19 Burst results for "Jonathan Lethem"

The Happy Foot/Sad Foot Sign of Los Angeles

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:26 min | 7 months ago

The Happy Foot/Sad Foot Sign of Los Angeles

"On monocle. Twenty four brought to you by the team behind the urban est the show. What about the cities we live in this week? MANACLES COLLARTOO Rabelo. Takes us to the neighborhood of Silverlake in Los Angeles to show story of an unassuming thanks city icon a rotating sign outside foot clinic and trade. Let's listen in. There are many things that define the city of Los Angeles Palm Trees. The Hollywood sign film film studios scattered around and Winding Hills. That surround the city. One thing that I discovered upon moving there was that for residence of the east side that it is around as Silverlake and echo park areas. There's another item to be added to that list. The humble happy foot slash sad foot sign at first glance it might seem odd that the billboard of a podiatrist has become the unsung hero of a neighborhood. Mud there's more to the story than this sitting in the intersection between Sunset Boulevard and Benton way this blue sign advertises the foot clinic back in an unassuming strip mall one of the money that you can find in this car. Centric city with a Navy blue background to cartoons grace as the sign on one side a happy and healthy foot and on the other hand bandaged up sat foot holding on for dear life to a pair of of crutches every day and night assign slowly rotates on US access and here it's where the mystique surrounding its it's existence begins to make sense. You see this is one of the busiest intersections in the city and as scores drive by on their way to work important meetings a date or to simply hang out with friends. The sign has kind of become a sort of fortune teller for residence. If when when you drive by you see too happy foot that could be taken as a sign that you'll have a good day or be successful at a particular event or a goal that you have coming up or maybe you should say yes to something on the other hand if you stumble upon the sad fort while that's bad news for you from the Urban Tarot card reader. Perhaps you want go to that gym class after all or want. Make that phone call or worse you have have to brace for. What's not going to be a good day at all of course as with any superstition? This is not inaccurate. Fortune fortune-telling instrument. There's something quite mystical about this. Humble sign being embraced and cherished by Angelenos while having such an impact Own Their state of mind and decision making capabilities but this is not just an urban tale. The happy I sat foot sign has been immortalized. Allies in popular culture to it is featured in Jonathan Lethem's novel you don't love me yet. On David Foster Wallace's the Pale king in music deals have track titled Sad Foot Sign Serve. ooh And the musician back has spoken about it. In an interview to despite its cult following last year residents woke woke up to worrying news the foot clinic was moving premises and the sign was going to be taken down and destroyed a pop. Up Store was launch to help save an restored. The happy for sat foot blue sign. Here you could buy pins t shirts hats and more featuring the iconic collaborations of the two feet in September when it got taken down the team behind the store why kit trading post decided to take the signed signed to their store in east Hollywood while the clinic the side Swat to do it. It's not the same as driving by it every day but if it's any consolation consolation it means that the sign still belongs to Angelinos and hopefully we'll be back to. Its rotating position in an unassuming intersection soon. For now I'll take solace in the fact that whenever I

Silverlake Los Angeles Hollywood Jonathan Lethem David Foster Wallace Fortune Winding Hills United States Navy Benton Angelinos
Edward Norton Discusses His New Film 'Motherless Brooklyn'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

11:37 min | 9 months ago

Edward Norton Discusses His New Film 'Motherless Brooklyn'

