. About a half hour After arrived. My girlfriend called and said Don't whatever you do, eat the ice cream, so she must have looked at her app. You know, looked at some old You know the footage and she saw it while she was out, and she called me and said, Don't eat the ice cream. Wait a minute. What flavor? Ice cream. Did he order? Maybe it was the short and curlies That's so bad. Hey, may have had an itch on his crotch but had to scratch it with something I'd paid for. It's disgusting, so that he'd get Did you get dismissed from his job? Or did they get a promotion? In this country. Who knows? I don't know what motivated to do that. You know, the people he was delivering to. Andi must describe my maybe had a scratch. Maybe in a niche and know it was hot. Scratched an itch to take the cookies and cream here..

Guy Davis Davis Nick Nolte Jonathan Terry Domino Subodh Matuzak Freddy Bullet Wass Dallas Andi jerry size
"jonathan terry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Out I've been speaking with Jonathan Terry a policy adviser at John Jay college of criminal justice and Louis L. read a national organizer for cut fifty we're talking about the impact of the first step act a bipartisan criminal justice bill that was signed into law one year ago Lewis I know that you're very involved in communities where people are returning home from prison you talk about some of the biggest hurdles for them once they're out yeah absolutely so I think that there are things that you know are obvious and show up in the stat sheets you know these are the things in terms of employment housing and securities it center in the likes their rough I think that one of the thing do the major issues that this first that backs seeks the remedy is the simplicity of things such as not having an identification card one of the provisions within the bill actually requires all federal people were being released to make sure that they have access to appropriate identification when you think about that that may not necessarily seem like much quote unquote much but when you think about how an individual could potentially have incidental contact with the police with with with law enforcement in that individual could potentially have the year term of supervision violated because of incidental contact because he or she may not may be in a place where they may be accosted by the police they could be are riding and as a passenger in the vehicle an officer asks for that individual's identification that individual can't produce it because here she has not necessarily so our security because you need an ID just to get an ID and the all of the bureaucracy are involved with that that individual could actually be odd you know holding to the local police department just to you know check out who the who they are in when they are there that could potentially trigger violation for please contact so you know there are things in terms of like employment yes people need to be back you into or not even back because most of the individuals who were actually incarcerated they may not necessarily have had employment in the first place so need they need to enter into our work force they need to make sure that they have adequate housing they need to make sure that they have access to appropriate health here treatment except in so one of the things that we're doing it cut fifty is one of the several are following we have partnered with lifted to our relationship with Kim Kardashian they have given us ten thousand of free lift writes your credits that we are distributing to individuals who are being released under for step act so that they can have access to you know just you know employment opportunities our health cure opportunities except around a health care appointment such Exeter I should say in addition we have also partner with talk space talk space is the online therapeutic platform so that individuals can decompress from what I call the new PTSD and that's prison traumatic stress disorder are so that they can have and you know a a safe please just that you know I'll talk about the the traumas or indoor the vicarious trauma that they have actually observed as a result of being incarcerated let me bring Jonathan back in here for just a moment because this law I should mention affects people incarcerated at the federal level it doesn't even touch the roughly one point three million people in state prisons are we seeing similar reform movements at the state level Jonathan the federal system and cars rates more than any individual state system but the state systems account for the vast majority of people in prison so the federal system is about ten percent of the total US prison population and so we are seeing some of these reforms being put in place not all of them are prison reform some of them are broader criminal justice reforms but where they are being put in place it really depends on the state New York is just passed new bylaws which are going to affect shortly and twenty twenty in the new year in the new year and other places are thinking about you know legalizing marijuana or thinking about how do we safely a race past convictions and some of that is happening through advocate some of it is happening through progressive district attorneys and so at the state level not only do you have more people incarcerated but you have in some ways more complicated system just because so many different actors are involved in making particular decisions and so we do see these reforms but it'll be harder to push through and a lot of ways on the state level just to get everyone on board and let's talk about politics now on the federal level because many advocates have acknowledged that the first step back is a major victory but they've also mention that the next step is focusing on those who've been found guilty of violent offenses and perhaps even rethinking policing on a grander scale would either of those approaches be able to gain bipartisan support in your opinion Jonathan that's really the hard to say a lot of previous bills that were not able to be passed I'm lost a lot of support because they were they pushed too far a lot of advocates say that the first act didn't go far enough because it doesn't eliminate mandatory minimums because it doesn't push far enough on good time credits we're wondering about what is electronic monitoring do there is a new talked with and criminal justice reform circles that we are moving towards each car serration where people's information will be collected and where will know where someone is at all times will have a certain amount of information both up which is a different kind of captivity in a way and so there are a lot of sort of fights that are yet to be had but violent crime in particular is a really difficult one I think even for people on the last tour have been pushing for various kinds of criminal justice reform for years I'm thinking about releasing someone who you know may have sold drugs at some point is very different from thinking about what do we do with someone who might have heard someone on the street may have even killed someone and so those will be much harder battles and I at this point can't quite see it receiving bipartisan support but I think that the first act was fantastic because it showed that there is some possibility I was once told doing this work that if you don't believe that you can make a difference and push for them why are you doing the work and also I stay optimistic Jonathan Terry is a policy adviser at John Jay college of criminal justice and Louis L. read it.

