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Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on Inside Out with Tami Michaels

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

01:02 min | 40 min ago

Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on Inside Out with Tami Michaels

"Carmen Best is not happy with the City Council's plan to cut the Seattle police budget by 50%. I will fiercely advocate that we focus on realistic, rational and responsible solutions. Not political gestures are pandering, a political posturing, she says. The plan is abdication of the oath they took. As City Council members defending police defunding police, I should say by 50% would change things in Seattle's considerably. Momo's Jonathan show with the possible realities. If it actually happens, it's a huge gamble, Christopher Roof O with the Discovery Institute Center on wealth and Poverty. I think what you'd see is that wealthy neighborhoods would hire private security and the poor neighborhoods would unfortunately be left to fend for themselves. And rueful says it would be a win for criminals because fewer officers would be on the streets. I think you're going to get more chaos, more violence, more destruction, and you're gonna have a criminal class of criminal element that is able to operate. With impunity. David Lewis is one of several protest organizer is pushing ahead by funding, education, community and health and housing were funding programs that statistically will drop crime rates inherent and at the very least, he says, Now is the time to try. This's a civil rights revolution. This is a civil rights movement. That's Cuomo's Jonathan Show, reporting a head on crash with the wrong way driver. It happened yesterday in Bremerton. When a state trooper trying to stop the car with their police cruiser. The trooper sustained only minor injuries. The woman driving the wrong way was taken into custody on suspicion of drunk driving. And the latest Corona virus data from the state Health Department shows. The total number of cases is now more than 39,200 since the pandemic began, 4662 have been hospitalized due to Cove in 19. The death toll is 1424 out of all Corona virus tests performed in the state, 5.8% have come back positive. Homeowners. Time is 11 of.

Carmen Best City Council Seattle Jonathan Show State Health Department Christopher Roof Bremerton Momo David Lewis Cove Discovery Institute Center Cuomo
Naya Rivera search: California officials using sonar equipment

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 hrs ago

Naya Rivera search: California officials using sonar equipment

"California from CBS's Jonathan Vaguely Adi Search teams at Lake Piru are relying heavily on high tech sonar equipment and could Never dogs to help them find 33 year old actress Neha Rivera. She's believed to have drowned while out boating with her four year old son, Josie. Diver say the water is too murky to locate her body. With the naked eye. Sonar is able to do a 20 foot to 30 foot swath of area each time where a diver with zero visibility has about two foot swath. Since Robin eats a today

Neha Rivera Sonar Lake Piru Josie Jonathan CBS Robin California
Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:44 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"90 as well. In Boston. It's 105 President Trump last night commuting the sentence of longtime associate and friend Roger Stone. More details from CBS News. CBS NEWS UPDATE. President Trump commutes the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone, Terrible misuse of presidential power. Which runs directly at odds with respect for the legal system. Constitutional lawyer Floyd Abrams Stone was to a begun serving a 40 month prison sentence for lying to Congress in the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia in 2016 CBS News Legal analyst Jonathan Turley. Many people, including Attorney General Bill Bar believed that Stone was correctly convicted and correctly sentenced to 40 months. This is a friend of President Trump. A political ally, and President Trump was implicated in some of these allegations. That means that the president has an obvious conflict of interest. Ellen was just days away from reporting to a federal prison President Trump has commuted the sentences of as many as 10 people. CBS News update. I'm Cami McCormick a rally was set to for today in New Hampshire as part of President Trump's reelection campaign. But it was postponed because of the weather. Tropical Storm Fay to be precise, Mr Trump tweeted. With Tropical Storm Fay heading toward the great state of New Hampshire this weekend, he says. We're forced to reschedule our Portsmouth, New Hampshire rally at the Portsmouth International Airport at peace to stay safe, We will be there soon. Meanwhile, the president's campaign events have been controversial as attendees have not been required to wear face masks and coverings. Delay. Maxwell is trying to get released from jail on bond while she awaits her trial on sex trafficking charges. ABC Eva Pilgrim reports from New York, where the British social light is being held behind bars. Maxwell now house at a prison across the river from the facility were Epstein took his own life. Prosecutors called Maxwell an extreme flight risk. But her attorneys argue she never left the country after Epstein's arrest, instead staying out of the public eye given the crush of media attention. As alleged victims of Epstein also called for her a rep. Prison officials are taking every precaution to prevent her from the same fate as her former boyfriend. Maxwell has been outfitted in a paper prison uniform and has even had her bedsheets taken away as the Sunshine State's covert 19 cases continue to rise rapidly. President Trump's visit to South Florida yesterday took a different focus The president reassuring that the virus is under control. Here is a B C's Rachel Scott that it did not hold a single event on the pandemic, rather focusing in on drug trafficking sanctions against Venezuela and campaign fund raising, bouncing from event to event without wearing a mask and an interview with Telemundo, suggesting the viruses under control. We're winning the war and we have areas that flamed up and they're going to be Fine over a period of time. But this weekend, President Trump's campaign plans brought to a halt is outdoor.

President Trump Maxwell New Hampshire Epstein Floyd Abrams Stone CBS Cbs News Roger Stone Cami Mccormick Portsmouth International Airpo Boston Portsmouth Jonathan Turley Rachel Scott ABC Telemundo
Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Retire Young Radio

00:31 sec | 2 hrs ago

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

"Sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone, has stunned many in the legal world. CBS News Legal analyst Jonathan Turley the glaring problem is a conflict of interest. Stone is not on Ly, a longtime friend of the president's in a political ally, but the president was implicated in some of the allegations being investigated in the stone case. Stone was to serve a prison sentence for lying to Congress in the investigation of whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia, the latest now on the search for the Glee

Roger Stone Jonathan Turley President Trump CBS Analyst LY Congress Russia
Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "jonathan" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"20 confirmed cases of Soviet 19 at the prison in Georgia, to which I had been designated the president not pardoning Stone, who could ask for a re trial to clear his felony convictions and include witness tampering and lying to authorities, and he failed. ABC NEWS Washington and you're listening to ABC News. Stay connected. Stay informed. Cho, Mo Saturday. Good morning. Coma News Time is 10 02 American Johnson For Mark Christopher. Here's a look at some of our top stories. Ah, Homicide investigation continues in Tacoma Police responded to reports of shots being fired at 39th and rust in way overnight. Officers said. When they got there, they saw cars leaving the area. They also found a man who's been shot and died. Detectives and forensic experts are still at the scene of the shooting. Most Seattle City Council members say they agree with a proposal by advocates to defund the Seattle police Department by 50% and relocate the dollars to the cunt due to other community needs. Refunding. The police department by 50 cent by 50% would change things in Seattle considerably. Como's Jonathan show has the possible reality. It's a huge gamble, first of her roof O with the Discovery Institute Center on wealth and Poverty. I think what you'd see is that wealthy neighborhoods would hire private security and the poor neighborhoods would unfortunately be left to fend for themselves, And Rufus says it would be a win for criminals because fewer officers would be on the streets. I think you're going to get more chaos, more violence, more destruction. You're gonna have a criminal class of criminal element that is able to operate with impunity. David Lewis is one of several protest organizer is pushing ahead by funding education, community and health and housing for funding programs that statistically will drop crime rates inherent and at the very least, he says, Now is the time to try. This's a civil rights revolution. This is a civil rights movement. That's comas. Jonathan Show reporting. An off duty police officer who drove through a crowd of protesters earlier this month, is no longer with the Seattle Police Department and happened during a march on July 4th there the intersection.

Seattle Police Department Jonathan Show Seattle City Council Seattle Abc News Stone ABC Witness Tampering Mark Christopher Tacoma CHO Georgia President Trump Washington Discovery Institute Center Rufus David Lewis Officer Como
Authorities continue search for Naya Rivera

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:40 sec | 11 hrs ago

Authorities continue search for Naya Rivera

"The search for actress Naya Rivera, a former TV star of glee, disappeared Wednesday after she rented a boat on a lake north of Los Angeles. Teams are now using sonar and robotic devices. CBS is Jonathan vaguely Adi Today, Search teams at Lake Piru are relying heavily on high tech sonar equipment and cadaver dogs to help them find 33 year old actress Ni Rivera. She's believed to have drowned while out boating with her four year old son, Josie. Diver say the water is too murky to locate her body with the naked eye sonar is able to do a 20 foot to 30 foot swath of area for each time for a diver with zero visibility has about two foot swath.

Naya Rivera Lake Piru Los Angeles CBS Josie
Trump says he’s a victim of ‘political prosecution’ after Supreme Court rulings

Noon Business Hour

01:07 min | 2 d ago

Trump says he’s a victim of ‘political prosecution’ after Supreme Court rulings

"He's the victim of a political prosecution. House Speaker Pelosi says Supreme Court Action Today shows no president is above the law. In one ruling, the court gave New York City prosecutors the OK to pursue Mr Trump's financial records and a criminal case legal analyst Thane Rosenbaum. This is a terrible blow to the president, especially since the two justices he appointed to the Supreme Court. Norsigian. Cavanaugh voted with the majority, even though Cavanaugh as a young lawyer, once wrote that president should always be immune from prosecution while in office. The court obviously rejected the argument that a president enjoys broad immunity from prosecution then. Still, the records may never make it past the grand jury, and the president's lawyers can make new arguments in a lower court. The other ruling blocked House Democrats from getting Mr Trump's records. Legal analyst Jonathan Turley. If President Trump claims any victory, it will be over time, he succeeded in delaying any disclosure of this information. And these decisions will guarantee that this can just got kicked down the road. Past the next election. The situation only

President Trump Supreme Court Mr Trump Thane Rosenbaum Analyst Cavanaugh Speaker Pelosi Jonathan Turley New York City
Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

All Things Considered

03:57 min | 2 d ago

Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

"Facebook has made quote, vexing and heartbreaking decisions about free speech that is, according to an independent audit. And how the social network handles issues such as discrimination, hate speech and election interference. Facebook asked for this investigation two years ago. Today, the investigators are slamming the company and its leaders for some of their decisions for this week's Alltech considered NPR's Shannon Bond joins us and before we get going, I should mention Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR. Hey, Mary, least alright. So investigators slamming decisions by leaders of Facebook. What decisions are we talking about? This is really about speech, and the most prominent example is President Trump. So recently he's put up Facebook posts falsely claiming that voting by mail is rife with fraud, and he made a really inflammatory post about the recent protests against racism. The auditors say Those post clearly violated Facebook's own rules against voters depression inciting violence, But Facebook didn't take the post down. The audit also slammed the company's policy of not fact checking ads by politicians that something Facebook has gotten a lot of criticism over and over all, the audit says, You know these decisions really emblematic of how Facebook has chosen to prioritize free speech above all other values. They say that risk over shadowing games it has made fighting discrimination, for example, that no longer allows advertisers to target housing and job ads based on age, gender or zip code. What is Facebook say in response. Well, the company, as you said, didn't ask for this audit A commissioned it from Laura Murphy of former Sulu executive and a civil rights law firm and chief operating officer. Shelves Cheryl Sandburg said today that Facebook will make some of the changes that it's recommending. Including hiring a senior vice president, who will make sure civil rights concerns informed decisions on products and policies. But when it comes to setting firmer boundaries on political speech, that's something CEO Mark Zuckerberg has resisted. He says Facebook is committed to free expression even when politicians make false claims. And Facebook says it won't adopt every recommendation being made in this report. Now this audit drops as another development plays out all of these brands. I think we're more than 1000 now pausing their advertisements on Facebook in the name of protesting hate speech, or any of them are the organizers of that boycott. Are they speaking up today? Yep, And what I'm hearing is a lot of skepticism about Facebook. Here's Rashad Robinson. He's president of color of Change, one of the groups behind the boycott. The recommendations coming out of the audit are good as the action that Facebook ends up taking otherwise. It is a road math without a vehicle and without the resources to move, and that is not useful for any of us. Another boycott organizer I spoke with today is Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti Defamation League. He told me he thinks the boycotts just going to keep growing and remember, it's already gone Global until Facebook takes real action on their demands. Yeah, it sounds like we now have this damning audit this big boycott pressure from for many directions on Facebook to change its ways. That's right, and civil rights groups told me they're not going to ease the pressure on Facebook. I spoke to Benita Gupta, She's head of the leadership conference on civil and human rights, and here's what she had to say about the audit. It is a work in progress clearly and pour. In some ways it is. Starts and not a finish for the civil rights community. Gupta and other leaders. I spoke to you know, they say it's just so urgent that Facebook act now because the presidential election is just a few months away. That's something the auditors also say they're really worried about. They say it in the audit. They say a Facebook doesn't get more serious about enforcing its policies, holding politicians to the same standards as other users. That will open the door to more voter suppression even calls for violence on

Facebook Senior Vice President President Trump Jonathan Greenblatt Benita Gupta NPR Mark Zuckerberg Anti Defamation League Shannon Bond Alltech Cheryl Sandburg Mary CEO Fraud Chief Operating Officer
Limited number of Rutgers undergrads will return to campus this fall

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:26 sec | 5 d ago

Limited number of Rutgers undergrads will return to campus this fall

"Be mostly remote learning in the fall at Rutgers, President of the school Jonathan Holloway today saying it was not an easy or hasty decision. There will be a small number of on campus classes like lab in clinical work and some arts instruction. School says on campus housing will be extremely limited as well. Holloway leaving open the idea of in person classes in the winter and spring. No specifics yet on safety measures.