"Everybody. I'm Peter Travers this popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a movie out now that I truly love called motherless Brooklyn which is written directed and starred my guest Edward Norton Great Devere then too long. It's been way too but I talk about long as long as I've known you which has has to be going on twenty years. We've been talking about mother. It was really you've been. That book came out. Jonathan Lethem's book came out and he said I'm going to do that. Yeah this is going to be. But it's finally here. Peter I told you I would and I did I did but you know I can't wait another twenty wanted to do it. But how do you feel now. Really good I when something's been rattling around your head for a long time it is it is nice to get it out. It's sort of like I relate. My character has to read syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder and when he talks about having glass in the brain. And that's a little bit how this project was for me. It was like glass in my brain. I want. It was uncomfortable and I wanted to. I did want to get get it out but apart from that personal compulsion to see it through. I'm happy with the way it came out. Maybe maybe more than I usually am. Actually it's saying the things I wanted to say and I think maybe you commented on this. It's it's sort of. I don't think it would have had the resonance that that it has now ten years ago. Honestly We were talking about this before we started just the difficulty of course as he has commented on very eloquently. I think in his kind of elegy to the how difficult theatrical films have gotten how difficult it has gotten to release original theatrical films. It's it's always a struggle for filmmakers to make original Ville visions. It's always been you see the cast we had in this film. We have Bruce Willis and Willem Defoe and Alec Baldwin and Google about the Ron and Bobby Kennedy Volley in great great actors. But you still have to. You still have to sort of struggle to find the resources is you need to make it. And I wasn't and I didn't need them. Two hundred million easy. My I got all my actors working the free on my actors worked for nothing to help me get it made honestly but you still but you still have to still have to figure it out. Well there's so many things in terms of mother Louis Brooklyn about what you have to do even with a studio backing him. You have a movie that maybe they don't know what the title is. Maybe maybe they never read Jonathan's book it'd be they're saying what's it about right. I'll what is this and that money has to be poured into letting them know what it is. Ask because not presold been John Game. Yeah No to do the property those things and look in my case. I I was there saying look. I WanNa make a big old fashioned period epoch about New York in the vein of the Godfather or L. A. confidential confidential. or any any of these great old fashioned movie experiences I think demonstrably audiences really loved right when they're good. We all love of those films and and I wanted to mash it up a little bit with other another type of movie. I love which you also have a pure you know sort of the underdog the the forrest gump. The Rain Man That idea of a a hero. whose very unusual has an unusual condition edition? That you've never seen before that you feel empathy for and the empathy that you feel for him the the fact that you immediately. You're on his side. That's part of what that's what pulls you through. A murky. It takes is one of the nicest guys you've ever played. WELL HE IS I. I think he's well. It's funny and someone said to me you've done a lot of people with Conditions are afflictions. I said No. I've done a lot of people who are fating conditions or yeah like like primal fear baking the score with Deniro in American History X. There's no faking. He's he's just. He's angry mentally ill and the truth is this character. He's not mentally ill he. Just has he has terrip syndrome so people they call him freak show but he's he's smart and he's intelligent. He's he's susu sensitive. The great thing about watching this movie is that it takes awhile sometimes for you to say my brain isn't working like Lionel's right. Oh He's piecing together this puzzle in his own head his own synapses and we're trying to put a linear thing that isn't there. No Oh but I I actually the only thing that I just. I think that Agreeing in house district buys by a certain point story. I think when characters this goes back to like J D Salinger Holden caulfield and catcher in the Rye when sometimes when a character tells you his own story right from the start you you relate you feel the emotional hook and I think if you set that hook early with a character if in this case Lionel in a classic detective voice over where he tells you I have something wrong with me. I struggle with it. I I have friends. Who Understand? Me like Bruce Willis but not everybody does and it's it's tough. You know you start to go. Oh I inside this guy I understand him. You want him to do well. You don't want him to trip himself up. You're always reform. I I just think what you're doing you're saying I don't quite know how he's piecing it together doesn't tell you know and that goes to what you've done with Jonathan Lethem's book set in the late nineties but you send it back in time as through the fifty S. I don't think anybody ever knew what to read sets the well. That's what you just said is part of the reason we put it in the fifties the the the isolation the characters isolation not just in terms of other people being a little less sensitive calling him freak show But if you know that he doesn't even know what he has your even more sympathetic. It's it's it's even more isolating to not know what's wrong with you in some sense but the other thing was honestly Jonathan and I both really like those movies. The the the old fashioned atmospheric feeling of those noir films from that era. The novel motherless Brooklyn Brooklyn is very interior it's inside the characters head but obviously a film is a big a bigger canvas. You have you've got to create a landscape for people to look cat and it's great landscape. Yeah it's that whole fifties thing that's going on in New York and why. Why no is called called motherless Brooklyn Yeah you know why basically has nobody so no one looking for him? But he has Bruce Willis's character yes when a minutes boys so he he has something. And that's how this movie starts. It's about who killed my mentor. Who did this and then we get what to me? She has a real chinatown by. which is where's what's festering underneath this? It's not just who murdered character. What's going on? It's it's what's going on. Well you had the water in La. That was going on. You Know Chinatown chinatowns. Great because it's about La's original sin. It's not just about Out a mystery it's about the idea that La is built on crime. And that's and that's that's what I like about our foams. They they do. What you said is exactly right? It says hey they say hey yes. It's a certain mystery and a certain emotional relationship is driving why he's investigating but really what what this about is the more he he takes us into the shadow we realize there are things going on in what we call our democratic like Galateri in New York society that are violently antagonistic to everything. We say we believe in which we see through the out Baldwin Characters or Robert Moses type character master builder under a person that says I'm GonNa create the city to look like this and then cuts out anybody who's an outside anybody who is into one percenter right which which is what goes to the topicality. Yeah even now and was a racist t the total race. Yeah and I think that idea of the way that the way that we actually baked people talk about institutional racism but discrimination was literally baked into the Way New York was built into a modern city. They literally did do things like lower bridges to the new beaches. They overpasses they set them too. Low for buses is to clear them. Because they didn't want black and Latino minority citizens coming to the new public beaches so they literally limited access and people think that sounds like a conspiracy theory but it happened though it did happen and we see it and yet these are things that you have in your screenplay screenplay this book added to. Yes what was in the book right when you collaborate with somebody like Jonathan Right. WHO's a really terrific right? I really great writer. Is He with you on. I couldn't have done what I did on. This was bowled you could call it. Yeah but but he doesn't say what have you done. No no no no. I wouldn't do that without checking it out out with him. I I felt that I felt there was reasons to set it in the fifties. We talked about that. He liked that idea because he likes those films and I think he he knew is fill his book we had a certain Surreal Meta modernism. If you WANNA call it data it's really about the interior life of this character. He he wasn't so married to the plot per se. The plot didn't wasn't like the story of my family or the story of my city. It was it's a very Byzantine mazed. It's really an excuse to write the character in some sense. You know he also loves Raymond Chandler and you know those guys marlow at the detective. Active in Chandler with went through a couple of novels right so we kind of approached it like his great character going into another the next another another story in terms of taking a movie which you've described we've talked about it now and putting it on the screen. Do you worry about it reaching reaching an audience putting out kind of putting out work that you do that you you have a deep feeling for is always It's always got Certain emotional risk no matter how thick skin you get over the years no matter how many no matter how many you know. I've been through quite a few experiences like I'm getting a a nice honor from the camera. Image Festival in Poland this year. It's the Great Cinematography Festival right. And they sent me a rundown of the films they wanted to review in this thing. And it's amazing like at the top line of of those kinds of assessments of films. I've done that people think are really Definitive or something like that. You have like fight club. And he's always in there and the twenty fifth and American history x is always in there and none of those films did well.