Jonathan Terry John Jay college Louis L.
"jonathan terry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Handler now nor works as an advocate for people who are incarcerated I think the first step at actually open the door in the eyes of many people for those who are incarcerated formerly incarcerated for more on the first step back to where it is one year in I'm joined by Jonathan Terry policy adviser at John Jay college of criminal justice and Louis L. read national organizer for cut fifty a bipartisan initiative to cut crime and incarceration in half across the country thanks to both of you for being here on the show thanks for having me on Jonathan first tell us how the first step act is intended to work when it comes to early release so the first the back includes several provisions for federal prison reform it eliminates the three strike rule which is a law that was originally meant to provide harsher punishments for those who have several federal conviction so previously you could get a life sentence for having three convictions for our convictions that's been reduced to a twenty five year sentence it also extends the two thousand ten fair sentencing act which reduce the disparity that could be given a sentence for selling crack cocaine versus powder cocaine is also brings people closer to home ideally five hundred miles is now the limit that people are supposed to be allowed to be away from home and and a federal prison it includes a lot of other quality of life you might say provisions for federal prisons as well so women who are pregnant or look no longer able to be shackled juveniles are no longer able to be put in solitary confinement is also expanded reentry programs which was mentioned a little bit before so the process of going back into society after prison is a an arduous one and so the first act apportioned millions of dollars for a lot of those programs to help people as they re enter was also meant to create risk assessment tools which look at someone needs record and various other factors to decide whether or not they are a risk to society and that way ideally we are able to look at people allow them to exit from prison and no because this person isn't going to be arrested anyone we feel okay letting them out even potentially earlier let me ask you about sentence reduction because as I mentioned just a minute ago more than three thousand people have been released now under this act can you explain what the process looks like for them to have gotten their sentences reduced right so a lot of the people who are having their sentences reduced were originally sentenced in the seventies and eighties as a part of the war war on war on drugs and so the the first act says that since we sentence people differently now we are going to look at those sentences that were given before and if they are no longer in line with what we would sentence you currently we're going to reduce those sentences many of them those sentences are reduced through petition some are reduced automatically there is also an expansion of the time which says that if you are incarcerated but you are taking part and programs that are meant to rehabilitate you whether that's job training or drug treatment or something of that sort you can have time taken off of your sentence and so they are different provisions to allow people to reduce their sentences and about a thousand seven hundred people have gotten reductions in their sentence since the first day back when to law and there's a reduction of about six years on average for people who have that reduction Lewis let me bring you into the conversation Jonathan just mentioned the war on drugs in the seventies and eighties this act is mainly aimed at people who were arrested during that time period many of them were black men what do we know about the demographics of the people who've been released under the act so far you know for decades the criminal justice our conversation among our political leaders especially both on the state and national level could be characterized as a race to the bottom it was a competition for who could be the toughest on crime who could lock up the most people and throw away the key it was also a conversation that was defined by dangerous rhetoric with no regard for empathy or second chances and you know essentially it dehumanize people I was one of those individuals that was in that conversation in two thousand I was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of a hundred and eighty eight months in for our listening audience I don't want to you know belabor the point in terms of you using your fingers and toes trying to figure that out that's a process that's approximately sixteen years I served almost fourteen years off that sixteen year federal prison sentence for a white collar related offenses most of the individuals by whom I was incarcerated with were not individuals that had got caught up in the war on drugs in the seventies and eighties in fact these individuals were caught up in the mid nineties to the early two thousands especially after the nineteen ninety four a clean crime bill ninety one percent of the individuals that were released under that particular provision that Jonathan talked about as it relates to the crack cocaine provision ninety one percent of those individuals were African Americans so let me just quantify these numbers of for you for second to date seven thousand people total have been released under the first step act I should say seven thousand people total haven't haven't received significant reductions in the have been released under for step back ninety one percent of those individuals happen to be African American who are African Americans who were sentenced under those draconian you know crack cocaine laws particularly pointing back to nineteen eighty seven moving up to nineteen ninety four and up to date until about approximately two thousand ten that has totaled that seven thousand number that has totaled approximately seventeen thousand years of human freedom that have been restored back to our community now think about this in the Christmas season Jesus was crucified approximately two thousand years ago and if we look at the numbers that actually places us back into BC so I think that this is something that is significant I am literally a pulled over on the side of the road twenty minutes away from MDC Brooklyn where I am going to be with the family who is going to have their loved one return back to them in this Christmas season after having served twenty years on a life sentence in that individual is going to be released as a result as a result of the first act and that's as a result of the advocacy with people such as myself to pick a case Sam David Safavian are you know cut fifties co founder van Jones and Jessica Jackson and the many other advocates in organizations that was in his are bipartisan coalition to make sure that we got this bill across the finish line Lewis let me ask you something because one of the act's major provisions as Johnson mentioned earlier was to place incarcerated individuals within a five hundred mile radius of their families so they would be closer to them why was that such an important part of this legislation yes so the reason why the five hundred mile provision is sick never get me a poor and within the first act is because of what it does one of several things number one in make sure is that individuals are connected with their families and that those relationships are cultivated between parents and their children number two it brings about a level of proximity to the individual who was incarcerated and also to the community and number three it actually reduces the probability of individuals who are incarcerated form participating and issues that very well could bring about institutional fractions so for instance if an individual is in proximity to of their last known address in they know that they are potentially going to see their mother or their father the family members of significant others accept or a they're going to be less likely to being engaged and fights assaults you know in the likes their own Jonathan the axe when it was passed last year it was hailed by president trump is a huge achievement in being able to bring the two parties together is loose mentioned it was largely a bipartisan effort why did this act appeal to politicians on both sides of the aisle so criminal justice reform brings people together in part because there's a strong moral push for it it's hard to argue and a lot of cases that someone who may have made a mistake should be put away for such a long time it's also incredibly expensive we spend billions of dollars incarcerating people especially here in the United States with the world's largest prison population we do we have over two point one million people in prison in the United States and I think that what that regardless of where you fall politically you can see that we are wasting a lot of money on putting people in cages on those people could be contributing to the economy those people could be with their families and so it really brings people together on either side and of course Jared Kushner hat is a father who's incarcerated in so he understand some of the issues that are being that are at play here and he was able to help usher along the political coalition that push to through the first step back and I think that we are also thinking a lot about mass incarceration the fact that we do have so many people put away the draconian laws that were just mentioned have.

