10 Burst results for "Joma Allu"

"joma allu" Discussed on Women Amplified

Women Amplified

06:14 min | 6 months ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Women Amplified

"Your money here and these are your cash expenses. Sorry i want to interrupt you just for a second because you have to be careful here because a bill that's like let's say you pay a service to pick up dog waste from your yard or mow your lawn. That's a bill but it's also a choice right. Yes it is a bill but it's also a choice. I mean it doesn't have to be an exact science. But i would say for your bills. You can still count that as a b. I always say it's something that you've made an obligation to and that if you didn't pay it than it would be an issue that's how you know if someone walks dog you don't pay them. There would be an issue there because what you're really trying to see. It's where you have the most control. Although you know like the dog walking you might say you know. Less easy bill that i can go. There are some bills. They're fairly easy for you to get rid of. But typically most of your bills are not as easy to reduce or minimise as your cash expenses so groceries grooming entertainment. This is where you really can do whatever it is one like. There's not a set amount. That's kind of been allocated to these things to once you figure out your is your ub's and your sees that. I want you to start doing a mac. I want you to add sees and compare it to how much all your in newbies cost. If most of your money is going toward sees have a spend too much issue because most of your money are really going toward things. That are not financial obligations. But really what you have the most choice if most of your money or bees and ubs most of your money is going toward that you might have a. Don't make enough issue because most of your money is going toward financial obligations and so that is just a like almost like a preliminary test to seen do. I have a. Don't make enough issue or spend too much issue as feel free. Then you can move some things around to your point you could say no one actually going to move my dog walking over to the sees. Does that make a difference. And you're free to do so but we're just trying to get a high level view of is most of my money spent on obligations or just the things that i have really the biggest over. Because here's why we do that. Celeste when i was a preschool teacher i did not understand that i had a. Don't make enough issue so when you're frugal and you say that you don't have enough money at the end of the month. Your normal knee jerk reaction is to save more. I was like you know what. I don't have enough to do the things i wanna do. I need to cut back more. But i didn't have a. Don't make enough issue. I mean i didn't have a spend too much issue. I did it. I was already cut back is back could be. I had a. Don't make enough issue. And had i known that. I wouldn't have reduced my life even more so it took me about a year to get an understanding tiffany. You don't make enough issue. So then i was able to look at solutions differently instead of saying. Let me trim back even more. I started to babysit in tudor. Made an extra six thousand dollars a year doing so. So that's why it's important to understand what is treat issue. Do i not make enough. Because most of my money's going to build for my spending too much because most of my money's going to my cash expenses and then only focusing on those solutions frugal. People don't need to cut back more and people who are making plans. They don't necessarily need to make more. They need to cut back. How do you then decide. What your fixed priorities are. So let's say that. I have a number of commitments and i wanna bring down the amount of debt that i have. How do i know which one to work on. So if i'm looking at my budget this is why i love the coating of the budget by the c. The b. the ub. Because if i'm like okay. I want to trim down my debt and i know i have to find some money from my budget. I don't go to my fix expenses. I i don't go to my bills. I that's where. I have the least amount of control i'm going to go to my cease. I i'm gonna say sees getting line. You know tiffany you know how to reduce your own hair and it will tiffany. You don't have to get a manicure every week. You know a tiffany. You don't have to get uber eats every other day. Let's work on our seas. And once i reduced my sees on paper. How much money do i see. Leftover my budget is that enough if not. Let's bump up to u bs. That's where we have moderate level of control okay. Ub's these are utilities. Right okay. Water okay electricity. What can i do to bring some of these things down my usage down and once i make the changes on paper. Is that enough money in excess for me to put toward savings or debt. No now we can look at the b.'s. Okay these are bigger bigger changes to be made. Okay my rent. You might say something. Like i'm in a one bedroom now but when lease is up i can move to a studio and save two hundred dollars a month. I can refinance my home. I can have a higher deductible on my car insurance. I don't want people to start on this end because these are bigger heavier choices. You always wanna start making choices with your sees. Then you're ub's and that's how you prioritize where you're going to find that excess money from if you have a spent too much issue really need to cut back on your spending. You're listening to a conversation with tiffany. The budget miester elite j. finance educator and the author of get good with money which was just released on march thirtieth. If you are loving this conversation and you want more inspiration mark your calendar and then join us on may sixth for the virtual workplace summit. It is presented by the conferences for women designed for everyone who's leading teams. It's a national event that offers you the tools and the skills necessary to shape and thrive in the new world of work this year's lineup features the nation's leading workplace strategists including malcolm glad well joma allu- and thomas friedman to see the agenda the full speaker lineup and register visit conference.

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"joma allu" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:36 min | 9 months ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Here & Now