Bruce Willis New York Jonathan Lethem LA Brooklyn Jonathan Peter Travers Jonathan Right Edward Norton Peter I Lionel Raymond Chandler Louis Brooklyn Terrip Syndrome Google Ville Forrest Gump Poland J D Salinger Holden Caulfield Chandler
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"Action as a technological being who's even made like cities the things we've made our bewildering enough i don't know i don't need these new challenges in order to feel stimulated i think we've got a lot of work to just catch up with the implications of like our coexistence with one another and incidentally wales and bacteria there's that great image of how when we do go out into space with is enormous technological apparatus that the isolated space man his spacesuit doing a space walk outside of his craft briefly existing off off the planet that there's more non human dna inside that spaceship than there is human dna inside that spacesuit just the bacteria in his gut with which he co exists there's your prosthetic life not a metal implant but the fact that you are inter penetrated with other biological species in order to digest your food was every instinct in my body militates against against utopian desires that i nevertheless experience as really but i don't really think that i i don't think i need the implants just yet the problem of being a self among selves on this planet is large enough without without the hearing of a bat i would rather just beat a bat that would be really intense to actually like spend some time with the bat that that's a that's a perfect wrap up and i'll also leave the audience with the fact that one of my favorite essays in the new book is about batman and we didn't get a chance to talk about it but yeah i should actually i saw your tweet about bevann brilliant linemen so jonathan letham thank you so much for being on think again today it's been a lot of fun talking to you yeah great to talk.

