20 Burst results for "Jonathan Control"

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

05:58 min | 8 months ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"A few episodes ago we had gabriel weinberg on the show and gabriel <hes>. Is the ceo of duck. Oh and he was promoting a book that he was working on at the time called super thinking which is now available highly. Recommend you go check it out. I was reading through it. And there's this excellent passage <hes>. About something called a strategy tax. And if you're not familiar strategy tax that's essentially what we're talking about an expounding on in today's episode strategy tax is the simple idea and again go read the book because he expounds on it as well but strategy taxes. Simple idea that you have a strategy and that strategy requires you to act in a particular way even win that type of act right the even when adhering to the strategy may actually cause some this traction the opposite attraction towards your ultimate goal right. So that's a lot of of definition. Let's make that tangible on the book. Gabriel talks about <hes>. For example google google choosing to make their business built on advertising <hes>. That in combination with the recent increase in demand for privacy tooling means that google is paying tax. Because it's very difficult for google to build privacy tooling that goes in opposition to their strategy right. Their strategy is to get as much information about people as they can right. This is very simple strategy as much information about people as we can speak and understand are buying habits. We can understand browsing habits. We can do all of these things with all these data points and everybody's happier. Unfortunately this isn't always the case. People don't necessarily want all that information shared and so the strategy kind of breaks down when there's a cultural transformation that pushes against the requirements of that strategy. Right in this case the requirements that strategy are gather as much data about people as you can okay so this is important right. This is important because there are other kinds of tax that we are paying every day behaviorally speaking that go beyond business strategy for example we have habit taxes. What is what does the habit tax habitats might be well i. i've decided to cultivate. This particular habit decided to cultivate the habit of. Let's say reading every day and this is good habit writer. We can kind of universally agreed that we probably should all read a little bit more but it doesn't come for free. There is some level of investment that we have to put into reading and sometimes there is a pure loss. There's not a one hundred percent gain that comes from reading. It might be very high gain but there is some tax return. One tax might be that instead of listening to digest. Regained the same amount of information. You may go read a much more long form book and ultimately there's a lot of fluff in that book right that would be an example of a tax on reading. There's a lot of other habitual taxes that are more obvious one basic example of this would be. Let's say you start working out and this is again <hes>. Known to be a good decision. It's a good investment to go and work out but there is some downside. Of course your time is being taxed but also what if you get injured. This is a type of tax that you can imagine paying for being more physically active if you're more physically active you have a higher chance of being injured while you are working out. It's not a perfect system because of course working out also decreases your chance of injury <hes>. Because of your lack of flexibility for example right <hes>. So we're all doing this. Calculus is mental calculus. All the time trying to understand the positive effects of given decision and the negative effects of a given decision sometimes the negative effects are <hes>. Kind of part of the game. they're unavoidable that is exactly what attacks would mean in order to stay consistent for example. Let's say you have a particular belief system in order to stay consistent with that belief system which is very important to humans. Psychologically that we maintain consistency. Sometimes we have to accept something that cognitively down the road. we're going to want to change. We don't want to necessarily accept that part of the belief right. This is something that happens very often in politics because especially in places like the united states. There are two party systems that require to some degree if you want to be a successful politician. It requires some kind of adherence to one <hes>. Entire set kind of a binary set of beliefs or another binary set of beliefs and. There's very few examples that break from that norm <hes>. The vast majority of the people in those two parties they pay a tax the tax that they're paying is maybe they don't necessarily want to back position.

gabriel weinberg Gabriel google gabriel today jonathan control thinking a few episodes ago
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"We have an interesting relationship with complexity as engineers. Complexity is often given bad rap. We think that we're supposed to. Reduce complexity in all cases, and that's a pretty good heuristic but. Sometimes the way that we address a problem. Is necessarily complex. In today's episode I, WanNa take a different perspective on complexity. Viewing it not as the enemy, but instead as a resource, an expendable resource. My Name's Jonathan Control you're listening to developer T and my goal on this show is still driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. There's a fundamental premise of today's episode that you have to be onboard with to be able to listen to the rest and find some value in it and that is. That there's no one right way to make decisions. And this seems. Obvious when we think about it from this frame, but it also doesn't seem totally obvious when you think about are. Striving are striving to make better decisions are. Attempts to have some grand unifying theory of how to make the best decision in the given circumstance that just doesn't exist. And part of the reason it doesn't exist is because what the best decision is is contextual per person and per problem. And there's so many variables that are out of our control that making the quote best decision. There's no way to really even control for what that best decision is and maybe there are multiple best decisions. In this can spiral out of control quickly. And as much as I wish that there was one unifying theory around how to make good decisions. There isn't. But There are some ways that we can choose to spend our energy, which is really kind of the goal of a theory that helps us make any decision at any point, and that is really to spend our energy in ways that we won't regret. After all there's no way for us to know whether a decision could have been made better if we're satisfied with the decision in the first place. How do you know when you missed out on something great when you already have something great this is difficult. To measure so. I WanNa talk about this kind of broad framework that's been discussed many times around decision theory. Right after we talked about today is awesome sponsor Imax. Speaking of making decisions. If you.

Jonathan Control developer
Your Present is Soon Your Past

Developer Tea

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Your Present is Soon Your Past

"Your perspective is centered on now. You see everything as something that is either happening in this moment or something that will be categorized as the future. Or categorized as past. But. It's very hard to imagine that the now. Will soon be considered the past, but what's even harder to imagine is that the now was once the future. And that at some point in the past you imagined. The now you imagined whatever was happening today. And likely. You imagined it differently. That's what we're talking about in today's episode. My name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to velvety, and my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. So if you think about this for a second, there's a lot of insightful thoughts that can come from. Kind of lingering on this thought the idea that your perspective. You can imagine that you have kind of like a camera and the camera can look at time, and they can see it in these three distinct formats. Into the future into the now we'll talk a little bit more about what that means a second and then into the past. And in both directions in future, and into the past the further away it gets the more fuzzy it seems to be. And at some point. Incomprehensible, there's no picture that you can imagine at some point into the future. That is even close to accurate. And though we have some record of things that have happened in the past, even looking back on those things, there is some level of distortion that is inevitably going to happen because you are distanced from that event, the certainly happens as a result of simply non existing if we look far enough back into the past. We weren't alive. And so everything that we know of events that happened before we were alive. Are regurgitation. They're things that we learned that believed from someone else. Perhaps we have evidence of those things actually occurring, but the end of the day those are not memories are not things that we actually experienced ourselves. Now. Believe it as an exercise to the listener to go and. Do some research on the faulty nece of memory. Suffice it to say that memory is not an incredibly reliable mechanism. We can substitute memories for example things that we've heard from other people. We can imagine that we did them. If we've heard them enough and so our memories, even when we recall them are changing, but nevertheless this system of looking into the future, looking into the past is based on this somewhat faulty recording mechanism. But when we think about nine now. When we think about what's happening now. We'd like to exclude now from any of our critical thinking. So. How does this happen exactly well? When we look into the future, we make plans. We think with intention about what we want to happen. Or even if we don't necessarily think about what we want to happen, we think about what is likely to happen. This is a fundamental human attribute to imagine the future to play out different scenarios, even if only because of our own survivals were doing this even involuntarily. The more distant we go once again. Of course it gets fuzzy, but the further out we go, the more human those thoughts are. For example we can imagine unlike any other animal what the world might be like. We are no longer here. Additionally. We can imagine what the world was like before we existed. But as we look into the future, we imagine. And we create plans. We have intentions. We think critically about cause and effect. Similarly, we can look into the past and we can easily critique our previous actions. This idea that hindsight is twenty twenty. Shows us that we can easily look into the past with an eye of critique. Now. Why is it that we can look into the future with an eye for planning? We can look into the past with an eye. Four critique part of the reason is because we are not experiencing either of those things where imagining them. And, so when we think back, even though we were a part of that, maybe we did experience it. We're still having to imagine it. We're not imagining in the same way that we might construct something that never happened where imagining what it was like when it did happen. When we imagine things, we put ourselves a fairly low stakes environment. This means that we can be critical past cells because. We're sitting here now. Are Opportunities of being better. Are Abundant. And if we think into the future, we can be overly optimistic rather than realistic. We can imagine that even though we've never stuck to diet plan, but this is the year on the first of January. We're going to stick to it. More to the point of Software Engineering, we can imagine that even though we've never been able to estimate the amount of time necessary to complete a given sprint. Suddenly. This sprint will be different. And we can do this because we're separated. We're not experiencing the sprint. That's in front of us where imagining it.