"Years ago by writer sarah ha-gi that spawned a slew of memes t shirts tote bags it reads carry yourself with the confidence of a mediocre white man writer. Joma allu- says it's more than a pithy line about mediocre individuals given unlimited power and instead a system we all play a part in luo this in her new book mediocre a legacy of white male america and she joins me now from seattle washington. Hey joma hi. This new book takes us through history and shows us how white supremacy and more specifically white male mediocrity. has become a core ideology of this country. What do you mean by white male. mediocrity it's not the individuals so much as a system that we are all complicit you say how do we begin to define it. I think that you know where i define. It is really in this idea. That white men deserve political power and wealth and safety and security. just because they're white men The idea that they will be seen as the strongest the best the most successful that they will always do better. Van women and people of color in our society has to be protected regardless of whether or not the white men in in question actually the skills or talent or accomplishments to backup said power or chievements and so what it does is it. it's a system that protects mediocrity that sits. That is the goal and the idea that anything would ask for. More of our systems let alone. The people within these systems becomes a threat to the status quo into our systems of power. Would you say this is just an extension of or part of capitalism. Absolutely i would say it's it's not even necessarily in extension of capitalism it's one of capitalism's means protections it's how capitalism gets people to sign on repeatedly. It's this idea that you're payout is coming so it may not be readily apparent in your financial status. It may not be you too readily apparent in you know what percentage of income you're taking home versus what you're creating for businesses but you will at least look in the mirror and feel better than women are people of color and it's what gets people signed on saying of course you can have greatness. It's coming but it also is a great deflection for why that paycheck never comes that you know. Oh well if you're not getting it you were supposed to. Someone must have taken it from you. Let's look at these women with liquor. These people have color 'em who are suddenly getting more and they must have taken what yours. Okay flipping that a little bit. I have to ask you something that i've been thinking about. Which is who has the right to be mediocre and not just survive but thrive is mediocrity divorced from whiteness. what we're striving for. I mean basically the alternative being that we expect women and women of color more specifically to be exceptional at all times. You know. I think that's a really great question and i would say there are two things were looking at one. I absolutely believe that every human being regardless of skill or talent deserves to have a roof over their head deserve to feel safe and secure in society. And i don't think that talent or power or prestige or race or gender should dictate. You know whether or not you get to survive in this country or feel safe in this country but leeds us and who we reward for. Their contributions should actually be making meaningful contributions. That improve the lives of people in our society should be leaders that can effectively lead and bring prosperity to everyone regardless of race and gender or or skill or talent. You know and that's something you know. That's where i think. The the difference is there are fundamental rights that all of us absolutely deserve. That shouldn't have to be earned. And then there's also who leads us who leads us to being able to achieve that and it should be people who show that they can effectively lead in your book. You select key moments to show how this system works from the way. Women were kicked out of the workforce after the great depression to the way that women of color in politics are challenged for holding views on equity in ways. They're white male colleagues or not. How do you go about choosing what to focus on. Yeah you know. I could've could've written hundred books right on this topic and had so much the focus on and it really started first with asking for me. Fundamental questions about white male identity in america as a political and social construct right through time and collecting stories and looking through all of you know hundreds and of of articles and books and say. Where am i seeing common threats. Where am i seeing. Something that that illustrates you know. One of the fallacies sort of ideals in our society. And what does that look like three time and so a lot of it was pulling these threads in and looking at one store and going. Gosh you know. I can see how this directly ties into this earlier manifestation or this later manifestation of it so it really. I surprised myself a lot by the things that i ended up including in the book because it really was information that was new to me that or if we should i didn't realize was connected until i was diving in. How do you go about introducing intersection. Analogy or at least the ways in which this ideology can create fraught relationships between say white women and women of color one thing. That was really clear to me in. This book was that you cannot separate gender rate in america that this power structures that uphold our systems those two are linked white supremacy patriarchy are linked but what that means then is often when it comes to people who are impacted by maybe one part of whitesman premises patriarchy. They'll make deals with it and so in looking at intersection. It's important to recognize that there are segments of the population segments of what the white women of white women in this country who've decided that their best chance at power is their proximity to men and upholding white male power even if it means they will never achieve true liberation. And so we have to look at the intersection of the different ways in which we've made these deals whether you know these are deals because we align ourselves with bite men because we are married to white man because we given birth weight man or because we've decided that we should emulate white men and who can and who cannot do that have set up different layers of oppression that can often still be baked into our fight for freedom when we don't realize that we're in many ways still hoping to hold onto our proximity to power. Even if it is tied to someone else's oppression while saying we're fighting oppression so it is really vital. We're looking at this that we always kind of come back to who's the most impacted by these systems. Because in that in trying to align ourselves with people who are most impacted we're going to also confront the ways in which we have been invested in in the oppression of others as well and have been upholding these systems. There's no way any of us get true. Liberation will holding onto our proximity to oppressive power. You know that that white male mediocrity is also killing white men that we need a new vision for white masculinity. What does that look like in. Who is responsible for that vision to take hold i. I don't know what it will look like because that will absolutely at the end of the day be up to white men and up to the people who raise white men and invest in white manhood. Right so we need to look at this and say this isn't working. It is absolutely harming white men as well. Yes the the extreme brunt of it has fallen on women not male populations and people of color for generations but seventy percent of suicides right now are white men right there. There is something desperately wrong and we have to figure out what because it is impacting. All of us. But if you care about white men if you are white man if you love white men you have to start thinking what is a healthier way to define success in this society because there is something incredibly toxic about not knowing how to feel about yourself until you know how you compared to other people and that's how we've set up our definitions of success in white male society. It is not your own individual talents. It is not your contributions to society..

sarah ha Joma allu america seattle Van washington leeds depression white male society
"joma allu" Discussed on The Cut

