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"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:17 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Mexico relentlessly unceasingly. He's trying to whip up as much fear as he can on the eve of the midterm elections. He's described it as an invading army with potential terrorists and criminals in their midst. The reality of the caravan is something entirely different. And one of our reporters is on the ground describe it the New Yorkers Jonathan Blitzer spent a week reporting on the caravan walking alongside them and talking all day long with thousands of people who have been heading north. I reached Jonathan Blitzer in Mexico. John you've spent a week embedded in the migrant caravan as it's been called traveling from Honduras north toward the border between Mexico, and Texas, although let's a long way away. Where did you join up how far into the journey has it been and how many people were along? By the time. I joined the group they had been traveling for few weeks. I I met them in southern Mexico and the state of Chiapas as they were in a small city of about maybe fifty thousand residents called my pasta pack, and by then the group at pretty much been, you know, steady at a little over five thousand people and what they've been doing is. They've been kind of skirting the western edge of the state of jobless moving north bit by bit walking about twenty five to thirty miles a day. How many hours a day is that? Yeah, they start. So so they start early. They start before the sun is up. So they started around four in the morning sometimes even earlier because it's so hot. And once once the sun comes up by eight in the morning, and it's ninety ninety five degrees and they're walking along a highway. And so the heat really really builds because the concrete the pavement rather. And so you start to see people arrive in the next destination as early as mid day, and then kind of trickling in through. Through the evening before they start an extra for the next city. Well, wh- what are the logistics of things? In other words, how do people eat and get water and charge their phones? It's must be immensely complicated. It is. And it's kind of an amazing thing to behold, I think roughly image syndrome is the basics water food. The caravan members are are entirely dependent really on communities along the route making donations there there are there's kind of a weird patchwork of relief agencies and groups that are traveling along with some people bring food to the town square. You know, there's medical attention that some of the migrants can get through through this network of of relief agencies. And so what they do is when they arrive in a place. There's kind of this the city wherever it is becomes almost a refugee camp kind of refugee camp for basically twenty four hours where they sleeping they're sleeping on the street. Sometimes they're sleeping inside. But for the most part it's outside in parks. It's on it's just on the street. It's in you know, in fields along the route some of them sleep alongside the road. It it. It's it's striking. Now, John I think we wanna know above all where these people are from what they want. And what is the common story that you keep hearing the vast majority of people on the caravan if not nearly all of them are from Honduras, and the story you hear to person is that life, and under us is just no longer sustainable. There's no work the cities and communities across incredibly violent and dangerous. Most of the people I've been talking to have tried pretty much everything they could think of they've tried changing their jobs, they've tried moving to different places within the country. And so there's a real sense of desperation among pretty much everyone who's undertaking this trip. I don't know. How fixated everyone is on the US people are really so desperate just to get on the move that they haven't even all considered what the US looks like what the border policy would involve kind of whether or not they could go through the full asylum. Process. So we've heard numbers like five thousand two is that number growing larger or getting smaller over time. I think that number is roughly consistent the group is sending a little bit increasingly what people are doing is. They're trying to hitch rides in some cases, church groups have arranged van and truck transport. And so it's a little bit more diffuse than it initially was, but there is still a basic kind of core logic to the way the caravan advances the idea is that you can't get too far ahead of the caravan. Because then you lose all the benefits of traveling with this large group. Why are they traveling in such a big group it what's the purpose of a caravan as opposed to twenty five people travelling together and hitching rides over. They would do it. Well, really the caravan gives them protection and the whole point of the caravan. It's funny when we look at the caravan from from the US side, it looks like this overtly political act kind of symbolic act sort of collective stand against the authorities along the way really what it is is a tool to get through Mexico. The root itself through Mexico is extremely dangerous. They're armed groups. There are gangs there criminals. You kidnap you extort? You beat you brutalize. You are all very real risks and on top of that Mexican immigration. Authorities are actually in Central America famously brutal for how they deal with Central American migrants. Mexico. He's deported more central Americans back home than the US has over the last several years. And so the idea by travelling in this group, you kind of in your yourself against Mexican authorities just converging on the group arresting everyone and deporting them, it's it's too hard for the Mexican government to deal with a group this large once the group if the group can eventually hit the US. That's uncertain and that's many weeks away at a minimum. The idea of the caravan no longer has the same utility, then people kind of dispersed and make their particular asylum claims or you know, sort of tried to cross it. They can John. You're not alone there as a journalist. There must be some awareness that people in the United States are watching this that this is the focus of attention, particularly on right wing media. And Donald Trump has been calling it an invasion, invasion is the word that has become the talking point for the Republican right about this. You people talk about this. And the caravan the lime talking to people are very aware of of of how aggressive Trump is on this on this subject. But I don't think they have much of a sense at all of the mid-term context of how the right and the US is kind of using this as a as a as a rally in did not aware of the election coming in a matter of days. Correct. And and and of course, you know, in some ways, why would they be because they're they're not going to arrive at the. The US border for several weeks till you let the midterms will be over by the time some of these people arrive at the US border. So when Trump tweets that criminals and unknown middle easterners are mixed in with the with the Hondurans in the in the caravan. It seems like a code for terrorists and lots of rhetoric about bad people to use his phrase. Are there any signs of this in the group? None none at all. None at all. I mean, anyone armed none. None. None. None no one that. I've seen knowing that. I've heard about, you know, the group there are little as you can imagine. There are tensions in fissures within the group. They've been traveling for weeks. They've been doing this grueling journey. There are rumors sometimes that circulate within the group that you know, while while I was in one of these towns in the southern tip of Oaxaca. There were rumors that someone was stealing babies and everyone in the in the camp panicked. And and look for this culprit, and in fact, within hours it turned out. Okay. There was nothing had happened. But that's really the extent of it. I mean, there's nothing. There's nothing at all aggressive or violent or dangerous about this group. You're seeing children you're saying mothers. Using father's you're seeing people who are making this grueling thirty mile a day trip in crocs in sandals in. Flops. It is a thoroughly unintimidated group of people. So when they start hearing about thousands of troops being sent by Trump to the border. What's the reaction? I think for the most part people expect the US border to be hard to cross, but I don't I don't even think that that's an immediate concern of theirs. Quite yet in some ways that more immediate political concern for them is what's happening in Mexico. It's really been overlooked in the context of the caravan in early December, a new president will take over in Mexico, and he's the restaurant where Lopez door, and he's thought to be much more sympathetic to the plight of migrants at least compared to its predecessor. And there's there's some uncertainty within the group about what will happen come December. First when Mexican leadership changes, this is a president who who said he'd stand up to Trump who who very much wants to be seen as a man of the people. I mean, the Mexican government is actually between a rock and a hard place here. I mean, you have Trump breathing down there next to stop this entire caravan in its tracks. The Mexican government can't exactly do that. It also has partners obviously in the region. And so it can't be seen as being too brutal. With this caravan moved north Jon last week, of course, Robert Bowers broke into the synagogue in Pittsburgh. And killed eleven people wounded more and his message on social media was a hysteria about what he called invaders word that we're now hearing on Fox News all the time that were that we hear from the president invaders in his words that come in to kill our people. I can't sit by and watch. My people get slaughtered is what the hours route he talked about massive human caravans invading America as the motivation for his fury, and eventually his murderous rampage in the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh. And I wonder as you are. Making this track alongside these migrants. How you process this reality of what's happening? I mean, just from just from a personal standpoint I really need needed to compartmentalize. Because to see I mean to seniors like that tragic tragic news to hear the president continued even after that you've after that massacre to to sort of gin up the base about this about this totally unfounded fear of of the border being overrun, it's just it's just it's so plainly at odds with what's happening here on the ground that it it's too overwhelming even to try to take stock of you know, here on the ground there to their worlds apart. I mean, there's no the people marching north are in a state of exhaustion desperation almost unfathomable uncertainty and the US remains to many of them in abstraction. What is an abstract to them is the blisters on their feet their thirst their uncertainty about where they'll sleep at night. But the the thing that was probably for me most striking about it was that around the time is it. A day after the shooting at the synagogue in. Pittsburgh the caravan itself about five thousand people strong arrived in southern Oaxaca and is preparing to advance to a tiny village. And this is where we were based called Santiago Neil pack population four thousand so smaller population than the caravan itself and listening to the rhetoric in the US the president sending troops to the border telling telling voters across the country that were about to be wiped out because this this band of marauders is advancing on our border and here I'm in a small town where there are actually more migrants arriving in. There are residents, and it was kind of this amazing moment of parallel universes. And you just watched as a community dealt with this incredibly complex, an intractable thing the arrival of five thousand people, and they felt a fear and a desire to kind of recoil from the Mike. They arrived at the same time. They felt a moral responsibility to help and over the twenty four hour period. That the caravan was in this tiny town of Santiago, not peck, you watch the community in a really organic and kind of soulful way deal with this insane situation. It really devastated me to see. So that was kind of the landscape for us as we were taking in that news. Eventually these people will will reach the border, presumably, what would be a humane sane and pragmatic. Way to deal with them when they do reach the border. I mean, most of these people who do reach the border and to be clear, you know, if the five thousand people in this caravan, it's not at all certain that all of them are nearly all of them were for that matter half of them will reach the border past caravans that have been more than a thousand people large tried to advance to the US typically have only a few hundred arrive at the US border seeking asylum. But in any case when members of this caravan do arrive at the US border, probably later in November. There is an asylum process in place at the border, and those who have claims of credible fear of being persecuted in their home countries will and should by law by international and and US law have the right to present those claims to immigration agents at the border, and to have you authorities way those claims the problem is, of course, that I'm not even confident that those who have legitimate claims. Of of of asylum. We'll have the opportunity to pursue it in the US. But but the humane response for the US government used to follow international law and to give those seeking refuge in the US a chance to make their claim. And and at least let the cards fall. Jonathan Blitzer speaking to us from Mexico. Thanks so much..