Jonathan Control Software Engineering
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"How will you handle the pressure of not knowing something? This is something that I'm specifically targeting. Early? Career engineers. To start thinking about this as early as possible in your careers, my name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to develop prety and my goal on the show is tell driven developers like you and clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers, and this question is one. That will prepare you for the inevitable. The inevitable situation where? Someone asks you a question. Or maybe you get a ticket in whatever you were. Project management software of choice is. And the problem that you're facing. You have no idea how to solve. In this happens for a lot of reasons, perhaps it's something that. You just have encountered yet or maybe it's something that you're not really primed to solve. It's something that. Is Outside of what your job description is outside of what you really even want to know about. And yet you've encountered it in some kind of professional scenario or even outside of your professional world in your personal life. Maybe someone is asking you a question that you don't know how to answer, but for some reason you feel pressured to answer anyway. What will you do in this situation? Why does it matter to think this way? Let's back up for a moment and talk about why it matters to answer this question before we ever even face this situation. We're fairly confident that we will face the situation because there's a vast amount of information that we just don't have as we said so many times especially recently on the show, the process of learning is confronting something that you don't yet understand. And then working through it to a point where you do understand it. And realistically understanding something probably isn't going to happen. When you deal with it only once anyway, so encountering some. Experience that you've never encountered before. And then adapting and dealing with the situation. And taking away lessons from that experience. So, we're pretty certain that the vast amount of possible learning in other words, the landscape of things that you have yet to learn. Absolutely dwarfs the things that you have already learned. This is true. For basically anybody at any point in their career. The amount of information grows faster. Than we can manage as individual engineers. And, so it's very likely that you'll face this for your whole career so answering this question. We start by answering answering this question preemptively for a couple of reasons one. We believe we will face the situation. But then the next question that naturally arises well. Why can't we deal with it when it comes? And generally speaking, this situation is frankly uncomfortable. When someone asks you a question, the you don't have the answer for especially if they expect you to have the answer and even more if that person is more experienced than you or holds a higher position in the company that you work at maybe it's somebody that you look up to or even if it's just merely a worker of yours. If! You have someone asking you a question that the expect you to be able to answer, and you simply cannot. That can be stressful situation specifically. This is a socially stressful situation because. You don't want to lose the credit that that person is implying that you have earned. By asking you the question, they show that they trust you to be able to answer. At least that's what our brains believe. And by saying that you don't know or by answering incorrectly, you're showing way that the credit was misplaced. But here's the critical factor. Typically. If we don't know the answer to something, we're likely to make something up. My is that? When you ask the question of what you have to lose that social scenario. If, you say, I don't know..

Jonathan Control
3 Ways to Be a Better PR Author

Developer Tea

06:07 min | 1 year ago

3 Ways to Be a Better PR Author

"Of the most frustrating things you and you can experience as a developer is writing a bunch of code spending a bunch of time working on features and then waiting around for a PR review in today's episode. We're going to talk about ways the you can make your PR's little bit better these pull requests. We talked about Puerto Question the last episode of developer t from the opposite side. How can you be better reviewer? But now we're going to talk about it from this omitting side. My name is Jonathan Controlling. You're listening to developer team. My goal on the show is driven. Villiger's like you find a clarity perspective and purpose in their careers and the first point. I'd like to make about having good. Pr's and hoping that other people will review them which is kind of the goal right the goal of having a good pr. Good poll request. Is that other? People will have all the information that they need to be able to review that Paul request with the least possible friction. Ideally what this means. Is that the review the responses that you receive the comments on your code that change requests that are provided on your code that they're all productive that you're not having to explain yourself multiple times or try to make something that is really confusing in your code or in your PR. Try To distill it down and comments instead what we WANNA see as engineers is Paul request. That are very clear. They're concise they make sense to the problem. There scaled through the problem. There is information and data provided for decisions that were made when it's necessary and it doesn't go overboard on optimization lot of clever code really what we're looking for in a poor request is something that allows me as the reviewer to clearly know what's going on in approve that change and I'm going to give you some specific things to pay attention to in your poll requests. This is a skillset creating pull requests that are narrow and specific enough and clear enough. This is this is a skill set right because this requires that as you are writing your code as you are working on a given feature they. You're considering what does this poll request ultimately look like to the reviewer? You have to put yourself in the reviewers shoes and in fact. That is my first recommendation. If you want to have a good Paul Request Review Your Own Code I review your own code. I what does this mean? Well the evidence of you reviewing your own code might be comments on lines of code and it doesn't even necessarily have to be comments in the code itself you can review your own poll request almost like someone else might review it now and most platforms like get hub. You can't be officially a reviewer. You can't approve your own poll request but you can go through an provide points of clarification input on your your reviewer hat now. This is really important to understand here. His isn't just a formality. When you put on the reviewer hat you're likely to see your code differently then when you were writing it. This is a very functional. Move that you make by reviewing your own code because this changes the perspective or the the seat you're sitting in right you're exchanging one hat for another for the submission had your goal is to hopefully get the code approved so you can get it moved along. You can ship code ultimately provide value to the Business Sarah from reviewing perspective as we mentioned on the last episode the goal is to come to a resolution on the PR. But here's the critical factor when you put on reviewing hat you see your code. Through fresh eyes of specifically criticism. You want to adopt the critical point of view and this operates on two dimensions. The first dimension is if you adopt the critical point of view for your own code. You might catch something before another viewer catches it. This will lower the a number of necessary per poll request and guarantee this. This is true if you start. Implementing this on your teams if you require yourself or require their author to go through and review as if they were a reviewer on their own poll request. You're likely to see many small things very simple errors that otherwise would take cycle and somebody coming in reviewing asking for a change request and then the original You know author of that code having to go back and submit that change and then read requested review. If the author self reviews a lot of those things tend to be caught when they explicitly put on that reviewer hat so there's that one piece of the kind of practical putting on the reviewer had changes your perspective of the second thing that does is it gets you on the same side as the reviewer in some ways pull. Requests can feel adversarial. The person who submitting the code is somewhat of an adversary to the person who's reviewing it and this is not very good necessarily because you both want to have shared common goal. And so if you can get into the critical mindset of your own code. It's possible that you'll be more likely to detach your ego from that code because now the goal is to make it better so that's my first recommendation in today's episode first recommendation for being a better poll requests author.