Jonathan Holloway Rutgers President Trump
Pine Street re-opened to traffic for first time in a month after 'CHOP' is cleared in Seattle

News, Traffic and Weather

01:28 min | Last week

Pine Street re-opened to traffic for first time in a month after 'CHOP' is cleared in Seattle

"Arrests for the last few days as protesters clashed with officers near the area formerly known as chopped Capitol Hill occupy protest in the last 24 hours. Things have been quieter and there are signs of progress Pine Street back open to traffic for the first time in about a month, But there are still some barriers on some surrounding streets that you'll see like maybe 1/10 And 11th comes Jonathan Chill tells us about the recovery underway and the plan plan for for what what will will happen happen if if protesters protesters try try to to come come back. back. It's It's nice nice to to come come back back to to Cap Cap Hill. Hill. No No more more police police checkpoints checkpoints and and the the lunch lunch rush rush is is starting starting to to pick pick up up against against soy soy chicken chicken wings wings and and then go sick your eyes. Capitol Hill is starting to look like Capitol Hill before turned into the chopper. Technically, this area's still closed for a few more days under the mayor's emergency order used to clear out protesters earlier in the week, But authorities say they reopened Pint Street early because all the cleanup is now done. However, the presence of protesters are still here by day. It's only a few like Jada Nolan. If they don't want you crossing that line. I'm gonna cross that line. But for the past couple nights, more demonstrators joined in clashing with police near Pine and Broadway, leading to several arrests. For the last few days, the police have tested the protesters, tactics and the protesters of tests the police tactics and if anyone has a pose on what happens next It's Omari Salisbury's, an independent journalist who's captured nearly every major development on the ground. I think it's going to be very busy this this weekend. weekend. weekend. Cale Cale Cale Anderson Anderson Anderson Park Park Park is is is still still still temporarily temporarily temporarily closed closed closed for for for cleanup, cleanup, cleanup, known known known with with with parks parks parks and and and rec rec rec up up up backto backto backto us us us on on on when when when it it it will will will reopen. reopen. reopen. Jonathan Jonathan Jonathan

Cale Cale Cale Anderson Cap Cap Hill Jonathan Jonathan Jonathan Anderson Anderson Park Park Pa Jonathan Chill Jada Nolan Omari Salisbury
Dozens more arrests as protesters clash with police outside Seattle's former CHOP area

News, Traffic and Weather

01:27 min | Last week

Dozens more arrests as protesters clash with police outside Seattle's former CHOP area

"Arrests in the last few days as protesters clashed with officers near the area formerly known as the Capitol Hill occupied protest or chop. In the last 24 hours, Things have been quieter. There are signs of progress. Pine Street back open to traffic for the first time in about a month. But there are still barriers on some surrounding streets like 10th and 11th. Almost Jonathan Chill tells us about the recovery underway and the plan for what will happen if protesters comebacks. Nice to come back to Cap Hill. No more police checkpoints and the lunch rush is starting to pick up again. Soy chicken wings, mango sick your eyes, Capitol Hill is starting to look like Capitol Hill before turned into the chop. Technically, this area's still closed for a few more days under the mayor's emergency order used to clear out protesters earlier in the week, But authorities say they really In Pine Street early because all the cleanup is now done. However, the presence of protesters are still here by day. It's only a few like Jada Nolan. If they don't want you crossing that line. I'm gonna cross that line. But for the past couple nights, more demonstrators joined in clashing with police near Pine and Broadway, leading to several arrests. For the last few days, the police have tested the protesters tactics and that's the protesters have tested the police tactics and if anyone has opposed on what happens next It's Omari Salisbury, an independent journalist who's captured nearly every major development on the ground. I think it's going to be very busy this weekend. Cale Anderson Park is still temporarily closed for cleanup, known with parks and rec up backto us on when it will reopen. Jonathan

Jonathan Chill Cap Hill Cale Anderson Park Jada Nolan Omari Salisbury
The Last Of Us

Beyond!

07:46 min | Last week

The Last Of Us

"Hello, everyone. My name is Jonathan Dornbush and this is a very special episode of podcast beyond because today we're going to be diving very deep into the last of us. Part to a full spoilers are in effect. If you haven't played the game, turn back now. Go play at go finish. It and then come back. Listen to this episode because we are going to dive. Into full spoiler territory with Lucille. O'Brien my have numbers with me, but more importantly I'm sorry, Lucy you don't have the highest honor this episode because we are joined by Neil Druckman and Halley, gross naughty dog for the last of US partout. Thank you both so much for being here and speaking with us today. They have. So the. House he twenty twenty being guys. Around. Warring Year of my life. Nothing. Much of note has happened this year. Definitely, so we'll. We'll try to find something to talk about this episode. I know Lucienne myself both have a ton that we want to ask you about and talk about with certain as much as I'd love to spend the next thirty minutes exclusively. Honoring the memory of Shimmer there are some conversations I do. WanNa get into and I. WE WE ARE GONNA go into spoiler, so it's going to get there. I Will Get National Story Beats. I promise but I did want to talk about. The I think just jumping right into the structure of the story for me would be a really interesting place to start because Neil you and I spoke a little bit before the game came out, and we talked a bit about sort of how the structure of the game chain through development, and I was sort of curious. If you could both talk about you know primarily, we have this sort of to factor story of the first half, really focusing on Elliot's journey, and then the second half focusing on Abbey's journey mostly in Seattle, but a little bit Jackson. How how did that story flow evolve? As you began to crack the story in figure out what you wanted to both explore? Whatever we had this kind of concept of constructive story about empathy by seeing two sides of a conflict. We had the two sides, but they are kind of distribution was different. Initially, this game was going to be open world with several different hubs. And the original was going to be playing abby. Some back story on her and her friends attack. They get rescued by Joel and Tommy and get. A. Help into Jackson and you spent a while in Jackson doing missions before some critical point, or you would reveal who she is as you would be struggling with this choice and kill Joel in annual take on his Elliott going on this journey to Seattle become the second hub of trying to find all these people in them. Eventually Confront Abby. But then as we were putting the story together, just filled with with the game, we were trying to make historic trying to tell with characters. We had our disposal. It didn't make sense for it to be open, moral and those. Aspects felt like there to conflict, and that's when really around the time like Halley, came on and kind of talk high level about the goals of what we're trying to do. And then it became more wide linear with some kind of more open areas but where we try to get to the inciting incident much more quickly, which is the death of all, and then get on with the journey, and then some point midway through switch perspectives to show Abbey set store. I don't remember yeah funny. You brought back the open world thing I don't like all right. The first like three weeks of my time at naughty dog were just like. Can we make it open world and like trying to make that work, and then realizing how much it sort of. Screws with steaks and tension building, and so we. We moved off of that, but we really played with structure. I mean throughout the entire process, so yes, the game is currently divided between largely between I. Steph Ellie second-half Abbey, but. We entertained. Inter cutting. We entertained moving parts around the flashbacks of all move I mean. The living thing this game. Yeah! I can't imagine it being an open wells. I think you're right because it is. It's source structured in a way that every every resumes when you're in an open world game, you're constantly distracted by this. Because they distracted by this little fitch quest, catch, seven chickens or something, concert imagined that interrupting the story so ultimately pleased that you went in the direction that you winton. Is Is there any sort of part of me. That thinks Oh God okay. The loss of story could be told in an open world setting. Yes, and I think we. The design team actually came with a bunch of interesting. Aspects to play in the world in open world setting and adjust. All while those ideas were interesting and provocative, they didn't fit. The characters were playing. I don't WanNa get into specifics. Wherever use any of those ideas? But it just too many things one concert each other. We have to make some hard choices as far as what game game we WANNA make. As, you're saying that the beginning. It came down to this idea of seeing empathy and telling that from two different sides and obviously something to preserve stories spoilers in where the story would go, because it does really demand, be played, I feel. It started out as you know on a like a product facing way a story about revenge. Why did? Though at the end of the day, wanting to really get down to empathy in this world, be sort of the catalyst for your interest in the story. I think that was the emotional core of what we were after. In targeted through and trying to figure out what is conflict about it? It was really to show. How Simonis characters are and how much conflict and so much of this for myself, I think the team is inspired by real world events where you have sides of conflict, and you see how they often dehumanized the other side to justify atrocious behavior. and. We felt through game. Play the putting in the shoes of Elliot to get you to fee, also ask certain feelings and put you in the second half of the game and through empathy through. Seeing the consequences, not just what you've done, but like what you've taken away. From his people get you to reflect on it. And that was kind of like what we were always after. I cannot track of of of your question. I just curious sort of of the. Sort of. Subverting that expectation, because so many of us went in expecting a revenge story, but I do things that I've taken away the most that empathy and that love and that care. That's the thing which is like maybe to a fault. We tried so hard to protect the experience players experience. We've done with the first game. Right within the last one never revealed why you're transporting Elliot from one coast to another, and ultimately the game is about the unconditional love. A parent feels for their child, and the sacrifice did. Megan is a feel to talk about that head on who will be taken away with experiences so for here? The say a here's an experience about empathy. You would play the first half. and You keep waiting for the shoe to drop. Your House is going to reflect back so instead. We presented something much simpler and then let you see how complex it is when

Elliot Jackson Neil Druckman Seattle Abbey Naughty Dog Jonathan Dornbush United States Joel Lucy O'brien Halley Abby Steph Ellie Megan Simonis Elliott Tommy
Missouri man freed from prison with help from WNBA star

First Take

01:43 min | Last week

Missouri man freed from prison with help from WNBA star

"Wrongfully convicted man who has the WNBA Myanmar fought for was finally released from prison yesterday. You see the moment right there. Jonathan Iron served twenty two years of a fifty year sentence after being convicted in one, thousand, nine, hundred and burglary and assault with a weapon, he walked free Wednesday. More was amongst those to greet him as he walked out. The four-time wnba champion, put her career on hold, missing two seasons to help him or family Ma- irons prison ministry in two. Two, thousand seven before her freshman year at uconn penitentiary visit here. She was on good. Morning America in that moment. I just really felt like I could. I could rest I mean I've been standing, and we've been standing for so long and it just it was an unplanned moment where I just felt relief in. Just it was kind of a worshipful moment, just dropping semi knees, and just being so thankful that we made it, and you know when I stepped away. To two springs ago, I just really wanted to shift my priorities to be able to be more available and present to show up for things that I felt. were mattering more than being a professional athlete, and so this is obviously one of the. Biggest and most direct results of that. Obviously you guys know. I went to uconn season ticket holder to men's and women's basketball and a followed my more for a long time. She gave up two years of her prime as the star. For this mission, it is absolutely unbelievable when we talk about the sacrifice into see this man walk free. It is such a remarkable moment in just kudos to her. What a special woman! In Role Model

Wnba Jonathan Iron Uconn Penitentiary Uconn Myanmar MA America Burglary Assault
WNBA star helps free wrongfully convicted man who spent 22 years in prison

WBBM Morning News

00:27 sec | Last week

WNBA star helps free wrongfully convicted man who spent 22 years in prison

"Prison after a county prosecutor declined to retry his case. The release follows years of work by WN Ba star Maya Moore and others who argued he was falsely convicted of burglary and assault charges. More was there when the 40 year old Jonathan Irons walked out of Jefferson City Correctional Center. He'd been serving a 50 year sentence stemming from the non fatal shooting of a homeowner in the ST Louis area when Irons was 16 your top

Jonathan Irons Jefferson City Correctional Ce Maya Moore Prosecutor Burglary St Louis
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills more than 100 people

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | Last week

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills more than 100 people

"The authorities in Myanmar say more than 100 people have been killed in a landslide at a jade mine. Officials in Cochin States say there had been heavy rain in the area and the miners were buried in a wave of mud. Rescue efforts are continuing. Jonathan head for reports, The video taken from the hills above shows a landslide pouring into the pit lake, churning up the blue green water. A moment later, the lake empties is its side collapses the water thundering into the valley below. Thousands of poor workers from all over Myanmar are attracted to these jade mines, which are believed to generate billions of dollars a year for mining companies. The hills have been denuded of trees. And carved into a bleak landscape of ban mud slopes.

Myanmar Cochin States Pit Lake Jonathan Head
Missouri man whose conviction was overturned with help of WNBA star is freed

WBBM Evening News

00:15 sec | Last week

Missouri man whose conviction was overturned with help of WNBA star is freed

"N B A star Maya Moore is skipping the 2020 season to focus on criminal justice reform, most notably the wrongful conviction of a man named Jonathan Irons serving a 50 year sentence for a crime he did not commit. Irons walked out of a Missouri prison today a free man.