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People for those who are incarcerated formerly incarcerated for more on the first step back in where it is one year in I'm joined by Jonathan Terry policy adviser at John Jay college of criminal justice and Louis L. read national organizer for cut fifty a bipartisan initiative to cut crime and incarceration in half across the country thanks to both of you for being here on the show thanks for having me on Jonathan first tell us how the first step act is intended to work when it comes to early release so the first day back includes several provisions for federal prison reform it eliminates the three strike rule which is a law that was originally meant to provide harsher punishments for those who have several federal conviction so previously you could get a life sentence for having three convictions for our convictions that's been reduced to a twenty five year sentence it also extends the two thousand ten fair sentencing act which reduce the disparity that could be given a sentence for selling crack cocaine versus powder cocaine is also brings people closer to home ideally five hundred miles is now the limit that people are supposed to be allowed to be away from home and and a federal prison it includes a lot of other quality of life you might say provisions for federal prisons as well so women who are pregnant are left no longer able to be shackled juveniles are no longer able to be put in solitary confinement is also expanded reentry programs which was mentioned a little bit before so the process of going back into society after prison is a an arduous one and so the first act questioned millions of dollars for a lot of those are programs to help people as they re enter was also meant to create risk assessment tools which look at someone needs record and various other factors to decide whether or not they are a wrist to society in that way ideally we are able to look at people allow them to exit from prison and no because this person isn't going to be arrested anyone we feel okay letting them out even potentially earlier let me ask you about sentence reduction because as I mentioned just a minute ago more than three thousand people have been released now under this act can you explain what the process looks like for them to have gotten their sentences reduced right so a lot of the people who are having their sentences reduced were originally sentenced in the seventies and eighties as a part of the war war on war on drugs and so their first act says that since we sentence people differently now we are going to look at those sentences that were given before and if they are no longer in line with what we would sentence you currently we're going to reduce those sentences many of them those sentences are reduced through petition some are reduced automatically there is also an expansion of good time which says that if you are incarcerated but you are taking part and programs that are meant to rehabilitate you whether that's job training or drug treatment or something of that sort you can have time taken off of your sentence and so there are different provisions to allow people to reduce their sentences and about a thousand seven hundred people have gotten reductions in their sentence since the first day back when to law and there's a reduction of about six years on average for people who have that reduction Lewis let me bring you into the conversation Jonathan just mentioned the war on drugs in the seventies and eighties this act is mainly aimed at people who were arrested during that time period many of them were black men what do we know about the demographics of the people who've been released under the act so far you know for decades the criminal justice our conversation among our political leaders especially both on the state and national level could be characterized as a race to the bottom it was a competition for who could be the toughest on crime who could lock up the most people and throw away the key it was also a conversation that was defined by dangerous rhetoric with no regard for empathy or second chances in you know essentially a dehumanize people I was one of those individuals that was in that conversation in two thousand I was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of a hundred and eighty eight months in for our listening audience I don't want to you know belabor the point in terms of you using your fingers and toes trying to figure that out that's approximate that's approximately sixteen years I served almost fourteen years off that sixteen year federal prison sentence for white collar related offenses most of the individuals by whom I was incarcerated with were not individuals that had got caught up in the war on drugs in the seventies and eighties in fact these individuals were caught up in the mid nineties to the early two thousands especially after the nineteen ninety four a clean crime bill ninety one percent of the individuals that were released under that particular provision that Jonathan talked about as it relates to the crack cocaine provision ninety one percent of those individuals were African Americans so let me just quantify these numbers are for you for second to date seven thousand people total have been released under the four step act I should say seven thousand people total haven't haven't received significant reductions in the have been released under for step back ninety one percent of those individuals happen to be African American who are African Americans who were sentenced undergoes draconian you know crack cocaine laws particularly coming back to nineteen eighty seven moving up to nineteen ninety four and up to date until about approximately two thousand ten that has totaled that seven thousand number that has totaled approximately seventeen thousand years of human freedom that have been restored back to our community now think about this in the Christmas season Jesus was crucified approximately two thousand years ago and if we look at the numbers that actually places us back into BC so I think that this is something that is significant I am literally a pulled over on the side of the road twenty minutes away from MDC Brooklyn where I am going to be with the family who is going to have their loved one return back to them in this Christmas season after having served twenty years on a life sentence in that individual is going to be released as a result as a result of the first act and that's as a result of the advocacy with people such as myself to be the case Sam David Safavian you know cut fifties co founder van Jones and Jessica Jackson and the many other advocates in organizations that was in this our bipartisan coalition to make sure that we got this bill across the finish line Lewis let me ask you something because one of the act's major provisions as Johnson mentioned earlier was to place incarcerated individuals within a five hundred mile radius of their families so they would be closer to them why was that such an important part of this legislation yes so the reason why the five hundred mile provision is sick definitely a poor and within the first act is because of what it does one of several things number one in make sure is that individuals are connected with their families and that those relationships are cultivated between parents and their children number two it brings about a level of proximity to the individual who was incarcerated and also to the community and number three it actually reduces the probability of individuals who are incarcerated from participating and issues that very well could bring about institutional fractions so for instance if an individual is in proximity to of their last known address in they know that they are potentially going to see their mother or their father of a family member is a significant others except around they're going to be less likely to being engaged and fights assaults you know in the likes their own Jonathan the axe when it was passed last year he was hailed by president trump is a huge achievement in being able to bring the two parties together is loose mentioned it was largely a bipartisan effort why did this act appeal to politicians on both sides of the aisle so criminal justice reform brings people together in part because there's a strong moral push for it it's hard to argue and a lot of cases that someone who may have made a mistake should be put away for such a long time it's also incredibly expensive we spend billions of dollars incarcerating people especially here in the United States with the world's largest prison population we do we have over two point one million people in prison in the United States and I think that what that regardless of where you fall politically you can see that we are wasting a lot of money on putting people in cages on those people could be contributing to the economy those people could be with their families and so it really brings people together on either side and of course Jared Kushner hat is a father who is incarcerated in so he understand some of the issues that are being that are at play here and he was able to help usher along the political coalition that pushed it through the first step back and I think that we are also thinking a lot about mass incarceration the fact that we do have so many people put away the draconian laws that were just.