Paul Developer Villiger Jonathan Controlling Business Sarah
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"We've all heard the phrases. There are no stupid questions. There are no bad ideas. He's the kind of phrases that we hear when we're kicking off a meeting and most of the time people don't buy them our instincts kick in and we hold back. We hold back a question that we think is going to make us look stupid or we hold back idea. That is out of the mainstream of ideas that are being presented in today's episode. We're talk a little bit about why we do this. Why we present the false idea that the table is open to any input at all when in reality on the flip side are social instincts and Awareness Kick in and prevent us from sharing those ideas. But then we're gonNA talk a little bit about why it's true that there is no bad idea or perhaps more accurately why you should share your bad ideas and your dumb questions. My name is Jonathan Control. You'RE LISTENING TO DEVELOP T. My goal in the show is to help. Driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. Most of the time in the meetings that we're talking about there is one person who is bringing this kind of idealism to the table idealism in the in the sense that they're inviting anybody to provide any kind of input that they want to provide but very rarely are these groups new. These groups have probably been working together if you found yourself in the situation. It's probably a group of people that you have previous context with is not new. People is the people who you have established a pattern a working relationship with and so in this kind of environment. It is nearly impossible to turn on the open ideas switch. The reason for this is that with established context like this. You've already built a picture of who you are to your co workers and they have done the same with you and I want you to put yourself in this situation. Try to imagine sitting in front of those co workers and their picture of. Let's say your competency as a developer starts to fall apart because you ask questions that they think you should already know. The answers to this is a scary concept. This is a scary place to be and it seems a very realistic scenario. It seems that there is some question that pops up in your mind. They are likely to suppress and decide that. You're going to try to answer it on your own later and your reasoning for this is probably something along the lines of well. That's just a small hole a gap in my knowledge. That other people don't have then so I have the responsibility to fill that gap so I can catch up with everyone else. And here's the amazing reality that we've just uncovered if every person in. That meeting has a stupid question that they are unwilling to ask. It is almost certain that the question you have will benefit someone else. The answer to that question will benefit someone else additionally if you were to build a team where this kind of pattern is acceptable. Where sharing this information is invited on a regular basis not just in the special brainstorming meetings but on a regular basis then. It's very likely that you breaking the ice with your question will open the door to other people asking. They're silly questions. There are a lot of reasons why we would choose not to share information ideas questions in these social or or professional social situations most often. The reasons are connected to an underlying fear. You don't want to be seen as incompetent. Perhaps you don't want to be seen as too opinionated. Maybe you have developed a kind of personality on the team of the one who always asks the questions and you decide one day that you're not going to be that person anymore that you want to avoid that negative stereotype and so even though you have a valid question. They may even be a dumb question. You've chosen not to share it and this is a hard problem to solve. There's no one quick trick that will solve this issue because we have a lot of kind of built-in motivations that are really core to our survival mechanisms as humans that help us avoid situations where we are introducing inconsistency if we introduce a new picture of ourselves if suddenly we are the person with a lot of opinions where previously we were easy going. Well that's inconsistent if we suddenly share that we don't agree with their own previous views or our own previous assertions than that is inconsistent. And so it's necessary and important if you're a leader that's listening to this podcast or if you are you know wanting to become a team lead for example that you are constantly encouraging this kind of questioning this kind of sharing of ideas. It's also important that the person who's doing that leading is participating in sharing of those ideas in other words. It is an advantage for a leader to be vulnerable and share the things that are confusing to them. Share the things that might make them look dumb. We're GONNA take a quick break and then we're gonNA come back and talk about why these questions the silly questions or the bad ideas why..

developer Jonathan Control
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Many of you are working from home for the first time maybe in a long time. Interestingly for the people who listen to this show remote work is probably more and more prevalent at your company or at least with people the you know in the industry. There's a lot of literature. There's a lot of blog posts that are being shared. Lots of advice going around about remote work much of that advice is about how you can change your habits or your daily procedures to better cope with remote work and it's worthwhile to read some this advice but in today's episode. I WanNa talk about something. That's less disgust about remote work. My name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to developer. T my goal in the shows up driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. Now whether you are dealing in your country with the global pandemic of the Corona virus or if your company has decided to go remote anyway Perhaps he worked for a fully distributed company. Maybe you're moving from wine job. That was not remote to a job. That is whatever your reason is for changing your work style to work remotely. There was a lot to consider about the effects that this might have on your work on your life. Of course it's going to have an effect on how you collaborate and communicate with your co workers. Marin not going to focus on that aspect because it's been covered in so many other media outlets and so many other books for example on the subject instead I want to focus on the hidden in puts the environmental changes around you. That you are subjecting yourself to by working remotely and this thinking applies even if you aren't changing your work From an office with people in it to remote office even the simplest changes. Let's say you're staying in an office of people. Even the simplest changes to your environment are shifts in the inputs that you have in your day to day experience. So what are we talking about when we say imports when we say hidden inputs in particular well these inputs are not fundamentally hidden exactly instead? These inputs are persistent or passive inputs. They're things that were not necessarily choosing as inputs traditionally. We've talked about inputs. You think of media like a book that you're reading or you think of music that you might be listening to or news. They are watching on TV. What we're talking about with these inputs are your environmental surroundings in goal. This episode is to get you to think about the downstream effects of those environmental choices was environmental surroundings. You are choosing as passive inputs to your day to day life so one. Very simple example. Let's imagine that you work in a room with window and that window has natural light coming through most of the time you went that natural light to show on your desk and so you sit with your back to the window. Anybody who's worked remotely for a while knows that this can have a major effect on your video conferencing. It's really simple but when you have light coming from behind you. The camera you're using is going to be blown out. People are going to have a hard time seeing your face and this may seem trivial. You're wondering we talk about all of these really big ideas on developer to you. Are we talking about you? Know a webcam setup. Well when dealing with remote work the details tend to matter more than we expect them to the way that you are presented in that twenty minute remote meeting on. Zoom zoom caller. Something that is the entirety of people's perspective of where you are if they have a lower bandwidth and when I say here. I don't mean that. Their videos loading slowly. I mean the amount of information that they're able to receive as a result of this of this Video `Cau- if that video call is lower bandwidth if they are not able to see your facial expressions clearly or if they're not able to hear you clearly you'll end up with a lack of information and that may not sound like a big deal. Lack of information is not necessarily a bad thing but because humans tend to fill in the blanks. We have to pay attention to a lack of information in the most simple scenario. It's likely that two people will have a different take away. When faced with a lack of information. In a worse scenario people are going to fill in the blanks with something negative and this isn't because they're negative people. It's because this is human nature when we don't know something when there's uncertainty. Humans tend to fill in the blanks with negativity. This is called the negativity bias. And it's something that humans have done for a long time and there's a functional reason for this if we assume the worst or if we imagine the worst than we can prepare for it and so this simple environmental input to your day to day life has had a major effect potentially manure relationships with your co workers. So what do we need to do to uncover some of these hidden inputs? These implicit inputs. You no doubt have received a lot of advice about working from home working remotely how to keep your team productive and sane. When you're working at home it's important to think. A layer higher to rewind from one of the problems the might face. This is one recommendation I have for you. Imagine doing a pre mortem but specifically about your remote work or by. You're working environment in general if you were to fast forward two months and imagine that you've experienced some drastic negative experience. Some drastic negative thing as a result of your environment but was the thing. And what can you do in your environment now or an ongoing way to avoid that drastic negative event this can be a helpful exercise but it also relies on your intuition to know what may go wrong in reality sometimes. Our intuition is not enough for example as it turns out cleaning up the clutter in your house when you're about to start Working remotely may have a major effect on your productivity and even if that clutter isn't in your way even if you can operate effectively you think with the clutter around you. There have been studies that show that working with clutter Or an environment. That has clutter. The people who are working in in. That environment are more likely to procrastinate. So it might make sense before you start this working from home policy to set yourself up for success. Start by cleaning. The underlying theme of these implicit or hidden inputs. Is the idea that we take cues from our environment. And we can add information into our environment to change the queues for example the experiences that we have in a given environment are likely to change our perception of that environment. For this reason it might make sense to designate a specific place for your remote work instead of working wherever you feel comfortable which might seem like good advice. You may instead went to designate an area of your home for that remote work focusing specifically on this idea of cues there are a lot of habits and patterns. That can help you. Use Cues to your advantage. Use those environmental cues to your advantage as it turns out this is in fact one of the most powerful ways to develop new habits to create new cues for yourself. Be Mindful of your environment and the cues that you're creating the cues that maybe you're not even aware of on a day-to-day basis. Seek those cues out..