US Mexico president John Jonathan Blitzer Donald Trump Mexican government Honduras Oaxaca America Pittsburgh Trump Texas Chiapas Santiago peck Santiago Neil Jon
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are going to be prosecuted anyway but they're not going to be separated from their kids there are specific rules in place enshrined in federal law that dictate how children are supposed to be treated while in custody and so there was an immediate tension between the executive order last week and existing federal law for how to treat children and whether or not it was even possible to keep children in detention while the government prosecuted the parents and then kept them in detention for the duration of the legal process concerning their asylum claim so that was last week by the start of this week the government said okay we're actually going to end the zero tolerance policy of prosecuting families across the border illegally because we don't have the resources to keep it going so one of the immediate problems was okay if you're going to arrest parents and kids and keep them together at the border where you gonna hold them and there were no answers to these questions and so the government kind of had to beat a retreat on that because there were just simply logistical questions about what it would even mean for them to hold parents and children together at the border so that was early this this week and then of course we got the judge's ruling from tuesday night which effectively ends family separation at the border it doesn't necessarily help us understand that judge's ruling doesn't help us understand whether or not the terms of the president's executive order from last week are gonna pass legal muster so there are a whole number of there's a whole host of questions that are unanswered and it's very confusing to follow let me reintroduce you here if you're just joining us my guest is jonathan blitzer he covers gration for the new yorker and lately he's been in paso talking to a lot of women who have sought asylum but crossed here into the us illegally we're gonna take a short break and we'll be right back this is fresh air.

