35 Burst results for "Johnston"

FDA Panel Is First Key Test for Biden COVID-19 Booster Plan

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | Last month

FDA Panel Is First Key Test for Biden COVID-19 Booster Plan

"The food and drug administration is meeting today to review pfizer's request for third dose of its covert nineteen vaccine. Npr's windsor johnston reports some health. Experts have questioned whether a booster shot is necessary at this point a key. Fda advisory panel convenes today to discuss. Whether there's enough proof that a booster dose of the cova vaccine developed by pfizer is safe and effective citing data from recent studies. Pfizer argues that. Yo protection against severe disease is holding strong in the united states immunity against milder infection. Wayne somewhere around six to eight months after the second dose. The pharmaceutical company also says those. Antibodies appear strong enough to protect people against the highly contagious delta variant. If the fda decides to recommend the boosters the cdc will then have to decide who should get the additional doses windsor johnston

Pfizer Windsor Johnston FDA Severe Disease NPR Wayne United States CDC
Biden Says Some GOP Governors ‘Cavalier’ With Kids’ Health Amid COVID

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden Says Some GOP Governors ‘Cavalier’ With Kids’ Health Amid COVID

"Biden is brushing off threats from republican governors. Who plan to sue the administration over its new vaccine mandate npr's windsor johnston reports in reinforcing his pledge to keep schools open safely. This fall president biden. Snap back when he was asked about. Republican governors who plan to mount legal challenges to the administration's vaccine mandate. I am so disappointed that Particularly some republican governors have been so cavalier with the health of these kids. Biden issued two executive orders on thursday that mandate vaccines for federal workers. Government contractors large companies and healthcare workers. Republicans say biden's new plan amounts to government overreach

Windsor Johnston President Biden Biden NPR
Biden's Vaccine Rules to Set off Barrage of Legal Challenges

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden's Vaccine Rules to Set off Barrage of Legal Challenges

"President biden is brushing off threats from republican governors. Who plan to sue the administration over its new vaccine mandate npr's windsor johnston reports in reinforcing his pledge to keep schools open safely. This fall president biden. Snap back when he was asked about. Republican governors who plan to mount legal challenges to the administration's vaccine mandate. I am so disappointed that Particularly some republican governors have been so cavalier with the health of these kids. Biden issued two executive orders on thursday that mandate vaccines for federal workers. Government contractors large companies and healthcare workers. Republicans say biden's new plan amounts to government overreach

President Biden Windsor Johnston NPR Biden
Interview With Matt Johnson, Air Ambulance Pilot

Between Two Wings

02:29 min | Last month

Interview With Matt Johnson, Air Ambulance Pilot

"Hello and welcome back between two rings. I am your host to emily norman and today we have matt johnston with us. He is an air medical helicopter pilot. A dp also check airman at his company matt. Thanks so much for taking the time to chat with us. Thanks for having me of course so we start off each episode by explaining where we're at. I thought appropriate to show off my one and only helicopter experienced such as behind me. It was actually off years ago and the other fixed wing pilot when my co workers got to go up and we were like little kids on christmas. It was amazing. But tell us a little bit about where you're at a really nice shot got lucky with that. I was flying back tonight and One of our flight physicians Was riding up front with me. We don especially flight so with drop the other crew members officers just the document and So full credits. His awesome picture doctor and into But yeah he's not that picture. That's kind of become a certainly one of my favorites. Nice view of the queen city see cincinnati often view definitely a night. Flying always gives some epic views. Sled sokolow bit about being an airman co pilot. You get that flight requests. What's next. I would say that. We the majority of our time on making decisions for fights. It's january in our high ninety percentile weather related. Sometimes it's crew related. It could be other logistical issues and could be duty time or something like that but generally speaking this weather so being said we are if we're like green status than we have a pretty good idea what the weather's going to do for the day we can just go and respond once. We're call that if we're yellow like a day like today as you probably your rank worn down here. Beautiful ohio So we're really for shit. We have a phenomenal operational. Control centers are helping. That's based in shreveport louisiana. So everything that i'm looking at. There's another human being trained many of them you know aviators or aviation background meteorology backgrounds. They're taking a look at exactly what i'm looking at. And they're making sure that i've evaluated all potential hazards and risks

Emily Norman Matt Johnston Sled Sokolow Queen City DON Cincinnati Shreveport Ohio Louisiana
Biden Addresses Hurricane Ida Destruction with 'We're All in This Together'

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | Last month

Biden Addresses Hurricane Ida Destruction with 'We're All in This Together'

"President biden is pledging federal assistance. Npr's windsor johnston reports biden's also vowing to help with ongoing recovery efforts along the gulf coast where either slammed ashore as a powerful category four storm on sunday president biden says his administration is closely monitoring response efforts but noted that a lot of work needs to be done to get states back up and running my message to everyone affected is. We're all in this together. The nation is here to help. That's the message. I've been making clear to the mayors governors energy and utility leaders in the region who my administration has been working closely with over the past few days biden is scheduled to visit louisiana on friday where hundreds of thousands of people are still facing power and water outages ida was the fifth most powerful storm in us history striking the state with winds of more than one hundred fifty miles per

President Biden Windsor Johnston Biden NPR Gulf Coast Louisiana United States
There's a Bipartisan Backlash to How Biden Handled the Withdrawal From Afghanistan

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

There's a Bipartisan Backlash to How Biden Handled the Withdrawal From Afghanistan

"President biden is facing sharp. Bipartisan criticism over his management of the us exit from afghanistan us troops scrambling to evacuate thousands of american personnel and some afghans from the country after the taliban seized control. Npr's windsor johnston has more senate republican leader mitch. Mcconnell has blasted president biden over the rapid collapse in afghanistan saying that he owns it calling. Biden's decision to withdraw. Us troops ill advised. Mcconnell says both republicans and democrats want answers. We're going to be investigating what happened. I think it's noteworthy that three of the democratic chairman democratic chairman in the senate announced. They want to start holding hearings about what happened. What went wrong senate. Democrats say they're planning to hold a hearing on. Us policy toward afghanistan including negotiations between the former trump administration and the taliban as well as the biden administrations execution of the

President Biden Windsor Johnston Afghanistan Mcconnell United States Senate Taliban NPR Mitch Biden Biden Administrations
Exploring Attachment Patterns in Relationships With Chelsea Wakefield

Relationship Advice

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Exploring Attachment Patterns in Relationships With Chelsea Wakefield