developer Jonathan Control Marin
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"One of the most important things that managers can create for their teams is a sense of autonomy and freedom. But what exactly does it mean to have autonomy and freedom? Of course we have to have some shared goals. We have to deliver value to the business. So how can we consolidate this idea of freedom and autonomy with having shared common goals and the imperative of delivering value to the organization? Today we're going to talk about a barometer for measuring freedom and autonomy on your teams and we're also going to discuss why it's so hard to create freedom and autonomy on a team. My Name is Jonathan Control. Listening to develop not my goal in the show is driven developers. Iq Find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers this idea of freedom and autonomy. Something that you'll read -An basically every management book since two thousand almost and this reflects the change in the market from a control based management system which worked well for an industrial age of factory setting to a knowledge based system. And this is what we work in as developers or at least this is what we strive to work in as developers in in this scenario it makes sense they would want to have freedom for the people who are those knowledge based workers in as it turns out the barometer for measuring that level of freedom on Guillotine. Is the same reason you want. The freedom to begin with the barometer is measuring the freedom to change if we zoom in on an organization and then all the way down to a team level and even down to an individual level. The imperative to have freedom on a team isn't based on an idealistic notion that you can just do whatever you want to magically value appears on the flip side value is not only generated by working on tightly controlled nearly defined tasks the freedom that we want to create software teams is the freedom to do what we believe will solve the problem the freedom to disagree the freedom to exercise our opinions towards an end goal. What most organizations get wrong about freedom is that people want freedom from their work that somehow work is binding them and in order to have good culture. You must be able to get free away from that work on a regular basis. This is where we get the idea of flexible vacation policies as a culture building tool and while. This isn't necessarily wrong that sometimes we do need time away from work. What is more engaging and perhaps more important for company culture is freedom in the work and the barometer here is freedom to change if you see a lack of change on a team. There are likely both explicit and implicit reasons for this. We're GONNA talk about those right after we talk.

Jonathan Control
The Ocean of Choice Between Can and Will

Developer Tea

07:41 min | 2 years ago

The Ocean of Choice Between Can and Will

"There's an ocean of a difference between can and will When you think about what we can do the possibilities are virtually infinite not in the since that we can do absolutely anything but rather that the number of options and potential timelines that we could follow well we can't really accolate them and so they might as well be infinite but what we will do is a completely different story and thinking about this ocean the difference between can and will is something that we do as developers every single day understanding this difference is is perhaps the critical key to becoming a great product developer maybe you're a product manager and you're listening to this episode good an understanding that what is possible or what there is an affords for your application for example well that doesn't necessarily mean that get your user will use that affords we're gonNA talk about this difference in today's episode my name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to developer t my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in your careers many of us have a list of things that we would like to do and these are things that are achievable perhaps simply by making a choice some of these things are not necessarily a simple choice away but they're certainly within our grasp there within our reach what we can do is very different from what we will do an in the ocean between what we can and what we will do we have a critical and fun the mental function of the human mind and that is choice when we observe the things that we can do our option and and we have to convert our energy and our time in our resources into some kind of choice we're narrowing down that list of things we could do and somehow amongst an infinite number of choices we choose only one and of course this choice cascades and it has effects on what we can do after that choices made but this fundamental concept and the idea that we have a vast amount in front of us that we could choose and yet we only end up choosing one thing can be debilitating and the good news is that our brains help us out a lot our brains are actually making a lot of these choices automatically for us and cutting down a lot of those options making us believe that they're not options at all for example most of us follow cultural norms as if it was not optional to break from them so we're GonNa talk about two ways that this affects you in your career we're gonNA talk about it both in the kind of day to day work that you do and the assumptions that you make about others but then we're also going to talk about it in kind of zoomed out perspective about the choices you make at a broad scale about your career and about your life but first let's talk about how this applies to the work that you do on a day-to-day basis and the assumptions that you make about other people in your users and other developers if the list of options that are available to us is nearly infinite then our brains job is to constantly be sorting that list by the most relevant options to us and sometimes that sorting process produces a clear winner sometimes that sorting process requires more kind of analysis from our conscious thinking from our more deliberate thinking processes here's what's interesting we intuitively believe that other people's brains do the same kind of sorting or at least given the same problem or given the same choice the topmost options maybe the top five are going to be the same between us and a colleague or user but what we miss is that one of the inputs to this kind of sorting machine this algorithm that we're unconsciously often doing is our position in relation to the choice in other words if I am serving someone else making a choice then I am sorting the options differently than if I was making the choice myself on top so then you can add the complexity that not only would I make a different choice if I was in their shoes but they would make different choice for me in their shoes even with the exact same scenario they're sorting algorithm is different even when they are relating to the problem from the same vantage point on this we often believe that by simply making something possible we've taken enough steps so that the user that we are building for or another developer will go the rest of the way that because the option is available that they will then choose to do it this is entirely skipping over this ocean of difference between can and will and the vast majority of our word doc as developers and really as humans in our careers is understanding and working in the complex space between Ken and will and so in our day to day interactions our expectations of what others will do very often going to be wrong the be denied and perhaps even more importantly it's hard for us to see why it's hard for us to adopt decision making rhythm that someone else has in their in their mind that sorting algorithm and so what can we do about this I have two basic recommendations they're very simple we'll get through very quickly the first is to simply listen more allow the person to express the things that are kind of going into their decision making process there's probably something that they will say that you could not have predicted this is particularly true if you are building products for an audience they are not really a part of listen to the audience and gain the knowledge from their feedback rather within from simply your own intuition my second recommendation on this day to day kind of gap between can and will is to bill called a common framework a shared framework for making decisions and making decisions based on for example a shared set of values or a shared set of clear goals. We're GONNA talk a little bit more about how this disparity between what you could do and what you will do