jonathan letham
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"Specimens of animal nature and we've developed this insane intangible software gore ghost wear or vaporware called consciousness which remains a total puzzle experiencing ourselves as we presently exist is it an enormous psychological philosophical onto logical challenge that i think we should make sure we're continuing to rise to and abide with before we start needing to necessarily see on the infrared spectrum it's sort of like you know needing like a new iphone we haven't even still figured out like what it really is to even just have like a landline i mean it's freaky that we have closed time and space down through these technologies in a book called chronic city i wanted to write about screens how they were changing me and and reality and how i realized that i didn't even need to write about like second life or virtual reality even just writing about like ebay what it's like to follow to like disassociate out of your physical body and be following an auction on ebay where like you are sort of on the other side of your computer hoping to get that comic book that expensive cover coverlet batman comic from nineteen forty that someone else who you can't see is bidding against you for and the weird strange associative onto logical freakout that experience when the sense that other person bidding against you on ebay that was weird enough i don't know i just don't need the hearing of a bat or a and it's kind of like the vacuum of space my body doesn't really want metal implants in it i'm really not sure it's gonna feel that good and i've got plenty there's plenty of unfinished implications about the human animals scituate.

ebay
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"Doesn't hear like a human being here's their wires that are directly implanted into his brain that stimulate the auditory section it never goes through an ear and he upgrades his software every now and then and then he hears differently all of a sudden the sounds are different and he actually here's different ranges depending on how is software has been updated but it's he always reminds me that what technology did for him was make him more connected more emotional i remember somebody was colorblind but they actually have an auditory cue is to color and so it's sort of changed the way their brain responds the implants that are coming and they will be coming soon once you could implant artificial years and people why just here with the range of human right why not here with the range of a dog or a whale or bird that can hear much higher and lower pitch frequencies that we can that will come soon and then when we can augment our is why just see visible light why not see x rays and ultraviolet and infrared light and everything that's out there i don't think there's any way around this that the aliens we're going to encounter if the ard vance from us by many centuries of technology are going to be indistinguishable from is and i don't think we are looking for biological life i think we should spend more time thinking about what life really will evolve into it may be that the biological being that i am was just the first stage of lucien and unnecessary and maybe even beautiful next step in have aleutian is for us to be audited and maybe someday to completely design artificial bodies.

lucien
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"One of the oldest questions i think humankind has asked is if there's other life in the universe is very very different from us or is it very similar and even when it comes to the microbial level even like very small like bacteria things in right now we're exploring the solar system looking for evidence of life on mars or on some of the icy moons of jupiter and saturn their oceans underneath the ice and even if we found a microbe i think one of the first questions is does it have something like dna is it similarly put together the way we are or is it something very different even at the microbial level and then you take that question and you move even farther i mean what would alienate that are more evolved look like aliens that maybe even have advanced civilizations and this is one of these things where i'm very wear of the limits of human imagination einstein famously said you know the universe is not stranger than we do a magic stranger than we i can imagine and i think that a lot of times people say well we have one evidence how life started and how life can exist and it sort of makes sense that maybe something similar would have started on different planets i think actually when you when you when you think about civilizations aliens out there that are advanced maybe even have more advanced civilizations than we do the thing that i really can't get around is that i think that the definition of being human is about to change a lot in the next century i think that humans and a is and computers will begin to merge actually become somewhat indistinguishable from each other this is not some terminator scenario of the is taking over and destroying everything but for example i have a friend who has coke lear implants he was profoundly deaf than had clear implants put in and i've gone to classical music concerts with him i remember i went to go see carmen and there were tears rolling down his face as he was listening to carmen and he knows that he.