Jonathan Irons Maya Moore Missouri
Inside Moore's extraordinary quest to free Irons

ESPN Radio

00:16 sec | Last week

Inside Moore's extraordinary quest to free Irons

"Moore. She gave up to you to prime years of her career to help free Jonathan Irons, who was wrongly convicted 22 years ago. Folks of a crime he did not commit. He walked out of a Missouri penitentiary today, in large part due to Maya Moore's

Jonathan Irons Maya Moore Missouri Moore.
Your Present is Soon Your Past

Developer Tea

05:59 min | Last week

Your Present is Soon Your Past

"Your perspective is centered on now. You see everything as something that is either happening in this moment or something that will be categorized as the future. Or categorized as past. But. It's very hard to imagine that the now. Will soon be considered the past, but what's even harder to imagine is that the now was once the future. And that at some point in the past you imagined. The now you imagined whatever was happening today. And likely. You imagined it differently. That's what we're talking about in today's episode. My name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to velvety, and my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. So if you think about this for a second, there's a lot of insightful thoughts that can come from. Kind of lingering on this thought the idea that your perspective. You can imagine that you have kind of like a camera and the camera can look at time, and they can see it in these three distinct formats. Into the future into the now we'll talk a little bit more about what that means a second and then into the past. And in both directions in future, and into the past the further away it gets the more fuzzy it seems to be. And at some point. Incomprehensible, there's no picture that you can imagine at some point into the future. That is even close to accurate. And though we have some record of things that have happened in the past, even looking back on those things, there is some level of distortion that is inevitably going to happen because you are distanced from that event, the certainly happens as a result of simply non existing if we look far enough back into the past. We weren't alive. And so everything that we know of events that happened before we were alive. Are regurgitation. They're things that we learned that believed from someone else. Perhaps we have evidence of those things actually occurring, but the end of the day those are not memories are not things that we actually experienced ourselves. Now. Believe it as an exercise to the listener to go and. Do some research on the faulty nece of memory. Suffice it to say that memory is not an incredibly reliable mechanism. We can substitute memories for example things that we've heard from other people. We can imagine that we did them. If we've heard them enough and so our memories, even when we recall them are changing, but nevertheless this system of looking into the future, looking into the past is based on this somewhat faulty recording mechanism. But when we think about nine now. When we think about what's happening now. We'd like to exclude now from any of our critical thinking. So. How does this happen exactly well? When we look into the future, we make plans. We think with intention about what we want to happen. Or even if we don't necessarily think about what we want to happen, we think about what is likely to happen. This is a fundamental human attribute to imagine the future to play out different scenarios, even if only because of our own survivals were doing this even involuntarily. The more distant we go once again. Of course it gets fuzzy, but the further out we go, the more human those thoughts are. For example we can imagine unlike any other animal what the world might be like. We are no longer here. Additionally. We can imagine what the world was like before we existed. But as we look into the future, we imagine. And we create plans. We have intentions. We think critically about cause and effect. Similarly, we can look into the past and we can easily critique our previous actions. This idea that hindsight is twenty twenty. Shows us that we can easily look into the past with an eye of critique. Now. Why is it that we can look into the future with an eye for planning? We can look into the past with an eye. Four critique part of the reason is because we are not experiencing either of those things where imagining them. And, so when we think back, even though we were a part of that, maybe we did experience it. We're still having to imagine it. We're not imagining in the same way that we might construct something that never happened where imagining what it was like when it did happen. When we imagine things, we put ourselves a fairly low stakes environment. This means that we can be critical past cells because. We're sitting here now. Are Opportunities of being better. Are Abundant. And if we think into the future, we can be overly optimistic rather than realistic. We can imagine that even though we've never stuck to diet plan, but this is the year on the first of January. We're going to stick to it. More to the point of Software Engineering, we can imagine that even though we've never been able to estimate the amount of time necessary to complete a given sprint. Suddenly. This sprint will be different. And we can do this because we're separated. We're not experiencing the sprint. That's in front of us where imagining it.

Jonathan Control Software Engineering
We aren't paying enough attention to the impact of the pandemic on the arts

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

03:38 min | Last week

We aren't paying enough attention to the impact of the pandemic on the arts

"Elizabeth Alexander Thank you very much for coming on the PODCAST To talking to you today, so we know the devastation, the corona virus has had on the economy on health care and healthcare workers, but not enough attention been paid to the impact of the pandemic on the arts. has there no there really hasn't did? I think it gets very fundamental. Questions are artists apart of our economy is the arts sector in or in part of our economy. That's one question. Another question is. The Arts why need support the arts? How can we live without the arts and the need to be helpful to not only the arthrit- large you artists when our friend for foundation president, Aaron Walker was on the podcast a a few weeks ago. He mentioned a daily phone call. He's on with philanthropists trying to figure out how to buttress nonprofits during this time. Are you on those calls or involved in similar efforts? Yes and it's so wonderful to have Darren as a comrade and partner and brother in this work because he keeps us moving forward always, he keeps us. Weighed in is I is always on seemingly impossible? That is a very important for us to have in our field and Jerry for me also. In he brought me into this world to. So? Yes, loan philanthropist! We are talking of regularly New York Allegra Piss national groups of art, Philanthropists. Finding out what is going on, people's Randy's because that's our connections you around. What we're seeing and how we might think about being helpful and also bringing other people into efforts to be helpful, so for example forward and Bloomberg gathered US and led an effort in your city to put together A. Included private donors and this is very important when you know the the philanthropy money. Is there one senate well, but the private could go anywhere or at all? You have a lot of wealth. You don't necessarily have to spend it and you certainly don't have to spend it on the arts, so you in court. Consortium, which of two hundred million dollars. For granting in the arts and also social services in New York City, which we felt was so important, because we are really really really really. In, the heart things in this pandemic and that overlaps. On the Earth Front with. Their own are everywhere but New York has the arts is a crucial part? Is Identity any highly among? So with that effort the. Community Foundation of New York City was the administrator, and we have representatives from our foundations. WHO looked at opposes? Coral went up late in a week. Money have everybody were almost at the end of that money on which says something about the need, but also extremely proud of the efficiency with which we were able to collectively make decisions, and he helped all

New York City Aaron Walker United States Jerry Elizabeth Alexander Community Foundation Bloomberg Darren President Trump Coral Randy Senate Partner Administrator
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rejecting a Duel Identity

Developer Tea

05:09 min | Last week

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rejecting a Duel Identity

"It's easy to imagine. A dual system. A Dewalt sense of identity, the good side, bad side. The impulsive side of us and the more thoughtful side. This dual sense of identity is not real. It's only on our perception, and it can change the way we think about how we work as engineers. My name is Jonathan Cottrell you're listening to developer. My go on. The show is driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. Just like many of the other distortions that our brains can of trick us into believing the idea that we have to cells that we have the good side, the bad side that Dr Jekyll and Dr Hide. Is exactly that it's a trick, a distortion, a simple way of thinking that hides away the complex realities of our ego. So. Why are we talking about ego? Are we talking about dual since of identity on a podcast for engineers will? The truth is when we look at our code. Or? When we look at our previous code, we often tend to blame one or the other. We take credit. When. We believe that we've done something good and we assign that credit to the good ego. We assign it to. Who we intend to be. But then when something goes wrong, we don't take the same level of responsibility now. We may not blame our bad selves, but. We insulate our good selves from stakes. We imagine that the mistake is the fault of the circumstance when it's ourselves, but then when we're looking at other people, we imagine that the mistake is the fault of that person. Taking a wider view, we imagine that we. Can Transcend our own ego. In other words, we can get outside of our own sense of identity. Our own sense of purpose or worth. Our Self. Perception, This is that ego that we're talking about. And when we insulate our own egos from mistakes when we don't blame ourselves. For the bad that we do, but then we turn around, and we don't apply the same rules. The same luxuries to our co workers. We're doing this because we cannot imagine that are co workers have transcended their own egos. This is once again a distortion. This is called the fundamental attribution error. The idea is that we are assigning blame to a person based on who they are. They're fundamental attributes. Rather than doing what we do for ourselves, considering all of the other reasons, all of the other influences that may have caused an error. Going back to this idea that we have a dual, I'd identity. One of those identities is one that we reject. We don't integrate into our thinking. We? Don't believe that we're going to be late. We don't believe. That, we will be lazy. We don't believe that those are a part of who we are. And so we assign them we assign those negative attributes away from ourselves as far away as we can put them. Here's the takeaway for today's episode. Those sites are just as much a part of you. As the good ones. And there's no reason to push away from this. There's no reason to imagine that you can sequester all of your negative attributes. More negative behaviors or bad habits when we assign those to that second identity that second sense of self. that. We kind of naturally create that black, hole. That is not what we intend to be when we do that. We're not taking responsibility for the totality. Of our own actions. And when you do take responsibility for totality of your own actions, you can actually inspect them. Not. All the things that we think are bad. Behaviors are fundamentally bad behaviors, some of them responses to your environment and others. Are Good in the right light. I want to be very clear that there are certainly behaviors that we shouldn't try to portray in a positive light, but. The flip side of that of not being positive about them is not to reject them or act as if they don't exist. Instead we can learn from ourselves if we imagined that our identity is one and the same, no matter if it is positive or negative.

Developer Jonathan Cottrell Dr Jekyll Dr Hide
Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

Ask Me Another

06:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

"Oh! So what a great! Hello! That is! That makes a nice with. Commerce exactly. How's it going John? I've just turned the fan off in my office so that we can record which means we are counting down to the point when my body goes past one hundred and five and I pass out I. Know this this room to this room to is like freezing with the air conditioning on, and you turn it off and five minutes later. You are basically able to bake sourdot Brennan. Yes, and you know I I have ways of cooling fans. Air Conditioners can't use them well recording now, also I have to keep. The door closed in this room. Because let's just say I. Have A feral cat living in my office right now. So. We can't have the door open. Your that. Yeah. That's a meal. You're feral cat. Theory is that's betsy that sense? Betsy sounds okay. He's all. Right, now he's at the window and he's meowing I. Think what he's saying is help. Your. Guys. Your barrel cats. Maybe he say free food and here. Really Awesome. Sleep all day. Any Food I love it. Yeah. He's he's. He's doing great. As you know as you know, I have started taking care of the feral cats in my backyard, but the feral cats are now not in a crate. They are not in a basement. They don't have a towel over them. They are roaming freely in US recording studio. One has a skin condition and is staying with me awhile until the skin condition is soft, and it may not be solved I. Don't know I may not be solved, I'm not sure what's going to happen. Maybe he's going to be an indoor cat. Who knows at the window? Your indoor cat. Let's let's. Let's let's make it personal. It's not an indoor cat. You notice that. I'm trying not to say it because I've become too attached to this cat. While the cat does deep deep, deep, deep, deep, deep in its feral mind and heart. Can, you can see Betsy Beth. Everybody Radiator Watch I taught him a trick. Betsy. Betsy I. Do that looks at me, Really Cute, a loud noise and ahead turn studies Ya. Predator, so it looks at. The first sign of like threat approaching. I make that noise and he's like. Again. Once again we have nothing to. Show for you from the Netflix series working moms with the show's creators and stars Catherine Reitman and Philip Sternberg. Then we talked a longtime friend of mine comedian Baron Vaughn, and he shares with us his innermost thoughts on. Be Better, roommate, the hulk or Wolverine? But I. Really get things going with Alex Newell and Jane Levy from. The NBC Musical Dramas Zoe. Extraordinary playlist to show is about a woman who discovers she is the ability to hear people's thoughts as songs, so everyone on the show is a triple threat. They can act sing and dance, but Jonathan can. They won't their way through an asking other trivia game I hope so. I always thought triple threat was acting singing and Trivia. Would you say it's acting singing and dance interested? You know what? Maybe maybe it is. Maybe maybe Trivia is just woven in there. We'll find out. And like magic here. They are Jay Levy Alex. Newell thank you so much for being part of Ashby another. I have been watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. Okay? No, that some of the cast are professional singers dancers like you Alex but the show features a lot of choreography that I assume you don't get a lot of time to learn. What was that like for you, Jane Yeah. There's a there's a an array of experience throughout the cast, Alex Newell comes in, and just does one kick and is like I learned it. It's fine. Under some of us who get eight rehearsals because it's a lot harder. Yeah. I do I do learn I have learned a music number. The day of but Jane has as well. While yeah, but mine are usually. My characters in every single dance number every musical number, because it comes through her superpower, but most of my choreography. If you WANNA, call it that in those numbers or just me like walking in a straight line so I can learn those on the day. You have a dance background. Don't Eugene. I danced as a kid. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, so you're not afraid of it. No I love it. I'm much more afraid of singing singing is. Really difficult for me. But she meals every time that's. After, the but but. Every time a period. Wow, thanks, Alex, but dancing is just fun and I care less about being good about good at it right? Yeah, because you can move and that's the most important thing. It's the rest of us who are when you start dancing cooper like oh no! Her dancing, Lake when we do the. Of The second episode when she was like. They were like nothing. Like dancing can. Like five steps. That's when I was in shape. So we have a couple of great games for you. Let's let's play some games. Okay so this first one. You're going to be playing against each other. We're going to go back and forth. This is a this is a game about characters every answering. This game is a famous character. Jonathan I are going to read you an excerpt of how the author described the character, and you just have to guess who is being described. Great Okay. So Alex will start with you. Here! Her stepsisters ridiculed her. AP's. stepsisters right? How many? How many. Honestly I, I wanna read the rest of it just for our listeners, and also because I did not when I, heard this description I had never heard this particular version that her stepsisters ridiculed her, and scattered peas and lentils into the