"Our attachment patterns are something that is almost unconscious because they're so early they have to do with our early experiences with Caregivers and whether does experience this fell relatively secure. Whether we have the kind of responsiveness that we needed or feel safe. And welcome in the world or whether they were inconsistent or sometimes they were even dangerous. So when i talked people were back. Their early. lives I find that some of them as little kids were really really focused on their parents and they wanted to know how to please them. What are the parents lawn and needs that. They could stay in alignment with them and do not get in trouble or get the kind of attention that they were longings for that creates something called an anxious attachment pattern where the lottery. Johnston is hyper focused on the other and the needs of the other and every little nuance of that other person. That indicates that there's a message then. Maybe they're displeasing them or perhaps that other person has gotten a little bit different her distant because they feel overwhelmed by the attention they start your more insecure and afraid of abandonment so that's one type of attachment patterns that we call anxious and the other type of detachment pattern looks more independent but it's also insecure attachment patterns and these are the children that grew up learning that it was best just to go to their room and read a book or play video games and they sued and settled most of the way along. So if you get paranoia somebody who is afraid of abandonment and the other in. Who's afraid of being overwhelmed by a lot of emotion are hey us that could be a really difficult herring and those two galloping across the relationship landscape because one's trying to rock closer than the others seeking says and both of them are misinterpreting accused the

Johnston
"johnston" Discussed on High and Mighty

High and Mighty

02:35 min | 2 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on High and Mighty

"Mighty. Here's a question i have. Is there anything you wanna do now at that. You're an american that either you couldn't do before or was more difficult to do before like pre to do previously. I should say like yeah. Yeah the main thing is traveling because when you come back here with your canadian passport you have to go to the international section even if you have your green card you have to a different section when you come out whereas us passport. Yeah and i know that sounds like really stupid. But because i well pre go to canada rabble exactly and i have my canadian passport. So it's like you know. I'm like the bourne identity. Here jason. Born i'm cruising. I've got my passport. i'm all over the place. I'd like to buy one flight from. Lax to toronto from lax. That would be alanna. Johnston flying and on the way back it would be alone jackson jackson. Yes of course. According to my naturalization. I'll be flying in as one woman and leaving another. Here's the other thing that i wanted to do and i wasn't able to do so. I've had this fantasy for years when thinking about becoming a citizen. I'm not even joking on this. So you know how hogan's original theme song of american. Yes so all. I ever wanted to do was to get my citizenship and play that song. Come out and playing that song. Obviously i couldn't do that because the dramatic circumstances and i wasn't allowed to use my phone and all the drama of tried to pass this test but that was something i wanted to do so my plan is to do that on july. Fourth is have my entrance into a party or wherever. I'm going playing that song on a speaker on portable speaker. And i have a vase of american flags ready to go. That was given to me as a gift. And i'm going to walk in with them. Playing well norm. We'll have to play the song and kind of escort me from behind a couple yards behind me of course with his head down. This is how he walks naturally. So why ruin a good thing. Why fuck fuck that. Something that works. Yeah words it's great that by the way that is something you could have done previously a hit the same but yes now now. You don't at least singing along to the lyrics you won't be lying for the first time. Yeah i'm gonna be pledging to all sorts of things on the forehead. let me tell you. I'm going to be pledging to absolutely everything i like. Are you familiar with the hogan's original theme song and now i'm picturing gets.

jackson jackson alanna Johnston jason hogan toronto canada
Senate Votes to Advance Bipartisan Infrastructure Proposal

WBUR Programming

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Senate Votes to Advance Bipartisan Infrastructure Proposal

"President Biden in a bipartisan group of senators finalize key parts of the bill, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. Senate Democrats are also working to pass a separate, much larger package. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says he's moving forward with a two track strategy to pass the largest infrastructure package. In decades. The first track is the bipartisan bill focused on traditional brick and mortar infrastructure projects. The second track is a budget reconciliation bill where Democrats will make historic investments in American jobs, American families and efforts to fight climate change. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has warned that she won't bring the bipartisan infrastructure bill to the floor until the Senate delivers the larger $3.5 trillion spending plan. Senate Democrats are expected to pass it by using a budget maneuver that would not require any support from Republicans. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington President Biden today called on Americans to follow the latest guidance on mask wearing and also urged people to

President Biden Windsor Johnston Senate Chuck Schumer NPR House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Washington
"johnston" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

03:30 min | 3 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"Things do these things which is good because you can come up with abstract thoughts you can come up with different things but you can struggle and maybe not see what is truly real and be part of the merman. Come to the end the summary of the book and this book it cod and it was maybe even too close to home. I saw the life of david meredith. I saw what he was. Like as a person i saw myself in and boy did not like that. So maybe a point of introspective me. I think i already have addressed most of the issues. That i see myself in him as a bad thing. But men reading about that in reading about what was essentially an alternate car. Living in alternate life was bizarre. Was a little bit eerie. I did like the book addressed other aspects such as wars such as the feeling in the ass such as what it is to be an osce things like this and right at the end of the book the very last seen the non interaction the shirking of responsibility that david shows throughout two his brother. Jack is just exemplified. It's the epitome of a ship person and just left me really going. Damn david is a crap person. This was close to my top ten list. I'm giving it an eight out of ten. My brother jack by george johnston and to cap off this book. I'll talk about some ozzy slang. When i'm reading those e book or try and express what these words mean in the english language number one popping up is who men. This is ozzy end. Aldo's at that. I'm not exactly sure what it means. I think it's more of a goodbye away to say. Sia rather than heller. One of my mom's friends stu says us and she is in a sixty seventies and this just something that is really part of her vocab. I have not heard other people particularly my age and younger say this. So who ru nipah. This refers to a young person particularly a boy. But i think just for young people in general. You'll see this in particular with these. Life saving clubs. They're competitions their names for the. Let's just say saab fifteen category. I'm not exactly sure but definitely young people. They're called nipples ropel. This is definitely in australia. And this is to feel hot. Done by or to feel slighted or to even be angry. You can say oh. That guy's rope -able men as as in men disgusted. Something bad happen to you. You've got a a feeling a negative feeling in you and the last one is flog and this can have multiple interpretations and i saw it used multiple times in the book for different things so it can mean to hit something as in flogging something. This is probably the standard definition to flog. Something in australia in english also means to steal something to get something a quiet and then also to sell it. So i'm going to something off. And this may be referred to more of selling something that you don't particularly want or selling something in a slightly underhanded manner for example. I'm just gonna flog that off and so those are the english slang that i took from this book. So we've come to the end of another book review and i really do want to thank you for joining me up until this point. If you'd like to hear more you can hit. Follow or subscribe on whatever platform and you're listening on..

david meredith george johnston osce david Aldo heller stu Jack jack australia
"johnston" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

