27 Burst results for "Jonathan Cottrell"

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"We're GONNA jump straight into this discussion. The . first thing that smart people do that results ultimately in a bad decision. . Is Not making a decision at all. . We'll call this inaction. . Better term where a better mental model for this. . Is Inertia. . The idea here is that we continue doing whatever it is that we've always done. . We don't make a decision because we've already made a good decision in our own minds, , and perhaps we did make a good decision and we're relying on that historically good decision to carry us through indefinitely. . And there's obviously a lot of problems with a Nursia. . There's a lot of problems with not making more good decisions. . One of the most obvious problems is that as things change round you. . Of course, , new responses to those changes is necessary. . The good decision that you made three days ago could. . Even, , in comparison to today's situation, , be a bad decision if you were to make it again and yet. . We continue complying with our previously made decisions as if they are slated in gold, , they're always going to be good decisions and this is Not, only , a fallacy, , but it's incredibly dangerous because that inertia. . Is Self reinforcing by the time we've built a habit and we continuously invest in. . Continuing that habit it's very hard. . This is why I'm calling it inertia. . Not only is it the unlikeliness to act? ? The unlikely <hes> decision making points you're not going to come up with you know come out of nowhere with a new decision <hes> unless you're confronted with this. . But it's also self reinforcing because the more times we take that same action without any adverse responses in other words, , everything seems to be going fine. . The more we reinforce in our own mental Schema that that decision and that ongoing inertia is a good thing. . As a quick aside, , I'm going to provide kind of an antidote to this I want you to evaluate the decisions especially, , the big ones the ones that take up a lot of your time evaluate those decisions on an ongoing basis imagine that you had to make that decision again. . For example, , I might ask myself this weekend if I was faced with the opportunity to start a new podcast today. . Would start one. . And it's important to recognize that not all of these questions have obvious answers and they're only providing a batch a backdrop for conversation. . Obviously starting a podcast today is different than starting a podcast five years ago and things have changed but if I could snap my fingers and changed my reality. . In a particular way. . What would I change specifically as it relates to previously made decisions if I could make a different decision today, , what would it be? ? So once again, , the first thing on our list of four things, , four ways that smart people make bad decisions is inertia. . The second thing that causes smart people very smart people very intelligent and aware and <hes> intentional people like the people who listen to this podcast. . The second way that you are likely to make a is by focusing on the outcome. . In her incredible book. . Thinking in bets and on the interview that she did with me here on developer t any duke calls this resulting. . The idea of resulting is that you're focusing on the outcomes of your decisions rather than. . The way that the decision itself was made. . And there's a critical difference here and it's hard to see when you're reviewing decision. . It's intuitive to imagine that the way we determine whether decision was good or bad is based on what happens as a result of that decision. . But we're missing out on a critical component of the equation. . We imagine that we have all of the factors necessary to evaluate the quality of the decision by looking at the outcomes, , but we're discounting or perhaps entirely ordering the role of many other factors that we don't have control over we can call all of these factors together randomness. . Randomness. . In this case is not true randomness. . There are certainly other kind of decision makers or stakeholders or whatever you WANNA call them actors in our little scene of a decision of a given decision. . But we don't necessarily have control over them. . So we might as well think about those factors as random there in the environment that we choose to operate in but we don't necessarily have control over those factors. .

Jonathan Cottrell Nursia developer
Future Focused Feedback

Developer Tea

04:43 min | 7 months ago

Future Focused Feedback

"One of the most important things you'll do in your whole career is participate in feedback sessions. And in good feedback sessions, things look very different than they do in bad feedback sessions. That's what we're talking about on today's episode. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to develop routine. My goal on the show is still driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers, and in today's episode. We are talking. About feedback how to build a good feedback mechanism. If you are like most people. Myself included by the way. When you hear the word feedback. You have an immediate negative response. Maybe, because of something that has happened previously or maybe because of some mental picture that you've built up about your work place where about what feedback really means. This picture that when things are good, we stay quiet. When things go poorly. That's when we need to talk. And so when you hear that someone wants to provide you some feedback. The feeling that we might get that a lot of people get. is one, of, fear, So how can you give feedback better? And how can you be on the receiving end and receive feedback better? That's what we're talking about in episode so. First. Let's take a step back and talk about what feedback really is. Feedback on its own is a term that's used in communication modeling. The idea of feedback is that there is a message is being sent by some Messenger. And that Messenger has some kind of audience. Wants the audience receives the message. They provide some kind of you guessed it feedback. So how does this fit with our working model? Well, the messages that we are sending are not intended for a particular audience most of the time. Most of the time when we do our work, we're not trying to illicit positive feedback. We're trying to do our jobs. And so when we can understand that feedback session is actually more like an original message session. We can start to look at feedback little bit differently. This is especially important for managers. Managers Win, you provide feedback to an individual to a direct report. You have to understand that person may not be expecting that feedback at all, and instead of seeing in as a response to something that they did that. The direct report did they might see it as something that you decided to do. Out of your own. Making out of your own volition, and this is important because. If, they don't see this as a reaction, right if your direct report doesn't understand that this is feedback as directly related to something that they did, and you're trying to empower them. They might. Put up their guard and The idea of feedback is to provide a loop that is invited. Otherwise what we're doing is we're creating messages and calling them feedback, so it's important to. Make feedback a collaborative process. That's the first tip that I'm GonNa, give you today. Make your feedback a collaborative process especially if you're a manager, but also if you're the person who is typically receiving the feedback from your manager. We're GONNA talk about how it goes the other direction as well later on in today's episode, but if you're the direct report, right in you are receiving feedback. Or if you are the manager who's giving feedback, it's important to recognize the point the whole goal. Of feedback and that is. and. This is tip number two for today. Future focused feedback? The whole point of providing feedback. As it stands in our modern workplace. At least today is to improve. To make slight adjustments or To have a moment of relational connection. Maybe the feedback is simple as letting. Someone know that you thought what they did was excellent. That's totally valid feedback and. It serves a purpose that is still future

Jonathan Cottrell
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rejecting a Duel Identity

Developer Tea

05:09 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rejecting a Duel Identity

"It's easy to imagine. A dual system. A Dewalt sense of identity, the good side, bad side. The impulsive side of us and the more thoughtful side. This dual sense of identity is not real. It's only on our perception, and it can change the way we think about how we work as engineers. My name is Jonathan Cottrell you're listening to developer. My go on. The show is driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. Just like many of the other distortions that our brains can of trick us into believing the idea that we have to cells that we have the good side, the bad side that Dr Jekyll and Dr Hide. Is exactly that it's a trick, a distortion, a simple way of thinking that hides away the complex realities of our ego. So. Why are we talking about ego? Are we talking about dual since of identity on a podcast for engineers will? The truth is when we look at our code. Or? When we look at our previous code, we often tend to blame one or the other. We take credit. When. We believe that we've done something good and we assign that credit to the good ego. We assign it to. Who we intend to be. But then when something goes wrong, we don't take the same level of responsibility now. We may not blame our bad selves, but. We insulate our good selves from stakes. We imagine that the mistake is the fault of the circumstance when it's ourselves, but then when we're looking at other people, we imagine that the mistake is the fault of that person. Taking a wider view, we imagine that we. Can Transcend our own ego. In other words, we can get outside of our own sense of identity. Our own sense of purpose or worth. Our Self. Perception, This is that ego that we're talking about. And when we insulate our own egos from mistakes when we don't blame ourselves. For the bad that we do, but then we turn around, and we don't apply the same rules. The same luxuries to our co workers. We're doing this because we cannot imagine that are co workers have transcended their own egos. This is once again a distortion. This is called the fundamental attribution error. The idea is that we are assigning blame to a person based on who they are. They're fundamental attributes. Rather than doing what we do for ourselves, considering all of the other reasons, all of the other influences that may have caused an error. Going back to this idea that we have a dual, I'd identity. One of those identities is one that we reject. We don't integrate into our thinking. We? Don't believe that we're going to be late. We don't believe. That, we will be lazy. We don't believe that those are a part of who we are. And so we assign them we assign those negative attributes away from ourselves as far away as we can put them. Here's the takeaway for today's episode. Those sites are just as much a part of you. As the good ones. And there's no reason to push away from this. There's no reason to imagine that you can sequester all of your negative attributes. More negative behaviors or bad habits when we assign those to that second identity that second sense of self. that. We kind of naturally create that black, hole. That is not what we intend to be when we do that. We're not taking responsibility for the totality. Of our own actions. And when you do take responsibility for totality of your own actions, you can actually inspect them. Not. All the things that we think are bad. Behaviors are fundamentally bad behaviors, some of them responses to your environment and others. Are Good in the right light. I want to be very clear that there are certainly behaviors that we shouldn't try to portray in a positive light, but. The flip side of that of not being positive about them is not to reject them or act as if they don't exist. Instead we can learn from ourselves if we imagined that our identity is one and the same, no matter if it is positive or negative.