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"In Our last episode we talked about taking implicit things and making them explicit Blissett. We're GonNa continue this discussion today. We're GONNA talk about a couple more things that may be helpful for you to move from kind of the automatic processes the implicit lissette processes in our in our brains making them more explicit bringing them to the slower processes. My Name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to develop prety might go on the show is to help driven developers find clarity perspective and purpose and their careers in today's episode. We're going to dig into something. That's a little bit it difficult for us to understand as humans even though it's something we experience every single day. That is our emotions. We like to think that emotions are some kind of reflection or a pure representation of what's going on around us. When in fact our emotions are something that we can and a ferry often do have some influence over of course as with anything? This isn't a black and white discussion. It's not that you have no control or full control but rather the you have some kind of separated control something in the middle. You can influence but maybe you can't directly decide how you're going to feel that in today's episode we're GonNa talk about some specific ways that you can have a positive influence on your own emotions simply by once again taking something that is currently implicit. Is it making it explicit. We're GONNA discuss two things that you're currently probably managing through an implicit set process moving those two explicit the first one is less about influencing your emotions and more about understanding them and this process. This is fairly simple. Whenever you're feeling a strong emotion unnoticed we didn't say a bad terrible emotion or a wonderful emotion but a strong emotion something that you realize you can recognize that you're feeling something very intensely. I want you to do an exercise. Try to to recognize that emotion and pay attention to it and then either during or right after shortly after that kind of intensity any of that emotion fades I want you to take note and this is probably easier to do if you pull out some kind of notes machine or her an actual notepad right down the primary emotion that you feel this can be something like joy or sadness and then when she to dig take in a little bit deeper to that what kind of joy or sadness are you feeling in that moment for example joy may be excitement mint or it may be contentment. These are two completely different types of happiness joy. Both of them are important to understand Dan and then I want you to take it one step further. Can you describe that emotion at an even more detailed level and by the way feel free to he used more than one word. You don't have to describe your emotions with a single word. You can describe in whatever detail. You'd like to describe it now. The interesting thing is we very rarely do this with their emotions. Instead we often try to fast forward the bad ones and we try to hold onto the good ones and so when the good ones fade we ended up feeling sad and when we can't fast forward the bad ones we end up feeling sad again now. You may be wondering if you're listening to the PODCAST. If you're a new listener to this show and you're wondering how is this specific to developers this this applies to people who aren't aren't developers of course but it's important for developers to get in touch with the way that they experienced their emotions because our work very often an illicit our emotion we may get frustrated and actually understanding frustration may have a direct impact on how we go about for example debugging problem so let's say for example that you feel exasperated. Did you feel completely worn out you feel tired because he'd been trying to figure out what's wrong with this particular piece of code and everything you try keeps unfailing failing in your at kind of that last little bit of energy that you have left for the day in your very prone in this kind of situation to make a mistake take for example to rush through it and to try to brute force your way through whatever problem you're trying to solve similarly early. You may feel on top of the world. Maybe you're having a really great day. You've been kind of cruising along and knocking out features left and right and you feel incredibly confident overconfidence or feeling totally worn out. Both of these scenarios can be Ede's because in both of these scenarios. It's very possible for you to make a poor judgment so this is directly related the two year work because our emotions change our behaviors and win. We can observe and understand emotions better. We can respond to them. Perhaps more mindfully we're gonNA take a quick break and talk about today sponsor but then we're gonNA come back and talk about how you can decide to have it.

Jonathan Control Dan Ede two year
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"You'll hear stories of how to be great how how to act like a superstar programmer in this episode. I wanna talk to you about how to become better better improvement as a fundamental practice. We're gonna use this episode and most likely more episodes in the future talking talking about the process of improvement. My name is jonathan control near listening to developer t my goal on this show is to help driven developers. I find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. It's no secret and if you've listened to the show before you've heard me say it probably a hundred good times if not more that failure is a fundamental part of improvement if you can't fail and do so in a relatively flee safeway in other words failing in a way that doesn't have dire consequences for you or for your company that they might pass on to you. You can't fail in these ways then. It's difficult for you to learn. You have to create an environment. Perhaps even outside of your day job. Where failure is in fact acceptable. This theme of decoupling your failures from your fears will recur her throughout our conversations about improvement because it is fundamentally necessary for you to fail in the last episode of developer t we talked about the idea of progressive load of <hes> kind of pushing yourself to that failure point over and over in each time trying to go one step further whatever that means and whatever context you are improving in progressive overload and failure are fundamentally necessary for for growth for improvement. This concept is not novel. This is the basis of pretty much all science related to improvement but what what we need to do is study how we look at failure and more specifically how much of our failure we look at it's easy to look at the failure directly. The thing that went wrong the action that you took that next time you hope not to take and it's easy to believe that awareness of that particular action that you took that hopefully hopefully you won't take next time or maybe it's an inaction something that you didn't do that. You hope you will do next time. It's easy to believe that knowing about it is enough enough that understanding that you didn't do something that you should have or you did do something that you shouldn't have that is enough for you to change it but we know that this isn't true. We know that our behaviors as humans are not that simple we try to do things and then we fail. We try to build good habits. We try to improve and we often fail. We don't hold up to our resolutions. We don't hit our goals. We don't meet our own expectations quite often now. While this simple five minute or so podcast it's not going to cover for all the reasons that we fail as humans we are going to talk about something that is too often missed during that process of evaluation and even after evaluation the adjustments that we make on the next iteration before we talk about that i wanna talk.

developer programmer jonathan five minute
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"You'll hear stories of how to be great how how to act like a superstar programmer in this episode. I wanna talk to you about how to become better better improvement as a fundamental practice. We're gonna use this episode and most likely more episodes in the future talking talking about the process of improvement. My name is jonathan control near listening to developer t my goal on this show is to help driven developers. I find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. It's no secret and if you've listened to the show before you've heard me say it probably a hundred good times if not more that failure is a fundamental part of improvement if you can't fail and do so in a relatively flee safeway in other words failing in a way that doesn't have dire consequences for you or for your company that they might pass on to you. You can't fail in these ways then. It's difficult for you to learn. You have to create an environment. Perhaps even outside of your day job. Where failure is in fact acceptable. This theme of decoupling your failures from your fears will recur her throughout our conversations about improvement because it is fundamentally necessary for you to fail in the last episode of developer t we talked about the idea of progressive overload of <hes> kind of pushing yourself to that failure point over and over in each time trying to go one step further whatever that means and whatever context you are improving in progressive overload and failure are fundamentally necessary for for growth for improvement. This concept is not novel. This is the basis of pretty much all science related to improvement but what what we need to do is study how we look at failure and more specifically how much of our failure we look at it's easy to look at failure directly. The thing that went wrong the action that you took that next time you hope not to take and it's easy to believe that awareness of that particular action that you took that hopefully hopefully you won't take next time or maybe it's an inaction something that you didn't do that. You hope you will do next time. It's easy to believe that knowing about it is enough enough that understanding that you didn't do something that you should have or you did do something that you shouldn't have that is enough for you to change it but we know that this isn't true. We know that our behaviors as humans are not that simple we try to do things and then we fail. We try to build good habits. We try to improve and we often fail. We don't hold up to our resolutions. We don't hit our goals. We don't meet our own expectations quite often now. While this simple five minute or so podcast it's not going to cover for all the reasons that we fail as humans we are going to talk about something that is too often missed during that process of evaluation and even after evaluation the adjustments that we make on the next iteration before we talk about that i wanna talk.