Disruptive Adventism

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

"To them. My name is jose briones s and today we are talking about. Lgbtq adventists and the bible with a johnston. She has a book coming up about the topic. And we'll be exploring a little bit more about this conversation. I know it's been a little while. Since i have checked in on the podcast but i'm still here and we're still making episodes is just been a slow process because a lot of transitions new lifestyle post pandemic but we're back and we're excited so my first question will be for you alicia about how has it been after the pandemic for you you're in arizona. How's it been for the last couple of months after you know we're back to life just regular life per se. It's spin kind of amazing to just able to be out and about I know some people who are fully vaccinated who have gotten covert anyways. So that's a little bit disturbing but Not really bad. Their symptoms were fairly mild. And but.

jose briones johnston alicia arizona
"johnston" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Learn to love very well said i love the message. There's been an honor for me. I gotta say. Trent johnston first-class father all the way. Thank you so much your time here. I last fatherhood. Alex has been a pleasure. Thank you back to wrap things up. Here are first place fatherhood. I gotta give a special thank you once again. The trent johnston forgive me a few minutes of his time. Here shulku please. Let me up on twitter guys. Who dry d on instagram. Let me know what you thought about. Today's episode of always read you feedback. Make sure you go back through the archives. Check out my interviews with matt roloff. Little people big world also on. Tlc as well as my interviews with bill klein from the little couple. Adam busby from out daughter. Jon gosselin from jon and kate plus eight at so many other reality. Tv and join me right here on first. Fatherhood sure you follow me on instagram at alexander. School as i got some really big names. I'm dropping here as we get closer to father's day you guys are really going to be in for a treat. That's all i got you guys today. I'm alec glazed. Listen i remember guys. We are not babysitters we're fathers and we're not just fathers we are i last fathers town no..

Trent johnston Jon gosselin Alex matt roloff alec glazed jon bill klein twitter kate father's day trent johnston Today Adam busby instagram today Little people big world eight first alexander first place
"johnston" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

07:36 min | 4 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Joining me now. First-class class father. Trent johnston welcome to first-class fatherhood. Are you doing well. Let let's start it off like this here. How many kids do you have. And how old are they amazon. I have five children. We have Joan twenty one on just turned twenty. One elizabeth alex and emma or both fifteen. Joanna and elizabeth are biological children and ana alex and emma. Our children from russia china and south korea. Incredible got four kids myself. We've got three boys and a girl and we didn't get to go on. The fourth tried to catch up to you but we got so If you could hear just take a minute to hit my listeners with a little bit about your background and what you do so I am a director of landscape management from the university system in georgia. I'm stationed at one college right now. And a bit in landscape industry think about twenty eight years professionally about seventeen years but Growing up and i'm a father full down followed. The family keeps me busy and we have a little side job. Reality show seven little johnston's we'd have been filming for almost seven years now. We are currently shooting season. Ni- yeah obviously. The show has been a big success here. Trent and You know along this journey that you've had landscaping reality. Tv a longest journey. How old were you when you first. About how old you became a father and had to becoming a father kind of change your perspective on life so when i was nineteen and see what sixteen really convinced her mom and dad. That was a really good guy. And you know. I'm betting armlet amber and we married six. Excuse me we met at nineteen hundred sixteen years old. We married when we were twenty. Two and nineteen amber during that are courtship in our dating amber had a few surgery. She underwent a major brain surgery by the doctor. Ben carson who ran for president while back gupta. Johns hopkins hospital and then Almost a year later to the day she a major back surgery and you know that was a tough time in a struggle for us but we made it through and we knew that we could get those two things together. We made a very large wedding. A lot of family. Friends joins us and shortly after we got married in november amberg at pregnant with gentlemen in april so she said she was taking birth control. I thought their attacks but The good lord blessed wonderful kid and we were excited and then we had elizabeth two years later. And after we have elisabeth at jona you know we felt like our family wasn't complete but at the same time while amber was carrying of jona analysts with played a toll on her body when she delivered elizabeth morning. She delivered elizabeth. She was fifty one inches around and she's only forty eight inches tall. You know we knew that We would expand our family. We do it through adoption on a lot of foreign countries overseas the acceptance of local people is not like it is here in the us. I mean we still have a long air. The us not just for people but for other individuals But you know we. We found ana and i came home one day from work an- and all this paperwork laid out in this picture. And she says trent. I've found our daughter. And i said i didn't know she was missing. She's now found another daughter and I honest. I signed all the paperwork for auto before i ever saw pictures for her and that began our journey and what little two three more kids or family incredible. I've had several dads on here. Who have adopted. i think it's It's one of the greatest forms of law is is the adoption process. Now for you guys. You have You adopted from three different countries. So what was the genesis of. That was the reason behind not staying with the same country and adopted from there. What was dj genesis of decide to adopt from three different countries. There was never a board that we selected from and each time we were expanding our family. We were never significantly looking for adoption. We're never planning to adopt at that particular time. So amber work with organization Matt roloff at the time was really involved. In our organization amber was district director and she was helping some other members of the organization. Place children up for adoption. Orphanages in adoption agencies in the us would contact organization and as we knew prospect of family. That would be interested in this chow. In ambra would looked over the bios. We knew some friends and families that were interested and every now and then amber would come choose. Say we can't pass us on up this one she to us and that happened three times so on was four years old when we found out about her hand. She was four years old when she came on. Russia typically required you to make two trips for the adoption. We're fortunate that they approved us. We only had to make one trip The i'm we over there for sixteen days. It was an adventure re landed cold turkey. We didn't have all the We didn't pay all the extra money for the chauffeur's and the administrators to take us and do everything we run a budget. We're on a tight budget and we. We landed in moscow moscow for about five days. then we flew over to western siberia. We over there for about eleven days and then flew back moscow to finish up and come along so that was an adventure. We found alex when he was Amber fouled out about alex video again another adoption agency pushed out his information in a video of him out and amber saw the video. It just fell in love with him at that video. Alex was about two weeks old four weeks. We were like yeah. I think he needs to come home. So at six weeks. Oh we had signed papers. And when alex was six months three days old when we met up at the atlanta hartsfield airport and we met up with a gentleman who has a nonprofit organization. He's retired pilot and he was an adopted child and he flies to foreign countries in eastern transport agent. He brings the job into the us and basically handed them off to the doctor family. So we did that and then we adopted emma when she was five years old. We found out about what she was for. Anna's adoption took a little bit longer. She came home. She was five. We flew to. China had a great time. Great visit with him m bonded with us. Very quickly. I'll never forget the very first time. She walked up which she came into the room. You know. I knelt down and we had a little magical moment. We actually have the picture of a amer was talking and doing business channel about the adoption. She always handled all the business out of the adoption. You know i was the come home. Sign ear you know right. The jags pass the money. And and pray the good lord that everything gets.