Developer Jonathan Cottrell Dr Jekyll Dr Hide
Listener Question: How Do I Communicate with Non-Technical Decision Makers?

Developer Tea

05:52 min | 9 months ago

Listener Question: How Do I Communicate with Non-Technical Decision Makers?

"How do you communicate a technical solution to a non technical team member? And specifically when that non technical team member needs to be involved in making a decision has technical implications. That's the question that we're talking about on today's episode. My name is Jonathan Cottrell. You're listening to develop for. And my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers, and I got this question from a listener named Saul crews Saul contacted me on link in feel free to connect with me only two and if you want to I'm more active on twitter. You can find me at j Cottrell and you can also find me at at developer Thi. This question is such a good question because there's so many important topics that are wrapped up into this question, so I want to dive into the question. but I when it comes, take a step back and talk about how this happens. Why do we ended up in these situations to begin with? When I first started as an engineer I thought the my job was to create good code code that other engineers would find inspiring or creative. Things that were novel and solutions to hard technical problems. This is what I thought. My job was, but the truth was my job. went far beyond this very simplistic version. It's easy to attach to those things. These are the kinds of things that a lot of engineers. Believe they believe that a lot of their job has to do with the quality of their code or The vast majority of their job has to do with whether or not. They're solving hard technical problems with novel solutions. And that's not wrong. It's not wrong that that could be a part of your job. But your actual job, and when we say job on the show and this episode, we're talking about what your employer is willing to pay you for. What they are willing to give you money for your actual job. is to provide value to that employer. Nothing more and nothing less. and. We can get into the nuanced discussion of what exactly is value. And it's useful to talk about one particular aspect, and that is tangible versus intangible value. Tangible value is directly tied to some kind of obvious resource that we all share. Let's say that you're developing a feature that. Is a specific contingency for winning a particular customer. This is tangible value, and it's pretty clear that your contributions are tied almost directly to that value becoming a reality for your company, but then there's other intangible value. Let's say that your company is interested in having good developer relations well going back to that previous. Misconception of what my job was. When I started as an engineer, having really well written code that would impress those other engineers. Might be used as a recruiting tool. And it may not be the only specific thing that causes somebody to join. The company. It may not be the only thing that gives you. The thumbs up as a developer relations expert. But it provides intangible value that snowballs and eventually connects. To tangible value, so I want to go back to the question that was asked by Saul where he asks how we can. As developers communicate to non technical people who we have to make decisions with. And I! I'm going to tell you how not to do it. then. We'll take a quick sponsor break, and then we'll come back and give you some tips on how to do it better. So here's the first rule on how not to communicate to a non technical stake holder. Don't treat them as if they want to learn the technical details. This is very difficult for me as an engineer and someone who has got to the mindset of teacher, because in my mind, everything that I'm interested in other people may also be interested in everything I. Know about a subject that helps me make clear decisions. I assume other people who want to make decisions about the same subject. May also want that same knowledge, but the truth is that your role is not to be a teacher. And that's not to say that you won't provide some information. Some critical information, even as a subject matter expert, but a subject matter experts job is not to teach the technical details, but instead to communicate their impact. Kind of getting ahead of ourselves here. But. It's not to teach the the person who non nontechnical. That's not your. To teach them the second thing you have to be aware of as an engineer. Is that the reasons you might make a decision. The especially the technical reasons you might make a decision. Are Very likely to not make immediate sense to your audience. In other words, let's imagine that the technical reason that you want to use a particular language is because it's ability to work concurrently or Kind of performance metric. Communicating this raw performance metric is unlikely to sway an audience that doesn't really know the difference between one language and another or one performance, metric and

Engineer Saul Developer Jonathan Cottrell Twitter J Cottrell
Mental Models for Finding Balance

Developer Tea

07:19 min | 9 months ago

Mental Models for Finding Balance

"What does it mean when we say balance we use this term? When we're talking about our work we use it when we're talking about our political views. We use it when we're talking about how we judge other people. We use the term when we talk about how we should treat other people and we certainly use it when we talk about decision making but what exactly is balanced and who decides win. Something is in a good balance or if it's unbalanced in today's episode we're GonNa talk about two models of thinking that can help us understand some nuances about balance. My Name is Jonathan Cottrell listening to developer tea and my goal on the show is to help. Driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. And here's the reality balance most of the time when we use that word. What we mean is something acceptable. Something that feels peaceful for example when we use it in the frame of work life balance or something that we generally agree is fair. When we're talking about the justice system and defining that balance is a dynamic problem that doesn't have a singular solution for example balancing a workload. What's GONNA look different for different people? Based on their capacity maybe based on what kind of what phase of life therein and so balance has no singular representation. It is like most things relative to your context but there are different ways that we achieve balance. You can edge. I imagine someone balancing on tight rope the idea being that any misstep will throw them out of balance and that once the tight rope walker is out of balance. There is no recovering because they've fallen another mental image. You can bring up. Is that of a scale where you way down. One side and try weigh down the other one in equal proportion many times when we think about balance as it relates to our personal lives. The picture that comes up is more like a calendar. And if you're to scan across that calendar the places where you're spending time if they are heavily weighted in one area. You may feel unbalanced but I wanNA to talk about two models of balance that come from the hard sciences specifically i WanNa talk about thermodynamic balance or inter pellets and chemical balance first. Let's talk about thermodynamic balanced for a minute. Thermodynamic balance is the balance of essentially temperature and temperature is a measure of energy higher amounts of heat means there's more energy and lower amounts of heat means there's less energy and generally speaking when you put something that has high energy near something that has low energy they will interact. They're not going to stay separate from each other but instead it was that kind of system if you were to say create a vacuum in have a one area of the vacuum half of the vacuum high energy and the other half of the vacuum as low energy those two fields of particles whatever they are air or water or whatever will tend to move towards some equilibrium. It's important to note that another law of thermodynamics is that no energy is lost or created in a given system so this is all theoretical if you had something that had let's say one hundred units of energy and something that had fifty units of energy and they were in equal proportion to each other than you would end up with seventy five units of energy on average across that whole field technically the law of thermodynamics. That were referencing. Here is that things will tend to move towards An absolute zero which essentially means that. There's no difference. There's no potential energy in the system available. So why are we talking about this law of thermodynamics him? What does it have to do with your kind of sense of balance as a person or in your work where? There's a lot of ways that we can apply this concept to our lives applying this model of thinking to our lives when you are feeling a sense of tension when you feel what you would label as unbalanced. It's very likely that you have this kind of juxtaposition where you are holding too much energy and we will use that term kind of loosely. Right now where you're doing too much for example and the equilibrium that you need to find is by doing less. This is an oversimplified example because in most systems balance or equilibrium is not found between two competing forces. We don't live in a vacuum where you have only to can fields that are trying to find equilibrium. We live in a much more complex environment with new variables being introduced every day. We'll give you a very simple example of this before I was married before I had children. I had more available energy to put towards working when I say working. I mean learning doing things on the side of the extra energy that I now and putting towards my relationships with my family the seems like an obvious example but what this means is that balance has a different definition for me now balance means something different than it used to and this isn't always purely on an individual level. Sometimes balance is a shared concept in a given culture are giving context we do have some shared limits as humans but we also have shared culture that changes our personal definitions our personal perceptions of what it means to work with balance now most of the time when we talk about balance as it relates to our work. We're talking about. What proportion of our time are we spending on work? And the modifier that we use Let's say as as a Employer is we provide time off. We provide holidays. That's one of the benefits that an employer might provide but sometimes sometimes the amount of time off has nothing to do with the balance at all.