"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And so it really brings people together on either side. And of course Jared Kushner has a father who was incarcerated and so he understands some of issues that are being That are at play here and he was able to help assure along the the political coalition That pushed through the first step back and I think that we are also thinking a lot. About mass incarceration The fact that we do have so many people put away The draconian laws that were just mentioned have really torn apart communities. And we're able to you now fight that together and I think everyone can see the value in that Lewis. I know that you're very involved in communities where people are returning home from prison. Can you talk about some of the the biggest hurdles for them. Once they're out. Yeah absolutely so I think there are things that are obvious and show up in a stat sheets you know these are the things in terms himself. Employment Housing Insecurities ETC likes thereof. I think that one of the major issues Dad I act seeks to remedy is the simplicities of things such as not having an identification card Wanted to provision visions within a bill actually requires all federal people who are being released to make sure that they have access to appropriate identification when you think about that that may not necessarily seem like much quote unquote much but when you think about how an individual could potentially Have incidental contact with with police. A with Wi- with law enforcement and that individual potentially have their term of supervision Violated because of incidental contact because he or she may not may be in a place where they may be accosted by the police. They could be Riding as a passenger in a vehicle An officer ask for that individuals identification that individual can't produce it because he or she has not necessarily secured it because you need an ID a d just to get an ID and all the bureaucracy involved with that that individual could actually be you know a hauled into the local police department apartment just to check out who they who they are and when they are there that could potentially trigger a violation for police contact. So you know Vera things in terms of like employment yes people need to be back And or Not even back because most of the individuals who are actually incarcerated they they may not necessarily have had employment in the first place so they they need to enter into our workforce. They need to make sure that they have adequate housing. They need to make sure that they have access to appropriate health care treatment etc and so one of the things that we're doing it cut. Fifty is one of the several following. We have partner Wickliffe through our relationship with Kim Kardashian. They have given US ten thousand a free lift rideshare credits that we are distributing to individuals who are being released under the first step so that they can have access to You know just you know employment opportunities healthcare opportunities etc Healthcare appointments etc.. Say in addition we have also partnered with talk space. Talk space the online therapeutic a platform so that individuals can decompress from what I call The new PTSD in prison traumatic stress disorder. So that they can. Have you know a safe place just is to you know. Talk about the the TRAUMAS or indoor the vicarious trauma that they've actually observe as a result of being car serrated. Let Me Bring Jonathan back in here for just a moment because because this law I should mention affects people incarcerated at the federal level. It doesn't even touch the roughly one point three million people in state prisons. The sentence are we seeing similar reform movements at the state level. Jonathan the federal system incarcerates more than any individual state system but the state systems account for the vast majority of people in prison so the federal system is about ten percent of the total. US prison population. And so we. We are seeing some of these reforms being put in place Not all of them are prison reform. Some of them are broader criminal justice reforms but Where they are being put in place? really depends news on the state. New York is just past new bail laws which are going to affect shortly and twenty twenty year in the New Year and Other places are thinking about you know legalizing marijuana or thinking about how do we safely race past convictions. And some of that is happening through. Who advocate some of? It is happening through Progressive District Attorney's And so at the state level. Not only do you have more people incarcerated but you have in some ways a more complicated it system just because so many different actors are involved in making particular decisions And so we do. See these reforms but it'll be harder urge to push through in a lot of ways on the state level Just to get everyone on board. And let's talk about politics now on the federal level because many advocates have acknowledged the first step act is a major victory but they've also mentioned that the next step is focusing on those who've been found guilty of violent offenses and perhaps even rethinking policing on a grander scale. Would either of those approaches be able to gain bipartisan support in your opinion Jonathan. That's really hard to say a lot of previous bills that were not able to be passed. lost a lot of support. Because they were. They pushed the too far of advocates. Say That I didn't go far enough because it doesn't eliminate mandatory minimums Because it doesn't push far enough on good time credits We're wondering about what is electric monitoring do there is a new Thought Within Criminal Justice Reform Circle that we are moving towards e commerce ration- where People's information will be collected And where we'll know where someone is at all times we'll have a certain amount of information built up which is a different kind of Captivity Anyway and so there are a lot of sort of fights that that are yet to be had but violent crime in particular is a really difficult I think even For people on the left who are have been pushing for various various kinds of criminal justice reform for years Thinking about releasing someone who you know may have sold drugs at some point. It's very different from thinking about what do we do with someone who it might have heard someone on the street may have even killed someone And so those will be much harder battles and I at this. Point can't quite see receiving leaving bipartisan support. But the first step act was fantastic because it showed that there is some possibility I was once told doing this. Work that if you don't believe that you can make a difference in push forward. Then why are you doing the work at all so I'll stay optimistic. Jonathan Terry is a policy advisor at John. Jay College of Criminal Justice and Louis L. Read is a national organizer therefore cut fifty. Thanks to both of you for joining us. Thanks for having me on.