president us executive jonathan blitzer
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm terry gross back with jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker he's en el paso texas where he spent the past couple of weeks reporting on the crisis at the border he's interviewed parents in detention who were separated from their children after crossing the border illegally why have you decided to spend the past few weeks in our past why did you choose el paso a paso is especially important because it is where the administration i tested out it's zero tolerance and family separation policies in the summer of two thousand seventeen so you know the government officially announced all of this in in may but there were reports for months and months about families who've been separated at the border and a lot of those reports came out of this particular patch of the border in west texas and what has since come out is that the administration decided to test out what this would look like here and so you're in a place sort of in one sense the laboratory for where this policy i began and it's now a place that is feeling the current chaos of the administration trying to rejig the policy in ways that are really acute dramatic to see you know there was that audiotape than reporter from propublica recorded of children a one of the places were they were being held crying and broke people's hearts an faa get really mobilize people to question the wisdom of the policy separating parents and children from your reports you know you've been talking to women who were separated from their children you talk about how much these women are crying i've never in my life seen anything even remotely like this i mean i i've been meeting women who's who who were crying so violently they can barely speak a meeting women whose hands are shaking who look at me with kind of vacant gays it's extremely upsetting to see there was one instance that particularly shook me involving a mother who i had met this is last week she and i met on a wednesday and on wednesday she hadn't heard anything about her kids you know her kid was she had some ideas but she wasn't sure she hadn't spoken to him this is a nine year old kids you've been separated from she hadn't seen since may twenty six so almost a month and she was just devastated i mean she she looked physically ill she hadn't been sleeping she looked like a fundamental part of her was missing it was scary to see physically and then we met again two days later and we met because there is still more complexity in her involving her case and how this administration now might be dropping the criminal case against her and sending her day gracious attention anyway just there's she's got a long road ahead of her but that morning she spoke to her kid on the phone this is for the first time now in close month and it was like she clicked back into being i've never seen anything like this i mean it was like just by virtue of having spoken to her kid her is kind of started to zero back in on me her skin look different her hair to seemed just every she seemed revitalised now she is still a shell of performer self because she's still not with their kit and she's still have answers how she's going to reunite with their kid and there were parts of the conversation she had with her kid that we're extremely concerning her kid who's now in a government shelter appears to be treated well is getting food is you know he he seemed okay seemed okay spirits obviously he's scared he wants to see his mother but he told her that three days after they were separated while he was in government custody someone hit him because he wasn't eating and he wasn't eating because he was so scared he was so upset so she's hearing this and as a mother this is tearing her apart at the same time she's so profoundly relieved that she could even hear his voice that that alone was enough to to it almost gave her the kind of energy to talk to me about the other stuff so i mean what i'm going to go through his it's nothing short of torture i i don't know how to put it so the women we've been talking about crossed.