Jay Levy Alex Alex Newell Betsy Jane Yeah Jonathan Betsy Beth Betsy I. Air Conditioners United States John Baron Vaughn Jane Levy Netflix NBC ZOE Catherine Reitman Jane Eugene Ashby
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:48 min | 5 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Is that the formulation of Whiteness. That were latching. Latching onto is not really working out very well for white people either and so I think part of the issue is not to deconstruct anybody. But to say that we've gotten ourselves into this position position where the formulation of whiteness that we have on one hand is incredibly violent towards other people and also it's killing white people too and so wouldn't it be great to step back and at the end of the book I I give some examples of how I think that might happen. But I think there's so much evidence about how for example societies where more people can advance are better and healthier societies where. It's easier for people to get to work. In communities and economies do better business says says that that have the most divergent viewpoints and diverse viewpoints ended up being more productive and creative because different people bring different things to the table and so in a way. Hey you know I I I guess part of the issue is how does this moment where we're at a crisis read a crisis of Whiteness. Right now among other things. How can we use this to step back and create a better formulation formulation? That's more more horizontal and distributive that works better for everybody including White Americans. You're talking about President trump and the you know the the form of whiteness that he is that he is pushing and that you said this is a formulation of of whiteness that is incredibly incredibly violent towards towards other people and that gets to the last chapter in your book last thought is all about the castle doctrine and for for some listeners. That might sound familiar because we became familiar with that term as a result of the shooting of of Trayvon Martin in Florida where that was has sort of the stand your ground. Send your ground law but it's all part of the castle doctrine that You have a right to defend defend and yourself and defend your home. And you use the example hyper extreme example of castle doctrine that played out in Missouri with with a young woman who somehow got a gun and ended up killing herself and in. Correct me if I'm wrong and retell the story but I do think the castle doctrine ended up not just being able to defend your home but being being able to defend yourself wherever you are even in your car rate and so the story I tell it and the book was a story. That happened while the Ferguson Kazan protests. Were taking place in in Missouri about a young woman from Ferguson. who was a bartender who basically had not been a gun owner before and and then there was all of this quote unquote racial tension at the time and she said I'm going to get a gun to get ready for Ferguson? which was comment? That was open to interpretation after about what she meant had but basically bought bought a gun and was driving around in the streets. She was the passenger in a car waving this gun around saying she was getting ready for Ferguson and the car ended tragically rear ending another car. The gun at that time was pointed at her head and very tragically. She lost her life at at her Byron. The hat and so the story tell is why. Why was there a gun in that car in the first place and part of the issue as about this idea that basically as as the the framework goes a man's home is his castle? which usually initially if you think about like the Heller decision from two thousand eight people were familiar with that? Meant you can keep a gun in your house to to protect yourself against intruders. But what we've seen. Is this logic of protecting yourself against others and often against racial others has led to the expansion of this so-called Castle doctrine so that people can carry guns basically the person themselves becomes becomes the castle. And so you can take take a gun in your car. You can take a gun if you're George Zimmerman just walking around and so this idea of basically the this notion of whiteness as something. The thing that needs to be defended by castle against other people was one that I really try to interrogate in the book. And basically say you know what. What does that mean? What messages messages that sand and and who are who are the victims while the victims obviously are people like Trayvon Martin and there's a lot of literature that shows you you know who gets shot by stand your ground laws And it's it's mostly a young black men but but it's also a risk to just the people who are carrying the guns right that they feel like they have to be on guard all the time and so part of the issue is I felt like this was a powerful metaphor for the kind of America that people people are trying to build that is protected in castle and not collaborative In a way. That's very racial is and and the hope in using. That story is in the conclusion inclusion. I turned toward other models that we could be building that are not the castle doctrine. They're the they're the drawbridge something like that. You know other words like let's let's let's let's work backwards from this because building castles is is just GonNa kill us all Jonathan. LemMe in our conversation with this question in politics picks and particularly democratic politics as I said earlier. There's a lot of focus on reaching out to those forgotten. Voters read white voters who may have voted twice for President Obama and then voted for president trump. And I keep thinking doesn't even make sense and for the Democratic Party to reach out to those voters. Are they even reachable. That's what my thinking is an and in reading your book. The one question that keeps coming to mind especially in our conversation is given everything that you've written about and all these questions that I've asked you and in the dangerous time at least to the way it feels to me that we are in this country. Are you you hopeful. And Are you hopeful that we can get past this. Very turbulent time that we're in to to a point where at a minimum we start to acknowledge the role that raise in white supremacy plays in just about everything that we do in this country as American. Well it's it's funny. But as a researcher I feel like all of those things are possible given the fact that I've been working on this project for quite some time. Now Oh and doing a follow up project now. I think it's important to note that many of the people I spoke with were not crazy. They were not completely an educated. Did they often knew exactly what they were talking about. You know more so than many of my liberal friends in New York about the affordable care for example and and and so you know. I think it's important to note that I feel like there's a lot of stereotyping on all sides but one of the stereotypes was that you know people were the beverly hillbillies or something like like that and and I. I think that's that's very unfortunate right because the people I talk to and recount their stories in the book are making calculated decisions nations. That are not crazy right. Some people told me I know. I'm suffering from this policy. But would I really care about. Is the long game of politics care about you. Know not having abortion in this country country which whether or not you agree with that at least it was strategy. Some people felt like they'd been put in a bucket of being deplorable by the Democrats and they had no other place to turn. And I and I think we've seen recent elections and places like Louisiana and Kentucky were people I mean I think people are making reason decisions and so it it it. It's hard for me because I think that there are two ways to argue that question right on one hand. I really do think that it would not cost the Democrats to reach each out at I. I think it's a big mistake to give up and say that people are too far gone. I'm I I think that If you can stay true to your ideals and your policies and instill acknowledged the fact that people like the people I talked to in the book are I mean honestly genuinely suffering. I mean. Read The gun chapter of the book. And and I it's it's quite powerful and so on one hand. I think that there needs to be some kind of acknowledgement of that and I think for example you can see now. President President trump is reaching out to black and Latino voters. You've Jonathan have written about this. Yeah and and and I think that's a very important strategy whether or not he gets the votes it shows that he's trying I to create a coalition for everyone. I don't I don't think it's GonNa win and votes but I still think it's an important strategy and I think the Democrats need a strategy like that and on the flip side right. Of course I I think it's important to note that you know white suffering is is just one form of suffering and so to think really very very very deeply Lee about how can we craft a democratic message that acknowledges and reaches out to people and tries to address these issues but also acknowledges as I mentioned in the book kind of the violence. That's being done in the name of the formulation of Whiteness. Jonathan Mezzo author of dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing America's heartland and also the director Vanderbilt University Center for Medicine Health and society? Thank you very very much for being on the PODCAST and for writing your book. It's been my thank you. Thanks for listening to Cape Up Tune. In every Tuesday you can find us on apple podcasts and stitcher and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us. I'm trying to think K.. Part of the Washington Post you can find me on twitter twitter at Cape Heart Jay..

President Jonathan Mezzo Ferguson. Trayvon Martin Missouri America Vanderbilt University Center f Washington Post President Obama New York twitter Democratic Party President trump George Zimmerman Heller Lee beverly hillbillies apple Florida researcher
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

13:48 min | 5 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"This was was at the center of a lot of controversy because it turned out after the ad ran it was also the gun that That a number of high profile mass shooters including Adam Lanza used I am and so they had to withdraw the ad I think and it's at the center of a legal case right now but what I do in the book is I just I just basically untapped unpack the the language of that advertisement and show how what's being sold is a gun as a marker of a a kind of threatens masculinity that's being returned turned up kind of privilege being returned literally using the language of the ad through through through the symbol of the semiautomatic weapon. And I just I I just track that through and talk about what. What does that mean right and the other thing that you do? Jonathan is that you un- you impact the symbolism of that ad but you also walk the reader through the history of gun ownership in the country writ large and who could own guns and who could own guns is all wrapped up as with everything in race. There is a concerted effort to keep guns out of the hands of African Americans particularly after slavery rate at Nyu. And and what. When I just mentioned that I think the word privileges was racially coded term? That's exactly what I mean that there's about two hundred year history in this country of basically affording the right to carry a weapon in public to white Americans often and white men and denying it to everyone else particularly African Americans and that goes back to pre colonial times when landowners could carry muskets and they let their white workers carry muskets in order to quell rebellions as they put it from negroes and Indians and that went all the way through of of course in slavery You know th the debates about who could carry a gun were often very often aligned with race and particularly in the period after the civil war are everything from John. Brown's raid to Klu Klux Klan raids to other you know the aftermath of Nat Turner. All these factors were all about out trying to disarm African Americans and show that basically carrying a gun in public was a white prerogative and what I do in that section of the book is basically track that history up through to the present day where even though ostensibly you would think that the second amendment apply to everyone. I use that history to show how for example open in carry it. White White Open carry People are seen as patriots who can walk through Walmart or go to starbucks but I show all these examples of African American men usually who have permits and just go to buy something at the store ended up getting tackled their shot. And so this this idea of who of you know AH carrying a gun being a racial prerogative. We have modern day. Examples philander Casteel in Minnesota at had a license for open carry told the police officer officer that he was reaching for the permit and that he had had a gun and he got killed and you have an example of a Of a white man who was walking in a Walmart with a might have been a semiautomatic weapon he had a weapon openly carrying it in this Walmart and he he got out alive and I'm thinking about the black man in the Walmart who was carrying a toy gun that looked like an assault rifle. Will someone called the cops. The cops come in and he's killed No there's so many stories like that and again. It's a fine line because I'm not arguing. The book that I think everybody should carry a weapon. I think we are not doing. See many guns. And this goes back to Malcolm X.. And Robert Robert Williams of the end up Lacey. Pe- book called Negroes with guns. This idea that basically who does the Second Amendment apply to and on paper it basically is not racially coded language but in practice. I I have a lot of examples in the book and many that I've accumulated sense of of basically white man there. There's a story in the book for example about a man in Atlanta. Who just walks around at a a youth youth baseball game holding his air fifteen over his head and screaming? Here's my gun and there's nothing you can do about it and all the parents the baseball players are hiding in the dugout. They're terrified and the police come in. They're like hey you know there's nothing we can do about it. How nice the but it's protected In in in terms of particular particular kind of carry laws So there's a racial politics two to how plays out because I kept thinking you know. Try that as non white man and see how far how far you think we know the answer the answer to that and I want to talk to because you you sort of alluding to the the castle doctrine that I want to talk to you in a little bit but I do want to get to the third area that are you focusing on in the book and that's tax cuts and the state of Kansas and how Kansas used to have a great reputation for its schools people would moved to Kansas to go to Kansas schools. And then Governor Brownback Sam Brownback becomes the governor slashes taxes X.'s. And all hell breaks loose. You you write early. Budget cuts overwhelmingly impacted schools and low income minority districts but these initial initial cuts were not enough to fill the gaping holes in state budget soon as thoughtful. Kansas state legislature told me quote the fire that we set in the fields burned burned all the way up to the home. I mean that was that was. What are these Zito and you do research like this and every Mo- every you know you you have moments where people say things that are just so clear so clear? And I think that was really one of those moments where I was interviewing someone and it was like this fantasy that I think a lot of legislators and conservative voters and you know parents even who sent their kids to public schools in Kansas had that we could do things that were similar into healthcare going to penalize people who are taking from the system in an undeserving way in schools was a very powerful marker of that. I mean as you mentioned Kansas. I'm from Kansas City. The and I kind of saw this happening. As I was growing up Kansas people would move to Kansas because they always had a a a key because Kansas always had a top ten public school system and every metric he can think of fourth eighth grade reading and math High School graduation rates. All these things were phenomenal for public school system in Kansas and part of the reason Kansas is this oh strong was because of changes that the state had made literally investing in the Public School System in the aftermath of the Brown versus board of Education Decision in the nineteen fifties and and Kansas were very proud of their public schools and then along comes brown back kind of fueled by a kind of you know. Koch Brothers Libertarian Conservative. Republican ethos of a steady in times of prosperity and he started cutting everything but the biggest cuts were to the famous Kansas school system. And I think think initially when I talk to people they were like. Oh it's not going to affect us that much and I found some pretty interesting kind of urban myths from parents. I would talk to that. Oh we're just penalizing the minority districts because they're using all the tax dollars. People told me Sam on party buses. Challenge any of these like like. Hey where's your evidence for the Party bus. Well it's funny because people kept telling me that the Black School Jasser wasting money on these party buses and so I called the. I called the black school districts and I said Hey did you guys have any party buses and they'd be like you know. We hardly have money for textbooks. Like what are you talking about. You know we can barely get you know lunches for the the students and so there was this kind of urban myth going around kind of profligate minority districts that I think fueled people's rationale about what was being cut but unfortunately just like healthcare. We're all connected right so the minute you start taking money away from the school system in one area the entire system starts to suffer. And that's certainly what happened in Kansas. which is that? The first effects were seen and minority and low income districts. But then the the just started to be a system wide. So all of a sudden you know everybody's dropout rates started to increase. Graduation rates started to go down and Kansas Tennessee. She is a predominantly white state. And so the people who were getting hit by this this politics the most Were were white students. They had by far the biggest dropout rates by far the biggest just drops in competence competency exams and when that started happening I think for many cans was a bridge too far so that was when people started saying. Hey wait wait a minute. What are we doing here so I think when the issues started to hit home all of a sudden there was a massive mobilization and people who had been supporters of Brown bags policies started to turn and and the Kansas Story? I show you know for better or worse. Here's an example of of a point where people really started to see how the policies affected them in part art but also started to get a broader set. So I interview a lot of legislators and and and school district people who basically say you know what we realized is that we have a social social responsibility For something like a school district to to make to make the system better for everyone and so- Kansas Voted Incense Republicans. And it's still having that debate right now. In fact you write that. The Kansas experiment with Brownback is something that president trump is trying to do on the national level. And get that right. Well I mean the scary thing about all the examples in in my book. Are that in a in a different planet other than ours. He might think these are examples of what not to do right Tennessee. Hennessy blocked healthcare reform with no backup plan and people started dying. Missouri started to give everybody could get a gun and what happened injury and death rates skyrocketed. All these kinds of suicide partner violence police shooting etc.. Kansas cut it schools and people started to really suffer and so in a in a different university would think well. Gosh let's find a model that worked somewhere else and try to nationalize that right. I mean New York for example for New York is forty seventh in the out of fifty states in terms of gun injury and death in many categories. Let's think about what New York's doing and maybe keep people safer or or California has a better school system Other states and other countries obviously better healthcare systems and so that it in fact what we see is the opposite right which is that all of the policies policies I talk about in these southern states are ones that the trump administration has tried to nationalizing so This idea of cutting away. The public school system became one of the core markers of the kind of many of these devos initiatives which are taking money out of the common full of a public schools. Of course we know what happened with healthcare and gun so in a way the the states become kind of canaries in the coal mine I think for for for for the nationalization of of politics and policies that have been very toxic at state levels so you in addition to talking about taxes in Kansas and guns in Missouri and healthcare in Tennessee. You do dude throughout the talk a lot about just overall about race in how we talk about it or don't talk about it or the mistakes we make and I'm going to put you and Tony. Tony Morrison in the same within the same question. Oh my God why I mean you have a quote from Tony Morrison where you where she says to restore whiteness to its former status as a marker of national identity number of white Americans are sacrificing themselves. And that gets to the the overarching argument in your book. And now. Here's something that you write that I think a lot of people either. Don't get get or understand or had not even realized and you write my findings in this book suggest that we make a wrong turn when we tried to address racism mainly as a disorder of people's brains or attitudes or try to fix the problem simply by attempting to sensitize people or change their minds. I mean it's it's it's such a obviously complicated issue and I'm just first of all honored to be part of the conversation. We're having as a country about this and I I would say I come down in a couple of ways I mean you know i. I tried very hard in my book to be respectful of the people that I was interviewing and I didn't want to pathologies anybody at all. Based on their identity. I tried to judge people based on their deeds not on the category that I put them into do and and I think it's important to note that you know there are different ways to be white in this country and so unfortunately right now. President trump has co-opted a particular narrative of Whiteness is whiteness under attack and white victimhood and all these factors and from that I feel has done all of these things that are counter to the interests of our our nation including to too many people who are extensively his supporters so to push back on that part of what would I argue is that we have to articulate a different model of Whiteness In other words it's the responsibility of white America if there is such a thing and of course that's many things you know. White America has not often had to define itself right. Because it's the invisible norm or the control group but right now if you don't agree with the model of Whiteness. The president trump is articulating. It's incumbent to articulate a different model of whiteness and just to be clear I don't think that means that people need to apologize as for who they are. I don't think that that means that you know that anybody is given any particular status but I will say the part of the argument of my book..