Jonathan Cottrell Developer
The Overreaction Paradox

Developer Tea

05:57 min | 1 year ago

The Overreaction Paradox

"In today's episode. We're going to discuss. Something called the overreaction paradox. This is a newly coined term for a long existing phenomenon. My Name's Jonathan Cottrell. You're listening to develop a t and go on. The show is to help. German developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. A spoiler alert for today's episode. Even though we're talking about something called the overreaction paradox. We are not suggesting that the people who are responding to this global pandemic are overreacting fact in most ways. This paradox supports the other side of the argument. That overreaction can often be completely rational. Here's how it works will use an example from our work as developers. Let's imagine that you have a startup. You've come up with a great idea. And least you think it's a great idea for an application and you know that this apps going to be launched on product hunt tomorrow but you do nothing to prepare for it. Maybe leave the APP on a small server. That can easily be overloaded. Or maybe it's dino that goes to sleep on Hiroko or something and so as the APP is shared on Product Hunt. Or as it's shared on hacker news and because it's such a good idea they had it gained enough popularity but all of the traffic. Obviously overtakes your server and you can't scale to meet the demand now not only. Does the traffic overtake the server? But you don't really do anything about it. You kind of sit back and say well. Things will work themselves out eventually. People stopped visiting the site because it's unresponsive and in a way things did work themselves out but just not to your advantage. People stop visiting the site because was unresponsive. In this scenario. You didn't overreact but you still experienced a significant failure and it's obvious that you could have done more to prepare now. Let's stick it to the other side of this argument. Let's rewind back to the night or the month before the launch. Your great startup idea is scheduled to release on product hunt. Perhaps you thought ahead and decided to release on Hacker News on a day earlier. Perhaps you're going to stagger. You're you're already kind of preparing for the onslaught of traffic and coordinating your marketing efforts to manage that traffic. Well and so you prepare in advance in multiple ways first by coordinating those released times and then maybe you scale up your server or you have redundant servers multiple backup options in case the first line of Defense or your first server falls down and you can easily reroute traffic to another server. And of course the tactics to do this. There's a lot of them and we don't need to dive into the details. But it's important to notice here then you haven't even released your product. Yeah in fact if you're looking at the need the immediate need for these extra measures of precaution. The the immediate need just. Isn't there now. Let's fast forward to the day of launch. And you start getting heavy traffic in fact even heavier than you had planned for him now. Initially your plans all kind of work you have one of your servers get overloaded and traffic automatically flows to the second one but then you have a few users that are reporting that. They're seeing some kind of error. You react immediately adding even more servers to your pool of service and you can see how this kind of reactive response and proactive response. If you're looking at it in comparison to the previous the previous scenario this kind of activity is much more desirable but I wanted to kind of change the second scenario. Let's imagine that not only. Were you able to handle all the traffic? But you're able to handle all of it easily with a lot of headroom. In this scenario people might say that you overreacted. That you prepared to heavily or that. You imagined a problem that never existed. These are all phrases that we like to throw around and we have good reasons for throwing these phrases around for example is not really a good idea to write code before you need it. And this is essentially. The some of the overreaction paradox. I'm going to read the tweet directly from James Clear James Clear as the person who kind of coined this term. The overreaction paradox. And here's here's the tweet. Windy results of taking effective action. Is that nothing happens. Which makes your efforts seem unnecessary. And like an overreaction. Even if it was the right thing to do I want you to. Think about this overreaction paradox while we go and talk about today's sponsor and then want to come back and talk about how we can make our incentives align with the things that we care about so that we don't get stuck on the wrong side of the overreaction paradox.

James Clear Jonathan Cottrell Hiroko
Don't Make the Problem Fit the Model

Developer Tea

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Don't Make the Problem Fit the Model

"One of the most critical and fundamental skills any developer must cultivate is the ability to map. Mapping is the concept of taking some information and relating it to some other information the seems overly simplified but if we apply this to actual maps we can see the direct correlation for example when we take a picture with a satellite. We have pixels and we can map those pixels to actual latitude and longitude points in our physical world. What's interesting is that? Latitude and longitude is in of itself. A mapping exercise in so it stands to reason that we can stack maps on top of each other. We can add new information using old maps. That's exactly what we're doing when we're creating routes on these existing maps were taking the many different layers and compressing them together. Creating multiple maps that are abstracted from underlying maps. In fact almost all of the information that we operate on a day-to-day basis relies. Some kind of mapping but it stands to reason that as with most things that humans try to do very often. We get our mapping wrong in today's episode. We're going to talk about how forcing a concept into the wrong model can cause major problems in software and your career as a whole my name. Is Jonathan. Cottrell you're listening to develop my goal on. This show is to help. Drew Developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers as with all models. A model is not a pure picture of the truth. Alfred Decor Ziblonki. I said that a map is not the territory it represents but if it's correct it has a similar structure to the territory which accounts for its usefulness once again if we think about actual maps that we use the Google maps for example satellite imagery on Google. Maps often is out of date. In fact it's always out of date to some degree therefore it cannot ever be exactly the territory however models are useful just because a maps satellite imagery is not perfectly up-to-date. Doesn't mean that those images don't represent some picture of today's current reality in most cases. Those images are up to date enough to be useful and it's important to recognize as with so many topics on this show the necessity of context. In what way can a map be useful? In what way can a model be useful? We talked about models in the last episode of develop not specifically. We talked about the idea of having implicit and explicit models that inform our various processes. And it's important to think about your models but it's also necessary to think about how models can steer US wrong models can and often do give us a false sense of confidence. It's not just because we picked the wrong model to represent a particular idea. We shouldn't always blame the

Developer Alfred Decor Ziblonki Google Cottrell Jonathan
Getting On The Right Level When Solving Problems Collaboratively

Developer Tea

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Getting On The Right Level When Solving Problems Collaboratively