Jonathan Terry US Jared Kushner Jay College of Criminal Justic People Lewis PTSD New York Wi Kim Kardashian Vera officer TRAUMAS partner Wickliffe Progressive District marijuana policy advisor
"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Takeaway

"One year ago president. Then trump passed a law that promised criminal justice reform across the country. We call it the first step back. I sort of like the idea of just calling. Criminal Justice. Justice reform the bipartisan first. Step at authorized the early release of federal prisoners who were convicted of low level drug offenses and have worked through rehabilitation programs and one year later. More than three thousand inmates have been released. One of them is Nora. Yahya I did ten years in Danbury and then lowered my security level to camp and from there I was released upon the F. Essay which put me out out March eleventh two thousand nineteen which took off approximately three years of my sentence. Nora was in for possession and intent to distribute cocaine. Oh Kane I think one of the excitement of the first act is that people could get closer to the families and continue that Bonn for Nora besides sites being away from her children incarceration meant enduring painful health issues with no relief while I was incarcerated. My leg start hurt. Sunni in I also had like two lumps in my legs so one night I couldn't even get up. They actually had a call to amraams but it was only after her release this year that she was finally able to undergo back surgery completely. Change all the pain in my legs. I feel like one hundred percent percent like the person I was prior to all even after the long-overdue medical treatment for Nora re entry was challenging it. It was very hard not just technology wise. That's that's something in its own south. That was hard and very challenging also started out in a new state which which is New York but I had to start over with my children. Who are who aren't children? Who are adults now but the first step act led her to criminal final justice reform organizations that helped guide her post incarceration life? They introduced me to a computer round. There was just the basics of surf. The Internet are net things that are just totally foreign to me. They also helped me with my medical assistance because I hadn't had the proper medical treatment and I also took a program. I'm to become license for food handler. Now Nora works as an advocate for people who are incarcerated. I think the first step actually opened the door in the eyes of many people for those who are incarcerated for me incarcerated for more on the first step act and where it is one year in. I'm joined by Jonathan Terry Policy Advisor at John. Jay College of Criminal Justice and Louis L. read national organizer for cut fifty a bipartisan initiative. To cut crime and incarceration in half across the country. Thanks to both of you for being here on the show. Thanks for having me on Jonathan. I tell us how the first step act is intended to work when it comes to early release so the first step back includes several provisions for Federal Prison Reform it eliminates the three strike rule which is a law wow that was originally meant to provide harsher punishments for those who have several federal convictions so previously you could get a life sentence. Thanks for having three convictions. Convictions that's been reduced to twenty five years. Since it also extends the two thousand ten Fair Sentencing Act which which reduced the disparity that could be given in a sentence for selling crack cocaine versus powder cocaine also brings people closer to home. Ideally really five hundred. Miles is now limit that people are supposed to be allowed to be away from home wind and the federal prison it includes a lot of other quality of life you might right say provision for federal prisons as well so women who are pregnant are no longer able to be shackled juveniles longer able to be put in solitary confinement Also expanded re entry programs which was mentioned a little bit before so the process of going back into society after prison is a AH arduous one and so the first step act Apportioned millions of dollars for a lot of those programs to help people as they enter. It was also meant to create risk assessment tools which look at someone record and various other factors to decide whether whether or not they are arrested society and that way Ideally we are able to look at people allow them to exit from prison. And no because this person isn't going to be arrested anyone we feel okay letting them out even potentially earlier. Let me ask you about sentence reduction because as I mentioned just a minute ago more than three thousand awesome people have been released now under this act. Can you explain what the process looks like for them to have gotten their sentences reduced right so a lot of the the people who are having their sentences reduced were originally sentenced in the seventies and eighties as part of the war on drugs and so the first step actor. It just says that since we sentence people differently now We are going to look at those instances that were given before and if they are no longer in line with what we what sentence you currently we are going to reduce those sentences Many of them. Those incidences are reduced through petition. Some are reduced dramatically There is also an expansion in of good time. Which says that if you are incarcerated? But you're taking part in programs that are meant to rehabilitate you. Whether that's job training or drug treatment or something of that sort you can have time taken off of your sentence and so there are different provisions to allow people to reduce their sentences and about a thousand seven hundred people