The Cut

10:20 min | 10 months ago

"joma allu" Discussed on The Cut

"Go over the tasting notes. Visit eater wine club dot com to learn more coming to hbo max. Silence with general. Lions as president. Gee crew generalize became known. As the woman who dresses america a formidable business and style icon. Now she's launching a new business and at helping people from all walks of life find their own style get ready for masterclasses fashion beauty and interior design in every episode of stylish with gentle lions streaming december. Third on hbo max and now a joma allu- reading from mediocre the dangerous legacy of white male america. I was at an idyllic women's writing retreat. I spent my days in a charming cabin. Surrounded by trees kept morumbi. A little woodstove. As i looked out the window to the giant evergreen surrounding my cabin i was supposed to feel the spark of inspiration but i wasn't feeling inspired yet. This setting was quite a change for someone like me. A single mom of two boys used to writing over the din of crashes and bangs and shouts and her own attention deficit disorder. I had adapted to being creative even with a teenage boy regularly interrupting to tell me that he needed more snacks and yes was still incapable of finding them himself. But this writing. Retreat was designed to get women away from the cries of mom or honey that so often compete for brain space. We were supposed to be honoring our creativity by giving it time and space. It deserved no children. No man no internet no television so we worked each day in solitude and then every evening at around six pm all five of us. Riders would leave our individual cabins and gather for dinner in the main farmhouse over lovingly. Prepared meal made with vegetables freshly pulled from the farmhouse garden. We would discuss writing projects asking each other questions and offering support and encouragement. We talked about the work. We were doing the books we were writing the plays we wanted to write. We floated ideas ask for advice about agents and editors we laughed and drank wine but more than anything we talked about men not our partners or friends or brothers we talked about shitty dudes and even though we came diverse racial ethnic and socio economic backgrounds. We all had plenty of dudes to talk about. We talked about the white men in publishing. Were constantly devaluing. Our work we talked about the male writers who would grab your ass book fairs or offer to give you feedback on your work and then try to sleep with you. We talked about how much time we spent writing about shitty white dudes because if we weren't writing about the president we were writing about. How man without uteruses should not control a reproductive choices or about how rapists should actually go to jail for rape even if they were gifted athletes every evening we would come together and talk about how we were trying to write and live in a world run by men who seemed pretty determined to stop us from having a voice from experiencing success from having our own free and independent lives and. I know this isn't a problem. That's particular to the writing industry. I've participated in similar conversations. When i worked in advertising and when i worked in tech these are conversations. I'm sure that women find themselves. Having in just about any job. They have in every school. They attend and in every community where they live. There is an abundance of bad guy is to be found just about everywhere and we can't seem to stop talking about them works. According to design. This is a comment that i am. Many of my fellow. Racial justice commentators have made when truly horrible things happen just as they were intended to a police officer shot an unarmed black man and a grand jury decided that the officer didn't even need to face trial works. According to design a kid of color selling weed will be sentenced to years in prison. While a wealthy white man receives house arrest for a second. Dui works according to design although the phrase may seem alarmingly coldhearted. It is our way of reminding ourselves that the greatest evil we face is not ignorant individuals but are oppressive systems. It is a reminder that the deaths of trayvon martin and sandra bland are not isolated cases. It is a reminder to refuse to let our shock and outrage distract us into thinking that these incidents do not all stem from the same root source which must be dismantled that source is white male supremacy white men lead are ineffective government with almost guaranteed reelection. They lead are corrupt and violent criminal justice system with little risk of facing justice themselves and they ran are increasingly polarized. misinforming media. winning awards for perpetrating. The idea that things run best when white men are in charge. This is not a stroke of white male luck. This is how our white male supremacy systems have been designed to work. And when i say white supremacy. I'm not just talking about clan members in neo. Nazis blatant racial terrorists while deadly and horrifying have never been the primary threat to people of color in america. It is more insidious than that i am talking about. The ways our schoolrooms politics popular culture boardrooms and more all prioritize. The white race over other races ours is a society where white culture is normalized and universalized. While cultures of color are demonized. Exotified or raced. The average black household in the united states has one thirteenth net financial worth of the average white household. The average hispanic household has one eleventh. One third of black men in america are expected to be imprisoned in the course of their lives a stark. These numbers seem we people of color. Especially women of color live with these realities. Every day our entire society is built to ensure that white men horrid power and it's important to remember that the women and people of color most violently harmed by these systems are those who are also queer transgender or disabled the male supremacy in white male. Supremacy has been in place in white culture since before white people thought of themselves as white for centuries women were not allowed to own property to attend university to vote whatever degree of freedom women and girls had in their public and private lives was determined by men. Women still spend a large portion of their lives. Battling man for their basic dignity and safety. They faced the persistence of the gender wage gap. The fact that one in five women is a victim of sexual assault and the ongoing debate about whether male abusers should keep their jobs and even their status. These injustices are not passed down by god. They are not produced by any entity greater than ourselves. These oppressive systems were built by people with our votes. Our money are hiring decisions and they can be unmade by people so at this beautiful dinner table in a farmhouse in the woods as we continue talking about these white men and their unchecked anger. Fear and irresponsibility this phrase kept popping into my head works according to design. I thought about the white man who talked over me in meetings. I thought about the white male lead in a movie who sits in his cubicle and laments his lot but moaning that he was supposed to be so much more. I thought about the white men wearing swastikas in charlottesville angry about their own failures and shouting about the people. They blamed for them. I thought of every think piece published since the two thousand sixteen election trying to explain the new angry white man. He was disillusioned. He was afraid he was dissatisfied with his job and his elected representatives. He felt forgotten and left behind our modern pluralist. World's focus on diversity had harmed white men in some real way leading to this age of white male anger. At least that's what the pundits said and here. We were a group of accomplished women. Talking about these white man is if they were a problem that had recently fallen upon us from the sky instead of the predictable product of centuries of cultural political and economic conditioning and suddenly my anxiety of the last few days faded. Because i knew that i was going to write this book. The cut is made by ba. Parker and beringer me mixed and scored by brandon mcfarland are executive producers kirwa and stella bubby special thanks to create a cadenas sangita skirts gender. Gone an editorial team at new york magazine. You can read and support their work at the cut dot com slash subscribe. I may reshuffle man. Thanks for listening Coming to hbo. Max stylish with gentle lions. As president of g crew. Generalize became known as the woman who dresses america. A formidable business and style icon now. She's launching a new business and helping people from all walks of life find their own style. Get ready for masterclass fashion beauty and interior design in every episode of stylish with generalize start streaming december third on hbo max..

joma allu america sandra bland hbo Lions trayvon martin charlottesville brandon mcfarland kirwa stella bubby cadenas sangita beringer Parker new york
"joma allu" Discussed on Up First