carmen
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"So it was so much it was such such luck for me because you know my mother's favorite band was cream it wasn't like electric guitars we're gonna freak my parents out but i did get to like cut my hair really short and put on a dog collar in high school so the actual specific signifier of punk not the like henry rollins punk is any anti thawra tarian gesture i couldn't ever make that claim because i already knew that there was lenny bruce or tristen sahra or or my my mother getting arrested on the on the steps of the capitol and being thrown in jail in washington dc during an anti war protest couldn't fancy that punks specifically invented rebellion i could like the particular flavor of rebellion that they offered me it was funny as hearing rollins who was himself a musician in a band what he seems to leave out of the description is there is a punk aesthetic which you know okay it's a little less of like a grandiose thing than talking about like kicking back against cherie korea law but punk for me is also like a particular way of playing electric guitar which is good right like that that there's you know it's like three chords and the truth you know and feedback and i mean album covers got cool again you like punk for me is also something like looking at a clip of the specials if you're looking at like musicians on television in the nineteen seventies it's getting really earth tone and really kind of a lot of flowery clothing and then you get like the specials with their pig genes and.

lenny bruce washington dc henry rollins
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"Is punk rock it's also very jeffersonian and so that to me is punk rock you can ask the next person he or she might tell you something different so it is subjective so is it present in our lives today absolutely i find it music i find an art i find it in filmmaking i find it in these amazing demonstrations happening all over the world these twitter fed facebook fed flash mobbing revolutions that are happening all over the world that are indeed changing the course of government ousting people i causing mubarak and changing people's minds so yeah punk rock is alive and well i like the way he's making it so political but you don't need punk to be antar tarian so then it begs the question of if it starts for him with the velvet underground you know if it can encompass occupy wall street does it also encompass the dada manifesto does it increase uber roy the french alfred jerry does it encompass ver lane and rambo i grew up with punk came along as incredible sav for me in a way i was so i was born in nineteen sixty four which i've always been very reluctant to talk about things generational because i always felt like oh sort of borne out of time and when people offer me generational identifiers i'm like no i was actually thinking about this other my brain was formed in the fifties by rod serling and lenny bruce and philip k dick and jerry lewis and little richard that's actually where my brain was shattered even though i wasn't technically around to experience it.

rod serling richard twitter facebook mubarak alfred jerry lenny bruce jerry lewis
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"Next that's published in november's called the feral detective and i've been thinking about feral children in a kind of half assed way all my life since falling in love with edgar rice burroughs tarzan novels when i was seven or eight you know somebody left a stack of tarzan novels in my in my room they weren't even from my mother's book shelves i mean there there was the hierarchy in my house i was like oh these this maybe this really is trash it's not on my mother's shelves it's not as of but i read them and i was like ooh tarzan now of course those things unbearably there everything the racist and misogynistic and formulaic but they're also you know tarzan was a big like sherlock holmes tarzan jesus christ no james brown there are very few bugs bunny there are very few figures that loom so large right and then you know and then you hit then you find mobili also colonial horrible cranial fantasies but the image of moberly turns you on it's weird and exciting he can dance with the bear and he can go and steal the fire from the team for one thing their kids without parents who can do whatever they wanna do absolutely like you so this this image even in its most rudimentary or grotesque form always sort of spoke to me and then i become like a teenage film snob i start going to only european repertory cinema in in manhattan when i'm seventeen or eighteen and i i like truffaut and i like verna herzog and i saw kaspar hauser and i saw the wild child buttress and i was like this is something this is a thing what is this i like this well i mean part of it of course is that i was identifying with veracity in children.

manhattan truffaut verna herzog kaspar hauser james brown moberly
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Think Again

"No ad advocate for the books you care about the way i do all the time if there were no criteria that you believed we're more than just your eccentric the weird conjugation of your wishful thinking with the words on the page i believe in the books i believe in but not categorically not like you should read dystopia fiction that's pointless i care about individual books and and the experiences that they construct for the reader and i believe in them as individual encounters so i'm not saying let's all read by this program or according to this concept or structure or external category i'm saying look at annika vans ice that book is crazy it's amazing it just does stuff to you that no other book will do now it happens that you can make some sort of useful comparisons for annika vans ice to like j g ballard early j g ballard a world that's kind of frozen and characters moving through it in a weird sort of some nambu list confusion you know this kind of existential angst combined with eko catastrophe but that's not really telling you that like okay so the only good books are eko catastrophes fulham right existential angst that's you're saying i love this antica van novel i'm trying to describe it to you kinda reminds me those j g ballard books but it's also it's really modernist and strange and well you know you gotta read it it's about the individual experience of the book not there's a program that that's going to help you understand what's good to say that this author is categorically great or this genre is categorically great right is is limiting and misleading i'm getting nervous about saying anything categorial no here's the thing i get really excited about authors and then i want i want to read every last damn book they wrote and sometimes that's credibly rewarding it's like it's like deep cuts if you love if al green comes on the radio and you're like yeah love and.