Ben carson Trent johnston emma Anna amazon Joanna Matt roloff Alex georgia elizabeth five six nineteen four years six weeks south korea ana alex four weeks april six months
"johnston" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:20 min | 4 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"What happen. I met a bunch of amazing people who are now like my lifelong friends. Who were like. You should go to the sculpture department. And i don't even know if i realized that the time like there was a sculpture department. You know and then. I was. And then when i was my first year school was all introductory basic art theory and design things like that in a really lean towards the material manipulation in like physical making rather than the computers and the graphic design element which i have a lot of respect for but not honesty was a struggle for me is like feeling my dorm room up with garbage and junk and making stuff with so much more fun so that really derailed me and my parents were like yeah. I'm gonna apply to the sculpture department. My second year school near lake like what no no nice supposed to go design school and luckily they they let me move in that direction. You know with you know. They were definitely hesitant but It i excel data in. I found a passion Second guests at all gone. So that's what led me to that in there in art school i was exposed to so many amazing artists were students and my professors and teachers and instructors and it just sort of. That's just found what i'd been looking for him when he moved to this cultural depo- well you know you had all these introductory classes sort of teaching. You like you know how to weld how to use the woodshop into basic carpentry. How to make mold like all that kind of institutional like object making material manipulation. And but i was really getting exposed to like to artists that were historically based but also sort of that were in my environment that were using found objects and recycling repurposing reusing and It's funny because i. I really liked a lot artists when i was young like like people. Think for jeff koons who would make these other balloon. Yeah the balloon dogs..

second year jeff koons first year school Second guests
"johnston" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:53 min | 4 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the blackout. Put casper again to talk to amazing people that do awesome amazing amazing things. Today have justin foster so like. Are you yawn artist. Ray sure you know. I remember actually met you. I came into different binding to talk to your wife. Amy and you know just oh. You did a screen printing. Well she actually said oh you make arts and you pissed off the roots make art and i couldn't like see in my head and then she told me to take your instagram. Johnston foster arts. And i was like wait. This is garbage. How did he start for you. Well i mean. I've been making things ever since i remember. I've always been kind of you. Know not handy is the right term but always interested in creating and making things from was a child whether it be from starting with or drawing as you know. Young children do and But just always wanted like to have a project or something to do. You know always like being inspired by what i saw like on television or comic books or cartoons or just i mean i was lucky that my parents excuse me to a lot of art museums as a child and i was really inspired by like just looking back on it now at the freedom of that so i've always been making stuff but when my early years was you know kind of whatever in the moment you know whether it be like skateboard ramps or tree houses or like i said like ob- Scoped this whatever. I thought sculpture was child earn. You know but it's it all started in. I i think like the skateboard ramps and the tree houses were like as a kid. I didn't have access to material. So we were going to construction sites taking the scrap wood or whatever we could find right and now it was just sort of out of necessity But then as i kept working and eventually went to art school and like being a student on a budget and using what materials. I could get my hands on because i couldn't afford bronze or steel or those sort of marble things like that so i i was but i'd always been attracted to you know the adventure of collecting and i've also been like kind of an obsessive compulsive person anyway but that you know i think if i always say this is like if i wasn't an artist at be a hoarder mentioned that i was hoping it saying that people come into my studio on here. My neighbors like what is he dragging into that house. This time you know so. It's like my pickup truck is constantly filled with random..

Amy instagram Today justin Ray Johnston
Biden Doubles FEMA Program to Prepare for Extreme Weather

1A

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Biden Doubles FEMA Program to Prepare for Extreme Weather

"The headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency in Washington today. NPR's Windsor Johnson reports bythe Stop it. FEMA comes about a week before the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season. President Biden says he plans to double the money the U. S government will spend to help states, tribes and territories prepare for extreme weather events. During his visit to FEMA headquarters, Biden said he will insist on nothing less than readiness ahead of the upcoming hurricane season. Disaster strikes have to be there to protect and also help people recovered. And so it's about not about red states and blue states. We all know that it's about having people's backs and the toughest moments that they face. The funding will double the current size of a FEMA program that gives money to state and local governments to help safeguard their communities before natural disasters strike. Winter Johnston.

Fema Windsor Johnson Atlantic Hurricane President Biden NPR U. Washington Biden Hurricane Winter Johnston
Biden Proposes $1.7 Trillion Infrastructure Counteroffer to GOP

Snap Judgment

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Biden Proposes $1.7 Trillion Infrastructure Counteroffer to GOP

"Say Major differences remain with the White House over President Biden's major infrastructure plan. Despite a compromise proposal, MPR's Windsor Johnson reports, the Biden administration has cut the overall price tag of its infrastructure package to $1.7 trillion White House press secretary Jen Psaki says the new numbers more closely aligned with Senate Republicans requests. This proposal exhibits a willingness to come down in size will also staying firm in areas that are most vital to rebuilding our infrastructure and industries of the future. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has said Republicans could support a package up to $800 billion He also says Biden's plan to roll back Trump era tax cuts is where Republicans draw the line. Windsor Johnston.

President Biden Windsor Johnson Biden Administration Jen Psaki MPR White House Senate Mitch Mcconnell Republicans Biden Donald Trump Windsor Johnston
White House Makes $1.7 Trillion Infrastructure Counteroffer

NPR News Now

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

White House Makes $1.7 Trillion Infrastructure Counteroffer

"The biden administration has shrunk its infrastructure proposal in a bid to find common ground with republicans but as npr's windsor johnston reports. The two sides remain far apart. The biden administration has presented congressional republicans with point seven. Trillion dollar counterproposal. About five hundred billion dollars. Less than its original offer. White house press secretary. Jen psaki says the proposal exhibits the administration's willingness to come down in size. It does so largely by cutting from areas where there is bipartisan. Consensus republicans have argued that the bill is too broad and too costly. npr's windsor

Biden Administration Windsor Johnston Jen Psaki NPR White House Windsor
Biden Applauds Gaza Ceasefire Agreement Between Israel and Hamas

Fresh Air

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

Biden Applauds Gaza Ceasefire Agreement Between Israel and Hamas

"Jack's fear. President Biden is praising the ceasefire reach between Israel and Hamas, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The agreement comes after nearly two weeks of fierce exchanges of rocket fire and airstrikes that killed more than 200 people. President Biden is crediting the Egyptian government which helped mediate the ceasefire. I extend my sincere gratitude to President Sisi The senior Egyptian officials who played such a critical role in this diplomacy. Also priest appreciate the contributions of other parties in the region who have been engaged in working toward the end of hostilities. President Biden on Wednesday stepped up the pressure on Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to put an end to the violence. Biting also spoke with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. Both sides have warned that they could resume attacks if the