Up First

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Up First

"And peers Noel king talking to Minnesota, state, representative, Ruth Richardson, and her son. Sean about how systemic racism has shaped their lives individual or interpersonal racism can be easy to define for some people. Especially White Americans who have benefited from inequalities built into our society systemic racism can be more difficult to identify Noel sat down with Jomo Aluko author of so you want. To talk about race and they talked about how systemic racism works the framing around racism has been there's a white person who doesn't like people of color or a clan member someone you know who's making their hatred and ignorance very obvious. But what's actually been impacting our lives are systems that rely on subtle and not so subtle biases against people of color to disempower. At risk, and so we've been fighting for job opportunities for safety from violence for education, and that is upheld not by you love or don't love people of Color. But by how you participate with our systems, let's say there's a United States of America where there is no systemic racism there is racism. There are still white people who don't like black people, but there's no systemic racism. Is it a better country for black people? Oh, absolutely far better than if the opposite were true because that would be. An area where I can walk down the street and no matter what someone feels about me no matter what they assume about me if I can send my son's out to go play and not worry someone's going to think that they're robbing them and then be able to call the cops in have my children shot right I can go in for a job interview and if someone doesn't like me because they don't like black people, it means I have recourse it means that they know that perhaps acting. Upon that is too dangerous for the success of their business because we have anti-racist laws that prevent that from happening it also means that the ability for people to pass it out on their in personal racism from generation to generation is limited because they don't have the systemic support. So you may think what you think about when you go to school and your schools are reinforcing anti-racism when you go to work in your workers reinforcing anti-racism, perhaps what your parents thought about people of color loses its validity. Whereas right now reinforced, we're seeing changes in ordinary Americans willingness to accept that systemic racism exists on the other hand president trump's top economic advisor Larry Cudlow, told reporters quote I don't believe there's systemic racism in the US and to make his case he said we elected president. Barack Obama Attorney General Bill barred believes there's no systemic racism in policing there used to be but the laws have changed doesn't exist anymore. Is it worth trying to convince people who are unconvinced and seem unconvinced that systemic racism is real? I don't think we have time. I think that we push forward and we change the system and let the other people catch up. I think that it's much more important right now to be activating the people who know that something is is wrong. There are of people who can say everything right? Who can say systemic racism is a problem. It could black lives matter sign up in their window and they consider their job dead I would rather do the work of getting those people to go to. City Council meetings right to go to school boards to start activating for real change. What would it take to end systemic racism I understand that is a very big question. But if there were a couple of things that you could point to and say in twenty, five, thirty years to make this country less racist at its core in its systems, what would you point to? I would say that by then we would have funded the police force and come up with a new system of prevention and of building community that reduces crime in a positive manner. I would see an overhaul of our mental health systems that doesn't criminalize mental health issues and I would see a overhaul of our educational system. I would say those are some good places to start. You know but we can just keep going forever. That's author each Joma allu- talking with NPR's Noel, King about systemic. Racism..

Noel king president United States Ruth Richardson Jomo Aluko Minnesota Sean Barack Obama Larry Cudlow representative NPR America City Council trump Attorney advisor
"joma allu" Discussed on The Goal Digger Podcast

The Goal Digger Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on The Goal Digger Podcast

"Pitcher as a human being and Jessica as an educator podcast brand and business, because it's all mixed right now, and it makes it hard to move forward with economics at play including the income of my team, because it's not just about me anymore. It makes moving forward more complicated, but there isn't a clear line between the human version of me and the business version. Number, eight, when moving forward, what is in alignment with my business mission and what needs to happen for me personally, what is the work that needs to be done? But personally and in the business, and where in how do they intersect I? Don't know if you're asking yourself any questions like this. These are my questions number nine. What is holding me back right now from living out the work? Why is there so much pressure to say the right thing right now and how is? is in action supporting the bigger mission or goal is silent sending the wrong message. Is it a process to let people into while we're in that mess and lastly number ten. Who is it that we're speaking to as we move forward? Who are we focused on serving? Who are we letting? Fall off? Who are we writing to? Who are we creating for? And how do we communicate to those who need our voice specifically? Please remember. These are real questions that I'm asking. They're not. And I do not pretend to have any of those answers, but have sought out the right guidance to gain understanding. So lastly I just WANNA share my plan, so you can actually find my plan on my blog as well, but I wanted to go back through what I am committed to as a leader and a human being, and I think it's really important that we not get back to business as usual, but instead create our new normal through what we have learned, so here's what you can expect from me. As we move forward number one listen reading and educate. All of that is happening. Happening within ourselves so that others do not have to do the work for us. As a team, we will be doing monthly training with an expert and I will personally continue deeper work off line, both with my time, and with my finances, so here are a few resources that I've found to be incredibly helpful. In this time. Here are four books that I am reading and have read, so you want to talk about race by Joma Allu- me and white supremacy by Layla. I'm still here. Black Dignity and a world made for Whiteness by Austin channing Brown and white for Gylfi by Robin Dangelo. I'm also currently enrolled in and taking the check your privilege create equity course with my Schettino Hill who you will hear soon on this podcast and have also taken trainings from trudy. Lebron and Sorry D. Coaching on practicing ally ship and unpacking white privilege. Number two I have made donations to charities furthering the agendas of black people you will integrate ways of giving back regularly into the brand and the business model number three. We have already hired a corporate trainer in an emotional intelligence practitioners challenges holds accountable to move forward and to create with a focus on empathy, inclusive engagement and mindful communication as well as understanding what true humanity looks like because our actions are indicative of what's in our hearts. Few want to meet her. You can actually listen to her episode. Her name is Tico name John and she was on episode, Two hundred and ninety three. If you'd like to get to know her more..

Joma Allu Jessica Austin channing Brown Schettino Hill Lebron John Robin Dangelo trudy
"joma allu" Discussed on Misfit Stars