"Have you ever been accused of being too in the weeds to nitty gritty. Or maybe you've been accused of something kind of the opposite that your head is in the clouds. You're too so far zoomed out. You're thinking too abstractly in today's episode. We're going to talk about what causes this kind of problem in what you might be able to do in conversations to fix it. My name is Jonathan Cottrell. You're listening to developer. Team goal on the show is took driven developers like you. You find clarity. Perspective purpose in their careers developer t was initially built as a show. That focuses is on a very narrow subject for a short period. Today's episode will be an example of that or only going to have a few minutes. It's discussing this topic in necessarily we are discussing something at a zoomed in perspective. And we don't always cover every we single implication or detail kind of leave that as an exercise to the listener. If you want to dive deeper you can. But what's necessary to be able to do. This is choosing what level. We're going to talk about the subject. At what do we include and more importantly what do we leave out of course when we're putting out content As podcast and we can get to choose what level is appropriate for the podcast. And for what I want to talk about on the show but it's not necessarily so when you're in a work scenario when you're collaborating with other people when you're trying to solve a problem when you're trying to build a successful business the economics of the discussion the economics of your approach all of this deals with the level that you choose to solve and if you've experienced this you've probably experienced it at an interpersonal level in some kind of meeting leading scenario One on one meeting for example between an individual contributor and that person's manager developer and their manager and the managers trying to solve the team dynamics they want to understand. How do we create positive? Relationships between the team members numbers and the individual developer brings a specific solitary problem one issue that they have with with another developer and these are two different levels. The question being asked is how do we solve the relational issues that the team is facing thing but the answer. That's being provided is zoomed in on one specific instance of a problem. This specific civic. Instances of the problem may help us understand the larger picture that the manager is asking about and it certainly shouldn't be ignored. There's nothing wrong with this level of thinking but in the conversation that's being had perhaps the most functional thing that can happen is either. The manager chooses assist to address the specific problem. I with that individual which is probably a good first step by the way or the individual recognizes or. The manager tells the visual that. Hey you know what. We're trying to solve the problem. And one layer above and one layer abstracted from what you're talking about and this difference could even be quite minor. The difference between these layers is not necessarily substantial stansel but defining what layer. You're going to solve the problem at helps. Both sides focus on the problem at hand rather than then whatever. The relevant details are in the disparity between approaches. You've probably also experienced the opposite of this. Where the question being asked was at a higher layer and the answer given was at a lower layer where the question asked is at a lower layer and the answer given is at a higher layer this kind of Response often feels defeating To the person that's asking the question. Sometimes this is just a question question about tactically solving a problem and the answer Moves up to a process level for example this very common scenario in management. Now this doesn't mean once again that the thoughts about the process oriented approach are wrong very often. The conversation should eventually evolve to that point but for the person who has In this is my personality that tends to this as well for the person who tends to abstract act problems quickly to respond by abstracting to a level of assistance thinking rather than answering a tactical issue this can sometimes frustrate the people that are asking the question similarly to someone who is getting into the weeds. It's kind of the opposite problem But the same level of frustration can happen because it's a communications breakdown. So how can we fix this. Consider the idea of answering a question question being largely about understanding the question thoroughly to begin with you've probably heard the socrates quote understanding. A question is half an answer and this certainly applies in this scenario with someone engages in conversation with you especially when you are engaging engaging together to solve a particular problem to solve an issue on a team for example understanding the question understanding meaning the problem understanding the concern thoroughly is part of the solution. Don't approach these conversations as if the question is clear and obvious even if the question has been worded and reworded multiple times even if both sides believe they they have an intuitive understanding of the problem at hand the problem needs to be defined and redefined signed and explored together this is part of the collaborative process when providing feedback. Do it in a conversational way. Day that is always also looking for more feedback about the feedback right so in this scenario where you're starting to get into the weeds. Make sure you're answering in a way. That is aware of the fact that you may be answering on different levels. Ask The question of. Is this too in the weeds or do we need to talk about something more abstractly. If both sides of the conversation are aware the people tend to answer questions at different levels than frustration can be replaced by communication and getting at the right right level. Is One step getting the right answer.

Developer Jonathan Cottrell
Productivity In The Face of Ambiguity with Functional Assumptions

Developer Tea

02:51 min | 1 year ago

Productivity In The Face of Ambiguity with Functional Assumptions

"As we pointed out many times on the show before a senior your engineer a great developer someone who has a lot of experience you will very often hear their answer to almost every requestion starting with it depends and while this can be the right answer it may also so leave you feeling paralyzed in fact in some ways this might make younger or less experienced developers seem like they move faster because they don't have these weights from their past experiences they don't have to go through all of the things that it depends on so what can we do to empower our senior developers to empower our ourselves to make decisions even though we have all of this context that makes us feel like we are paralyzed. That's what we're talking about in today's episode of developer T my name is Jonathan Cottrell my goal on this show is to help driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in your careers now just a quick recap the idea that it depends it comes down to very simple reality that context his always critical and when you ask a question that doesn't have context built in to that question well a good developer is always going to ask for that context this is a good strategy for example just as a kind of a bonus points a good strategy for showing that you are a thoughtful developer clipper that you may have this senior level experience when you're in in in an interview is to ask for that kind of context when you have a question that doesn't have context included it's a even somewhat vague question ask for more context ask for the edges of the problem try to understand the problem problem thoroughly however on the flip side you're in your job and you're trying to make decisions in the face of uncertainty not a lot of what you're trying to do is take vague requirements take vague requests and turn them into highly clarified tasks asks or turn them into code so how do we deal with this seeming paradox where on the one hand we know ooh that operating as if there wasn't context as a terrible idea but on the other hand when we ask for all of the context that we might need to make the perfect decision we ended up paralyzed gathering that context and we never actually moved the ball forward.

Developer Jonathan Cottrell Engineer One Hand
Leverage as a Career Heuristic

Developer Tea

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Leverage as a Career Heuristic

"Many past episodes we talk about some of the pitfalls of our biases as of our cognitive distortions and often this discussion turns to the concept of heuristic here risks being he kind of rules of thumb that we use when making snap judgments and here is six are incredibly important unfortunately often they get a negative rap been on this show so in today's episode I WanNa talk about a specific heuristic the you can use to kind of drive your career growth James Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to Develope my going the show is self driven developers find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers before we talk about the ristic I want to discuss today I want to take a step back and think about how we as developers as engineers designers donors how do we set our goals of course in the context of a company you may have revenue goals you may have you know official okay ours everyone agrees on but there's a distinct line in the sand between the common goals making more money and the more specific goals like having a positive impact on a particular group of people no matter how you create your goals almost everyone falls back to some kind of basic rules of thumb for example almost every once whatever they do to be sustainable and I don't necessarily mean environmentally sustainable of course that could be a part of your values the people don't tend to set out with the expectation and the desire to fail or to stop doing something that they're doing quickly the Hicks of earning resources or social recognition social appreciation these are the heuristic we tend to share and these serious six can kind of be automatic they're built in we don't have to sit down and write down that we want Social Nisshin we know how to sit down and write down that we want more resources so that we can survive and thrive so we have a bunch of these automatic curious expert what if we wanted to kind of create or build another set of heuristic on top of this most of the time when we think about our values news it is not necessarily at the heuristic level in other words there aren't really rules of thumb we have to think very hard about how we measure certain decisions against the the values today I wanna talk about a heuristic that will help you grow your career that may not necessarily be obvious it may not necessarily pop out to you from your nature or your subconscious but before we get into talking about this particular heuristic I want to introduce it with it a caveat and that is that no one is going to care about your career more than you do think about that for Ramona no one will have the capability of carrying about your career more than you do now many of you have probably heard this in some form or another that nobody's going to care about your life or your job or your income more than you do and it's true but some of the connotation nations need to be cleared up here this doesn't mean that no one else cares about your career at all and also doesn't mean that everyone else is out to get you or that they will put their careers above yours very often decisions are mutually benefit missile they benefit both your career and the other person's so have to be careful when we are thinking about making moves for our own careers we have to be careful in assuming that no one else cares at all about our careers when the truth is probably somewhere in between I've heard some pushback on this idea also from the angle that other people can't care as much about my career as as I do and I think the the better ways think about this as no one else will invest as much in your career as you will no one else will invest as much in your careers you will and when we think about it this way they he clears up any kind of confusion so let's talk about this heuristic I will talk about what the heuristic is them we're GonNa do a quick sponsor break in come back and talk about how it applies in particular scenarios in your career you're going to have moments where you have to you negotiate and negotiation isn't always about getting a better salary it's also not about getting a promotion of course those are moments of negotiation but you're negotiating all the time negotiation is out of our lives pretty much every day now we often think about negotiation as getting the Best Bang for our buck getting a better price on something but negotiations much more than that at a fundamental level negotiation is the process of resolution the process of finding common ground with another person in order to take the next step essentially anytime you are making decisions a specially when you're making collaborative decisions you probably have some dynamic of negotiation happening additionally you can imagine that negotiation happens within ourselves as well we seem to have two sides in an even decision the one side that wants to do the thing that it is immediately gratifying or maybe the thing that is safe and the other side that wants to do the thing that's long-term better for us or maybe a bit more risky often the decision making process for an individual is kind of a mock trial between these two sides thing to arguments of each one and then deciding which one is the most persuasive and so it benefits us to understand and to be good good and negotiating pretty much all negotiation relies on leverage and this is the heuristic the you can use used to grow your career now I want to be clear that I think there are a lot of ethical implications in this discussion because leverage can be anes Bhai totally innocent and even beneficial processes where you can gain leverage through very unethical processes even illegal processes like tale in the same way that earning resources as a heuristic you can come by those resources in both illegal in legal ways to remember that with every heuristic that you use I e need to bring with you the tools of inspection in the filtering that you have through your values and through your ethics and of course using the filters of societal norms and even what's legal but once we get on the other side of that once we get to the place where we can gain leverage we can build leverage for ourselves in ways that are totally above board we provide ourselves a much better position in any negotiation