President Biden Windsor Johnston Egyptian Government President Sisi NPR Hamas Jack Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas
Premier League: Alisson's Historic Goal Keeps Liverpool in Top 4 Hunt

Caught Offside

01:54 min | 5 months ago

Premier League: Alisson's Historic Goal Keeps Liverpool in Top 4 Hunt

"Quickly. Now a couple other games from the past few days that we just want to briefly touch on jayjay. What what your club did the other day. One of the most exhilarating finishes of the season allison in stoppage time with the header to keep liverpool season alive essentially. Can we hear our low. Make that call please. Absolutely here this killed in full go has saved season hoax when you succeeded in the trivia league schools. Go the screaming of the name. Allison just just an amazing moment. i even more missing. I i hate to be analytics and tactics. But i've never seen this piece from osama allardyce team where nobody nobody picks up a player and i guess it was because they taught pick up. The attacking outfield players. Don't bother with the goalkeeper. That's coming forward. It rarely works but it was such an athletic header. It was such a leap and he snapped back his neck and powered at pastime johnson. Think about it how. Good johnston being in that game. No one to get past them. None of liverpool's array of field attacking players could do it. But it's the goalkeeper who was hugely emotional after the game. The last few months few weeks with his father passing in in in tragic circumstances in brazil really came to the surface condemn. You gave a pretty pretty special post-match a conversation to to sports so what a moment moment of the season. I think in the primarily in a season that has been lacking in moments. I think it's the moment of the season

Osama Allardyce Liverpool Allison Johnston Johnson Brazil
NASA Looks to Advance 3D Printing Construction Systems

Innovation Now

01:15 min | 5 months ago

NASA Looks to Advance 3D Printing Construction Systems

"Is working on a system that would three d print detat. A road storage units. Whatever astronauts might need to live and work on the moon or mars is innovation now says additive. Construction with mobile placement project is developing technology to build structures on planetary surfaces using in situ resources. Here's mallory johnston deputy project manager for acme at nasa's marshall space flight center a lot of people when they think of three d. printer sir thinking of the plastic ones that lay down one layer at a time a work on a giant machine that three d prints concrete. The idea is being able to package up a system. Launch it to where it needs to go and then have it set itself up clear the spot and then autonomously build a structure using the materials that you might be able to find on the moon or mars but this technology won't just advance human exploration. Imagine being able to take this system into disaster relief areas and using materials that are available locally build structures like owns roads in just a few

Mallory Johnston Marshall Space Flight Center Acme Nasa
So You're Going on a Trip...

The Cut

06:37 min | 6 months ago

So You're Going on a Trip...

"Of the community but when vicious new upstart house emerges blanca and the rest of her chosen family must come together once more to uphold the legacy of the house of evangelist. Pose air sundays at ten pm. Only on facts. It is so hard to slow down and just find time to be especially right now. When i'm so looking forward to the future and planning ahead and making all these ideas and fantasies about what. My life is going to be like now that i'm fascinated. I just have to remember to put one foot in front of the other right now and won't seems counter. Intuitive to recommend an app of all things to help you stay present. That's exactly what i'm about to do. It's called head space and it can transform your habits as long as you have ten minutes to spare head. Space is an app loaded with guided meditations designed to offer a daily dose of mindfulness. And it's truly a cut above other meditation apps because it relies on clinically validated research. To help you feel better no matter what. You're up against their two sessions in particular that i knew had benefit pretty much anyone listening. There's a three minute. Sos meditation when you're just overwhelmed by the day and need a quick release and there's a wind down session for when you can't sleep at night much definitely beats staring at the ceiling. You deserve to feel happier and head. Space is meditation made simple go to head space dot com slash the cut for a free one month trial. That's head space dot com slash the cut for a free month with access to head spaces full library of meditations for every situation. This is the best deal offered right now. Head to head space dot com slash cut. Today the cut. The cut cut cut okay. We're gonna play a game. I'm actually playing a game with you. The listener so just play along here. So you're going on a trip and you have five animals a cow. A horse alliant a lamb and a monkey really picture each one a cow a horse a lion a lamb and a monkey all right now on this trip huron. We're going to have to give one of those animals away. Which one do you get rid of. I all right. You got which one you're giving away now get rid of another animal and then the next one and then the next one and then which one do you keep that last remaining animal. Just hold it in your mind's eye for a minute that's the animal that represents what you value most in life. Each of these animals are representative of the priorities in your life and like the lion is your pride in the horses. Your job and the cow is wealth and the Lamb is your significant other and The monkey is like a child. Michelle learned about this game from her aunt back when michelle was a teenager and the wish he thought about it back then was like okay. If the premise is that. I'm going on a trip. I need to pack really light and so i was like it's going to be a real pain in asks to like carpet lying around so like that's gonna go first and then like the cow is also like this really like large stubborn animals so like i can get rid of that and looking back it makes sense that michelle would immediately give up her pride in her hopes of striking it rich. Because you kind of have to. If you're going to grow up to be touring musician my name is michelle sonner and i also play in a band called japanese breakfast but before japanese breakfast was playing venues all around the world back when michelle was a teenager playing this game with her aunt the third animals she gave up was the horse and then as a real toss up between like the lamb and the monkey and when michelle played this game with her aunt. She was like wait a second. Have you played this game with my mom. What animal did she pick. Since you know choosing your child is an option why she better have picked the monkey. Although michelle wasn't a hundred percent sure that her mom would choose. The monkey felt was my mother's priority. But she was also kind of like somewhat of an enigma to me. And i think that that was why the type of game was so enticing to me because she could be very private and somewhat withholding as michelle writes in her new memoir crying h mart. Her mother wasn't what she calls a. Mommy mom my mom was by no means like coddling anyway. She was very present and very involved in my childhood but she was not easy on me in a lot of ways of every time i got injured. My mom would be very upset. Instead of like you know rushing to my aid and taking me to the doctor and sort of like telling me it's gonna be okay. She could you know she would get very angry and start yelling at me because she was just so angry that it happened. I think and didn't know how to track that energy. Even as michelle grew up her mom was always a source of tough love. I remember when. I got fired from my job at a waitressing and mexican fusion restaurant and i was so obsessed know worked really hard and and a lot of i've seen other moms we like you know it's their loss honey like you'll find another job or whatever. My mom's i won't show anyone can carry a tray. She just had this like very like cruel reality that she would hit me with in michelle's mothers defense. Michelle was kind of a handful. I was such a rowdy tomboy. I didn't take care of my things very well and that drove my mother crazy. My mom was someone who had like a twelve step skin care regiment and tony piece of clothing for twenty years and looked like it had never been worn and she took so such great pride in like self care and her appearance and fashion designer handbags. And you know. I was like a little punk kid that wore daniel. Johnston t shirts and patched overalls and wanted to like play rock music for a living. I was very angry and perplexed by my mom's decision to settle for

Michelle House Of Evangelist Blanca Michelle Sonner Tony Johnston Daniel
"johnston" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

James Miller | Lifeology

04:07 min | 6 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

"Jeff. Johnston who is a founder of choices network a nonprofit organization. He started after losing his oldest son. Son seth to a heroin overdose in two thousand sixteen and today's episode. Jeff reviews book. This one's for you and inspirational journey through addiction death in meaning. Welcome to my show. Jeff i james. Thanks for having me on. I'm i'm really excited to.