Kansas Governor Brownback Sam Brownba Kansas school Public School System Kansas Story President trump Kansas City Tennessee Adam Lanza Klu Klux Klan Walmart Nat Turner Jonathan president Brown Robert Robert Williams Tony Morrison Party
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

10:56 min | 5 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"That's it that is a Arg- The argument you make is one that I think is very powerful. Well thank you I I you know again. I'm I'm for more health care physician myself and I and I think the system we have now is unconscionable in many ways but I think that the the the points I'm I'm trying to make in those passages are really that I think that there's a an important caveat. I think that a lot of progressives have fallen into the trap of basically saying Oh will the minute people see how Medicare for all I would benefit everybody. That of course they'll be converted because it gives them it gives them healthcare and we just learned that lesson recently ago at the affordable care. Act that actually. We just giving people healthcare doesn't mean they're going to jump on board your ship because there are these profound valances about what government sponsored healthcare means. That aren't just about whether or not you go to the doctor or how much you pay for. It actually has to do with race and who who's life is worth insuring in the first place and there's a huge history history of Of this you know going back to attempts to desegregate for example southern southern hospitals and attempts to create other versions of national health care. And so I guess the point I'm trying to make is Medicare for all is not enough if you don't also come up with a strategy for addressing race and racial tensions. That's part part of it but the other part of course is that I interviewed and we did on the project a lot of African American citizens in the South who felt like they had worked very hard to attain pain. They're affordable care act benefits and they were very supportive of President Obama and everything that represented and even though Medicare for all wouldn't be a huge jump from what they have now. The idea that basically people people fought to obtain these these you know competitive insurance marketplace benefits or or Medicaid expansion benefits. So I I don't think that overthrowing the affordable care act would would be huge sell in those populations without without some framing also and so. I think the point I'm trying to make is that it's I I think there's a logical leap of fifteen steps. You have to take to get there that have to do not so much with the healthcare economics with with you know. Race descended racial tensions and racial anxieties in this country. And I I haven't heard that letter debate So we've been talking about healthcare in that part of the conversation in. Your book is focused on in Tennessee in its attempts to expand healthcare under the affordable. CARE ACT new. Also say when. We're thinking about Tennessee before we go on if that's okay because I think it's important note also one other point that I forgot to make also that the affordable care act was hugely effective rate. And so look what just happened in the Election Kentucky very recently so another part of the analysis in this section of the book was comparing Tennessee which did not expand Medicaid and did not create competitive marketplaces with Kentucky. And there's a lot of data in the book that basically shows that relatively similar populations and socio economic levels but Kentucky saw very dramatic very dramatic improvements not not just in health and longevity but people paid less for medications they ended up having fewer medical bankruptcies went for more routine office visits. And so I think the the the other part of the issue that I haven't heard is also I mean people can see in the Kentucky Tennessee comparison part of the book that that people started to like the affordable care act. And that's I think that's what we I started to see in this election in Kentucky pretty recently so I think that's another important point to make. Is that the affordable care act in some ways even though it was kind of the first version Asian of technology that and a program that would have had to have been continually improved. And that didn't happen. But the affordable care act was very effective particularly in the southern states is that were brave enough to try it So that's healthcare in Tennessee. Jim My mind. The most startling section is the first section and that is gun control and Missouri. And you write as gun. Laws were liberalized in Missouri gun deaths spiked among white people. This this was because white missourians dominated injuries and deaths via gun related suicides partner violence and accidentally shootings in ways that outpaced east African American gun deaths from homicides please walk us through how liberalization of gun laws in Missouri. Sorry which were done obsessively to allow people to protect themselves from some unseen. Marauding hordes people suddenly suddenly made being a white male a risk factor for gun deaths are in this case suicide. Well I I think that's that basically summarizes the Void v Very. Well I mean Missouri was such a was such an important part of the research because the important thing about thinking thinking about Missouri is that before about two thousand eight Missouri was a state that had a long history of gun ownership and hunting and particular form of gun rights But there were laws on the books that basically said in order to get a gun or to carry a gun in public You need to do things like get a permit and permit involved is usually usually going to the sheriff's Office for three minutes or less and just you know the question was are you a wanted felon on the loose or something like that. It was not very extensive but there were laws and processes that when you bought a gun at the point of purchase you know there were there was a process of basically saying should this person own a gun and most people bought. It wasn't a big deal but in two thousand eight there was a kind kind of the beginning of a kind of a takeover of of state politics. Fueled by of course people Titians who overturned pretty much every every gun law on the books so all of a sudden there was open carry and concealed carry campus carry Park Keri Bar. Carry every kind of carry you can think of have an end. Missouri really became the New York Times called it. The shoot me state in a way this idea that basically Missouri went from a state that had kind of centrist gun laws to one or all of a sudden it was quite easy to to get a gun and to carry a gun and a lot of people lauded this as an expansion of gun rights of patriotism of freedom and liberty and all as this was happening there were quotes from Wayne Lapierre on down. Basically saying this is your right to protect your family. As Lapierre put it from you know gang bangers and carjackers and other kinds of racialist others and I just started look at the data and it turned out that as guns flooded into Missouri. There was a rise in black DOC on black shooting for sure but the numbers were not relatively dramatic was about forty or fifty shootings a year. which every loss you know every life life lost as a as a tragedy but the real drivers of the dramatic rise in gun death in Missouri were white male suicides which literally spiked through the roof if I mean for the five years after this Missouri became one of the top three states in the nation out of the blue for white male gun suicide and so in the book? I really talk about this. This this disconnect between guns that were literally being sold as kind of symbols of freedom and patriotism and but also about like protecting yourselves loves against you know Willie Horton who might come in your window on one hand and this idea that nobody was talking about really the epidemic of gun suicide which was a very very very complicated story really complicated because the risk factor wasn't depression it. It wasn't having seen a psychiatrist. It wasn't all the usual things that you would think. Think of with with guns suicide. It was A particular kind of gun suicide. That was you know the main risk factors were. I showed statistically do you own a gun have have you had a recent crisis and white Americans were about ninety percent of the victims hair. In fact you right in reality white men in Missouri outpaced everybody else and rates rates that far exceeded the percentages of actual white men in the state in two thousand fifteen white men comprised roughly four forty percent of the population of Missouri but were victims of nearly eighty percent of gun. Suicides you start out the conversation on gun control in and Missouri by talking talking about the quote Unquote Man Card. You were talking about how you know. The gun symbolizes freedom in patriotism but it also is wrapped up in masculinity and race. And how does the man card play into that will. The Man Card is very important advertising campaign one of several. I talk about in the book that basically sell guns. I mean it's important to maybe just step back and say that there's been a transformation in the United States about why people feel like they own guns in the first place If you look back to Pew Public Opinion Polls for example. From twenty years ago people would the great majority of people would own guns because of hunting. Hunting You know. I knew I needed to go hunting. Family tradition of hunting and very few people felt like they needed a gun for self protection from other people. I mean some people did but but that was a a a a minority by far and over the past couple of decades. We've seen a dramatic shift where now the dramatic majority of people who own guns say that I need it for self protection for identity for all these factors we've been talking about and so there's been this this dramatic shift in why people own guns in the first place and what I try to show in. The book is that that transformation was catalyzed by a number of factors laws and the Supreme Court but in terms of these advertisements they were based they basically basically if you look at the NRA magazines for example stopped selling guns as like you know shoot a rabbit for dinner that kind of thing and it was much more. This is your identity. Identify and very often coated identity as as a as a white male and it was quite explicit in a bunch of the ads and I think one of the most prominent ones was an ad for a Bushmaster and air fifteen rifle that they were selling that basically said you know you. Males are under attack because of political correctness and and they use the word Tofu and liberals and all these kind of Alba Kado toast. Yeah all the good stuff but but but it's basically said A. D.. WanNa get your man card back and so they it. WAS THIS AD campaign. That basically asked men to certify their their madness ns by all of these kinds of questions. And then by the gave you a card when you bought the Bought this this semiautomatic weapon and this card symbolized the ad said continue your consider your man card re issued and it. It basically said not just that you ran card was reissued but it used the word privilege With all all the rights and privileges afforded I think was the text and so it was it was basically associating. You know the the return of male cook obviously male privilege and in historical language this language had been used predominantly for for white men with owning an ar fifteen..