jonathan blitzer three days nine year two days
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm terry gross back with jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker he's l paso texas where he spent the past couple of weeks reporting on the crisis at the border he's interviewed parents in detention who were separated from their children after crossing the border illegally why have you decided to spend the past few weeks in l passer why did you choose el paso paso is especially important because it is where the administration i tested out it's zero tolerance and family separation policies in the summer of two thousand seventeen so the government officially announced all of this in in may but there were reports for months and months about families who've been separated at the border and a lot of those reports came out of this particular patch of the border in west texas and what has since come out is that the administration decided to test out what this would look like here and so you're in a place sort of in one sense the laboratory for where this policy i began and it's now a place that is feeling the current chaos of the administration trying to rejig your the policy in ways that are really acute and dramatic to see you know there was that audiotape than reporter from propublica recorded of children a one of the places where they were being held crying and broke people's hearts and get really mobilize people to question the wisdom of the policy separating parents and children from your reports you know you've been talking to women who were separated from their children you talk about how much these women are crying i've never in my life seen anything even remotely like this i mean i i've been meeting women who's who who were crying so violently they can barely speak a meeting women whose hands are shaking who look at me with kind of vacant gays it's extremely upsetting to see there was one instance that particularly shook me involving a mother who i had met this is last week she and i met on a wednesday and on wednesday she hadn't heard anything about her kids you know her kid was she had some ideas but she wasn't sure she hadn't spoken to him this is a nine year old kids you've been separated from she hadn't seen since may twenty six so almost a month and she was just devastated i mean she she looked physically ill she hadn't been sleeping she looked like a fundamental part of her was missing it was scary to see physically and then we met again two days later and we met because there is still more complexity in her in involving her case and how this administration now might be dropping the criminal case against her and sending her immigration detention anyway just there's she's got a long road ahead of her but that morning she spoke to her kid on the phone this is for the first time now in in classroom month and it was like she clicked back into being i've never seen anything like this i mean it was like just by virtue of having spoken to her kid her is kind of started to zero back in on me her skin look different her hair to seemed the just every she seemed revitalised now she is still a shell for former self because she's still not with their kit and she still doesn't have answers how she's going to reunite with their kid and there were parts of the conversation she had with her kid that we're extremely concerning her kid who's now in a government shelter appears to be treated well is getting food is you know he he seemed okay seemed in okay spirits obviously he's scared he wants to see his mother but he told her that three days after they were separated while he was in government custody someone hit him because he wasn't eating and he wasn't eating because he was so scared he was so upset so she's hearing this and as a mother this is tearing her apart at the same time she's so profoundly relieved that she could even hear his voice that that alone was enough to to it almost gave her the kind of energy to talk to me about the other stuff so i mean what i'm seeing these women go through his it's nothing short of torture i i don't know how to put it so the women.

jonathan blitzer three days nine year two days
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To be prosecuted anyway but they're not going to be separated from their kids there are specific rules in place enshrined in federal law that dictate how children are supposed to be treated while in custody and so there was an immediate tension between the executive order last week and existing federal law for how to treat children and whether or not it was even possible to keep children in detention while the government prosecuted the parents and then kept them in detention for the duration of the legal process concerning their silent claim so that was last week by the start of this week the government said okay we're actually going to end the zero tolerance policy of prosecuting families who crossed the border illegally because we don't have the resources to keep it going so one of the immediate problems was okay if you're gonna arrest parents and kids and keep them together at the border where you gonna hold them and there were no answers to these questions and so the government kind of had to beat a retreat on that because there were just simply logistical questions about what it would even mean for them to hold parents and children together at the border so that was early this this week and then of course we got the judge's ruling from tuesday night which effectively ends family separation at the border it doesn't necessarily help us understand that judge's ruling doesn't help us understand whether or not the terms of the president's executive order from last week are gonna pass legal muster so there are a whole number of there's a whole host of questions that are unanswered and it's very confusing to follow let me reintroduce you here if you're just joining us my guest is jonathan blitzer he covers immigration for the new yorker and lately he's been in l paso talking to a lot of women who have sought asylum but crossed here into the us illegally we're gonna take a short break then we'll be right back this.