developer programmer jonathan five minute
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Whether we'd like to admit it or not we've all dealt with a difficult co worker and the level of difficulty and the reason for the difficulty is really highly varied. Every single situation is different in every a person is different in today's three by three episode. We're talking about three strategies for dealing with difficult coworker relationships. My Name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to develop not my goal in the show was helped driven developers like hugh find clarity perspective and purpose in your careers and we've all had this kind of problem and if you haven't had it then you're probably an anomaly or maybe you will have it in the future so you can refer back to this episode when it does happen but the reality is that there's not any one silver bullet way to deal with difficult co workers now to lay the foundation for some of the kind of theory that we're. GonNa talk talk about in today's episode. We have to affirm the idea that the level of difficulty that you have with a given person is fundamentally league a part of your relationship to them in other words. Someone is not just out on their own being difficult. The difficulty is a difficulty of relationship now. That's not to say that you're the only one has trouble Bible with this particular person. They may have a particular ways of behaving that are not tenable for a lot of people or it may be that just rubs you the wrong way. In either case there are strategies that you can use to relate better to this person in the first. Our strategy is to simply be on their side. What does this mean practically whenever that person is doing something that you don't totally understand end instead of entrenching yourself in what you already believe in what you already feel in your frustration and that feeling of annoyance that you might have towards a person instead of retreating back to that place where you normally go try to get on their side of the fence try to see things their way. This is a particularly good technique for developers because a lot of the time the difficulties that we have come down to technical opinion. We end up bike shedding for hours often. I'm productively but if we can set aside our own opinion if we can Ken lay that down and see things through someone else's eyes then we often understand that most of our opinions about software development are at least partially arbitrary it may not be that they are actually arbitrary to you but when it comes down to do the goal that you have the common kind of objective that is shared between you and the person that is difficult both your way and their airway may work well and if you can see things through their perspective one of two things is likely to happen either one. You're going to change your own mm perspective because you see things in a new way through their perspective or the second thing that might happen is because you understand their position position better. You may be able to explain how to bridge the gap between your opinion and their opinion the fundamental idea here is instead of retreating and trying to pull somebody to your side. It's important that you take steps towards them. You can visualize. How an argument is going to play out if you can imagine someone leaning in towards the other person to hear the nuances of what they're saying rather than leaning back so that they can yell louder the Second Strategy for relating better to a difficult co worker is to think further into the future pitcher most of the time the struggles that we have between one worker and another those struggles are temporary. They're focused on on temporary problems like for example this project or this particular feature or this particular client and often if if we can stretch what we're focusing on if we can stretch that target out a little bit further into the future then a lot of that interpersonal conflict will diffuse. He's very quickly. The third and final strategy that I recommend in dealing better with a difficult co worker is to try and articulate your problem problem in terms of your own fears most of the issues that we have with other people stem from fears. There's that we have about how that conflict is going to affect us. Let's say for example that in your opinion one of your co workers there's on your team is lazy. Well your outrage them. Being Lazy is not some kind of problem that you have with laziness in general most most likely it's based on the fear that that person's laziness is going to cause a negative outcome for you. Maybe you're going to have to clean up after them or maybe you're going to have to work extra to make sure the project comes in on time or maybe you are worried that this person is going to take advantage of of their position and that they're not going to be held accountable for their laziness and this means a bad outcome for you because it likely creates a dysfunctional. Functional team or perhaps you have a fear that you will be treated unfairly the feeling that you're pulling your weight but the other person isn't now the reason this is so important is because if you can articulate things in terms of your fears then you can start to address the underlying problem blohm at its source rather than trying to externalize that fear and turn it into kind of an activated targeting mechanism you can can start to kind of work on your internal perspective your internal relationship with this person and address those fears. These three techniques are all about realizing that you have a relationship with this person that this isn't about fixing the team. It's not about fixing that person. It's more about fixing how you see that person how you respond to their actions in the workplace. You're unlikely to change people in your career. You're going to be much better off if you can focus more more on changing the way you relate with them and very rarely <hes> you may run into a situation where the difficulty is simply not worth it but the most of the time the relationship work is going to get you to the place where you need to be and.

Jonathan Control hugh Ken
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"And what you think about a belief that you hold relatively strongly for example something that is fairly common knowledge that's verifiable verifiable by science like the Earth being round or close to round and I want you to take a moment and answer this very simple question my do you believe that in this case the earth is round. It seems like a simple question and it seems like it has a simple answer but the truth is probably a little more complicated in today's episode. We're going to take a slight detour in talk about our reasoning in why they are beliefs might be a little more complicated than even we think they are. My Name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to develop not my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose near careers so we'll come back. To the question of whether the earth is round and instead we're GonNa talk about something. That's perhaps a little bit easier to have different answers to like. How should we build our javascript application? What kind of tooling can we use? What is best for our particular situation? These questions seem herder to answer and this is somewhat paradoxical. The question of what shape the earth is seems a little bit harder to verify hi then what language should learn coming out of college and yet we have a strong conviction on one belief and less of a strong one and even arguments about the other two what is happening here and why why is it that your belief about the earth being round is probably not just based on science as it turns out humans very often when they're faced with difficult questions provide substitute answers. I'll I'll give you another. Perhaps less consequential question. What would you like to have for dinner if you go out with your friends or maybe your significant other and you're trying to decide where you want to go to eat dinner and next time? When you ask this question I want you to notice the types of answers that you provide usually the answers are not straightforward? The answers aren't simply. I want X.. Y. Z. instead the answers are often formed through some kind of reasoning some kind of construction to explain to ourselves. Why we want something for example you could say what would you like for dinner in my answer might be well? I had Chinese last night and and this afternoon I had a salad so I want pizza tonight asking difficult questions like what language should you learn after college. Will it requires a lot of analysis so you may substitute the question which language is his most popular in the same way when you're asked whether the earth is round you probably are not drawing on your own personal study your own scientific verification in fact you probably. The aren't even surveying the scientific verification of other scientists who came before you instead you are probably substituting the answer to what is the consensus amongst the scientific community. We do this kind of substitution all the time not because it will produce the best answer but instead because it's more efficient we can often rely on things like consensus to get us a reasonable answer in other words if you can trust that a lot of the scientific community is not colluding. They're not trying to convince everyone that the earth is round for some nefarious reason Zain and instead you can default too trusting the scientific community will now you have a proxy you have an easy way of answering questions that otherwise would require some kind of expensive or difficult verification the you're not really going to do in this outlines a key difference that our brains kind of muddy up a little bit and that is the difference between something that you know or something that you have kind of experienced versus something. Something that you believe when we ask ourselves what is the best way to solve this particular problem in code we aren't running every possible solution and then choosing the perfectly optimal solution instead. We're looking back back at our experience. We're trying to predict into the future which one of those experiences matches the pattern of our current problem and then we're going to try to apply some kind of insight from that past experience. If we don't have something that matches the pattern from the past then we use the things that we know we use our common kind of algorithms. Maybe data structures are common ways of of approaching problems certain models that we may have best practices <hes> we might collaborate with other developers in their experiences ultimately. We're making our best guess in very often that best guests requires some of this substitution instead of answering. What is the best? Best Way to do something we might substitute. What is the fastest way or maybe in a better scenario? What is the most maintainable way to do something? These substitutions often provide us the value that we're looking for even if they aren't necessarily directly answering the question or answering the problem that we have placed on the table to answer ultimately if we can be aware of win we are substituting and ask ourselves if we're okay with that substitute we can start to better hone our choices to the outcomes that we desire rather than convincing ourselves that we chose the optimal solution. We can actually identify the points where we are taking shortcuts. Thank you so much listening to today's episode of Developer T. If you enjoyed today's episode I encourage you to subscribe and whatever podcasting up you're currently using. We are only able to continue what we do on this podcast because of our incredible sponsors if you would like to partner with developer t and invest in the Development Community encourage you to reach out to us at sponsors expect F._M...