Missouri Tennessee Medicare Kentucky Wayne Lapierre Alba Kado United States Obama Park Keri Bar New York Times President Jim Willie Horton partner NRA depression Supreme Court sheriff's Office
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

10:59 min | 5 months ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part and welcome to Cape Up Healthcare in Tennessee guns in Missouri tax tax cuts in Kansas professor. Jonathan Metal at Vanderbilt University focuses on those three areas in his book dying of Whiteness. How the politics six of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland using compelling data and focus groups metal shows how white people are willing to die rather than be connected a two or finance policies. They believe are giving resources to people bayview as undeserving find out more about this important book right now. Jonathan Mental. Thank you very much for being on the PODCAST. Hey It's great to be here. Okay I've been raving about your book for months now and it is really an important book. The name of the book is dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland it land. And you start off the book by telling the story of Trevor Talk About Trevor sure will basically the the the impetus for the book came from a series of focus groups that Some colleagues of mine and I were doing in kind of rural Tennessee. Where we were talking to medically ill poor White and black Americans about the affordable care act and we just found some very dramatic stories which I recount in the book but I think probably one of the most powerful stories was is one of a man named Trevor who called Trevor in in the book. who was suffering from liver failure and a bunch of other chronic conditions. And he really would have benefited from this was in the year. Twenty eleven at the time. What the what? The affordable care act potentially was offering which was increased access to physicians financial help. Because he was under you know in the facing medical bankruptcy and this was in a focus group and I basically asked You know what you're feeling about the affordable care act. And he told me I realized that I realized that something like the affordable care act might be beneficial for me but I have to tell you. There's no way I'm supporting or signing up for a program that is he put it. Benefits benefits Mexicans and Welfare Queens. That was a quote I heard a lot and basically the the idea was that even if this program might benefit me. I'm not going to support a program. Graham that might also benefit by his estimation kind of undeserving immigrants minorities and the reason that was important was because again. It was a refrain that I heard quite right often that I'm you know we don't we don't want to be part of a program that might not just benefit us but other people and in this case you know. Here's a guy who's he's on. Death's doorstep literally literally on death's doorstep and so part of the jumping off point of the book is how powerful is this idea about kind of what it means to be white in America and this idea that basically weekly to be to be white means to have to block the advance of other groups and in in a way that the call of whiteness because of stories like this where people literally literally traded their lives at rather than sign up for social programs support programs that they felt like might go to benefit other people who were undeserving to the pointed ended the focus groups when you were talking to either all white groups are all black groups who had a colleague who you worked with an African American man who he taught out to all black groups and you talk to the all white groups for obvious reasons but talk about that will we just wanted people to feel comfortable. Obviously Racist Racist Right Marker powerful marker in the south where we're doing are doing our research and so we really wanted to get people's honest opinions About I mean. Obviously I'm a race scholar. So is my colleague Derek Derrick Griffith and so part of the issue as we just we wanted to get the real stuff the real the real responses and so I think part of part of the issue was that but also you know because races such important dividing line in places like Tennessee where we were doing the research we really wanted to see. We really wanted to compare. We asked every Group the same questions and the focus groups were pretty interesting about the first fifteen or twenty minutes of the groups. Were just general questions you know. How do you define health? What do you do to to to to maintain your health and it's interesting that Race really wasn't a factor in those early questions so everybody would joke around and say stuff like you know. I try to keep my weight down around but then I walked by. McDonald's mcrib is on sale for ninety nine cents and everybody would kind of laugh and everybody you know I would. We would all laugh. I mean I personally loved the mcrib awesome. Now go on. I mean I did said Skip Vida But anyway you know so for the first twenty minutes or so when we would ask general questions about health there really were no race race dividers right. And we're also socioeconomic class but we can talk about that later but then about twenty minutes into each group we would ask this question and so who benefits from healthcare reform and. It's important to note that we were doing these interviews in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. This was a time when Tennessee was really debating. I'm should they should. We expand Medicaid should we create To basically except the affordable care act rejected. That was something very much on people's minds and what we found was when we asked this question who who benefits from healthcare reform the almost to a person the African American men would say things like everybody. Does you know we are society benefit. If more people are insured. Sure not just black people. That's what they would say But really everybody and so this idea that we get from the African American focus groups was was. You know. It's kind of the attitude you want people to have if you're going to create a national healthcare system which is if we get the most people in the system. It benefits the most people when we would ask the groups of particularly lower income white Americans against we got a a range of opinions but one that seemed to dominate was. As I mentioned this idea that basically I don't want to be part of a system where the benefits that could be going to me are going to as they put it undeserving. Immigrants Minorities which tapped into a lot of these things about you know building a wall and keeping people Out and so really. I think that the profound racial difference we found in these groups was really that one group really had a very a very broad idea about Menendez's Monette work at risk. All the things you would want people to have when you're creating health insurance and for for the White Americans we spoke to an you know. Of course I'm a white American myself myself In these groups people people would basically it was the sense of kind of limited resources and privileges are being taken away from me and and and that was important both because it it spoke to an ideology which was just countered to the idea of creating a national health care system it was important because it tapped into historical tensions ends about other times to democratize health. Care you know Johnson and Truman administrations. you know desegregation things like that but it was also important because the ideology the of blocking the affordable care act was one that we didn't just here in the groups that was how the entire state voted. We elected politicians who decided not to expand Medicaid not to create competitive insurance marketplaces. And so in a way that ideology we felt a from a political standpoint was was quite dominant in terms of how the state ultimately voted and decided what to do Well on that larger point of you know the the white focus groups looking at the idea the of their resources going to quote unquote undeserving. People but you also make a point of in here. It's on page one. Seven where you're talking about. President trump and his hammering away at the at the affordable care act that obamacare and you're right trump essentially asked lower income white people to choose less coverage and more suffering over a system that linked them to Mexicans Welfare Queens and to healthier longer lives and it was that that were that verb linked them. The idea of being connected to these people was a was a bridge too far right. I mean it's it was one of the more powerful points and something I couldn't advantage before doing these focus groups but basically the idea I mean think about it. If you're an you know I'm I'm not. I hope people see this. I'm not trying to totally really slam. All the people I interviewed. I feel like there were remarkable stories of bravery just about what it means to stay alive in a part of the country where there's no social safety net. But but I will say that at this idea came came up again and again. which was this kind of particular form of white identity as what I'm holding onto? It's kind of keeping me alive. But what if I smoke three packs of cigarettes a day and I as people that tell me I I live a healthy diet. Things like that and I'm in a network where my good health is dependent on a healthy African American person or Latino person who maybe jogs every day and doesn't smoke you know in a way there's a sense of dependence ends up being in a in a broader social network where my actions are related to other people's actions who it frightens me to be dependent on and so there was. There's all this underlying tension about about what it meant to be in really in a a a healthcare system is a web people are connected and and you're dependent on a certain certain number of people being healthy one got if one person cost ten dollars for just a checkup and one person cost ten thousand dollars because they need a kidney transplant. Supplant it balances out right so in a way your actions are connected to the actions of other people and I think that that anxiety there's an underlying anxiety about what does it mean to be dependent dependent on people who who At least my formulation of Whiteness tells me I'm superior to In the Democratic Party. There's this big debate. That's going going on about health care and Medicare for all. And you've got candidates who for Medicare for all and then there's folks who have medicare for all who wanted and then others others who want to tinker with the affordable care act and you had a very interesting warning that you say not a warning but just sort of a sign for people the pay attention to both early in the book and then later on in the book where you right. I talked to white men like trevor who vigorously resent government intrusion into their lives in fear their tax dollars will go toward lazy minorities even as they themselves suffered the consequence of restricted access to healthcare these types of attitudes complicate kate attempts to sell healthcare reform in rural America and might doom progressive calls from Medicare for all the warning in that is folks folks. This isn't just a conversation about healthcare and this just isn't a conversation about money. This is a conversation about identity city in for for the very people who a lot of Democrats say the Party needs to win over and twenty twenty. Those are the same people who are very resistant to the idea of Medicare for all from your argument a system that would connect them to people they view as undeserving irving and after four years of president trump..

America Trevor Tennessee Medicare Jonathan Kaye Cape Up Healthcare President Jonathan Mental Jonathan Metal Vanderbilt University Democratic Party twenty twenty Welfare Queens professor Kansas Derek Derrick Griffith
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

15:20 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"You Jonathan, and it's great to be here. So I couldn't imagine a more perfect person to talk to about New York City, nineteen sixty nine and that fateful weekend fifty years ago. But before we get into the specifics of, of that of those nights talk about what gay life was like in New York City at that time. Gay life in New York City as it was in the rest of the United States, and indeed, the rest of the western world was invisible to everyone except those participating in it. So that meant you could find another gay person if you knew the address of a gay bar like the stonewall inn, or you knew of. Okay. Shen in central park, where people like yourself, probably the ramble might be interested in meeting someone else. But generally speaking, if you're gay person, you did everything in your capacity to keep it a secret from your friends from your family, and from anyone else who wasn't gay. And, you know, legend has an I'm old enough to remember is sort of the remnants of those years when those sort of signals and things were still there. How did gay people K men in particular identify themselves to each other, since everything was so closeted. And so's secretive. Mostly through knowing sidelong glances, I would say. Not the carnation in the lapel or. Well, we're about we were about sixty years beyond the carnation period. By the there were I suppose already some people who paid attention to the color of the handkerchief in your left rear pocket of your blue jeans, but that really was more popular in the nineteen seventies, right? It was really just a question of, you know, inborn Gaidar and trying to figure it out. I do remember when I was an undergraduate at Columbia, being cruised on the subway invariably by men. I wasn't interested in which was very disappointing. That is a perennial perennial thing. Radio problem, depending no matter the decade. So even though even though the laws made being gay illegal New York City was still a mecca for, for gay people. Wasn't it? It was a huge mega just because they were more of us here than there were anywhere else. The proportions. The percentages may have already been higher in San Francisco, but the gross numbers have always been white just in New York City, I would say in the last two hundred years anyway, so yes, it was very much a mecca. It was very much a place where if you met the right people, and especially if you're in the rich gay life, you could have very exciting life. That was unimpeded by the police or anybody else. And whether you were a, a rich gay, or, or a poor gay the way society manifested its disapproval of gay people was was ever was everywhere. Can you talk about some of the ways that disapproval manifested itself? What were the crime? Well, the first and most important way manifested itself in the nineteen fifties was when Dwight is. Hours signed an executive order, right at the beginning of his administration, which was the first time really that gay people were banned from employment by the federal government and also from employment by all of its contractors and horrendous episode, which is described in the new must see documentary, the lavender scare which is just opened in theaters, and we'll be on PBS shortly. But it also was reflected in the way these questions were covered in the liberal media famous story on the front page of the New York Times, which said growth of homosexuality causes growing concern quoting the moral leaders of New York City over the fears that this was suddenly visible. If you were walking up and down third avenue, there were people who even a straight person might assume was gay. This was something, which a Rosenthal, the then new metropolitan editor had not. Based on his return from Japan and he was horrified by how obvious homosexuality had become in his hometown. So he immediately wrote an article which advocated eliminating it, and then Mike Wallace followed up on CBS with an early CBS documentary called the homosexuals, which was actually quite mixed. I mean it had a lot of anti gay stuff in it. But on the other hand, it began with a very attractive blonde young man saying, I'm gay, and I'm all right with that which was undoubtedly the first time. Thirty million people had seen such a thing on primetime television in America. So there's this tiny little tiny tiny little steps towards visibility in the mid sixties, but not in the workplace anywhere. There are no openly gay. Reporters were really anything when Merrill, Miller comes out on the front page of the New York Times magazine in nineteen seventy one he's the first writer to do that. He was a famous journalist, and novelist, and he. Got letters from wires who said if I follow your example, I'll lose all my clients and doctors, set lose. Oh, my patients and Broadway. Producers said, I'll never be able to raise another dime. If anybody knows I'm gay. Let me take you back to that. Eisenhower executive order because as you were talking about that in what it did in terms of banning gay people from federal employment. It made me think of Frank candy, the late Frank Kennedy, is that the executive order that pushed him. And speaking of visibility to pick it in front of the White House with other gay men and lesbians, to pick it in front of the White House back, then it certainly is. And Frank Cam, a Washington resident for most of his life is by far the single most important person in the history of the gay movement, not only because of what he did, and taking on the federal government, but also because he was really the very first person to sit down and read the psychiatric literature and say this is just garbage in garbage out. This is just prejudice disguised as pseudoscience, and he had to do two things once he'd reach that conclusion he had to convince the. The Washington and New York Mattachine societies, which were the earliest gay rights groups of the early nineteen sixties to adopt resolution saying just because you're gay doesn't mean you're sick because up until this, I'm even at places like the Mattachine society, it was very common at Mattachine meetings for them to invite psychiatrist to the meeting to explain to all the members that the only way they could become healthy would be if they became straight, so he had to convince gay people, first of all that they weren't sick. And then the same Frank comedy led the campaign to remove homosexuality from the list of disorders from the American psychiatric association and that was the most important victory of all in nineteen seventy three and to give you an idea of how difficult that was the first time he could find a psychiatrist to speak at a national meeting of the, I think it was in nineteen seventy one, the gay psychiatrist was willing to lobbyists colleagues, but only if he was. Allowed to wear a mask while delivering this speech one, one of the things one of my fondest memories of my first years in Washington was meeting this older cantankerous man named Frank Cami at, at a few events here in Washington. And of course, there's a street named for him here in Washington and his pickets and placards and posters, and papers and pictures are all at the Smithsonian. Now, let's come back to New York. New York City, Charlie and talk about I was asking you before about gay life in New York at the time. And you'd mentioned earlier how you know, if you're a gay person in New York, and you, if you knew the address of a of a bar where you could meet other gay people. That's where you would go. What was the role of the mob in gay bars back then? Well, generally speaking, the bars were most frequently owned by the mob and the mob, not only owned the bars, but also arrange the weekly payoffs to the local police precinct to limit the number of rays of the premises. But really almost all of commercial gay life was controlled by the mob in the early nineteen sixties. And so then. These raids that were were made on on gay bars. They weren't sort of they were regular in they happen, but there wasn't a set timetable or schedule. I'm just wondering there seemed to be selective enforcement of these laws against homosexuality in New York City. Very selective that there was a tendency to ramp them up before the world's fairs both in the nineteen thirty nine in the nineteen sixty four world's fairs politicians would announce that they were cleaning up the city and anticipation of all the tourists who are going to come to the world's fair and cleaning up the city meant arresting as many homosexuals as possible. It was really sort of disgusting tradition. And how long would would gay people arrested have to spend in jail. Was it a, a nominal amount of time, or was, it days or weeks or or months, and loss of everything? I think generally speaking it was it tended to be only overnight. The problem was there are so many newspapers in New York and all cross the country, who would print the names of anybody who was arrested in one of these raids, and what's your name was printed in the newspaper? The odds were enormous that you'd be fired from any job that you had in any profession. So that's was, what made it so devastating? So e in your in your book, the game, atrop- Louis, which how old is it? Now, Charles they twenty five years old. It was first published in nineteen Ninety-seven. And I brought it up to date for the first time in two thousand seven and I've just written eighteen thousand words, a new preface and a new final chapter to bring it to two thousand nineteen and to include all of the marriage equality decisions as well as Brokeback mountain and moonlight and his folk et cetera. Well, I bring up the book because when I read it in the first edition, and it's written in by decades. And for me the decade on the nineteen sixties was for me. The most powerful an interesting and beautifully written of all of all the chapter of all the chapters and use my favorite to thank you. Well, it comes it comes through. I mean Charlie you and I have known each other for a long time, and, you know, I'd read all of the other decades before reading the sixties 'cause I thought, what do. Need to read the sixties for I wanna read the stuff? Well read about the people who I may have met and known, maybe. No, some of the situations and then I went to the sixties last and that was when I thought, oh my God. I'm so glad I went back to read the sixties being because knowing Charlie Kaiser is to note the sixties were very important decade to him. But in this chapter, you talk about a lot of the things that happen in, in America, not necessarily, not only things that happen to the gay community. But you spend a lot of time talking about Judy Garland. Why, why is Judy Garland important in the story of the gay civil rights movement? When I began my research is for this book, they I knew nothing about Judy Garland, but I also knew that there were two things that I would have to cover in this book and the I was the aids epidemic. In the second was Judy Garland, because she was the icon of a certain kind of upper middle class white gay man in America in the nineteen fifties. And I think it was partly because she was a brilliant artist who could really singer, heart out, and partly because she was the sort of person who just when you thought she was completely down and out. She could still come back and have an amazing triumph. And I think gay people identified in part with her extremism, and impart with her description, she said, I was just like rocky Marciano, who is a famous professional. Boxer, you can just I when I'm down, you know, I always come back for more. I think it was that part of her that was the biggest part of her appeal. And when she died in, in nineteen sixty nine by, then she is now known as Judy menaul Manelli requested that no one wear black to the funeral. James Mason began his eulogy at one o'clock on Friday, June twenty-seventh, and it was broadcast into the street by loudspeakers for the thousands who were lined up outside ten seventy six Madison Avenue. And then here's the key. The key thing you right? No one will ever know for sure, which was the most important reason for what happened next. The freshness in their minds of Judy Garland's funeral or the example of all the previous rebellions of the sixties all that is certain is that twelve hours later twelve hours after Garland's funeral a handful of New York City policeman began a routine. Eighteen raid of a gay Greenwich Village, nightspot and the drag queens, teenagers lesbians, hippies even the gay men in suits behaved as no homosexual patrons had ever behaved before what happened in the early morning hours of June twenty eighth nineteen sixty nine. Well, what happened more than anything else is a cross dressing, lesbian named stormy delivery, one of my favorite people in this book, and someone who I had the great honor of traveling to Berlin with for gay pride after the book came out. Stormy says the cop hit me, and I hit him back, and she has the best description in my mind. If what was really going on that evening when she says, stonewall, who's just the flip side of the black revolt when Rosa Parks, took a stand finally the kids down, there took the stand, but it was peaceful. I mean, they said it was a riot. It was more like a civil disobedience noses got broken there were bruises and banged up knuckles and things like that. But no one was seriously injured the police got the shock of their lives on those queens came out of that bar, and pulled off their wigs and went after them..