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"And the last episode of developer t and a few episodes before that we talked about how to become I'm a terrible developer terrible manager and it seems that these episodes have resounded well with people who have had these we as developers we tend to adopt in today's episode we're going to talk about another behavior or class of behaviors may be an attitude or a approach that has gained a lot of traction recently and that is the attitude of radical transparency or candor being incredibly candid with people always telling the truth never hiding anything but there are some problems with the way that the average person might see this practice this ideology we're GonNa talk about this problems kind of dissect why okay their problems and how we can practice this ideology perhaps a little bit better my name is Jonathan Cottrell listening to develop a T. am I go on the show is to help driven I find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers and so if you've encountered this idea this idea that we should be audibly candid with our feedback with our thoughts in any interaction we should be radically honest and this is idea of making it radical is that might shock someone you might have a moment where the receiving end whoever you're talking wherever you're communicating with their taken aback by whatever your honesty you're transparent answer was to the question or whatever you're transparent question was to them and it kind of makes sense why this is growing in popularity generally speaking in many cultures including in American culture. We've moved away from control and dictation style of management's where someone essentially gives the orders and everyone follows them we've moved away from that and we've moved more towards a relational management and theoretically this is better if we understand each other if we understand our motivations and our personal interests and cares and we can probably do better you work with each other we can hand each other things that we think is going to energize the other person is going to provide them with motivation and appreciation for their job happiness with their job and hopefully we can work together more we can continue kind of making each other's lives better and therefore want to stay working together and become more reductive together and so all of these reasons are good reasons for this shift and management style but it could be argued that what is lost is the clarity of intention in other words when you have a relationship with someone you might be incentivized to protect the relationship hip even if it means that for example productivity or profitability might suffer and so this ideology springs out the situation where were becoming more relational in the kind of the ORG structure the management structure and now we need to deal with when we see receiving a very clear problem and so now we kind of merge the ideas together the idea that we can be incredibly honest is someone in a way can be seen as the most kind thing the most relational thing that we could do because by being totally honest with that person we are presumably doing what's best for them so hopefully we can see the value in this honesty in approaching each other without much pretense so where does this go wrong what happens to turn this kind of idea already sour this is where it gets pretty interesting because the problem is fairly subtle and that is the idea that one person is delivering truth perhaps a Capital T. should be put on that truth to another person that in a moment of candor in a moment of honesty in a feedback session one person is providing someone else a moment of reckoning with truth and the problem with this is that fundamental level when we talked to another person and we're speaking from our experience from our own perceptions an in these scenarios where were sharing this incredibly ended feedback when we're exposing some Rav version of what we think to another person it's easy to believe that we have some kind of stranglehold some kind of access to a truth at that person is blind too often to the person that receives is this feedback it feels like a self righteous jerk is delivering it and this ideology tends to you empower that kind of mindset that because you are now lowering your guard and you're you know doing away with some level of pretense that you can be jarring that you can hurt someone's feelings because you're doing it for their own good and I guess the idea is that if we're all truthful for long enough then our feelings will not get hurt as often so the same problems that we had before turned into a new version of that problem where we intend to have radical transparency Z. or where we intend to have these very clear feedback structures what we've actually created is a more tense and fearful workplace on top of that those who are providing feedback to those who are receiving the feedback particularly if you have some position in the organization where a lot of your job is about providing feedback they tend to feel emboldened by this new license to be totally transparent so how do we fix this how do we maintain this idea this good intention of being more honest dispensing with the pretense since being able to provide clear feedback feedback to each other without creating these bad habits without emboldening favorite monitoring tool whether that school stack driver new relic as your monitor and.