Jeff today two thousand sixteen james Johnston
"johnston" Discussed on Impact Pricing

Impact Pricing

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Impact Pricing

"I'm studying at our guest. Is matt johnston and here are three things you wanna know about matt before we start is the ceo of pecan joint. He started out his career as an analyst meaning he's probably pretty good with spreadsheets and my favorite thing about matt. He was a pricing analyst for comedy central in new york. Welcome that mark delighted delighted to be here. Yeah yeah got that brings back memories and it's like you know when i think about my pricing career in the main. It's yeah. It started back in comedy. Central as i priced airtime with comedy central. Were slapped buying in the middle of manhattan very much. A work hard play hard. A spirit butts learned a lot of debate boss. There aren't yet fascinating fascinating sector to work on pricing. Nice so young kid in manhattan working on comedy central. That's gotta be a great job. Yeah well look well. Actually by next job was probably depends. Are you look at. It was even better. It was actually pricing stocks as an equity analyst for for j. p. morgan on wall street so from rags rags to riches and a couple of years. I look at that did that for about two and a half years and then realized you know what i i was selling my soul to the street and i'd rather add value in other forms working back in probably the companies again and bringing.

new york matt johnston j. p. morgan about two and a half years manhattan matt three things comedy couple of years comedy central central
The Power of Conjoint Analysis with Matt Johnston

Impact Pricing

02:12 min | 6 months ago

The Power of Conjoint Analysis with Matt Johnston

"I'm studying at our guest. Is matt johnston and here are three things you wanna know about matt before we start is the ceo of pecan joint. He started out his career as an analyst meaning he's probably pretty good with spreadsheets and my favorite thing about matt. He was a pricing analyst for comedy central in new york. Welcome that mark delighted delighted to be here. Yeah yeah got that brings back memories and it's like you know when i think about my pricing career in the main. It's yeah. It started back in comedy. Central as i priced airtime with comedy central. Were slapped buying in the middle of manhattan very much. A work hard play hard. A spirit butts learned a lot of debate boss. There aren't yet fascinating fascinating sector to work on pricing. Nice so young kid in manhattan working on comedy central. That's gotta be a great job. Yeah well look well. Actually by next job was probably depends. Are you look at. It was even better. It was actually pricing stocks as an equity analyst for for j. p. morgan on wall street so from rags rags to riches and a couple of years. I look at that did that for about two and a half years and then realized you know what i i was selling my soul to the street and i'd rather add value in other forms working back in probably the companies again and bringing That way so before we jump into the real content. I just want to say thanks for being an impact partner and especially thanks for your help in creating the new conjoint course that we put up you guys. Were you hugely helpful for us. Look at it was our pleasure. It was a great great exercise for us to do because it really helps us focus. You know we go through a lot of demonstrations and you know they're they're engaging but i stayed the exercise of developing the course collaboration with your good self was yeah. We're learning experience for us to out. Just going to really find to in our thoughts on on aware epic. What the value pecan epic really brings to the table. And you know where we want to take it

Matt Johnston Pecan Joint Matt Manhattan Mark New York Morgan
COVID-19 Vaccine: Questions Answered With Dr. Johnson Fatokun, MD

The Unfiltered Real Talk Podcast

02:27 min | 6 months ago

COVID-19 Vaccine: Questions Answered With Dr. Johnson Fatokun, MD

"In today's episode. What talking to bob hawke topic the nineteen vaccine and addressing some of the concerns and worries a face around getting the vaccine and a lot of be concerned about getting the vaccine. And i just a good idea talk about it with medical practitioner would need to the as a medical doctor. Dr johnson photographer who is experience family. Physician practices here not berta so welcomed up. Johnston gets a happy ear only program. Thank you so. We've reached up the johnson today in his office in actually in limit. So how are you doing for staff about. The johnson are crazy busy. Yeah times and very odd certain tumbles love just so. There's a lot of backup false when it comes to these vaccine when it comes to the arrows reside surrounded. He has to put measures in place to mitchell. Everybody is safe. Count your office yasu safety. Those who can't calm you have to do provide catholic though. Sometimes you see some collision myself book late. Making phone calls to crash lot. Mitchell vision gets cab when you do give the house up gracie chugging discounts. So what do you. So i wanna ask you like the like you said. These are very uncertain times challenging times. What are you doing for self care as doctor like. What are you doing to stay motivated. You know into so many things. Well i'm me. Tried to go for walks. I make sure each row physically. No pounding gavin every day. Well it's good food and then rest will any to work. I take any date. It never ends now. Vision context you because of the accents so detects you to call you so you have to find out so downturns and which works and they'll which entity i don't sit in the quiet through soochow everything away

Bob Hawke Dr Johnson Johnson Berta Johnston Mitchell Gavin
Biden, Suga Meetings Set to Focus on China

1A

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

Biden, Suga Meetings Set to Focus on China

"House today. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. This will be Biden's first face to face meeting with a foreign leader since taking office. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki says growing tensions with China is expected to be a key focal point of today's meeting between President Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Asuka. Our approach to China And our shared coordination and cooperation on that front will be part of the discussion, as will our joint commitment to the denuclearization of North Korea. Security will be a prominent issue of regional security, The corona virus, pandemic trade and climate change will also likely figure high on the agenda. In addition, the Japanese prime minister is expected to invite President Biden to the Olympic Games in Tokyo this summer. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington The

Windsor Johnston Jen Psaki President Biden Yoshihide Asuka NPR Biden China White House North Korea Olympic Games Tokyo Washington
"johnston" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