New York City Judy Garland Charlie Kaiser Washington New York Times federal government America executive White House United States New York Mattachine Jonathan Judy menaul Manelli the New York Times magazine San Francisco Japan CBS Gaidar Mattachine society Columbia
"jonathan" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on LadyGang

"You can follow Jonathan at Jonathan Bennett on Twitter or at Jonathan Bennett on Instagram Jonathan. No, I haven't Jonathan d Bennett right here. What's he for dick Jonathan big dick yet? Oh, yeah. And you have so many things for sale of so many things where everything your body. You can both come at a price. But everyone has a price William Scott. Oh my. Cute, though, the cookbooks good really, feel very proud of it, it was a lot of work, but it, we turned out, really, well, the burn cookbook, you can get on my Instagram. Everything's available on my Instagram. Burnt cookbook. We have a Wednesday Rosa, which is a wine. With point wines. You can get for girlfriends can't sit with us. And then we have pride top that are amazing through tipsy elves. Check them out. I partnered with them. So that's available right now, four prime go get him now because I know there's a lot of prize left for the rest of the month we have on Wednesdays. We wear rainbows. We. Yup. We have to function. Rainbows to get function regulation, Hoti. Get in loser. We're gonna pride like all these. So they're super fun. No, your special hustle. Amanda. For. It's like so mad. She didn't think of these things, I think I think, fairmont's, so. You're like you know, we have a very big thing coming up in the works that will be in October. That's huge that you're not why can't see where it is. But just trust. What is it rhyme it coming out over third it with horn? It rewind in. It's really good. Really good. Stay tuned. Cape next Tuesday..

Jonathan d Bennett dick Jonathan William Scott Twitter Rosa Amanda horn
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Pam Jonathan Kaye part and welcome to Cape up for the past few months. I've been working on something new. Between sit downs and a civil rights retreat in California in January and the faith and politics institutes, civil rights pilgrimage to Alabama in March. I've had the privilege of talking to a variety of civil rights leaders a few of them, you know, many of them you may not, but they're all significant voices. We need to hear their stories. More importantly, we need to heed the lessons of their experience. Because we won't have many opportunities to hear from them much longer. If we're going to understand the civil rights movement of the nineteen fifties and sixties, and how it affects our lives still these are the voices to listen to people like Andrew Young who was with Dr king when he was assassinated. And then I remember he used to say, but. You know, some of us are not going to make it to forty. He said, but if we make it afford it we make a hundred. Well, he didn't make it to forty. So it becomes me. Almost an obligation for me to keep doing whatever I do as long as I can do it, and I'll be eighty seven of the month. And I don't know I make a hundred or not, but you can't waste the experience. We've had. Andrew Young is right. We can't waste their experience. And so for two months each week here on Cape up. We're going to hear their voices. Listen to their stories and try to understand how we can move forward from here. We're calling the series voices of the movement and it will start on April fourth. So make sure you subscribe to Cape up or find it on Washington Post dot com slash podcasts.

Dr king Cape Pam Jonathan Kaye Andrew Young Cape up Alabama California Washington two months
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"North Carolina, a former governor named Pat mccrory staked his entire election, a not just attacking LGBTQ people, but attacking trans people, especially and in a state that Donald Trump won by four points that same state voted to aalst for the first time in its history, the incumbent governor because he attacked our community, those attacks inspired, turn out across the state of North Carolina. Like we had not seen before LGBTQ people, allies, Democrats independents and some Republicans standing up and saying, we won't stand for this hate and voted to oust Pat Mkhori. We can repeat that in states all across this country, and I believe we're going to this November Chad Griffin, president of the human rights campaign. Thanks very much for being here. Thanks for having me Jonathan. Thanks for listening to Cape up tune in every Tuesday. You can find us on apple podcasts and Stitcher, and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us. I'm trying to think k. part or the Washington Post. You can find me on Twitter at Cape heart, Jay. If you like Cape up Jonathan Cape are usually check out some of our other great podcasts, like, can he do that a podcast that explores the powers and limitations of the American presidency or try the daily to twos? Big idea of show that brings you daily analysis from political correspondent, James Holman. You can find these shows anywhere you listen to podcasts and learn more online at Washington Post dot com. Slash podcast. The Washington, Washington, Washington Post.

Washington Post Cape Washington Chad Griffin North Carolina Jonathan Cape Pat mccrory Pat Mkhori Cape heart Donald Trump Jay James Holman Twitter Jonathan president apple
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"When we talked just before the inauguration, it was January. It was January seventeen, twenty seventeen. And even then I was expressing concern about what could come of a Trump presidents and you said, then, you know, let's yeah, there's all this stuff out there that gives me plus, but let's give him a chance because he is the president of the United States, and we should want our president to succeed. Here we are in the middle of twenty eighteen. Year and a half later Arthur. News which thinkin. This time of populism which is inherently problematic for somebody with my philosophy. And why is that? Because populism is ordinarily based on inherently on polarization. It tends to look at the will and the passion of the crowd and get in front of it. People who like populism there, people who don't. I think it's generally dilatory is phenomenon because I think that leadership is really important in that aspirated leadership, which actually will pull people long in a good direction is a good thing. So if you have anybody who's a populist leader from Donald Trump to Bernie Sanders is gonna give me a lot of problems. Philosophically, I think that's it. It could weaken the country a whole lot. And you see a lot of these things coming true. Look, we have policies about trade and immigration. I think ultimately get hurt poor people around the world, and it helped her poor people right here in the United States. But again, I, I don't get to choose the president in. It's in a way what a nightmare, what is Toby and nightmare to have that, you know, the president American Enterprise Institute, choosing the president every time. I mean, it would be. I'm not necessarily saying that would be the best. Thing. I don't know. I mean, I know you are. I would argue if we could have a do over and you could pick the president, I would give you that shot or just you and me, Jonathan, you and me work it out. I mean, but, but here's my point actually, I'm persuaded that the these days that Jonathan Arthur, you're democrat, I'm a conservative independent if we had between now and four o'clock this afternoon. There's a whole bunch of stuff that we could solve. And if we were across the table from each other negotiating on something, I would say I don't want one hundred percent. I want Jonathan get what he wants to because that's the way that ordinary people deal with each other. But that's in the current environment that's become anathema to both Democrats and the Republicans. The whole point is these days if I don't get one hundred percent, I'm a loser and I got zero, and it's a, it's a total victory for the other side. And that's the problem that we have in a highly polarized environment. This partly characterized by populism, but it's mostly characterized by culture of contempt. Culture have contempt toddler about that. So we often hear that Pol. Ticks today is characterized by anger and that's not right. Anger is a hot emotion. You're married. So am I there is no correlation between anger and divorce in the social psychological through. I know it's crazy, right? I mean the year and a half. Absolutely. Your extra newlywed, right. I've been like I've been married twenty seven years. The first five were hardest. That's thank you. Well, it's a power struggle, right? And there's a ton of anger by the way I'm married to a Spaniard. So I've had approximately nine thousand eight hundred fifty five major fights. Understand. So anger is not correlated with with divorce. What's corley with divorces contempt, which is the conviction of utter worthlessness of another person and treating them as such. That's really, really problematic is the guy Eurasia Washington Seattle named John Goodman. He has the, he's the world's leading expert and conjugal failure. He talks about divorce and what brings couples back together. He's a hero. He's right couples back together. He's the love doctor and he finds the number one predictor of couples getting divorces I rolling and sarcasm and mocking. Okay. What's bad for marriage is bad for politics and bad for a country. The biggest problem that we have in the country today is culture of treating each other with contempt. I mean, imagine if you and I treated each other like the Democrats and Republicans treat shows Jonathan Kaye part what a lefty. You know, this big left wing social agenda. Will you know what you might be right? And I might be wrong. And if I'm wrong, I wanna know I, which is why I want to be your friend, and that's the essence of the competition of ideas that makes our society..