Misfit Stars

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Misfit Stars

"That? And I think that part of that is to. Is For us to begin to normalize. Conversations about it and to not. Not. You know I think for a lot of my life. Even up until just really recently I when when when I heard somebody call another person a racist. Yeah, it sounded like it was a bad name. Names. And you know like we talked about last week You know the idea. Let's take back the word racism or racist, as it's not a slur, not a pejorative. It's any descript. Her and we need to be able to say that. Out Loud conversation, but I think more broadly. I think for for most of my life again until very recently. When the issue of race would come up. It felt like it was impolite. Conversation you know and I. I Would shy away from it again that as a tool of the system to maintain the status quo if we can't talk about stuff if we can't get over that emotional discomfort that we feel. then. The system wins absolutely you know. So that's that's one of the things that. I take away from. This is that we just really be needed need to be normalizing? Talking about it. I think we also need to be normalizing the idea of. Acknowledging our own racism. Absolutely this, there was this one quote that I saw earlier like last week or so and I I I've read this woman's name and number of times, and it's going to take him even looked up the pronunciation. Phonetically for you want me to say you say they won't get it right the first time Joma. ALLU-, it's a beautiful name and she's a writer. She wrote it's spelled I. J, e, O m a last name. O. L. You. Wants to look it up. She's the author of the book, so you want to talk about race, which I've I've just heard as a really great book, not one. They've read yet, but I saw her. Twitter and she she quoted she tweeted this out last week. She's at the beauty of anti-racism is that you don't have to pretend to be free of racism to be anti-racist? anti-racism is the commitment to fight racism wherever you find it including in yourself, and it's the only way forward which I love, because I think that for a lot of white folks. The idea of admitting to being racist is really hard. Hard in any small way like it has to be like this thing what they score perfectly on a test that you have to get one hundred on. If you've got an anti one hundred shameful exactly exactly, and if this is if we keep those if we keep that experience in the realm of shame were never gonNa make progress you know, but I just loved her her her framing of this that like. Like I can say me Shannon Curtis person here sitting talking to all right now, there are things their ideas that I have that are racist. And let's just normalized that and that doesn't mean that are hateful towards black people. It means that are structurally biased in your favor exactly. Yes, and it means that. In any given moment if I could if I if I if I stumble upon one of those ideas that racist. That's an opportunity for me to acknowledge Oh man that idea that has been harboring in my life. Is Racist Okay. That's an opportunity to decide what I'm GONNA do with it. How how how am I gonNA? Undo that idea that I've been holding onto. What what can I do in my life to? Turn that around to become an anti-racist. Saying in my life, it helps in your own mind to make it easier and more palatable. You could think of it as this idea that I have is. Racist could be sort of equated almost. In a synonym kind of way with this idea that I have supports racial inequality right? Some of the sting out for you because the racist. Yeah, you're right for our entire lives has been loaded. We can't undo that loaded nece with five minutes thinking about it. Is, it'll probably stink for the rest of our lives know that's the way we've been raised. Last week talk about the similarities in sobriety and anti-racism work. Where did where did that come up? was that in last week's podcast can't remember it. But, but this is bringing about like when you know when you when you enter a twelve step recovery room, you know. Like for me I'd go into a room and I'd be like Hi. I'm Shannon codependent. And it doesn't mean that I'm GonNa, go through the twelve steps, and I'm not going to be codependent anymore. No means I'M GONNA learn tools to to. Continually for the rest of my life undo those patterns. But I'm always going to struggle with that. That's always going to be a part of me like when you go into a twelve step recovery meaning for a USA down when you share your like hi, I'm Jamie. I'm an alcoholic. You haven't had a drink in close to sixteen years. But. You're still alcoholic, right? That's an admission of the that's required to move forward in recovery. We said last week. If you can't name, you can't work on it, so maybe we need to be mediated. Normalize this notion and an unshaven defy the notion of admitting to our racism. Because that's the place from which we can move into. Undoing it, you know. Because the keeping, it is implied talk to talk about racism. The system wins right when we allow that to happen. When when denial happens, this is just not happening. This system wins. And if our goal is to undo this, and to be part of the work of undoing this, we've got to move into the discomfort of of Confronting Denial and confronting. Polite silence. You know. There was one thing that I wanted to. Bring up. This is in our notes that we talked about it when we talk about. The idea of Sort of Being a state of denial to sort of. Give cover for our oppressors. I when we were discussing this before the podcast, it really made me think about. Like, zoom out to our society writ large. and. How much have all of us gotten used to living in? What really is an abusive system? I mean we were we were born into. We lived in our whole lives way. But I'm talking the system beyond just the aspect of it being a racist system, you know. Our, healthcare system is crap. Who our health is abusive. You know our mental health. You know that the mental health of Americans. Is just a rare where Iraq. The majority of people. In this country are barely hanging on economically living paycheck to paycheck. The coronavirus, epidemic and the shutdowns, and all the unemployment that ensued has really shown a light on how very thin the margins are that people are living on. You know this notion. That was at forty percent of Americans in before coronavirus Tushar forty percent of Americans didn't have four hundred bucks on hand to deal with some emergency. What do we do? What are you GonNa? Do you let? The margins are razor? Razor thin..

Shannon Curtis Twitter writer Tushar USA Iraq O. L.
"joma allu" Discussed on Who Positive

Who Positive

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Who Positive

"I'm Andy. This is who positive welcome to episode. Fifty three only have one thing to talk about today and that is George Floyd? Like many white people I, feel like I need to listen rather than speak right now. However I have a platform and I feel like a half to use that platform to speak out against the murderer George Floyd. This has to end. This has to change things if you're looking for things to listen to. I have a lot of suggestions. Weight fragility by Robin Diangelo. What if I say the wrong thing by Verna a Myers? How to be anti-racists. By X. Candy. Conversations with people who hate me. By Dylan Moran. You'll is racist hosted by Andrew T and Tony Newsom. Between, the world and me by tiny see coats. March by John Lewis Andrew Aiden and Nate Powell. Color of law by Richard Rothstein. See, you want to talk about race by Joma allu-. This is really about justice. This is about. People, having endured injustice for centuries makes me ask the question of what would my heroes? What what would the doctor do? If faced with something like this? We don't have to wonder. We have excellent episodes like Rosa where we can see exactly how the doctor reacts to this, so I asked myself, what can I do? How can I help? How can I become part of the solution and not just remain part of the problem? I think the biggest thing I can do is vote and I will talk about this again in late October. As a reminder. That we have power to change this through the people we put in power. We get to choose who those people are. So late October all US up again I'll talk in. The other thing I can do is I can not spend money at places that support racist ideology entirely some places that I'm not going to be spending money lately. TACO bell. The wwe. The UFC molson coors brewing company. I could using snapchat. New Balance Wendy's an l.l bean. Not Seeing spent a ton of money at those places in the past, but I'm definitely not be spending money there now. Property is replaceable the wife of George. Floyd is not. They've been peaceful protests Colin Kaepernick's. Is of particular note here? His kneeling and then the kneeling. On George Floyd's neck. If you have some extra cash. She certainly could donate to the end of Lacey Pe-. Also be donating some money to the local diversity council here in Rochester. I'm another thing we can do. We can keep talking to our white friends about racism and about injustice, no justice, no peace..