Developer Jonathan Control Zain partner
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Take a moment and think back on the last twenty four hours. What did you give up in the last twenty four hours? And what are you forfeiting fitting by listening to this podcast you've certainly heard of the fear of missing out or foam. Oh but we don't often ask ourselves. This question without a clear sense of loss in other words are fear of missing out is usually fear of missing out on something specific. We don't often talk about this fear in terms of opportunity and that's exactly what we're going to focus on in today's episode my name's Jonathan Control and you're listening to developer tea and my goal in the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose near careers opportunity cost is a huge cost that we should be considering not just as developers but in our lives in general but I wanna be very clear the goal of focusing on the fear of missing an opportunity a different kind of foam. Perhaps is not to induce anxiety but instead to actively recognize that every decision you make is a decision to sacrifice something thing else and it can be no other way every decision we make. There's something that were choosing not choosing the opposite of now you may hear this and here the message age that this means that every decision you make must be worthwhile and then you'll fill in the blink for what worthwhile means to you for example people like me who have a high priority. On their family life might take this episode to mean that they're supposed to go and spend all of your time with family that there's always missed opportunity to spend time with your children for example but this is a more complex topic because there's a lot of evaluation that goes into these kinds of decisions. If you were to stop working altogether and go and spend all of your time with your family then viewed eventually run out of money wouldn't be able to provide for them and a lot of other competing priorities would unfortunately fail and so we do this kind of negotiation with our decision-making we think about the things that that are worth sacrificing but sometimes we're not as mindful as others. Sometimes the decision that we make given moment is purely in response to whatever's happening around us or maybe it's some..

Jonathan Control developer twenty four hours
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"In your career you've probably experienced the phenomenon known as beginner's luck whether this was you or another developer. Maybe someone who wasn't a developer Oliver at all that you encountered. They were early on in their career but they seem to be skyrocketing. The talents are going from zero to one hundred. What is the reason for beginners luck and <unk>? How can we figure out how to have beginner's luck when we're no longer beginners? Certainly there's no special magic science to this and that's what we're talking about on today's episode. My Name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to developer not my goal on the show is held driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in your careers so beginner's luck. Is this interesting phenomenon and is not the only one that's related to today's subject object but I I want you to put yourself in the shoes of a beginner. Maybe consider a hobby that you've been interested in learning but you have almost no context for that hobby. Imagine a task is put in front of you that you've never done before and you have to figure out how to do it yourself. It's even better if you can imagine this without any reference to the way that other people do do things and this is where we start to form why beginner's luck exists one of the things that makes humans unique is that we hear very good emulating other humans we see something that someone else is doing and we take in a lot of different signals and we tried to decide. Should we do it like them or should we do it differently from them and so people that we perceive to be successful title or otherwise some kind of model of what we would like to be we generally emulate them. We're very good at copying other people's actions and you can see how this can be really useful instead instead of going through the long journey of learning how to do something <hes> from scratch we can take advantage of the shortcuts from people who have already learned but this is where it gets interesting because every. Human although we are very good at copying others humans are also prone to become entrenched in their beliefs and what does this mean well it means that as you continue to copy other people and once you find certain ways of doing things certain best practices for example as a as a software engineer those things become harder and harder to discard and sometimes these curious sticks and these rules that we learn these guidelines these copycat motions that we continue to use sometimes they can be very useful in fact most of the time they can be very useful but it's also oh useful to the beginner in particular to start without any of that framework to begin without any of the rules to have kind of open horizons on what is possible and what it means to have a best practice. This kind of unconstrained version of learning can provide you with a different landscape than you otherwise would have less restraints during the learning process. Can Be incredibly valuable so here's my recommendation for today's episode and this is a very short episode by the way coming on the heels of our interview with <hes> Will Larson if you didn't listen to that I encourage you to go back and listen to it but here's the takeaway as we continue to learn more you can kind of imagine the information that you learn as bricks and these bricks get put into walls in your mind in those walls are really important. They're really useful but they can also be rigid and restrictive. Sometimes those walls shouldn't have been built the way that they were built. Maybe maybe they're roughly correct but you needed to move it to the right by a couple of inches and so if you can imagine that the information that you're learning sometimes needs to be remodelled now you you can start to learn how to unlearn some of that information. He can see the value in seeing multiple perspectives perhaps holding on lightly to your best practices for example and. This isn't just about learning. This isn't just about you know acquiring new skills. This is about how you see the world you see your career path. If you imagine for a long time that your career path is going to go in one particular Taylor trajectory and then something changes something that you didn't expect happens and let's be honest. This is going to happen to all of us. At some point we all have unexpected events that occur that shift our plans but what happens when that all comes kind of crumbling down while it takes a lot of energy to do this. There's huge payoff if you can think about your beliefs and entertain ways is to flex those beliefs to been them to the breaking point to reconstruct them and look at them from different angles so the homework for this episode. If there is homework over a weekend is to consider a belief that you hold fairly strongly something that is kind of central to your career or maybe to your personal life something that you believe very strongly and I want you to entertain. The opposite belief or an opposing belief it could be something as simple as a best practice in code like don't repeat yourself keeping your dry entertaining that you should repeat yourself entertain that idea and maybe even try to make an argument for the other side and I want you to be particularly mindful of a backfire effect that may occur and what this happened. What what happens when a backfire effect occurs is that when you try to entertain an opposing idea then you end up becoming entrenched in your original idea even more so the beware of this exercise <hes> possibly creating a stronger belief than you already have the hope is to try to kind of test your own beliefs structures in particular about your career about something that you're learning you know finding ways to change the way that you think about these things in starting by.