president Jonathan Arthur United States Jonathan Kaye Jonathan Toby Donald Trump John Goodman Bernie Sanders American Enterprise Institute corley Eurasia Seattle one hundred percent twenty seven years
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Cape up is sponsored by zeal. One of the only thing better than getting a massage getting a massage and the comfort of your own home. Introducing zeal. Wow. I'm Jonathan Kaye part and welcome to Cape up. Andrew gillum is the mayor of Tallahassee and is attempting to do something never done by a black person in Florida, be elected governor, but it's got to get through the primary curse still when he talks about the Democratic Party and his particular quest. He sounds very familiar. He sounds like Stacey Abrams the democratic nominee for governor of Georgia here for yourself right now. Mayor Jalen. Thank you very much for being on the podcast. Thank you, brother. I appreciate the opportunity, Jonathan. So you are the mayor of Tallahassee, Florida? Yeah. And are you term limited? I am not. No. I've been on the council for twelve years. I'm fifteenth. Yeah, youngest person ever elected. Yeah, see the council down your three and you're now you said in your fifteenth year, I'm in my fifteen year career and your not term limited as mayor and not term limited my term expires, November, but I could run again, but I will not be running again. Obviously. Why would you give up the security of being mayor of the capital of Florida to run to be the governor of Florida? Yeah. I mean, the truth is, is one. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in public service at the local level and in still enjoying it. The truth is though you come to a point where the changes that you're trying to make at a local. Level are being impacted by what's happening above you and our case, right. We're trying to get a handle on poverty on affordable housing on a changed economy. I'm proud to be the mayor of what is the fastest growing economy in the state of Florida per capita. But the truth is, is that forty six percent of the people in the state of Florida can't make ends meet and they say they can't make ends meet at the end of the month based off of the economy that we have in our state. Similarly, the criminal Justice system and unforgiving cycle where were not allowing people to get their rights restored automatically whereby large, many of these individuals are getting out of incarceration returning to our communities, and they're very, very few economic opportunities for them. I mean, I had a brother who had a record, got out, apply for job, apply for job, apply for a job and got no, no, no. Such to the point that he does start his own business. He started by power-washing sidewalks, that turned into power-washing houses, which then turned into power-washing buildings in retrofitting, semi trucks. And now he runs a successful business and hires a bunch of former felons to do the work with them. You know, as you're saying that story about your brother, there would be people Republicans. Conservatives bootstrap Republicans who say, see a ha. That's the way it's supposed to work. Well, the truth is if you were to seriously asked my brother wanted whether he wanted to be an entrepreneur. He say, no. He said he got into it because he needed to provide meal for his daughter, housing closing for his family. And so it was born out of necessity. Now, in his case it worked right. But how many cases are out there where it didn't work, how many people don't get access to, you know, Republicans are often, you know for saying, pull yourself up by the bootstrap, but then we arrest all of these barriers that keep people from being able to do just that. And so you know, as the mayor of the city Tallahassee I was proud to ban the box. We don't ask about criminal background history when you apply for the job for job in the city of Tallahassee and less answering? Yes, to having had one is a disquiet. Far for the position if it's not a disqualifier we're going to measure on your merit. Are you qualified? Can you do the work? Will you make a good employee? And quite frankly, those individuals of some of the hardest working people we have within our government because Jonathan, they know what it means to be without. Right. And so what I'm simply saying is consistent with conservative thinking if you will, let's create an opportunity for people to have the dignity around work that if you make a mistake and you pay your pistons back to society that you then are oughta be able to reintegrate society be able to get a job earned decent living in take your yourself in your family or so you mentioned economy criminal Justice system. What about gun control? Florida has been the site of some really horrific mass shootings. Yeah, pulse nightclub park land. Dale airport. Oh, right. The Fort Lauderdale airports and you know, I wanted this doesn't exactly fall under gun control and more in terms of race, which I'll get to the moment, you know, George Zimmerman and what he did to Trayvon Martin happened in Florida. It's right. That's right. No, you're absolutely right. And you're right to call it out. I will tell you though. I do think we're in a particular moment in my state around this issue we had, although, again, I thought at the time and think now was insufficient to meet the moment. But we had the first gun legislation pass a legislature in generation in the state of Florida, which was conceived of and not perceived by the gun lobby to be friendly. Right. It was. It was a little bit of adding some restrictions of which they stand firmly against. I got sued by the gun lobby. They had me in court for two years all because we refuse to repeal the local ordinance which said, you cannot you guns and city parks, right? Not courageous, nothing earth shattering that Zada saying that was the. Thing, man, that people were actually firing guns and city park. Well, the ordinance existed, right? And so the idea is, I mean, you may I in my family, we had folks who shoot guns up New Year's Eve, not thinking about the fact of the bullet has to come down their practices that we don't necessarily. I

Florida Tallahassee Jonathan Kaye Mayor Jalen Cape Andrew gillum Stacey Abrams Democratic Party Georgia Zada Dale airport Fort Lauderdale George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin forty six percent fifteen year twelve years two years
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"AM Jonathan Kaye part in this week on Cape up, we've got something special. Now it's not coming out until Friday, but you'll understand when you hear, why are you ready? I spoke with Mark Hamill. That's right. V Mark Hamill like Luke Skywalker. So obviously I couldn't have him on the show and not take the opportunity to publish it on made the fourth, you know, Star Wars day. That's this Friday. Now, you know, Mark embodies a story that the degeneration story about hope fighting back against dark and oppressive forces. So the tide you over until Friday, we got political and recorded a short conversation about leadership and moccasins. Where do you begin. The constant turnover among senior leadership? It seems like every week, every few minutes someone is being dragged out by their feet. It's just how does he expect to maintain control without the bureaucracy he thinks he'd be gets a leader in the room with them. You can just wave as in get them, you say? Yes, preposterous and again keeps trying to put his immediate family members into positions of way too much Power and had said some things about his daughter that just seem not ideal blue upper planet. But what? What? Oh, no. We're talking about different things. Okay. We're going to need a minute to get on the same page here. Come back on Friday for the full Star Wars day interview with Mark where we talk about Mark's career by Star Wars still resonates so strongly any Sarah, some stories from Star Wars history. You might not have heard before. So check back on may. The fourth in the meantime, may the fourth be with you.

Mark Hamill Jonathan Kaye Luke Skywalker Cape up Sarah
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Thanks for listening to Cape up, Tune in every Tuesday. You can find us on Apple podcast and Stitcher and how about doing me a huge favour subscriber rate and review us. I'm Jonathan Kaye part of the Washington Post. You can find me on Twitter @ keep heart. James. Mm. Hi on my rhythm on a reporter here at the Washington Post I'm hosting a new daily podcast called retro pod. It's a show about the past rediscovered. Every weekday morning looks of history's most dramatic moments. I'll introduce you to colorful characters for a path. Forgotten heroes overlook villains, DREAMers explores world change. Check it out on your Amazon Echo google home or your favorite podcast player for instructions on how to listen visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod. The Washington rushing to Washington Post. I am Jimmy Kimmel and numbeer with Jeff address the to do his podcast edge of Fame. It's a collaboration between WBUR and the Washington Post of always wanted to be involved in the collaboration between WBUR Washington Post ever since I was a baby edgy fame before behind it beyond the spotlight subscribed an edge of fame where ever you get your podcasts Brought to you by sip recruiter, offering technology to help you find candidates that match your job qualifications.

Washington Post Washington WBUR Jonathan Kaye Jimmy Kimmel Apple Cape reporter Amazon James google Jeff @
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Eighteen and we'll see where we go after that but democrats wake up it is at the local level i can just tell ya four years in a row jonathan i vetoed a de fund planned parenthood bill every year if i were not the governor virginia that would be law today and all twenty plus women's health clinics in virginia would be shut down gone we would have hb to like legislation in the commonwealth of virginia that would be law today in virginia what would you say the let's this fastforward i know you don't wanna fastforward pass 2018 but i still would have has whereas did to 2020 let's say you got into the race how one of the knocks against you would be oh well i mean he is clinton era he he you know he was the guy he raise money for the clintons he's tied to the clintons he's a clinton guy and the party needs to move forward rely wh how are we going to move forward if we keep harkening back to to the clintons what's your what's your response to that well pushback a venue pushback first of all what i say is i need to be judged on my four years as governor not who my relationships are i have been very close friends and dorothy night with the clintons for many years we have vacationed together they have been great to our five children i never ever jonathan walkaway from my friends i am the most loyal person you will ever meet i am with you in good times i am with you in bad times and that is a trait that everybody will talk about and i'm proud of that but i've just hypothetically if ever it i'm running on a platform of what i believe in and what my value system and judge.

virginia clintons jonathan walkaway shut down clinton four years
"jonathan" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Works because he's performance israeli funny because the story is a strange sort of triumph of the outsider through through something that he made that he wants to be serious turning into a cult qomaty but most importantly because light timber ed wood it has a sense that there is something more than just laughing at somebody from making something stupid it has a weird sense of damaged inability that's actually quite moving on i liked it very much and i've seen it twice and the second time round i enjoyed it even more it's quarter to three this is five live we have a slightly short program due to the world cup draw but i am delighted to say entering stage left during the middle of the disaster did you not you how i brilliantly wasn't put off by the fact the jonathan bras won't in in the middle of the largest progess pretended like nothing was happening jonathan pryce allied after another how are you sir i'm very well thanks i'm just i'm a i'm a little bit nervous what has just happened next door as part of my preparation for you coming in on the show apart from seeing the movie and reminds you myself of all my favorite jonathan pryce performance his i read a qna that you did not secession and one of the questions while he's five places ahead of you already which man which person do despise the most in the world there and he just walk us me and and four very sort of bbc programming reasons you've just shed a green room with tony blair who was the answer to your who d despise most in the water will likely he was surrounded by security men so i couldn't get salo to him but you'd have enjoyed seeing hello if you'd had absolutely to love to talk to you yeah i'm sure he would anyway at all i can say thank you very much for joining us on on the show and you never know he is going to bump into no no if if if you'll hear and jonathan his hip because the man event christmas is new jonathan place a john decades chelsea.

jonathan pryce tony blair salo christmas world cup bbc
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"And it is call advance persistent threat and cozy bear which was a line would some of the intelligence unit and russia i mean they were active jonathan the aren't they not only they not only got your number so to speak imagine you being a dnc staff they had show telephone number that your emails they had access to your personal information if you're a dnc jonah and in some cases because we provided uh we did the initial a gathering of data to give to the white house to give people and they had all with a hat and they went after the people they threaten they harassed her this was not so i would not mind every day was like i have my my from foyer him until about seven thirty eight o'clock that was i was dealing with the hackett a m one a am 'cause i got all my brief appearance and then i had the somehow the summon the courage i think i ate a lotta open able to summon the courage of was not spin in its i was not popeye to sail on i was i was definitely an old male and i will give my courage up and then i'll go over the dnc in only a small number of staffers new the days that we were being attacked how the russians were going back in air would apt twenty eight and twenty nine to steal out data and by the time they got through our data and the d triple see data i do believe that they had corrupted how system and we couldn't turn off our system people keep saying well why don't you turned over to fbi because we could not turn our service oval that's all we had that how new jonathan kaye part was somebody we had to target i'm using you as a metaphor 'cause i know we would never target a journalist.

white house hackett dnc fbi russia jonathan kaye
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"How much of the of the mistreatment of you you think is structural that that's how the party organs are treated by presidential candidates and how much of it do you think liz race or was a generational i looked at it as generational because you know i'm gonna make fun of my friends but here's the difference at thank of it is you know uh is not an attack is just to acknowledge in the obvious i come from the school where i walk into your neighborhood jonathan in i i woke up to your door knock on it and and say we need your help we need you to vote i also come from the school that when jonathan is actively engage that we give you resources like buttons and bumper stickers in other khanna campaign paraphernalia including the issues in the platform to get people excited um i do not come from the campaign where we look at two computer model and and then suggest edge everyone in jonathan neighborhood because they look a certain way will vote a certain way i don't like that i liked up i like to go and talk to people i like to really figure out what people a joint and so both model should complement each other one is not better than the other uni both in a campaign and i thought hillary's campaign was missing that element of requesting help but as you know what it was like it's like when bernie sanders said to me he said these polls you trust the polls this was a big washington post this week in the weekend that i talked a burning the week i idea the washington post had come out remember this is after labor day what hillary's layton biwott been margin sao don't you believe that i knew the polls were you know basically a titan in the end and i just wanted them the respect my gut because my gut wet where my button win let's talk about the gut goals where the buck goes okay my but went the florida.

jonathan jonathan neighborhood hillary bernie sanders washington post layton biwott florida liz
"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"jonathan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Pitting typically white working class voters against african americans right and it is simply the rebuilding of that um and so for those who and when look when donald trump santa farms audience is rallies and say i'm going to give you your country back tantrums having a conversation about race he's feeding into some rationing anxiety and when democrats say i'ma give you a raising the minimum wage we are ceding you know at it as post to engaging in that conversation we're seeding the ground formal racial conversation about the future of america to download to donald trump and he or she who defines a debate winds debate i don't know what the answer is down because i was vice we can't we can't continue to see that conversation to them and look i don't bashar beat up on working class voters white voters who who do see a tremendous change happening in their country and their anxious about that ryan there in their right to be anxious about i mean you will let them to be anxious outright but so my point is not to bash people who are anxious about the change that are happening the country but democrats have to give them alternative vision by because ultimately jonathan america's and getting wider right at the thing america's not is not getting wider and so you know part of the the empathetic discussion that i've been trying to have on the podcast with with other folks is there is anxiety there is heard there is fear about what's to come some of it irrational some of it rational some of it not just affecting working a working class whites there are folks working class african americans working class latino americans and asianamericans and these are issues that span that span raise but when it comes to this thing i'm going to give your country back i wish democrats could come up with a with some kind of line that incorporates your country hasn't left you.

african americans america ryan donald trump bashar jonathan america