developer Jonathan Cottrell
Product Mindset With Jessica Hall

Developer Tea

12:33 min | 1 year ago

Product Mindset With Jessica Hall

"I think people are way too attached. Languages languages come and go every three to four years. people are re architect ing making changes. I A lot of people are are committing their organizations to a path without knowing how hard it's going to be changed as opposed to saying this is where we're solving wing for today with tomorrow at mind we think we know that things might shifted change over time because everybody has had to re architect and in in many cases multiple times that was the voice of Jessica. Hall the A CO author of the book the Product Mindset today is the second part of my interview with Jessica. You didn't listen to the first part encourage you to go back and listen to that before you dive into today's is episode. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to develop not in my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity. Perspective can purpose pissing your careers. Let's get straight into part two of my interview with Jessica Hall. I'd love for you to kind of explain further about how how I might know more practically dive into a product mindset. What are some ways some things that I do today that maybe I'm not going to do in in two or three years and instead. I'm going to be doing something else. What are those things that you see a Mo- more developers participating in the future. Yes in the product lines. Mindset has three principles that kind of underlie all things it starts with a fundamentally before principles building for outcomes outcomes that we're not just here to build code. We're here to build businesses to help. Businesses serve customers and to grow the end to continue to innovate that it's not just about the Kobe right but what does that code create. What is that code enable. What value does it deliver and the first principle is minimize typed value. Which is the idea that you know when you are working working in your I d e when you're writing things in Jira. When you're planning meetings when you're doing sticky notes drawing diagrams that's activity the value exists in the hands of your customers value exists when they can work with the prototype or use a productive feature in production or staging That's value exists in their hands where they can do something. So how do you as fast as possible. Put something to their hands. How how do you reject the notion that it has to be complete as to be fully implemented have every bell and whistle it has to have feature parity plus everything else. What is the smallest all set of things that you can do that solve the problem for somebody? PUT IT in their hands. How do you kind of slice across and say I'm going to deliver the ability for you to to look at this for you to manipulate it in for you to get some sort of result on just this thin stripe things and that from there. I can see people gosh should be really. I you know I really want to be able to do this thing great. Let me build that thing. You know. It doesn't account for this thing awesome. I'll get on that next but that first principles really the idea idea that we have to deliver that small sliver that small piece of the feature not everything and I think it goes back to school where you have this ocean of completeness and I don't want an incomplete. That's like that's bad. I can't simplify these things down. I can't cut it down. Just take a piece but taking a piece allows you to reduce waste to increase learning to start generating interest. Perhaps general revenue much sooner so the question you to ask yourself. Else is our minimizing time value when you go to plan your releases. Are you thinking about in every release in every sprint whatever you know analogy use news. How fast are we delivering value to. Our customers are waiting too long before we giving them things. Do we have things that are clogging up the pipeline that if we could streamline them we did you get things out faster which means we can learn faster. How do why isn't it in junior developer. Maybe think about implementing something that might get it done a little bit quicker a little bit simpler as opposed to something that maybe Nouri ability to scale but honey. We Ain't scaling yet. We don't even have ten customers so or win. The team goes to do release planning to say okay. Let's break this down and make sure we have something that we can release that we can deliver value to our our customers in that. We can learn and we're open in. We value without learning the NEX principle is solved for neat so the idea is that AH product needs to solve a need. When is that need. Why does this thing is exists. What do we do for people you know. Kenya explain you're at a bar with someone you just met like why your product matters and you know. What is the need? A needs is our best to find a by state like I can't do any better than him so I'm GonNa have to use his you know. It's you know it's a problem you know. Oh The doing laundry is a pain in the butt and you probably don't enjoy doing laundry your number two. I know that that I know the extent that it takes time and effort if I don't do you know if I don't get it done. That aren't where until you you can. You can put a price on that pain. that you're trying to fix your trying to fix it. You're trying to improve it somehow. You're hacking something together your laundry scheduler. You're you're using. You're trying different services and things in nothing's quite working and you're in the last. You're willing to invest in a solution. That's a neat neat. That's something I I can. I know I haven't if someone has a problem. They don't identify. They don't feel they don't connect act with they haven't figured that out yet good luck trying to cells kind of have to admit that they know it's a problem. They know it hurts. They're trying stuff suffer not finding the right thing. They're willing to make an investment in the new thing that's where you WanNa play and so that's kind of where it helping understand the customer and having spent some time. No one's asking you to do detailed research. Maybe read some of the research that your team is put together. Maybe look at some of the data. Maybe listen to an interview. There's something really powerful about connecting with other humans. the last one is accelerate age the so that comes in a couple different ways you know back in the day. You still only be able to release once a month now. We have good better tooling. better processes better ways to be able to deploy more often being willing to invest in that. I'm reading. This book called accelerate about the science of devops. It is is not an easy by any stretch like I can only go do a couple of pages at a time because it's so dense but it's also antastic in making the case through were very rigorous data heavy process of why to make that investment but it's not just the technology piece of that end getting your organization to invest in technology not the decision making you know a lot of people complain that priorities change at my answers will yeah they should because has everything around the spill change companies change markets change regulations change so why shouldn't priorities change its priorities changing such assigned. FLAKA organization who doesn't know what they're doing at their if they are changing without reason they're changing. They have been measured. They're changing aging because you know somebody right has shiny object syndrome that bad and he usually people call me because because somebody's got shiny objects in Rome. That's not not uncommon big but if they're changing because there is something has changed in the world and we need to respond to it. That's thank goodness right. Yeah thank goodness that retained because if we don't somebody else will get their first and we may not be here so changing priorities isn't necessarily a bad thing. I need people to kind of think that when priorities changing question where that's coming from rather than say oh my gosh product. Doesn't you know what's going on. Our leadership. Team doesn't know what's going on. Don't blindly execute yourself to the bottom of the ocean. Yeah this is a this is a problem right because if you if you look at what what do you mean when you say change. There's multiple things going on. You're you are in your environment and you may be doing something in that environment but if the environment changes around you then there's it's essentially indistinguishable able whether you changed or the environment changed right in other words. You can keep on doing the same thing but that doesn't mean that doing doing the same thing is going to result in the same outcome. This is very It's obviously true right because you can say okay well. Masika a silly example. This is unrealistic. Let's say that I'm awake. Now I might as well just continue staying awake and I'm not GonNa Sleep when when when the when night falls because I'm awake and I don't WanNa change that's crazy right because we're talking about a different scale of of changing and to to maintain homeostasis for your body. You need to sleep right so in a way. If you don't want to change you you should sleep right so if let's say that the other scale that we're measuring on is growth company is growing. You know say they're. They're growing their revenue. year of year at one hundred percent. I don't know some unrealistic number and they they don't WanNa change well. What is it that they don't want to change. Do they want to continue growing their revenue or do they not want to change something else and allow their revenue to sink right. That's so so so I think we we want to maintain our behaviors but we forget that our behaviors are not the entire story that the environment is changing around us and so you're not the same person that you were before. You're not the same company that you were before and certainly the things that you did before or not. GonNa have the same effect as they a- as they had previously yeah ain't that painted a but it makes it hard right. How do you know what to do. I will gosh it's really hard to say now. I I'm reminded of Pixar Stringer hits day very deliberately brought brought in that Bradburn who got like fired by budget studios and said. We believe you will challenge us. You will shake it up. You will not allow us to go into complacency with toy story seventeen or something and so he he was the you know the person's shake it up any took. Everybody wanted to shake things up in the whole company. Put the one team and they may day incredible and so. It's hard to to do that in You know it's it's rough. If you want to continue to see those numbers go up. You WanNa continue doing something. That makes you feel safe insecure that you know you can do that noble when it all feels like it. Smooth food is coming. I mean I hate to be the doomsday device but something is on the horizon. We've never I don't think again. I'm going to get this wrong but I think the number is that fifty seven or seventy five percent of fortune one hundred will turn over the next two years that didn't happen twenty years ago but it happened today the end you've got choices to make somebody who's GonNa income for you or you. Comfort yourself tied to keep pushing it forward and and that's that's scary and that's hard and your company evolves. Maybe some of the same people they write for it anymore.

Jessica Hall Jonathan Cottrell Kenya Rome Junior Developer Nouri Pixar Bradburn Budget Studios Seventy Five Percent One Hundred Percent Twenty Years Three Years Four Years Two Years
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"I pause and said all of these skills learning how to get the word out. Systematically, they apply equally to start up. In fact, they apply better to start up because you can do so in service of actually earning revenue, and you could put money in to pour fuel on that growth fire 'cause with velocity at the mercy of my purely my wits, and my resources and my social networking essentially because I'm up paying this coverage. And so it comes down to well how else can I use these skills? But most importantly, I fell in love with the process at realize this is the branch in my career that I'm now going to pause at and choose a direction, and I chose. Yes. Used these skills. I've developed and pursue growth marketing. We're continuing the interview with Julian Shapiro in today's episode. We're talking about growth for developers not just personal growth with brewing. Your personal projects growing projects that you believe in and Julian has done this. He's done it, successfully we're talking about how Julian accomplish this with his own projects and how he's doing it with other people as well. Thank you so much listening to developer t my name's Jonathan Cottrell and my goal in the show is to help driven developers. Like, you connect to your career purpose to you can do better work and have a positive influence on the people around you Julian has figured out what his purposes now, it's not something that ends you don't find it. And then stop looking for you don't find it and stop figuring things out. So Julian is continuing to grow. And we talk about ways that Julian's growing and learning on these episodes the last one in this one. So let's jump straight in the interview with Julian Shapiro. It's such an an exciting story. And I think a lot of developers aspire to, you know, the the opportunities that that you've had Julian and it's easy to to sit back and listen to this and think, wow, you know, Julian is he bats thousand right? He's he hasn't missed a beat here. But I'd love for you to take a moment before we go into this this area of expertise of yours in marketing. And specifically as a developer, which is particularly important to this show. You know, having the the cultural understanding of, you know, having worked on an engineering project moving into marketing, I think that's that's going to be a very interesting conversation..

Julian Shapiro developer Jonathan Cottrell
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. If software could talk, if it could write an autobiography. It'd be an interesting thing to read because software is developed by usually multiple people, and those people tend to bring their ideas and their experiences into writing that software. And if the software had some level of self awareness, it would be even more interesting to hear it. Tell its own mice story. In today's episode, we're gonna talk about how software can develop over time in a way that makes plenty of sense. But unfortunately, cripples the developers who have to work on it. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to develop tea. And my goal in the show is held driven developers like you connect to your career purpose. See you can do better work and have a positive influence on the people around you. An entity is pursued. I wanna share maybe a personal kind of feeling for a lot of you the feeling of entering into a software project when it's already been kind of established. You take on a project, maybe your new employees at an.

Jonathan Cottrell
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. If you're listening to this episode in the morning, then you probably have a pretty good reservoir of willpower remaining for the day. And as it turns out, you can even preserve that willpower. Most recently studies have come out about ego depletion that challenge some of the previous ideas that we've even talked about on this show. And today's episode I'm gonna talk to you about a way to preserve some of that willpower. My name's Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to developer t my goal in the shows to help driven developers like you connect to their career purpose so they can do better work and have a positive influence on people around them. And if you've listened to the show for a long time, you may have heard a sock about ego depletion. And this idea is that as you go throughout your day, as you make decisions those decisions, you only have a certain number of decisions that you can make. In a given day, and then eventually you lose the willpower to do to make those decisions as good as you're making them. Earlier. Of course, we talked on the show last week with Daniel pink about how our minds kind of have a shape throughout the day that we have this kind of regression in the middle of the day that we're, you know, we're not suited for analytical tasks during that time and that in the evenings for most people were better suited to more creative tasks. Whereas in the morning. Where better suited to more analytical tasks that require a lot more focus, a lot more willpower. Of course, these things can probably overlap, these concepts can overlap, but previously we've discussed on the show kind of this downward slope that starts really high at the beginning of the day ends really low at the end of the day. And the idea is then as the day wears on as you make decisions throughout the day that you lose a little bit of your energy a little bit of your brains power to make the right decision throughout the day. So the recommendation that has been given both by me on this show and in even academic journals is to make decisions that matter the most as early as possible. Well, given the research that Daniel pink presented on the show, this is still not a bad idea making really important decisions that require a lot of thought in the mornings is probably a good idea for most people. Of course, we talked about the different chronic types in that episode and so maybe a for you, it's at night, go and listen to those episodes to learn more about that. But the reasons that we believe ego depletion was happening may not actually hold true. So some more recent research has come out that ego depletion is more based off of what you perceive what you believe about the work that you're doing. Some more specifically, if you believe that what you are doing is difficult, then ego depletion will actually be real for you. You'll actually experienced that loss of willpower throughout the day as you are in a taking part in these difficult tasks, things that you perceive as difficult. However, if you do the same tasks and you perceive them as simple, you're much less likely to lose willpower throughout the day. Now this isn't a magic solution..