al green annika vans eko fulham
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"It will be sucked if who monday left behind i will say this that can feel smc the become y'all mamedov iphone thought i had gone as as they got none of their fees on become y'all obama telephone though as unethical i dan snowball i stumble based on sse there jonathan lethem y'all got off home though astle hitler demo by some water why not voted hang on some time sa sa gaza if you cocoa as then evidence evidenced by law again we are going to be better than that once again today a lot of sunshine to so today is my pick of the week we are going to see clouds and shot i am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from god's love if we come to hammond confessed he is faithful and it is in his nature to forgive us got some of the world that he gave his only be gotten fund the whoever believes in hand will have your life and have it more bundling he save us for my son so he can use this as an example to express his great patients with us others to realize that if he can save us save you to use the trim the way and the like toothless latte with regard irregular they say the only matter no way you have a shot were made about them sold that y'all know you will play yo kondo 'area why don't my lights line a ton of being in attendance survey you like a life sentence point you understand what i met him mine.

obama jonathan lethem hammond
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Oh please sonos two yeah moon my he owns shot is who try adams forums in two key that's a little bit of a gate by bjork from solo album number nine copious greg i am bjork out i'm done with bjork i've always loved bjork i really have no i know i know i always have uh she's been great but seventy two minutes this is the longest solo album she's ever given us of what is being called by fans her flew record i would say instead it's a collection often birds the tv farting when they are therapy mm i i got no joy from this record kept listening sort of masochistic louis to try to figure out where the beach york in this record was about i don't want to live in the past post in homogeneity invest protein i love those records i love bjork but this record is a collection of dirges amid temple would be kind there are almost no tempo no melody bjork poses the central question midway through an eye in love with love okay that's the sort of question she's always asked but she hasn't give us any reason the loved the music it's it's it's tuneless it's wandering it's it's uh i don't know if she's going for opera or some sort of naturalistic minimal astono he gave me zero joy and that's the first time ever in listening bjork from the beginning where i felt that way i gotta say it's the trash it record.

bjork louis seventy two minutes
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Song by mavis staples roofing on that lined by michelle obama when they go low we go high she sings i have a mind to bury them whole even though i want to thank the best of them and their people just like me and you i want to bear i have in mind bury them hold for what they're saying how there two of the original home when they go did i tell you from the outlay in that's ads when we those polled in detail tweedy astor you know our mavis it'll this okay 'cause they he wrote that line he knew he was feeling that way could sense mavis was to she goes oh yeah i'm i'm i'm in there with you on that on that line are there there's a roughhewn approach to uh the the initial uh demos for this record is basically jeff and his son spencer on drums which is the way they recorded their previous record with mavis that that roughhewn tweedy guitar on on on the on these songs that are the angriest is a really nice touch it's almost as if sterling morrison of the velvet underground stand in the studio and did some some guitar work on this reckon it has at sort of garage he kinda feel okay and latest feels right at home with that anything that's kind of sparse and gives her room the move simple winds where she can sort of improvise and build around our her bread and butter and have been since the early days when she was in the church up this is a great protest record and a time when we really need a powerful protest records in if there's ever a woman was put on this planet to sing those kind of songs it's mavis staples to buy it record for me it's an absolutely by it record greg i saw a tweet this morning as bad as every day can be of late we still live in a world that has made with staples yeah and and it's true you may listeners if you're following sound opinions this year we did too long interviews with mavis staples to uh pretty much to entire shows we think she is at important cheese in american treasure she's inspirational she gives voice to these feelings that uh that uh i you this helms as good as kendrick lamar which we talked about less.