George Floyd Richard Rothstein Tony Newsom UFC molson coors brewing compa Joma allu Dylan Moran Robin Diangelo X. Candy Lacey Pe wwe Colin Kaepernick Verna John Lewis TACO bell Nate Powell Rochester Andrew T Rosa Andrew Aiden Wendy
"joma allu" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Forever35

"Right? Yes I mentioned her at the beginning of. The conversation. Yeah. Her instagram is great, and she currently has a highlight of a ton of like beauty businesses clothing businesses. And some other some other companies, so yes. I just sort of scratching the surface here and I'd love to hear if listeners have favorite black owned beauty and wellness businesses and I love to. Buy from them and mentioned them on the podcast. Sort of along. Those lines were also curious about who your favorite black influencers podcasters. In this space are we want to? Talk to them. We want to elevate their voices. and. Yeah. We'd just love to hear who you all are following listening to reading, etc.. Yeah and you know we had gone back and forth on whether or not we should do intention to at the end of this episode. And what it would even be but I think. That this is an intention for us that is. Lifelong story like. This con- This is a permanent intention that we are. A focused on and Determined to do the work and. Stick with it. Yeah. All right well, let's take a short break and then I'm so. I'm excited that we're re airing this interview. With Joma, it is really it's like one of the interviews that is like really really stuck with me since we did it. Yes, and if you have not yet. Read so you WanNa talk about race. Please please please pick it up and read it frontier back. It's fantastic. It's so good. Okay, we'll be right back. Our guest today is each Joma. Welcome Joma. Hi Hi. We're so glad to have you. Here Joma. allu- is Seattle based writer. And Internet yeller her work on social issues, such as race gender has been published in the Guardian. The Stranger Washington Post Elle magazine NBC, News and more and Her New York Times bestselling first book, so you want to talk about race was released in January two, thousand, eighteen with seal press. Jomo was named one of the most influential people in Seattle by sail magazine. One of the fifty most influential women in Seattle by Seattle met one of the roots hundred most influential Americans twenty, seventeen and twenty eighteen, and is the recipient recipient of the feminist humanist award, two thousand eighteen by the American Humanist Association the Media Justice Award by the Gender Justice League, and the two thousand Eighteen Aubrey Davis. Visionary Leadership Award by the Equal Opportunity Institute. and. We are so excited to have her here to talk about her book and about Self Care. And Yeah so let's let's get into. It Ah, can we start Each Other? Just for listeners who aren't familiar with your book? Can you enduring I both read it? Can you tell us? Kind of tell us generally about what it is, and also kind of what your experience has been since publishing it. Obviously, it's a New York Times bestseller, which is amazing and I'd love to hear just kind of what it has been like since it came out for you. Sure. The book is called They WanNa talk about race. So it's it's. It's pretty self explanatory. kind of a guidebook on helping with your conversations on issues of race racism in America, it's really designed to kind of help. People get past some of the stumbling blocks that frequently do conversations on race. For your everyday life in work. At home in your community to really get past those initial conflicts, and to really funny areas for Change, so each chapter headed tackles issues or questions, people kind of stumble upon regularly when talking about issues of race. The book came out in January of last year. And it's been amazing. It's been really well received. It's been used in colleges all across the country work shops across the country. It's been amazing to hear from people about the difference. It's made in their wife and it's definitely a book that keeps going. It's been interesting to watch. Steady use and You know over the last two years now and to see still be relevant and something that people are still recommending to each other and to see it really improving not only relationships, but. In actual situations that are impacting people of color across the country in even outside of the United States. And we should say that it came out in the paperback edition in September. And you, you wrote a new introduction for the paperback which I thought was. A preface for the paperback that I thought was interesting Were you kind of talk about some of the I guess some of the things that you sort of wish you'd discussed in the original edition Can you talk about a little bit about how? You came to those realizations I guess. Certainly I. Mean I think this is something that faces. Every writer is. The things you right stay static, even the rhetoric grow and change. and. Often we grow and change because of what we right and so writing a book on recently first book. In the process of talking about the book and traveling in hearing from people. Added to what I felt like I wish I had this, you know. I wish I could have included this. It changed. It added nuance to my own ideas of what I'd written and seeing use also showed some areas where I could have done more. Or better and I think any writer always thinks they could do more on I. Think any topic we write about. We could write multiple books about but..

Joma Seattle writer New York Times Elle magazine United States American Humanist Association Her New York Times Equal Opportunity Institute. Joma. allu Self Care Washington Jomo America Gender Justice League NBC sail magazine Aubrey Davis
"joma allu" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Forever35