have gotten Martin reductions in their sentence Since the first step back into law and there's a reduction of about six years average for people who have that reduction Lewis. Let me bring you into the conversation. Jonathan just mentioned the war on drugs in the seventies and eighties. This act is mainly aimed at people who were arrested. During at that time period many of them were black men. What do we know about the demographics of the people who've been released under the APP so far you for decades the criminal justice a conversation tation among our political leaders especially both on the state and national level could be characterized as a race to the bottom? It was a competition for who could be the toughest on crime who lock up the most people in throw away the key It was also a conversation that was defined by dangerous rhetoric with no regard for empathy. The or second chances. In essentially a dehumanized people I was one of those individuals that was in that conversation in two thousand. I was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of one hundred eighty eight months and for our listening audience I don't want to Belabor the point in terms of you using your fingers and toes trying to figure that out. Oh that's approximate deaths. Approximately sixteen years. I served almost fourteen years off that sixteen year. Federal prison sentence for White collar related offenses most of the individuals by whom I was incarcerated with were not individuals that had got caught up in the war on drugs. It's in the seventies and eighties. In fact these individuals Were caught up in the mid ninety two the early two thousands Especially after after the nine hundred ninety four Clinton Crime Bill Ninety one percent of the individuals that were released under that particular provision at Jonathan talked about as as it relates to the crack cocaine provision ninety one percent of those individuals were African Americans. So let me just quantify these numbers of for you for second to dates seven thousand people total have been released under the first step act I should say seven thousand people. Total have have received significant can't reductions And they have been released under the first step back. Ninety one percent of those individuals happen to be African. American who African Americans who were sentenced under those draconian of crack cocaine laws Particularly pointing back to nineteen eighty seven moving up to nine hundred ninety four and and Up to date until about approximately two thousand ten that has totaled that seven thousand number that has totaled approximately seventeen thousand years of human freedom that have been restored back to our community. Now think about this in the Christmas. Season Jesus was crucified. Approximately approximately two thousand years ago. And if we look at the numbers that actually places us back into B. C.. So I think that this is something that a significant I am literally Pulled over on the side of the road Twenty minutes away from MDC Brooklyn where. I am going to be with family. Who is going to have their loved? One Return back to them In this Christmas season after having served twenty years on a life sentence in that individual is going to be released as as a result as a result of the first act and that's as a result of the advocacy With people such as myself to. PK Sam David. Sylvian Cut Fifties co-founder Van Jones and Jessica Jackson and the many other advocates and organizations that was in his Bipartisan coalition and. Make sure that we got this bill across the finish line. Louis let me ask you something. Because one of the acts major provisions as John mentioned earlier was to place incarcerated individuals within a five hundred mile radius of their families that they would be closer to them. Why was that such an important part of this legislation? Yes so the reason why. The five hundred mile provision is significantly the important within the first step act is because it does one of several things number one in make sure is that individuals are connected with their families and that those relationships are cultivated between parents and their children number two it brings about a level of proximity to the individual individual who was incarcerated and also to the community and number three it actually reduces the probability of individuals who are incarcerated from from participating and issues that very well could bring about institutional infractions so for instance if an individual is in proximity to of their last last known address and they know that they are potentially going to see their mother their father the family members a significant others etc.. They're going to be less likely early. To be an engaged in fights assaults you know in the likes thorough Jonathan. The acts when it was passed last year it was hailed by president. Trump is a huge chief. -Ment in being able to bring the two parties together as Lewis mentioned. It was largely a bipartisan effort. Why did this act appeal to politicians on on both sides of the aisle so criminal justice reform brings people together in part because there's a strong moral Push for it. It's hard to to argue and a lot of cases that someone who may have made a mistake should be put away for such a long time It's also incredibly expensive. We spend billions of dollar incarcerating people Especially here in the United States. We have the world's largest prison population we do. We have over two point one million people in prison in the United States leads And I think that whether regardless of where you fall politically you can see that we are wasting a lot of money on putting people in cages from those people could be contributing to the economy. Those people could Be With their families.