president us executive jonathan blitzer l paso
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is jonathan blitzer he covers immigration for the new yorker and right now he's been working out of el paso so now that it's mandatory that the parents and children be united i guess we'll have to see if there's sufficient coordination between the agencies so the government can fulfil the the demand of the judge that's right and i think there are a few other things to keep in mind so one of them is just before i mean hours before that federal judge issued this order the head of the department of health and human services said that there wasn't gonna be any plan for reuniting parents in unless those parents were already in removal proceedings and needed to be reunited with their kid prior to deportation so one thing to keep in mind is that over the weekend the trump administration said okay we do have a plan it's a plan that the administration described as reunite and remove and the idea was we will reunite parents and children for the express purpose of deporting them together and and obviously i mean there are a whole host of problems with this but one of them is that you were pressuring parents to wind down their immigration cases just so that they can be reunified reunified with their children and so there are a lot of parents who have come to the us seeking silom legitimately seeking asylum and in some cases have very strong cases for asylum but because they've been separated from their kids they essentially are under intense pressure to let their asylum claims go in order to find their kids and the expense of course the cost of that is being deported together and essentially abandoning their asylum claim and so the administration in some ways is holding these children i you know i i'm reluctant to say holding these children hostage but that's essentially what they're doing i mean they're using these children as leverage to pressure parents into backing away from asylum claims and just agreeing to deportation in desperation will you wrote about one woman who agreed to an early deportation thinking that that would unite her sooner with her son and it didn't that's a common and that's and that's common occurrence in detention where parents are just so distraught so confused that that woman who signed this volunteer the departure order which led to her you know in the processing of her deportation papers she was still so confused about what had happened her kid was ripped from her in a border patrol holding sal and el paso no one explained to her why this was going on what this meant a paper was put in front of her there was no lawyer present she didn't entirely know what she was signing she felt like well if at the very least i am cooperative with these people maybe some good will come of it maybe i'll be able to see my key quicker and so she signed without even really understanding what it was she was signing or what that would mean for future prospects with with their child so what happened with her child well i mean this is this is a difficult case i what i the short answer is i i actually don't know right now and when i last spoke to her and her lawyer it sounded like the mother and her child we're going to be reunited that now i don't know we can't tell whether or not they've been deported we hope that they'd been deported together and we're trying to figure out exactly what happened one of the catch twenty twos that a lot of asylum seekers have faced if they're charged with a criminal charge for being here illegally then i have the right to a public defender they have a right to a lawyer but if they're not charged with criminal charges of those criminal charges are dropped and they just become asylumseekers that seems to raise their status and help their chances but then they're not given the right to a lawyer they're not automatically given a lawyer and they're just kinda like left stranded on their own to navigate the system can you talk about that catch yeah i mean i just this morning i.

jonathan blitzer
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the new york conversation this is fresh air i'm terry gross back with jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker he's nl paso texas where he spent the past couple of weeks reporting on the crisis at the border he's interviewed parents in detention who were separated from their children after crossing the border illegally why have you decided to spend the past few weeks in l pasa why did you choose el paso pass is especially important because it is where the administration i tested out is zero tolerance and family separation policies in the summer of two thousand seventeen so the government officially announced all of this in in may but there were reports for months and months about families who've been separated at the border and a lot of those reports came out of this particular patch of the border in west texas and what has since come out is that the administration decided to test out what would all look like here and so you're in a place in one sense the laboratory for where this policy i began and it's now a place that is feeling the current chaos of the administration trying to rejig your the policy in ways that are really acute and dramatic to see you know there was that audiotape than report from propublica recorded of children a one of the places where they were being held crying and it broke people's hearts and get really mobilize people to question the wisdom of the policy separating parents and children from your reports you know you've been talking to women who were separated from their children and you talk about how much these women are crying i've never in my life seen anything even remotely like this i mean i i've been meeting women who's who who were crying so violently they can barely speak a meeting women whose hands are shaking who look at me with kind of a vacant gays it's extremely upsetting to see there was one instance that particularly shook me involving a mother who i had met this is last week she and i met on a wednesday and on wednesday she hadn't heard anything about her kids she know her kid was she had some ideas but she wasn't sure she hadn't spoken to him this is a nine year old kids you've been separated from she hadn't seen since may twenty six so almost a month and she was just devastated i mean she she looked physically ill she hadn't been sleeping she looked like a fundamental part of her was missing it was scary to see physically and then we met again two days later and we met because there is still more complexity in her involving her case and how this administration now might be dropping the criminal case against her and sending her day migration detention anyway there's she's got a long road ahead of her but that morning she spoke to her kid on the phone this is for the first time now in in close to a month and it was like she clicked back into being i've never seen anything like this i mean it was like just by virtue of having spoken to her kid her is kind of started to zero back in on me her skin look different her hair seemed just every she seemed revitalised now she is still a shell for former self because she's still not with their kid and she still doesn't have answers how she's going to reunite with their kid and there were parts of the conversation she had with that were extremely concerning her kid who's now in government shelter appears to be treated well is getting food is you know he he seemed okay seemed to okay spirits obviously he scared he wants to see his mother but he told her that three days after they were separated while he was in government custody someone hit him because he wasn't eating and he wasn't eating because he was so scared he was so upset so she's hearing this and as a mother this is tearing her apart at the same time she's so profoundly relieved that she could even hear his voice that that alone was enough to to it almost gave her the kind of energy to talk to me about the other stuff so i mean what i'm seeing is women go through his it's nothing short of torture i i don't know i don't know how to put it so the.