"Our guest today. Today is each Joma Alonzo. Welcome Joma Hi. We're so glad to have you here. Joma allu- is a Seattle based writer speaker and Internet yeller. Her work on social issues such as race gender has been published in the Guardian the stranger Washington Post Elle magazine. NBC News News and more and Her New York Times bestselling first book. So you want to talk about race was released in January. Two thousand eighteen with seal press. Joma was named one of the most influential people in Seattle by Seattle magazine. One of the fifty most influential women in Seattle by Seattle met one of the roots hundred most influential Americans twenty seventeen nineteen and twenty eighteen and is the recipient recipient of the feminist humanist award twenty eighteen by the American Humanist Association the Media Justice Award by the Gender Justice this league and the two thousand eighteen. Aubrey Davis Visionary Leadership Award by the Equal Opportunity Institute and we are so excited to have her here ear to talk about her book and about Self Care and yeah So let's let's get into it Can Can we start Each homered just for listeners. Who aren't familiar with your book? Can you endure night both. Read it can you tell us Kind of tell us generally about what it is and also kind of what your experience has been since publishing it. Obviously it's a New York Times bestseller which is amazing I'd love to hear just kind of what right it has been like since it came out for you. Sure I'm the book is called C.. WanNa talk about race. So it's it's it's pretty self explanatory planetary. It's a kind of guidebook on helping with your conversations on issues of racism in America. It's really designed nine to kind of help. People get past some of the stumbling blocks that frequently Canidu- conversations on race and for your every day life in work at home in your community to really get past those initial conflicts and into really find areas for change range. So each chapter tackles issues or questions that People Kinda stumble upon regularly talking about issues of race the book. It came out in January of last year. And it's been amazing. It's been really well received. It's been used in in colleges across the country work shops across the country. It's been mason to hear from people about the difference. It's made in their life and it's definitely a book that keeps going. It's been interesting to watch this steady use and you know over the last almost two years now how and to see it. Still be relevant and something that people are still recommending to each other and to see it really improving not only relationships let's but in actual situations that are impacting people of color across the country and even outside of the United States. And we should say that it came Out in the paperback edition in September. And you you wrote a new introduction for the paperback which I thought was a preface For for the paperback that I thought was interesting Were you kind of talk about some of the I guess some of the things that you sort of wish. You would disgust in the original edition Can you talk about a little bit about how you came to those realizations. I guess. Certainly I mean I think this is something that faces every writer. Where is the things you right? Stay static even the raiders grow and change and an often we grow and change because of what we right and so writing a book on recently. I book you. Even the process of talking about the book and traveling in hearing from people added to what I felt like. I wish I had this. I wish I could have included this. It changed it added nuance to my own ideas. He is of what I'd I'd written and Ching and use also showed some areas where you know could have done more Or better and they think any brighter always thinks they could do more and I think any topic we write about. We could write multiple books about but you luckily when you have a paperback you get to at least give voice least to some of that instead of just carrying it with you and so it was really nice to have the opportunity to talk about what I would like to include things. I learned that you know my own privilege had kind of stopped me from realizing raising of just care that I could have taken in some areas of the book especially daily Issues facing people of Color. That aren't lack. That's my own lived experience Ryan But also things that I just didn't realize needed to be explained as explicitly as they did and so seeing it And then getting another Chanson very grateful that it sold well enough to. Do you know to be able to have a paperback edition. So that I could at least include some of those things and talk about it and people know that I- side and you know I'm not the last person to write a book about race and certainly not I and it's always important. I think think for us to recognize what more we can do and what could happen next. And what ask about cultural appropriation because we talk a ton about self care on this podcast and self care practices and I think a lot of what we're seeing in self care right now kind of is there is a lot of cultural appropriation going on and so I was wondering if you could kind of speak about how we can bring more awareness to the ways in which a lot of self care practices especially you know things that white women are doing our coach cultural appropriation. Yes certainly I would say that you know hard what I I I think we should look at is a lot of the idea of self care as it is. Popularized wigs was well within white supremacy by the idea to have this luxury time. Where you can set everything side is something that many people of colored never get to two and I would say especially women of color and so a lot of detractors? That are often adopted are not Mrs Sarah what we would call self care her but our survival by a lot of practices other cultures have come up with to get by to live or something that are you know survival. For communities communal practices religious practices very important practices are treated as luxury items as retreats for white the people and it's important to recognize why that's problematic and it's not problematic that anybody would would want some luxury in their life. It is problematic to sink that you can take something that was created for survivor. Where for community eighty or you know to hold an oppressed people together and not take any of the struggle not to anything to you? Reconcile your part in that oppression and that's really where we're the issue wise for. I think a lot of people. It's not that people want to practice yoga or you know. Go on a sweat or do any of these things. It's the fact that these things are since they are part of a culture that is being told they don't have a right to themselves and these things were created to balance you. You know in to fight off sloop. Russian that white culture has perpetrated and or have been held onto inspite of oppression of white culture. And so then to have people who don't have to face any of that who we'd these things for that purpose to say. Oh that's nice. I want some of that without also so thinking what can I do to ease the burden that I'm imposing upon this culture Or what can I do to make sure that whatever prophets Sweden eight from this actually goes to the culture that created maintains its is in itself just more colonialism white supremacy. And so I think for me. The focus is not necessarily on the act itself but in the imbalance behind it by the problem is the symptom is cultural appropriation. Russian raped power imbalance ends up looking like true appropriate. And what I would love. People to look at is the power imbalance to look at where the problem lies. What makes it cultural appropriation? Asian and tackle back so tackle eraser and our cultures you know tackle The way in which capitalism cuts communities of color out of any profits from their own creations. Tackle the Exploitation of communities of colored sat tackle the censoring of Whiteness in media And pop culture all of these things that make cultural appropriation that give teeth. Those are the things I would like people to focus on where oftentimes ends up happening. Instead is something that rise still with inwards premacy which is people WANNA list of. What can I do if I can't you know if I can't do yoga if I can't you no dress up like a Gisha if I can't do all these things what can I do and really what people are asking is this? How can operate the same way? I always have without feeling bad and instead if you you know people talk about how much they appreciate and love other cultures. New Celebrating other cultures was celebrating other cultures needs looking towards sustainment of that culture her and showing appreciation for what was given by trying to not be a burden and to lift any burden that you've placed and that's really what I want. People people start focusing on. Yeah I mean kind of along those lines. I love all the actionable suggestions you have in your book for how people can fight systemic racism. Right you can try. You can try to link to the stomach effects of racism whenever you talk about racism Can you you can talk a little bit more about that and explain why this is so important. I'm it's an order for a couple of reasons. One is that what people of color are are suffering from is not the sentiments the lack of love for White people right and a lot of times. We like to keep discussions on race and racism. Awesome in the hearts you know feelings and love in Area and what will it really is is system systemic oppression. It's Tau those opinions and feelings could be manipulated by the system or the power that our systems give those feelings so I could walk in the street and people can think whatever they want with me and I'm fine with what does bother me. Is that if they decide to act on it and they'd said outcome feelings about me because the color of my skin our entire air system our employment system our government our media will line up behind that action to make it more powerful and that's really what impacts the lives of people of Color and so when we're talking about issues of race it's important to recognize a that it's oftentimes is more effective to get people to see why something is a problem that they're doing if they see how her playing into something more systemic but also because that's really where the pain lies for people of Color and people of color don't feel heard when all the here is. I'm sorry if you felt bad when I did this because it's not not saying. I felt that you know if I get talk to her in a meeting by a white man. It's not just that it's rude to be talked over. It's because it plays into the general erasure and subjugation. That black women face in workplaces across the country right it reinforces that pattern and it's part of a long trail of events to harm and it doesn't exist from its own and so we need to tie to these larger issues a because that's where the real issue is. That's what people of color are talking about winter talking about these situations but also because people need to understand the full weight of what they're doing and they need to also know but it's the systems they need to attack and that when they fail to look at their actions. They are supporting oppressive assistance. It's not just a made a mistake or I did what I would do with anyone else it is. I supported a longstanding harmful racist system. So you know I am example. I think using the book Lucas. If you make a joke about people of color being late in the office we are actually doing is not just making a joke. You are up hoping a stereotype. Oh type that makes people was likely to be hired for jobs and that because we have racist systems that allow all black people to be judged in mass That you know are fever. Negative stereotypes that want to find reasons to hold old white employees above employees of color. Then you what you're saying is no longer just a joke and the harm that that brunt of that that joke fields which is not just the by person you're talking about but every black person an officer black person who would work in. That office is larger richer than just a few words. And that's really why we have these conversations and I think that's why it's important. I think everyone should know especially white people. You should know the broader impact of what they're doing because people of color are meant to feel that every single day we feel the full weight of racist actions agents. That's why we spent so much time focusing on things like microaggressions because there's nothing micro about that because they play into a large system that is crushing people..