Jonathan Terry Nora crack cocaine president cocaine Lewis Jay College of Criminal Justic Louis L. United States Yahya New York F. Essay Danbury Bonn amraams Trump Jesus Kane
"jonathan terry" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"It does mean the sales over and old by the way what a nice to the keys look great under the Christmas tree I'm assuming you can't that the the actual vehicle under them maybe got a big tree I don't know but I think it's time for all wheel drive heated seats heated steering wheel mon spoil him or her or yourself sh one Buick GMC dot com twenty eight before the top of the hour on old what's on your mind body part by our friends in tight over the North Dakota home to our own Kate T. G. O. ten ninety on your radio and a community that first introduced me really to the box as my first got a sense of what was happening Stanley in Hyogo were were rocking it all right along with the rest of the bokken and the Spencer time there and fell in love love that community it's a great place to live that's the bottom line I mean you're gonna you're gonna you you're going to live a quality of life and tie gonna a very different from anywhere in the USA but you get for generations it just it's it's it has that home town feel kids are safe vibrant downtown community center which is really neat new library indoor play area an outdoor speeding right to this really cool ice skating rinks burners I'll be fun this winter tire okay Andy dot org find out more home to the greatness of consulting services our friend there Cathy nested her team our sons are seen Randy and one of the many businesses are just make Taiyo go past the course headquartered there as well all right so is our next guest a ready to go and get this really on the phone Mister I have not done a you tell me haven't gotten word yet that our next guest is on film await Daniels word in the meantime I haven't even mentioned impeachment hearings I today and here's the reason I have it first of all the Judiciary Committee is holding the first impeachment hearings but they took all that information from the circus that we had over the Intel can mean committee given over there now they're starting with hearings and the first hearing is for individuals I'm all of whom could fairly be called and I mean this in the most respectful way of academic eggheads there there there are you know over smart people and three of them are going to give their opinion that trump is I mean he is look up impeachment in the dictionary you find that's what they're going to say okay and and another fellow Jonathan Terry's gonna say this is ridiculous this is not what the founding fathers envisioned everything else you know everything you need to know now you know everything you need to know right there show all save you from from anything else they just had a little bit of a squabble was the squabble over whether or not to Adam Schiff would come over testified before the Judiciary Committee and of course any vote they have on this is going to go the way the Democrats they have more votes this person but it just you know get it over with this kind of a explosive when I get a kick out is for people who are giving their opinion and god bless you know they probably toiled in the historical No Way Out archives to determine their view of impeachment but it's just their opinion they're just they put their pants on one leg at a time just like you and I do and the getting up they're giving their opinion means nothing it's all for TV and it's all for TV coincidentally while the president there is and they tell hello label anyway there's they're squabbling handy Biggs's another fight of mers on on judiciary our own Kelley Armstrong's on there too Daniel do we have this reduction on the phone yeah okay good I mine all right I did I did I didn't know I did get the word surely some Roger there hang on one second goodwill and love the exchange between anti bags from Arizona and German Nadler Mister chairman I have a parliamentary inquiry general status parliamentary inquiry thank you Mister chairman close to two of the judiciary committee's impeachment inquiry procedures states that members of the committee can raise objections relating to the admissibility of testimony and evidence but it doesn't say what rules apply to admissibility so I'm hoping you can explain to us what the objections may be made under this clause and if you intend to use the federal rules of evidence yeah this is the general suspend that is not a proper parliamentary inquiry it is a profit is not a problem as I stated the rule I stated stated a rule Mister chairman you can ignore it and not answer but you can't just I'm asking for the application the rule for an explanation as we will analyze not parliament will apply the rules he will help us understand that there's there's no clarity there's rules are set.

one second
"jonathan terry" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KOMO

"Capitol Hill with testimony from diplomats William Taylor and George can't and Jonathan Terry guess correctly gets couple tickets to the trans Siberian orchestra the Tacoma dome listen for the come all afternoon sound bite weekday afternoons at four forty noril'sk variety around come on just go with our propellant sure it's money update new closing highs for the Dow industrials today the blue chip index rose ninety two points and though they just two points the S. and P. five hundred also notched a fresh closing highs the nasdaq composite east four points for the second time in a month an executive at Boeing commercial airplanes has been dismissed the company said it is replaced Linda mills as vice president of communications with Conrad son affected immediately mills for several months had been at the center of the crisis related to the two deadly seven thirty seven maxi jet crashes that resulted in the planes being grounded don't get excited cosco is not giving away any seventy five dollar coupons there's a hoax that pops up occasionally on social media and severely back again but the warehouse club operator says don't fall for in a Facebook post the company said well we love our fans and our members this offer is a scam and in no way affiliated with cosco that's your money now I'm Jim Tesco como nos center money news is sponsored this time by T. mobile for business helping keep businesses connected from corner coffee shops to cafes halfway around the world with data and texting included in more than two hundred countries and destinations more at T. mobile dot com slash business and your money news a twenty and fifty past every hour right here if it's time we're running the health insurance survey right now and here's a question to our listeners do you personally write the checks for your family's health insurance bill every month okay are you frustrated because your health insurance premium is costing you as much or more than your mortgage but.