developer Oliver Jonathan Control software engineer Larson Taylor
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"In your career you've probably experienced the phenomenon known as beginner's luck whether this was you or another developer. Maybe someone who wasn't a developer Oliver at all that you encountered. They were early on in their career but they seem to be skyrocketing. The talents are going from zero to one hundred. What is the reason for beginners luck and <unk>? How can we figure out how to have beginner's luck when we're no longer beginners? Certainly there's no special magic science to this and that's what we're talking about on today's episode. My Name is Jonathan Control and you're listening to developer not my goal on the show is held driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in your careers so beginner's luck. Is this interesting phenomenon and is not the only one that's related to today's subject object but I I want you to put yourself in the shoes of a beginner. Maybe consider a hobby that you've been interested in learning but you have almost no context for that hobby. Imagine a task is put in front of you that you've never done before and you have to figure out how to do it yourself. It's even better if you can imagine this without any reference to the way that other people do do things and this is where we start to form why beginner's luck exists one of the things that makes humans unique is that we hear very good emulating other humans we see something that someone else is doing and we take in a lot of different signals and we tried to decide. Should we do it like them or should we do it differently from them and so people that we perceive to be successful title or otherwise some kind of model of what we would like to be we generally emulate them. We're very good at copying other people's actions and you can see how this can be really useful instead instead of going through the long journey of learning how to do something <hes> from scratch we can take advantage of the shortcuts from people who have already learned but this is where it gets interesting because every. Human although we are very good at copying others humans are also prone to become entrenched in their beliefs and what does this mean well it means that as you continue to copy other people and once you find certain ways of doing things certain best practices for example as a as a software engineer those things become harder and harder to discard and sometimes these curious sticks and these rules that we learn these guidelines these copycat motions that we continue to use sometimes they can be very useful in fact most of the time they can be very useful but it's also oh useful to the beginner in particular to start without any of that framework to begin without any of the rules to have kind of open horizons on what is possible and what it means to have a best practice. This kind of unconstrained version of learning can provide you with a different landscape than you otherwise would have less restraints during the learning process. Can Be incredibly valuable so here's my recommendation for today's episode and this is a very short episode by the way coming on the heels of our interview with <hes> Will Larson if you didn't listen to that I encourage you to go back and listen to it but here's the takeaway as we continue to learn more you can kind of imagine the information that you learn as bricks and these bricks get put into walls in your mind in those walls are really important. They're really useful but they can also be rigid and restrictive. Sometimes those walls shouldn't have been built the way that they were built. Maybe maybe they're roughly correct but you needed to move it to the right by a couple of inches and so if you can imagine that the information that you're learning sometimes needs to be remodelled now you you can start to learn how to unlearn some of that information. He can see the value in seeing multiple perspectives perhaps holding on lightly to your best practices for example and. This isn't just about learning. This isn't just about you know acquiring new skills. This is about how you see the world you see your career path. If you imagine for a long time that your career path is going to go in one particular Taylor trajectory and then something changes something that you didn't expect happens and let's be honest. This is going to happen to all of us. At some point we all have unexpected events that occur that shift our plans but what happens when that all comes kind of crumbling down while it takes a lot of energy to do this. There's huge payoff if you can think about your beliefs and entertain ways is to flex those beliefs to been them to the breaking point to reconstruct them and look at them from different angles so the homework for this episode. If there is homework over a weekend is to consider a belief that you hold fairly strongly something that is kind of central to your career or maybe to your personal life something that you believe very strongly and I want you to entertain. The opposite belief or an opposing belief it could be something as simple as a best practice in code like don't repeat yourself keeping your dry entertaining that you should repeat yourself entertain that idea and maybe even try to make an argument for the other side and I want you to be particularly mindful of a backfire effect that may occur and what this happened. What what happens when a backfire effect occurs is that when you try to entertain an opposing idea then you end up becoming entrenched in your original idea even more so the beware of this exercise <hes> possibly creating a stronger belief than you already have the hope is to try to kind of test your own beliefs structures in particular about your career about something that you're learning you know finding ways to change the way that you think about these things in starting by.

developer Oliver Jonathan Control software engineer Larson Taylor
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. If probably use something that today's guest built without even realizing it today, we're talking to Julian Shapiro Jelena's. The author of the law city dot J s he also writes a bunch of very useful guides and Julian dot com, my name's Jonathan control. And you're listening to developer t am I go on this show stoke driven developers. Just like you next to your career purpose to you can do better work and have a positive influence on the people around you. And we do these interviews to try to figure out how other people are doing exactly that they're connecting to their purpose. The struggles they face, and we try to learn from their experiences here on developing t let's get into the interview with Julian Shapiro. Jillian, welcome to the show pleasure to be here. I'm excited have you on? And I'd love for you to answer. This question to kind of kick us off. What do you want people to know you for Jillian? Interesting. So. I'd say looking back twenty years from now, I love for them to think of me as someone who earnestly tried to write the best summary of everything passionate about and I hope that got them. Similarly, inspired to be bashing about what I am so marketing the science of building muscle critical thinking how to right that's what I would love to be known for. Yeah. And you're writing about these things now. Right. So it's this isn't just something that is, you know, a future dream of yours, you're actually acting on those on the desires. Yes. Yeah. It's something I sprinkle in throw my free time. But with. Even though I don't have as much free time as I'd like what I realize how much better subsequent drafts are of everything I write when I simply allow time to pass, and it's it's self evident. It's almost cliche actually people. Many people are familiar with this. But when you're literally forced to space out revisions over the span of half year because most people probably would have gotten done what I get done a much shorter period of time when you're forced to because you really don't have the time, but you do have the consistency. It gets so much better. I'm embarrassed by the previous draft of everything I write including everything currently on a website. I really really benefit from that. Yeah. Okay. So so that's a really a very interesting kind of a fact, and I wanna get back to it. What do you think people might already know the you've worked on? And maybe they don't know that it was you that worked on it. Yeah. Sure. So I guess I built something that a lot of people use under the hood, which is velocity j s and animated engine, and it was the output of me having taken a year off from working and trying to figure out what is the sort of highest leverage fix that. I could work on for front end development as a whole it could have been anything. I was just interested in coding as interested in doing so without any sort of business objective, and I landed on performance like the actual speed the paid time the the effect on you X of having performed website animation..

Jillian Julian Shapiro Jelena Julian Shapiro developer twenty years
"jonathan control" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"One or nine yeah right here we were really right and then we reiterate okay anyway now last month the mac and the kindermann oppose crossover that rio and since then utx has roared higher lying thinks this is a very powerful trend he sees the one hundred twenty three dollars stock possible going to the one hundred thirty before too long low ideally he recommends waiting for a pullback to one twenty were utx as an ice for support but like the others i dunno if we're going get the decline these stocks are so hot they may be bought right into the end of the year let me give the bottom line on these it's a good time to be in industrial company the charges interpret by bob lang he's just the industrial stocks are going to continue to have a good time rightly yearin he likes tattered pearl helix emerson electric honeywell united technologies and i i got to say grill all you can do is hope the tea stocks come in and give us better prices as part of social remark wide sell off that has nothing to do with their businesses why because of physicists are red hot we're going to michael in new york michael jim thanks for taking my call of course my stockings jonathan control i have a pretty sizeable opposition uh down about five percent and i've done my homework they're buying back shares dairy queen give it in and now i feel like it's very uh while points for the men's recently it's been downgraded what do you think jim go to do a cell.

rio bob lang new york michael jim one hundred twenty three dolla five percent
"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"jonathan control" Discussed on Developer Tea

"What was the last project the work done that felt ohi don't like it was falling apart or that it could fall apart at any point and part of that fragility is that the information about that project it's kind of difficult to find eight and so you're not really sure you can change your why you should change anything we're talking about this on today's episode because i went to discuss a potentially an antidote or at least be story at a picture metaphor that can help you think about how to avoid this kind of scenario my name is jonathan control you're listening to developer t and my goal in the show is to help you become a developer sometimes that means that if you're a developer in a leadership position that you think about the way the your team executes on project from a from assumed doubt perspective that not necessarily in a what what language or writing or in a what paradigm you're following in your code but also from the perspective of what is the flow of a project how do you handle tasks how do you handle uncertainty where does information livethese are all things that you should be thinking about especially if you're in some kind of leadership her ownership position we're gonna take a quick break and talk about today sponsor and i'm going to come back and talk about the reasons a ah projects may end up being fragile today's episode is sponsored by code ship one of the ways you can avoid having a fragile project is by testing that project but if you're only testing on your local machine than a couple of things may be happening one at you may actually have something locally working that doesn't actually work in production so you're tests may not catch some of those issues the best way to handle this is to use continuous integration this removes the testing the testing validation from your local machine and it puts it on a testing server was called a.

developer