Seattle Joma Alonzo Joma allu Joma Washington NBC News American Humanist Association New York Times Aubrey Davis Her New York Times Equal Opportunity Institute raiders United States America Canidu fever mason Ching Mrs Sarah
"joma allu" Discussed on Drilled

Drilled

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"joma allu" Discussed on Drilled

"This episode of drilled is brought to and part by seal press, publishers of some great two thousand eighteen books, including so you wanna talk about race by Joma allu-, girl talk. What science can teach us about female friendship from Jacqueline and Roz and minute book. Forget having it all how America messed up motherhood and how to fix it. I know a book about motherhood might seem a million miles away from an investigative series on climate change. But the book is a historical look at how ideas about motherhood were formed and a lot of the issues. There are very similar to what we see with climate change in both cases this country's obsession with individual success over the common. Good has contributed to a whole lot of unnecessary misery. Anyway, check it out at love to hear. You think you can buy anywhere books are sold. You can find links to all those places on my website. Amy, westervelt dot com slash book. Okay. Back to the show. When CNN made it up to Heyhoe by running the interview with her the next day, including that snippet. We heard before a lot of the interview focused on her just sort of reacting to some of the most ridiculous climate denial tropes. Here's an example. The president told the Washington Post a, quote, one of the problems that a lot of people like myself, we have very high levels of intelligence, but we're not necessarily such believers. He says, look we can have all the clean air clean water that we want and that's what he wants. But that it's China. It's India that other countries are not following rules or not do not have clean air, and that we're paying a price for that. And it's really their fault. Well, the reality is that China leads the entire world, including the United States in the most installed wind and solar energy. He's confusing air pollution with carbon pollution air pollution is the dirty stuff. We see in the air in China's cutting down on that too. But carbon pollution is the stuff. We don't see that lasts for hundreds and even thousands of years. And that's what's responsible for our changing climate view of the president. Has he ran on is coal beautiful clean coal. I think we're was the phrase. He often used coal worldwide is one of the major problems here. It is coal is the most inefficient and dirtiest ways to get our energy today, and in many places across the United States, including Texas where I live solar and wind energy is already cheaper, not just than coal. But then that tro gas as well, so again to me, this is a clear example of how manufactured climate Nile has skewed how the media covers the topic. San Torah got go on for several minutes sharing various theories largely unchanged and in those minutes. Heated something rescues his talked a lot about he mixed messages to make his overall take seem a little more plausible. What's in terms at about forest management? For example, is half. True. Forests have not been managed in a way that mitigates fires. That's not so much because of environmentalists, which is of course, what syndrome blames on leader in that segment, but because of a mix of factors. I of course, we keep building farther into forests second because we have such a low tolerance for fire. The. Small fires that would've stork -ly burned off old trees and brush, our new longer allowed to burn and that contributes to overgrowth check Cohen a research scientists, but the US forest service as part of the problem is also that we don't understand the difference between the intensity of a fire that would burn a house down versus what might cause human harm? Pain and injury from that heat is -nificant -ly less than what it takes to ignite would or even chart general belief that all fires are intense enough to set our homes ablaze has led to a sort of zero tolerance policy for fire that has led to increasingly larger fires as trees are left to grow. Unburned? They not only provide more fuel for fires in general. They also grow together to create a canopy that spreads fire quickly or working against ourselves. But it's not these issues alone that had contributed to California's increasingly intense wildfires. It's also major changes in climate as Cal fire. Chief Ken pem lot explains. Things are changing if you ask career firefighters out on the fire line who've been doing this thirty thirty five years. These are not the kinds of fire the conditions. We were facing, you know, just a few decades ago. So really it's forest management, practices, plus development, plus climate change. And when we talk about climate change, they're it's not just the intense heat waves, and those vicious. Cycles of drought. Followed by intense storms generate more fuel for fires. It's also the gradual warming of nights which used to be when firefighters could get on top of fire now or seeing nights or warmer there, also less, humid. So fires are continuing throughout the night in a way that they just didn't years ago. All of that together has led to the sorts of massive scale. Fires that we're seeing this year and Pimlott says that scale of fire is just not common changes. It's happening. We're seeing again more intense. Fires fires burning more rapidly. They're getting larger that one hundred thousand acre or more fire used to be the exception to the rule. We might get that every few years we're getting multiple one hundred thousand acre fires each year instead of getting into this kind of complexity around climate change or even a particular example of climate change, Catherine Heyhoe, a brilliant climate. Scientists goes on TV news shows and she's put on the defensive immediately because the climate deniers are allowed to set the tone for the story. And as she told us before. That's all been done intentionally here. She is in a previous interview talking about how that's all been created. And to in points. I think were in Hazan's testimony to congress tonight, maybe eight and the Copenhagen meeting in two thousand nine why were those inflection points because those are the two points at which major industries recognize that they would see significant reductions in their bottom dollar recognize that they had to start doing something to prevent legislation because if they did take actual we would have legislation to reduce it actually eliminate carbonation. So those two point for when people sat up and realized we have to when I people I mean, those the most lose from climate legislation that up and said, it's war. We have to do everything we can to stop this thing. And honestly, not even stop it and say to subsystem. Even stop it because Neville, just too late because every year that goes by me carbon reduction legislation is another year bottom dollars. Month

United States China president Joma allu America CNN Jacqueline Washington Post Amy California Roz plus development Heyhoe Chief Ken pem India San Torah Nile