mavis staples michelle obama mavis jeff spencer greg i kendrick lamar
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Hi i'm to run mcdonnell host of worldview world these the podcast for you if you can handle some hard truths here scholar raza asselot it's difficult to see what does it mean to be american what does that even mean anymore and so what do we do we just find some internal other and just define ourselves in opposition to whatever that other is get a grip on the world subscribe to the worldview podcastwbzorgworldview or wherever you get your podcasts you're listening this out opinions i'm greg cod with jim deary a goddess and it's time to listen to some new music dis dis the around this goddamn tension god i didn't know reid and do with tall ganic key bill is the bill on this long drawnout row that is a little bit of a song called little bit first track on mavis staples new elm if oil i was was black the 16th solo studio out in by mavis uh a legend greg you wrote a book about or i'll take you there born in chicago 19th 39 she's seventy eight now started out with the staple singers uh her brother and sisters and her father pops marching in the streets of the south with dr martin luther king of facing the firehoses the dogs in the batons fighting for civil rights solo career starts and sixty nine stacks bolt goes on to make records with how does your holland in princeton but i think the last ten years has been key she was signed in two thousand seven to anti epitaph one of the most adventurous independent labels in america has made five albums now for them uh one with why kutre the others with jeff tweedy of wilco been on an almost unprecedented outside of perhaps leonard cohen late career high.

raza asselot greg cod reid greg chicago dr martin luther king civil rights princeton america jeff tweedy wilco leonard cohen mcdonnell jim deary sixty nine stacks ten years
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"No the southern makes you feel alive this this is just like its southern its human i think a most of the day isn't anything that i won't listen to be made by human beings humans do uterus machines i i think that answer good rock and roll is something that makes you feel of live gets at the core of the two approaches to criticism not only of rock and roll but of any art forms and i had this conversation many times with my other great hero roger ebert it's this concept of authenticity okay is this just showbiz is this mere entertainment or is the art is sharing part of her soul and can we hear that as a critic leicester is saying this is not just entertainment this is a way of living your life certainly you know i walked out of that apartment on sixth avenue in fourteen street new york believing that and and i set out to write about rock and roll for living and may be try to do what he did not to be him uh his his writing was incredibly distinctive he came from the beats his ultimate hero was carrow at and if cara wack and ginsburg and boroughs road with the energy of the best bebop coltrane right you can hear it in the pros especially when you listen to them read um you hear the rhythms of the jazz lester turned it up he's right in like the stooges play he's right in like those garage bans he loves and eventually the ramones there's actually a brilliant play greg cold how to be a rock critic based on the writings of leicester bangs it did a month at the prestigious steppenwolf theater in chicago in july it had premiered about two years ago in the west coast and now it's doing on the entire month of january at the public theater in new york i mean talk about a classy institution lester i i can only imagine what lester would imagine a man who died as a pauper who couldn't eat.

roger ebert leicester new york greg steppenwolf theater chicago lester cara ginsburg two years
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Spleens a lot about where he came from and where he went with his writing uh what was it about lester uh his early career his writing the his impetus for writing the made him different from other critics uh you know let let let me read a a cents or two from let it blurt which came out in two thousand and six months after its publication cameron crowe uh did an autobiographical film about his days as young rock critic uh the start philip seymour hoffman the uh you know th the actor of his generation portraying leicester banks when my book came out i said leicester was the great gone zone journalist gutter poet and romantic visionary of rock writing hunter s thompson charles buchatsky and jack kerouac rolled up into one out of tune with the peace and love ethos of the '60s and the meat generation navelgazing of the 70s he edged data for sounds that will harsher louder more electric and more alive charting though not necessarily define in the aesthetics of heavy metal and punk heavy metal through the 70s uh punk rock as it exploded uh in the late seventies and early '80s sane in the midst of the '60s that yuck the beatles are fine okay but it's these garage bands the bans that would come to be celebrated on nuggets right bans like the count five whose psychotic reactions and carburator done is referencing the title to his posthumous anthology we're talking about a guy a great who was born in pretty much the middle of nowhere outside of san diego rural california escondido in nineteen forty eight he is best known though for moving to the suburb of san diego elco home which really was just a dusty couple of gas stations and a drug store when leicester was growing up an incredibly weird upbringing his mother was a devout jehovah's witness his father.