jonathan blitzer new york three days nine year two days
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And from the size syms foundation since 1985 supporting advances in science education and the arts towards a better more just society more information is available at size seems foundation dot org this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker release a staff writer so the possible outcomes for dhaka are that it will be settled in congress or in the courts or it will just end on march fifth president trump's state to end the program as part of a deal not to shut down the government a second time over the budget mitch mcconnell agreed to allow one week of debate on daca in which the senate could write a bill from scratch but president trump has promised to veto any bill that doesn't address what he described as his four pillars building the wall ending what he calls chain but migration which is basically allowing immigrants to bring in family members ending the diversity visa lottery programme and providing a path to citizenship for dreamers president trump is saying no room for compromise these four things or nothing these for things or a veto at you've said heard that at this point the debate really isn't about daca it about legal immigration what do you mean i what so striking about the turned the conversation is taken in congress is that you know really no longer talking about whether or not it is fair or make sense to legalize uh the socalled dreamers we're not talking about whether or not it makes sense to come up with a specific raft of border security measures instead that the real sticking point and this is something the white house's pushed very aggressively from the start he is making major changes to the legal immigration system assistance been in place since nineteen 65 and so the cost essentially that's being proposed for any negotiation on the status and future of dreamers has become how far you're willing to go to overhaul certain aspects of the familybased immigration system and that's something that i really i can't overstate how significant shift that is in.

jonathan blitzer staff writer dhaka congress trump mitch mcconnell senate president one week
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At seven thirty this is fresh air i'm cheri gross spoke with jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker where he is a staff writer he's written extensively about the predominantly salvadorian gang ms thirteen which carries out gruesome acts of violence and tries to recruit teenagers who are undocumented but blitzer says president trump who often talks about ms thirteen in his speeches is using the gang as a standin for all immigrants which misrepresents the situation blitzer has also been writing about daca and the president's decision to terminate the program march fifth unless congress passes legislation extending it this week the senate has been debating overhauling the immigration system so if daca is extended or if daca is totally cancelled what impact with that have on ms thirteen there is no relationship between dhaka and ms thirteen in that and that's you know that's another thing that the administration has done and it's interesting when the trump administration cancelled daca in september of of of last year the person came out to make the announcement wasn't the president who i think was two nervous about delivering a highly unpopular message because a lot of americans are behind daca recipients and it wasn't the head of dhs the department homeland security which is the department in charge of administering daca it was jeff sessions the attorney general who represent the kind of ideological nerve center of the trump administration on immigration and one of the things that jeff sessions said was that we are cancelling daca because the programme has lured people from central america these unaccompanied kids to the us because they see that there is a chance for them to get legalize through this program that is wrong all of the studies all of the evidence every form of research and the subject makes the case pretty clearly that people are fleeing to the us not because they're lured by something like daca which none of them have ever heard of but because they're fleeing gangs but you here the administration's effort to link the two issues they're trying because there's really no justification for ending daca certainly notification that helps the public interest in any way it's a program that benefits close to a million kids who have no criminal records at all who have gone to school in the us who've been living in essence there were small children um there's no connection whatsoever between duck animus thirteen but.

jonathan blitzer president senate daca dhaka dhs us cheri gross congress attorney jeff sessions america
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have brutally murdered seven team beautiful young lives in this area on long island alone big of it they butchered those little girls they kidnap they extort they rape and they rob they praying children they shouldn't be here they stop their victims they beat them with clubs they slashed them with machetes and they stabbed them with knives they have transformed peaceful parks and beautiful quiet neighborhoods into blood stained killing feels their animals in trump state of the union address he said that many ms thirteen gang members took advantage of glaring loopholes in our laws to enter the country as unaccompanied alien miners that led into his description russian of his plan to overhaul the immigration system may guess jonathan blitzer writes that the president has become obsessed with ms thirteen but he might actually be strengthening the gang by talking about how menacing it is and the anti immigration policies trump's administration is putting into effect are hurting many of the same people who are targeted by ms thirteen blitzer is a staff writer for the new yorker who covers immigration regarding to talk about the history of ms thirteen who the gang members are who the victims are and where this gang fits in the current story of american immigration were also going to talk about the uncertain future of dhaka and this week's senate debate about overhauling the immigration system jonathan blitzer welcome to fresh air do you know how ms thirteen became such an obsession of donald trump's it's an interesting question i followed donald trump on long island uh during the republican primaries and the spring of 2016 and you'd think that ms thirteen would have been an issue for him than if he was so fixated on the gang minimus thirteen has been on long island since the nineties but all throughout the primary campaign and drink all of these very dramatic public appearances that he made a long island different towns he never once mentioned ms thirteen at the time so the question of sort of when it burst onto his consciousness seems to have been out with the the murder of two girls um in september of 2016 it could have lined up all of trump's favored obsessions on the immigration issue uh the girls were american citizens they were surf synthetic teenagers they were brutally brutally killed world and it wasn't until after the election there was have this very dramatic moment during an interview he gave with time magazine as the person.