09:29 min | 9 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Drum History

"Mike. Let's jump in and Yeah why don't you go ahead and teach us about the history of drum lessons men. It's it's one of those things that right when you think about anyone. Acquiring a skill you have to think that as soon as that skill is acquired then that skill is ready to be taught to someone else and so we can assume that in the history of drums dating back to people banging on things that it was taught to other people the rhythms the traditional rhythms. All of that stuff. So i think if we're looking for forms of education and that's what you and i have discussed as in the past about like what a cool topic that would be informs of education. We have to start at in person lessons because that would have been the first way this would have been done in and that would be with any skill and so when you have in-person private drum lessons one on one. I'm passing on information to you in a skill set to you. That has it's own pros and cons. I mean all of these have ups and downs all of these things. it's like. Oh that's the best way to go except for this except for this and i think that that becomes such a cool topic because people like me. That are obsessed with education. We're always trying the best trying to find the best way to pass on that information to someone else. And i gotta say i would assume by the end of this. Podcast will wrap all the way back to the beginning which is in person lessons so i think the first thing that would have happened before published books and obviously before the digital world would be in person private lessons on the instrument. And i think it's probably safe for us to just do this coming from the drums set perspective instead of cavemen hitting random skinned instruments. No i think. I think totally and i think that's You know before that and and a lot of it maybe we can kind of dislike. Assume that a lot of the lessons that would have happened. before kind of our modern in person drum set would have been your were taught via the military Yeah seems like a safe assumption. From what i've learned over the years of doing the show is You know it's you're taught the snare drum for a reason or in other cultures. Maybe you're you know it's it's traditional music and you're playing and like a pub or in you know at a party quote unquote. Maria is. it's you know the function Was a big thing you know. What are you doing this for. It wasn't the modern day of like. Oh i play drums. Because i'd igam. I'm doing this to go along with this. Traditional dance or this traditional ceremony so going from those but if we consider like modern day private drum lessons they wouldn't have been that different even one hundred years ago. You would have had to go to someone's house or a music store and you would have had to sit down and take a one on one private lesson now. The pros the positive side of that is the i think the biggest one is this personalized when someone writes a book. It's not personalized. It's general but if i walk into a room to take a lesson with somebody hopefully as long as they're doing their job right they're going to be creating the education specifically for me and my desires on the instrument so getting personalized instruction is a massive plus the other thing is you have someone in the room watching you mess up. That can correct in the moment. Yes dead of submitting video and then waiting two weeks for someone to get back to you in the moment they can even and i don't mean this in like a whiplash kind of way but they can grab your wrists and turn them over a little bit and i. I still remember being a kid and having my teacher grabbed my hand and turn it over and just that feeling of like some another human being note. Do it like this. That stuck with me forever. Yes oh that is amazing and the other thing that never gets talked about enough but as someone that taught private lessons from the age that i was seventeen and from five and tell seventeen i took them and then i taught from seventeen on the teacher becomes a life councillor to the student because the teacher is the one person that is removed from their social circle. So the student who's going through whatever it is in their life whether they're a kid or adult they have this person they can tell their problems too and that teacher can't spread. The rumours can't yarn into drama. Because i don't know anybody so that's one thing that you know you get out of private lessons as you get a bit of a life coach yes someone in the room to correct you and you get personalized instruction. You're absolutely right. And and i just have a funny thing that happened because i i mean you're obviously on another planet from what i was doing so i taught at sam ash for a while and i taught private and then at another store here and i guess my specialty would be working with really young kids not as much shredding like. Let's go you know. Rip through a bunch of books and stuff. It was like getting kids to really like the drums. And i had a little kid. And you know. I won't name obviously but he They were. The dodd was from country. Where i believe. It was a little stricter on the kids. Um i think that's fair to say but the kid the young five year old would very often just kind of like talk to me and tell me stuff in like you said. It's like a psychiatrist thing almost but one time he said. My dad told me to grow a pair. What does that mean. And i was like. Oh man talk to your mom. I'm not. I'm not getting into that. I don't. I don't want sam ash to come after me but again that is such a normal part of being a private drum instructor is that you're you are the person that they can go to and just say like look i. I have no one else to talk about this stuff. And you know you can also end with the problem is you can't step in and be their parent because they already have parents and you just have to kind of be there for them and listen as much as possible. But i think that's that is one of the few things that i never hear mentioned and i think lake man even so my last private instructor that i was actually in the room with was peter manga dini and that was just such a blessing because he's just a legend in the world of education and i would drive two hours to go have my lessons with them and we would be in his basement and i was in my twenties so i wasn't a kid but i was able to tell him. Hey you know. How i'm touring and i have this record deal. Something doesn't feel right and he was the first person to tell me. Education can be your plan. You just have to choose it. Yeah and to have somebody say that to you when you think like. I don't want to admit that. I don't enjoy the rockstar lifestyle to have somebody believe in me and say look man. You're you're meant for this thing. I don't know where my career would be. If i didn't have an in person life coach at that moment To say those things absolutely he was on the I probably should have sent this to you before. He was on the show From when recording this a couple weeks ago a month or so really. Yeah he did We just talked about career and his life and he talked about you and Told a bunch of embarrassing stories. Awesome beautiful now now. He was super proud of you. Obviously but Yeah that was another suggested Episode by someone but I agree completely where you can like. It's almost like a It's just like someone who's been down the road before and can And can kind of steer you in the right direction. But i think maybe that brings up the point of but a a bad teacher can really affect things negatively as well right so so and you know for the downside of private instruction i think the biggest downside is that you are limited to the people in your local area and we don't all live in san francisco. La atlanta new york. London where there's top level pros. And that's i think why you see the success of books. Eventually later later in the timeline. The success drum clinics drum touring Even online lessons. That's because when it comes to private lessons whoever works at your local store. That's who you get. I mean i know as a kid. I didn't choose my german star five years old. My mom got me drum lessons and whoever the teacher was at the store that was closest to us that was going to be my new life coach and it didn't go well for like the first three teachers. I wasn't clicking with the people. And i had the jazz teacher that told me. The only way to play is like this and it was. You know god doesn't really sit well with me that i'm trying to get better in an art form in. You're telling me that it's the military that there's rules has to be done this way and so i think that can be a bad side of in person lessons. The other thing is that. And this is something you'll know from sam ash and either positive or negative but you are also limited to how much the store or the school supports their lesson program. So you might go to an amazing store that has killer gear but because of where. They chose to have their location. You don't get to take lessons on a drum set you have to take it adds or an electric it and so that's another really bad part about this is like oh man. I signed up for this instrument that supposed to be loud and bombastic. And i've never played one

bart van der zee martin martin novem ten two years Maria fifteen episodes mike today one first first thing mike johnston mike drum history those things
"johnston" Discussed on Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