lester philip seymour hoffman leicester heavy metal beatles california escondido gas stations cameron crowe charles buchatsky jack kerouac san diego san diego elco six months
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Wait an obsessive work prints in the new power generation file under prince paisley park 1992 designed to prove his utter in exhausted bility in the wake of diamonds and pearl's by some schroeck of commerce as bestselling album since purple rain this absurdly designated rock soap opera is he serious is he ever is he ever not proves mainly that he's got the fung i confess i am to square to regale the guests that my all ages dance party with sexy mf a title extended to six syllables and it's recorded version but my name is prince clears of a question posed by the title arrun available on floppydisk to any publication willing to take his gut and blue light aballah that's got the reggae is a sexy ma a minus in curler himself oh no and you know i think could go as an emblem for a lot of his readers and peers of the un embarrassed obsessive someone who will keep listening jonathan thanks for coming on the show eight with great to talk that was jonathan lethem one of the best novelists in america today and he koa edited shake it up along with kevin deadmarsh after a short break we're going to focus on one rock critic in particular probably the most loud he'd ever certainly the critic made me who i am today lester bangs in a minute on sound opinions from wbz chicago npr x i'll do that yeah.

prince paisley park kevin deadmarsh lester bangs jonathan lethem america chicago
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"What voices aren't we hearing from yet and need to be heard in this conversation that you came across in your research now i mean of course it desperately it desperately disproportionate and we did everything we could to you know both apologized explain and correct for at at you know any any how we could but um it's just it's you know it's congenital to the to the field as it is to to other parts of the culture and um you know i was really grateful for that uh sandra peace ellen stander you know vis name that was new to me when uh she came into our viewfinder fina writes this extraordinary piece about uh spending time in the orbit of led zeppelin if there at their dynamic and egregious peak the rock businesses volatile rapid in dangerous there's no backing out of a concert contract signed if you musician get sick they shoot em up like a racehorse in sent him on he gets crazy they slap him into line long enough to finish the tour before they dump him for ailing dopers of buses legal ostracism deportation locked out of the money pile in america for rock group aiming determined leave for the top two day mob exhaustion anxiety release sex drugs travelling in trying against incredible odds with their bare hearts and whatever managerial leverage they could muster and then she basically just lets you know she was harass you know to within an inch of her uh tolerance and and uh she wouldn't you know she's sort of uh i would prefer not to like i that's probably the last time i'll put myself in that situation though she really let you know what the conditions for a you know potential uh working journalists be females working journalists in that field uh you know what it was lights at the time and it you know you can just imagine that for her willingness to tell us there's probably a 100storey is that people uh you know quietly quietly covered up out of their own sense of awkwardness or were you know indignity yeah uh the boys club isn't only that you know riders were higher male riders were hiring other mail writers or uh you know um credential izing one another but that the musicians themselves probably didn't take women seriously might not have.

ellen stander america two day
"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan lethem" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"The and wbz chicago npr x this is sound opinions i'm greg hot and i'm jim dearer goddess this week will take a look at a topic near and dear to our hearts rock criticism we'll talk the author jonathan them to make the case for rock journalism as great american writing along the way we'll discuss the work of some of the very best critics in our field plus will review new music from bjork and mavis staples ann dowd how did can oh the eu that's all coming up unsound opinions you're listening to sound opinions and later in the show will review new records from two incredible women artis mavis staples and bjork but first we're going to talk about the art of rock criticism will start with the history and then we'll focus in on my hero leicester bangs of course judge jim we know the criticism spin around a for for centuries in many cases art criticism literary criticism theatre criticism for example but rock criticism is a much newer discipline it absolutely as greg really didn't come into his own until the mid 60s not unlike rock music itself it's taken a while for it to be taken as serious work as high culture opposed to strictly pop culture if you will that's why when a new anthology was released called shake it up great american writing on rock and pop from elvis to jay z the great american writing part of it got our attention generally thumbs an awardwinning novelist and macarthur genius grant recipient any.

bjork jim greg elvis chicago mavis staples ann dowd macarthur