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"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Appeals in this case what kind of gave rise to the supreme court's hearing of this issue was that judging in california injunction and so the relevant body then that the administration would have to go to and water to reverse that injunction would be court of appeals the ninth circuit court of appeals the trump administration tried to skip that step um and so the supreme court most likely will say look you have to go to the ninth circuit and this this issue will have to play out kind of in the courts first before we way and that's what i expect will happen um it's conceivable that because congress has reached this impasse and how to deal with the situation there will be a kind of temporary measure that may be extends doc are four uh a a you know a few years he probably until after the 2018 midterms but again it's not clear even what the political will is to get behind that so we really are in a kind of dangerous position with regard to dock jump daca ends unlike fifth what happens so if there's no solution if congress just strikes out what will start to happen is on march six you'll have every day from that moment forward people who have daca will start to lose their status and so i have two year status and when at two years expires the lose their status exactly it wasn't like everyone applied for doc at the same time to so it's it's all staggered and so you'll you'll have at roughly the pace of a thousand people a day you will have people for every day they're on out losing their status jonathan blitzer thank you so much for talking with us thanks for having me jonathan blitzer is a staff writer for the new yorker who covers immigration after a break david elstein will review the new superhero film black panther based on the marvel comics about an african king this is fresh air mm.

congress jonathan blitzer staff writer david elstein california two years two year
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio this is fresh air i'm cheri grows spoke with jonathan blitzer who covers immigration for the new yorker where he's a staff writer he's written extensively about the predominantly salvadorian gang ms thirteen which carries out gruesome acts of violence and tries to recruit teenagers who are undocumented but blitzer says president trump who often talks about ms thirteen in his speeches is using the gang as a standin for all immigrants which misrepresents the situation blitzer has also been writing about daca and the president's decision to terminate the program march fifth unless congress passes legislation extending it this week the senate has been debating overhauling the immigration system so if daca is extended or if daca is totally cancelled what impact with that have on ms thirteen there is no relationship between dhaka an ms thirteen and that and that's your that's another thing that the administration has done and it's interesting when the trump administration cancelled daca in september of last year the person came out to make the announcement wasn't the president who i think was two nervous about delivering a highly unpopular message because a lot of americans are behind author recipients and it wasn't the head of dhs department homeland security which is the department in charge of administering daca it was jeff sessions the attorney general who represent the kind of ideological nerve center of the trump administration on immigration and one of the things that jeff sessions said was that we are cancelling daca because the programme has lured people from central america these on a company kids to the us because they see that there's a chance for them to get legalized through this program that is wrong all of the studies all the evidence every form of research in the subject makes the case pretty clearly that people are fleeing to the us not because they're lured by something like daca which none of them have ever heard of but because they're fleeing gangs but you here the administration's effort to link the two issues they're trying because there's really no justification for ending daca certainly notification that helps the public interest in any way it's a program that benefits close to a million kids who have no criminal records at all who have gone to school in the us who've been living in the us instead were small children there is no connection whatsoever between duck animus thirteen but the more the administration.

jonathan blitzer president senate daca us cheri congress dhaka dhs attorney jeff sessions america
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The more the law enforcement response tends to miss play the way in which this gang takes root and communities so it would be a lot more useful quite honestly if law enforcement in invested money and time in doing uh antigang outreach a improving counselling services at local schools trying to provide uh avenues for people were involved in the gang to transition out of the gang in a one thing for example that the president is so obsessed with him this this this would be another answer the question is that the solution to solving the ms thirteen problem if your to to believe trump is you have to deport everyone um you cannot deport away this problem in fact deporting gang members in the first place is what created the problem and second of all there is a critical mass of ms thirteen members in the us who are citizens and so the gang itself has never going to go away unless you try to address the root causes of it unless you try to address why certain marginalized members of the community end up joining this gang you're always going to have this threat and this threat has existed since well before trump came into power um and and and you can watch over the years as the violence has spiked and then kind of ebbed and oftentimes it's been the quieter longerterm enforcement strategies that tend to curb the gangs spread um but all of the president's hyperbole about the gang mixed worse and and i will also say that the more the president talks about how brutal and murderous the gang is and the gang is brutal and the gang is murderous but he is so obsessed with playing up the violence of the gang um the easier it is for the gang to recruit the easier it is for the gang to intimidate people into joining warned to being acquiescent my guest is jonathan blitzer who writes in that immigration for the new yorker we'll talk more after a break and david adults dean will review the new film black panther i'm teary gross and this is fresh air.

president trump jonathan blitzer david
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This ms thirteen gang members have brutally murdered seventeen beautiful young lives in this area on long island alone think of it they butchered those little girls they kidnap they extort they rape and they rob they pray on shield they shouldn't be here they stop when their victims they beat them with clubs they slashed them with machetes and they stabbed them with knives they have transformed peaceful parks and beautiful quiet neighborhoods into blood stained killing feels are animals and trim state of the union address he said that many ms thirteen gang members took advantage of glaring loopholes in our laws to enter the country as unaccompanied alien miners that led into his description of his plan to overhaul the immigration system my guest jonathan blitzer writes that the president has become obsessed with ms thirteen but he might actually be strengthening the gang by talking about how menacing it is and the anti immigration policies trump's administration is putting into effect are hurting many of the same people who were targeted by ms thirteen blitzer is a staff writer for the new yorker who covers immigration regarding to talk about the history of ms thirteen who the gang members are who the victims are and will in the current story of american immigration we're also going to talk about the uncertain future of dhaka and this week's senate debate about overhauling the immigration system jonathan blitzer welcome to fresh air do you know how ms thirteen became such an obsession of donald trump's it's an interesting question the follow donald trump on long island uh during the republican primaries and the spring of 2016 and you'd think that ms thirteen in would have been an issue for him than if he was so fixated on a gang i mean ms thirteen has been on long island since the nineties but all throughout the primary campaign enduring all of these very dramatic public appearances that he made on long island a different towns he never once mentioned ms thirteen at the time so the question.