Daniel pink Jonathan Cottrell developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. Part of the point of developer t is to help you the driven developer connect to your career purpose in order to do that. Sometimes it takes a little bit of investigation on the show. We're going to talk a little bit more about purpose in this episode. Specifically, we're going to talk about how you can find purpose in a smaller way. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to developer prety, and we've already talked about point of this show in the other point of the show is so you can do better work because it's very difficult to do truly good work. If you're not connected to why you're doing that good work, the most lasting motivation that you will find is caring about the work itself. Of course, there are other kinds of motivation, for example, a paycheck or working with people that you enjoy being around. But if you can't find motivation in the work that you do, then you'll probably find limit to those other motivating factors. But in today's episode, I wanna talk a little bit about the struggle of finding purpose in your work and maybe help you out a little bit at least four today. That really is what today's episode is about the work you're doing today. So it can be difficult to find purpose. There's a bunch of techniques exercises you can do to try to uncover your purpose, but people can go their entire lives and never really find it. It seems like an elusive treasure that you have to dig up or maybe something that doesn't exist at all. Maybe something that you're searching for that you'll never find because it's not there to find. I think the problem with all of these ways of describing purpose is the idea that somehow this purpose is a token something that you can seek, or you know something that you have to carve out of the matter that is your time. And unfortunately, this is very hard to do for most people finding that token, finding that buried treasure that hidden sudden epiphany. This is something that doesn't really happen to the degree. That they feel like it substantial there is not a kind of light shining through the clouds. It piffling moment for most people. Now that's not to say that you won't have moments where you have more clarity than others. For example, figuring out that you like working with interesting problems. The sounds very generic, but sometimes people don't care about how interesting problem as so even those kinds of insights to your own preferences. Your own desires can be helpful. Other fifties that you may have is the people that you want to work for. For example, the users, the clients, the kinds of people that you care about working for regardless of what you're doing for those people. All of these things can be composed into some semblance of a purpose, and it's easy to think that are the people have found there's in the same way that it's easy to think that other people find that one perfect path. In any other area of life that they choose the perfect school or the perfect significant other everything fell into place, just right. The reality is much more messy. So what can we do when we have to deal with this irreducible uncertainty, this kind of big block in the road that we can't walk through. And sometimes it seems like we can't raw walk around it. We might have to choose different road altogether..

developer Jonathan Cottrell
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The i want you to take a moment and think about what time it is we're really talking about the hours on the clock more accurately at least from a scientific perspective we're talking about the relationship between where you are on earth surface and where the sun is and that sounds crazy to talk about on a developer pike cast but always talked about crazier things my name is jonathan cottrell and you're listening to developer t in my goal on this show is to help driven developers connect to their career purpose and to do better work so they can have a positive influence on the people around them and today's episode we're talking about time and how time matters to the work that you do how you spend your time and we set this episode up in the last episode we talked about how organizing your tasks for example shouldn't just be done in terms of productivity and in terms of you know some strict version of priority because we are human and humans we carry things like momentum's we carry things like trailing thoughts are previous thought has an effect on our next thought and so we're such imprecise being and we can't really treat ourselves like machines that's really what we covered in the last episode and in this episode we're going to talk about a more specific way in which we are uniquely human the way that humans experience time and how he work at a given time in the day and so this is actually a very powerful message if you are trying to figure out the best way to structure your day because a lot of us we really don't look at time as a special we look at time really most people look at it in a binary way or perhaps in a a threepart way the binary way would be to look at it as time that i am awake and time that i am asleep day and night this is the most common way to look at time a secondary way might be to look at it as work time so this is your awake time is split into two parts.

jonathan cottrell developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Have you ever been told to separate your work life from your personal life in today's episode i'm going to explain why that's probably not such great idea my name is jonathan cottrell and you're listening to developer t my goal on this show is to help driven developers just like you connect to your career purpose so that you can do better where can have a positive influence on the people around you that's the goal of the show in in today's episode we're talking about this idea of bringing all of yourself to work but really what we're talking about is what it means to have a principle or to develop it principle and what makes for a good principle so the idea of separating your personal life from your work life this is not a discussion on balance balance is a complex discussion that has unfortunately been kind of minimized to the idea of you a setting your hours and being really rigid about that or uh having a specific set time that you're going to turn off your email and no matter what it's going off at that point in every person practices balanced differently but that's not really what we're talking about in today's episode but we're talking about more is bringing your entire perspective as we talked about last week with the three episodes on perspective bringing all of your perspective to work with you so no matter what your balance looks like if you're not bringing all of your brain if you're not bringing all of your experiences to the table uh then really you're you're going to have a hard time becoming effective becoming a truly good developer and more importantly perhaps you're going to have a hard time in join your job because who you are and what you think in your perception those things are greatly a affecting on your uh ability to appreciate what you're doing at work or.

jonathan cottrell developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Happy two thousand eighteen everyone welcome to the new year my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to develop or t in today's episode over can actually be reassuring a previous episode of developer tea and it's it's relevant to the new year we're going to be talking about the anatomy of change today one of last year's most popular episodes i'm we're talking about this because so many of you and including myself at the beginning of a new year you set goals for the year and whether it's a cliche or not doesn't really matter that goal setting process is something that a lot of you are doing in as you're thinking about setting those goals i want you to be thinking about change in how change occurs and so that's why we decided to greet air this episode today if you're listening to this podcast for the first time at the end you like the challenges that we present here on the show i recommend that you join other developers like hugh and subscribe to this podcast we're going to be growing this community much deeper much deeper connections hopefully this year than any year previously and had love for you to be a part of that if you are a driven developer that's who retargeting on the show thank you so much for listening now let's get back to this episode from last year the anatomy of change a today we're going to be talking about something that a lot of you are already thinking about and we talked about it last year as well and that is some kind of resolutions hopefully you kind of saw this coming when we set headwear bringing in the new year by talking about change in so many people in the beginning of a year for whatever reason a many reasons they can talk about a few those in a minute but this is the time where people are trying to commit to some sort of change and a lot of times of people.

jonathan cottrell hugh developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Why are questions so powerful and similarly how do we control our thoughts that's what we're talking about in today's episode of developer t we've been discussing behavior change in how you may be able to effects behavior change in your own life in your own career in your own habits and also be able to use this in your jobs to be able to incite others to positive behavior change as what we're talking about in today's episode this is a third episode on this kind of meta topic we've talked about two more specific versions of behavior change or related specific topics to behavior change in the last two episodes of developer to but today we're talking about questions and why they're so powerful my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t the goal of this show is to help driven developers connects to their career purpose so they can have a positive impact on the people they have influence over if you're in this group of people then this question is relevant to you uh you do care about behavior changes do care about how you king an a become better in becoming better means changing and in order to change got to change how you acts every single day you know it's not just a uh a momentary thing it's not a decision that you make it's a decision that is followed by action and that is that is kind of the refinement process and we're all going through we're all trying to become better were trying to learn and then act on that learning so behavior change should be of utmost importance to any driven developer and really anyone who's listening to the show you're going to be able to get a lot out of this as well so what is the power of a question that a gain in tuition for this i could ask a very simple question for developers who run tests on a regular basis how often do you plan to run your tests in the next three days or perhaps a question that applies to virtually every one how often do you plan to floss neck.