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on KOMO

"Underway at runs through saturday at old hunt middle school coming up next we'll tell you what the answer was to our morning trivia contest and more importantly who the winner is that we're sending to victoria hey is it finally time for a new roof i love eko homes recycled rubber roof made right here in the northwest and you will too eco home service is a great family owned business they've been around for more than two decades nothing and no one can compete with their rubber roof it's not your typical asphalt roof that only lasts about fifteen years it will last twice that long it'll be the last roof you ever need and you're going to save money on your heating and cooling bills komo listeners love eko homes rubber shingle roof kathy for example says love their rubber roof really hardworking crew who are really respectful and left my yard cleaner than when they got their one hundred percent satisfied with their work in speed now's a great time to call eco home to they're having their komo's summer special for their popular rubber roof no interest no payments until two thousand twenty fifty percent off installation now's the time to call the energy solution experts take advantage of the komo's summer specially no interest no payments until two thousand twenty fifty percent off insulation the number the number to call is one eight six six eco home or check out their website eco home service dot com that's e c o home service dot com before we get to our sports update let's settle the business here of did you hear our daily news trivia contest here all of the question again it was twenty one percent of adults surveyed say they will seek out a tour attraction this summer just for this reason what's the reason bother their children well that may do it to anyone anyone i have nothing good restrooms could guess providence is a hard one i thought the answer was to take selfies with their pets i'll come on right really jonathan terry of olympia got the answer right jonathan you get that clipper vacations round trip cruise for two charming victoria b._c. really your chance to win it's did you hear every weekday.

old hunt middle school komo jonathan terry olympia two thousand twenty fifty perc one hundred percent twenty one percent fifteen years two decades
"jonathan terry" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"All right. Jonathan did. Terry crews study the art of French pastry. You know, I'm starting to feel like. Are any of these? It'd be no. If you tell me, it just seems like Terry crews so far can do anything. Onto something. And I'm going to say as unlikely as it sounds that he would have been able to fit in some study of French pastry into this very busy life. I'm gonna say, yeah. Sure. He does. No. But I went to Dominic yesterday had a grown up, man. Jonathan does Terry crews build his own computers. Yes. He does. First of all, okay. I'm going to my son. He's watching a computer. He's thinking he's saying all man you win, dude. I'm watching what do you mean? He's I'm watching it's YouTube. I'm why I'm wait. Wait, you watching people have fun. You know, it was one of those things where he was really into this stuff. And I just wanted to get in his word. And so I said, hey, man what we're gonna do. We're going to build a computer from scratch. And so I bought all the stuff. I had no idea what I was doing. It was the best time. Let me tell you. We got so close and. Yeah. Great job Jonathan. Terry stars on Brooklyn nine nine, America's got talent, the champions, and he'll be back a little later in the show for his own asked me another challenge. Get up for Terry crews..

Terry crews Jonathan Dominic Brooklyn America
"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:41 min | 5 years ago

"jonathan terry" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"And yeah that's a release it's clearly that i didn't like something about i may be a part because that's what the age we grew up with but i like the fact that wayne cashman was still skating around in in advance stage with like a little bit of a beer bell a ready to scrap but he had to but he wants to the hall it is he'd have that how many just the love the low dreadlocks and he's clean that up you know like he was in and dan buddy yeah but that he had like that led the lab but he would by the end he was even those of the fights but he stayed on two more years and i don't know i miss like he was got back i was tough those guys i don't aaron who was sort of like i came on star watch the bruins right at the end of the the the generation past the big bad bruins right right right need to have to esposito and all of those of his talent about the or yeah when sick had just laughed it was stand jonathan terry o'reilly and now and ray bourque it just come in i see you're a tiny bit later them yeah elevate owner that i was like eighty want i like i remember orr's i remember orr's last solid year barely that was my first parents oh no beast i watch away yeah that was like for yeah yeah not all i didn't as a catcher out of it's his on televisions watching but my parents were baseball in football so i didn't get exposed to hockey you know and in the end it is a just watching an entire baseball game and you know i night i saw that notebook and he watched every single game over the summer yeah and he would keep score and and then he would save a me go back and look at him and stuff in like that was like your going to like the baseball encyclopedic it was like you know book in your baseball.

wayne cashman bruins orr baseball football aaron esposito jonathan terry o'reilly ray bourque hockey