long island jonathan blitzer president staff writer dhaka donald trump rape senate
"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're liberals on immigration what's your solution because unless you're saying unless you're saying a country like the united states or germany whatever she just let everybody in what you were solution and what is the more liberal solution to a comprehensive understanding and policy for immigration there's always going to be quandary about who you let in who you don't think we have very clear international domestic law on protecting people who are asylum seekers and refugees and i think that's something that trump is turned around that has been so fundamental to how we define ourselves as america so i think that's a very good starting point is protecting people who have come here fleeing gang violence and fearing for their lives yeah i mean to thoughts on that i mean to begin with and 2013 and there was bipartisan support for comprehensive immigration reform the only thing that scuttled that it wasn't in the senate republican votes in the senate at the time what scuttle it works tree mists in the house and so it's always been this is an issue that has always been dominated by a small minority that can mobilize fear to prevent people from backing these kinds of thoroughgoing solutions so one of the things that the administration and anti immigrant conservatives play on is the idea of letting people in but in fact when you think about what comprehensive immigration reform would do it would do with the public that's already here so you have roughly twelve million people here who are undocumented this doesn't refer to a more people than this refers to actually normalizing or in some way stabilizing their status there is a political will to solve this problem but it is so much easier to speak in as kind of demagogue on this issue and politicians tend to fall into line jonathan blitzer in his colleague sarah skillman dibbled staff riders at the new yorker.

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"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In in any senses ice the words are their violations that i isis committing that are much higher rate than ordinary police two things in response to that yes the ice is definitely notorious for being much less scrupulous even the ordinary police li i think for the most part there isn't the same vetting of the officers are and they also don't generally interact with the criminal justice system so this is one of the reasons why i use is so pernicious on long island and dealing with the gang problem the local police dis is trying to root out gang members the local police faces basically public safety threat they have to the improve and eventually in a court of law that the people there are arresting have some gang tie and have been involved in crimes ice doesn't have to prove any of that all i have to do is round up people who are here illegally jonathan in addition to the argument that immigrants are making life unsafe and raising the crime rates which both of you say is untrue statistically till so that they're taking our jobs and we hear this in all parts of the country we heard political debate all the time as a troop it's not true in fact it's emphatically the opposite that they increase immigrants undocument immigrants increasingly do the work that americans wouldn't want to do it's such as construction home care service industries i mean the list goes on and on the economic research on this is extensive that the vibrancy economic vibrancy that immigrants bring to the community speaks for itself the problem is of course it's very easy as a matter of political rhetoric to suggest otherwise and to cherry pick statistics to mislead it's interesting we got a sneak preview of this back in alabama an arizona awhile back prior to triumph when they did pass them pretty drink coney and anti mcgurn policies that led to fruit rotting on the vine in alabama because there were literally just not the workers there to do the labour nuclear just led to severe problems every stakeholder in all these issues whether you're talking about the business community the educational sector law enforcement all of them begged the administration not to pursue these policies but i think the administration sees that it has a captive audience i think a lot of conservatives would say oh okay sayre still man jonathan blitzer that's nice that.

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"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan blitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This back in alabama while back prior to triumph when they did pass them pretty draconian anti immigrant policies that led to fruit rotting on the vine in alabama because there were literally just not the workers there to labor and usually just led to severe economic problems every stakeholder all these issues whether you're talking about the business community the educational sector law enforcement all of them begged the administration not to pursue these policies but i think the administration sees that it has a captive audience i think a lot of conservatives would say oh okay sears tillman jonathan blitzer that's nice that you're liberals on immigration what's your solution because unless you saying unless you're saying a country like the united states where germany whatever just let everybody him what's your solution and what is the more liberal solution to a comprehensive understanding and policy for immigration there's always going to be quandaries about who you who you don't i think we have very clear international and domestic law on protecting people who are asylum seekers and refugees and i think that's something that trump is turned around that has been so fundamental to how we define ourselves as america guns so i think that's a very good starting point is protecting people who have come here fleeing gang violence and fearing for their lives yeah mean two thoughts on that i mean to begin with and 2013 and there was bipartisan support for comprehensive immigration reform and the only thing that scuttled at it wasn't in the senate there were republican votes in the senate at the time what skull were extremists in the house and.

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