developer jonathan cottrell three days
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"That i can't speak for everyone i can certainly speak for myself and anecdotally i can tell you that have heard this from quite a few successful people the morning is perhaps the most important phase of the day as it relates to my work and there's quite a bit of neuroscience and other studies a couple of google quakes away i'm not going to detail all of that in today's episode but the quite a bit of research that suggest that the morning is the most important part for most people of the day as it relates to your productivity as it relates to creativity at cetera so uh we're gonna talk about some of that stuff today my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to than developer t today's episode is a three by three episode this is the last three by three episode of the week in release added to share this stuff with you today we're talking about three things every developer should do every morning and i believe that 95 percent of developers who are listening to this end probably people who are not developers who listening this can benefit from these three actions the very simple kind of straightforward practical actions again three by three weeks of this is three episodes inro ray give you three practical things three objective practical things a you can take away and immediately use right immediately get benefit from in your daytoday work in your daytoday life so i'm excited to dive in but first lemme reinstate once again what developer t is about.

google jonathan cottrell developer three weeks 95 percent
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"If you haven't heard this before you don't work in a silo whether you're because the freelancer or you work on a team or perhaps you managed teams or maybe you work on your own on a product that is used solely by computers believe it or not even you have to work with people because here's the reality your future self is kind of a different person than your current so of course you're not a different person but you are creating things for other people and sometimes that means for your future self because you don't hold all this information in your head and all of the time so other people ultimately become perhaps the most important resource the you have and that's exactly what hr is intended to be or at least that's what christon gallagher believes in today's episode we're going to be talking to christon she created edify easy you can find that at edify pd you dot com you're listening to developer team my name is jonathan cottrell in my goal on this show is to help driven developers become better at what they do they can have a positive impact on the world around them and on the people they come in contact with on a daily basis and so i believe this episode is going to help you do that and that's exactly why we're having christon on the show thank you so much for listening to today's episode let me get out of the way and we'll get into this interview with christian gallagher.

jonathan cottrell christian gallagher developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"As always michael on the show is to help you become a better developer him one of the ways that we can do that is to talk with people who were thinking differently about the purpose of code talk with people who were thinking differently about the purpose of becoming a developer and mark has one of those people once again my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t now let's get straight into the interview with mark engelberg mark welcome to the show hi thanks to be here so we should go ahead and let everyone know this isn't the first time mark and i have talked and in assigned even the first time that we've recorded in episode of developer t unfortunately the last time that we decide that last conversation we had the audio was corrupted somehow and so we're actually rerecording uh this initial conversation so if we say something that sounds like it maybe they've talked before that's because we have yet so uh mark has been very kind to spend the extra time to come back and redo this episode in i really think that the first conversation that we have market is enlightening in so exciting to me to talk about education and we're going to get into all that but i am very thankful that you decided to spend that extra time to come back and read it a show with me well yeah i enjoyed the conversation so let's do it again for the audience the style from his jump straight end so a.

developer jonathan cottrell mark michael
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"What differentiates you as a developer so many of the problems that we saw with code are not necessarily complicated and so much of what we do is an about managing the code itself but it's about managing ourselves it's about managing the creator of the code ends setting us up sending your own teams up setting up yourself your patterns for success setting you up to deal with people who need that code set you up to understand the people who need that code the users the clients the people you work with these are all so much more of what you will spend your energy on throughout your career as a developer this is not to downplay the importance of code this is not to downplay the importance of technical understanding because truly to be a great developer you must not forget those pieces but for the majority of developers who are listening to this show your career will demand more from you impersonal interactions and more from you and understanding the psychology of helping other people and the psychology of productivity and the psychology of learning your careers going to damn demand more from you in those areas than it ever will demand from you technically of course this is heavily opinionated this is my own perspective on this subject there certainly jobs were this is not true and there are certainly parts and days of your career where this is untrue where truly eat the most value that you're providing is in the technical sphere but for the most part uh these interpersonal connections are going to be the difference maker for you you're listening to developer t my name is jonathan cottrell in my goal on the show is to help you become a better developer.

developer jonathan cottrell
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"No have you ever been working on a project the weather says a freelancer or maybe work in in a start were an established tech company or maybe work and like i do in an agency and uh you're you're going through the project and things are going relatively smoothly and suddenly out of nowhere poorly so it seems some when there was a curveball that's what we're talking about in today's episode we're talking about mystery voices my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t michael on the show is to help you become a better developer and the way that i'm structuring the show is to have these these types of conversations this particular episode is in our planning series on because uh as as we'll see later on in the episode a lot of these kinds of curve balls a from mr voices can be avoided uh if we plan correctly so i've were talking about planning the you know planning software is incredibly difficult so it's a topic that needs to be covered it's something we need to talk about together it's something you need to talk about with your coworkers with your clients with your stakeholders with your bosses uh this is just a discussion that has to be had over and over because planning is difficult mystery voices are still very common where i work in probably where you work so we're gonna talk about this today and hopefully give you a little bit of a way to avoid this a one of many ways that you might be able to avoid mystery voices.

tech company jonathan cottrell developer
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"I hear and i forget i see and i remember i do and i understand although the origin of this quote is somewhat unknown the it's a chinese proverb but most of the sources citing that come from the 1960s the underlying concept of this quote is still very strong that's where we're going to be talking about in today's episode by name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t michael on this show is to help you become a better developer you may be listening to this new not a software developer guy you don't right code i don't do maybe anything with computers although fewer and fewer people that category as the years where on in as technology continues to imbue our lives and even if you're a software developer you may not see yourself as a software developer the title of developer is very much so incomplete for most people who work in this job tons of people own businesses and also develop software tens of people who listen to the show are also designers who work with software perhaps you are indeed or writing code in your daytoday work enter code continues to become more and more important so as people start listening to this podcast in those varying categories i went to make sure that we're avoiding mislabelling developers i want to make sure that we're avoiding perpetuating a sense of fear of perpetuating a sense of impostor syndrome but talks about impostors syndrome in the past but part of the way that we do this is by not trying to get into extremely technical details in short podcast and that's one of the reasons why we focus on larger more applicable topics that span of basically your entire life you can listen to this episode and five years from now and hopefully it will still be applicable to what you do so we aren't afraid to talk about specific technology we are avoiding those conversations but a lot of the time the better value the you can get out of this podcast is going to be when we talk about things like what we're talking about today today's episode is focused on learning.

jonathan cottrell developer software developer five years
"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan cottrell" Discussed on Developer Tea

"We'll start today's episode out by affirming of what is probably count of an uncomfortable reality and that is that pretty soon you're probably going to experience failure and you probably have recently experienced failure sometimes the failure comes in a form that is even difficult to identify you may have experienced failure recently without even realizing it at one of the things we do as humans as we try to wrap our failures in explanation into these episode i want to help you embrace this reality of failure and even more than that i went to create an environment where you are more able to recognize and affirm these failures thank you so much for listening to today's episode my name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer tea and of course we're talking about failure but more than that in today's episode we're talking about opinions and this is something that i've learned probably more as i go through my career and it's something that has changed a kind of continuously i've gotten more and more away from what i used to be and more towards what i'm hoping to present to you today as the the future goal this this attitude towards failure and really it's wrapped up more in the way that we carry ourselves than it is in the failure itself in uh the failure is kind of a constant it's going to happen and it's it is a part of the learning process we refine win we fail we take that failure we feed it back into our learning system we we use our brain to identify failures and then get better from those failures this is something we've talked about on the show hopefully it's not a novel concept to you about something that we have a hard time doing is recognising those failures and recognising the shortcomings was plays out in a particularly strange way that i'd like to point out really explicitly today and that is through the sharing of opinions.

jonathan cottrell developer