03:04 min | 11 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

"Let's move onto the crew's flight and first. Let's start off here <hes>. madison. Because i've one of the things i'd have to say i don't know a lot about this <hes>. This whole part one. Oh three type of flying so right off the bat. Let's get people to understand that and then we'll talk a little bit about why it's so much fun. So part one of three is <hes>. Ultralight flying the aircraft has to weigh two hundred and fifty pounds dry so less fuel and oil. I can't carry more than five gallons of fuel and has to cruise fifty five knots <hes>. <hes>. it's up to the pilot and the builder to really <hes>. Make sure that. The aircraft's follows that <hes>. The designers do their best to designer craft. That follow those rules and fly at those speeds <hes>. But in the end of the day at the end of the day it's <hes>. It's up to the the pilot to make sure that that is followed. And these aircraft <hes>. I've seen these over at like sun and fun and a lotta different airshows and the light sport air shows that type of thing. Usually you see ultralights there. What's really it's interesting because it looks a lot of them look like airplanes are kind of beefy other ones. There's not much to them. It's just a wing and you and the bugs and the teeth in the air. What are the common questions. That i get is <hes>. You know hey his that really safe to fly in and so let's let's get that the bat right away. What do you think i mean. I know madison <hes>. When you get that question. I'm sure you do often. What do you tell people when they ask. Is it safe to fly. There is safe to fly as you make them <hes>. It just like it. You're certified aircraft. You've gotta do your inspections you do your walk arounds <hes>. The the differences that a part one of three pilot. I'm doing the maintenance <hes>. And i have to make sure that everything is good to go on that. So i mean it's a safe as i can make it <hes>. And i wouldn't lie it. If i didn't feel confident in getting up in the air with it so so one. Oh three rules <hes>. You actually so you. I guess do most people buy or do they build these. I will. I bought most of mine <hes>. But i am in the process of building a mini mak. Sixteen fifty aeros. I bought plans while. I've been out here in afghanistan and <hes>. Slowly accumulated supplies at my house to build. Get back in february <hes>. But i i bought all of the aircraft <unk>. That i currently on <hes>. Between myself and my hanger. Buddy we have nine not including the arrows that i'm building and the two experimental aircraft that i also have <hes>. That am constructing. So you're really involved.

Cfi Abc mike johnston
"johnston" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"johnston" Discussed on Making Gay History

"<music>. I'm eric marcus. And this is making history. One of the things. I love about mining the studs terkel radio archive is the time travel. The chance to go back decades and hear the voices of people only read about like lorraine hands berry and christopher isherwood or the stories of people who are long forgotten like female impersonator. Leslie i also enjoy listening to studs terkel. His curiosity is proudly lefty opinions. And the way he connected with people sitting across from him but sometimes that was a struggle as you'll hear in his early nineteen seventies interview with lesbian feminist separatist jill johnston johnston was born in london in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine to an american nurse in an english bell maker. Her father left the picture soon after joe was born. She was raised by her mother and grandmother in queens new york in nineteen fifty-nine chill started writing for the alternative downtown newspaper. The village voice she began dance critic and later moved onto writing more personal columns where she embraced all things of guard and counter cultural a year after the stonewall uprising jill came out in. Print is a lesbian. Her focus shifted from the cultural to the political and she began advocating for a complete break from men and their institutions. She got a lot of attention. For pronouncements like all women are lesbians except those who don't know it yet but there was more to jill than just her talent for provocation for work was welcomed by women who felt sidelined both in the male dominated gay liberation movement and the feminist movement which was hostile to lesbians even at a time when radical thought was widespread gills views pushed the envelope and push the buttons when he interviewed jill about her book lesbian nation. Let's join the two of them as they lock horns in a conversation first broadcast on june twenty-ninth nineteen seventy-three. I wanted to ask you about not challenge. You just wonder about you. Say a woman is not free. Liberated that she's a lesbian now. Isn't this kind of fascistic on your part. Well it's it's the use of the word fascistic. No you i say this. I'm thinking when you say no woman can be a free will mushy. Aren't you denying people the right to be what they are no matter. Well we as women as you know. There is a feminist movement and women have been denied the right to be what they are. So i know that you know. Let's start with beginnings <hes>. The it depends how you're defining lesbian. I have political definition of lesbianism and <hes>. It what it really means a self commitment and we know that <hes>. We have a feminist movement because women have been been denied self commitment and we're just updating feminism by calling it lesbianism because we feel that <hes>. Total commitment to ourselves would include. Every phase of our activities is using the word women using the word lesbian in a much broader sense pricing. Well that's pepsi should be made clear. Yes that's why this book is a political book. Basically as a result of which. Sometimes your stuff seems outrageous. It's almost deliberate. I mean isn't that point that to outrage to disturb <hes>. Well i i i. It's a funny thing you know. I just say what i'm into. I don't know i don't set out outrage. I mean i. It seems that that where i'm at is not does tend to be outrageous. Could talk about that reactions to you when you appear publicly. i'm talking. I'm not talking about the inner circles of new yorker village of eligible. Talk about outside west of the hudson when you appear. What is the first reaction <hes>. This range from dummies to smarties and and people in yellow dresses and heels and stockings and girdles to <hes> to <hes>. Call them dummies though. Are you yeah. Girls and yellow dresses. Why well. I had this experience in seattle recently. A woman in a yellow dress just like that who to stop before i got on you know it took a look at my boots and she signaled the director to cut our time in half and and she was extremely hostile. Really you know just acting as sensor now. What do you think made her do that. Fear yeah i suppose well i i think <hes> is the way the culture has brought us all up you know and it's in the last decade or so that <hes> with psychedelics people's heads of opened up more and they're more accepting if not just tolerant of all different ways of behaving america hasn't been noted for its tolerance of just eccentricity people who accent or different just because they wear checkered hats or something but how did it begin yourself your consciousness your awareness that say you are a lesbian. Now in the sexual. That's you know. well. I was born a lesbian. You know i suppose all men or lesbians to from that point of view. It's all men came out of their mothers <hes>. Our first great sexual experience was with our mothers. And i think that all sexual experience afterwards is a recreation of that experience and so from that point of view it's a perversion for women to sleep with men or two to be invaded by man. I think that <hes>. That women as well as men want to recreate their original unity with their mothers. Isn't this forgive me easy. you have your right. I denying the natural impulses of people. Each of whom is different and unique.

Eric marcus christopher isherwood lorraine berry Leslie jill johnston johnston london
"johnston" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"johnston" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"A Nice Guy Community welcome back. . Welcome back. . It is strict on today and you are in for a treat today not just because I'm sitting in for Doug, , it's also because I get to talk to Dr Timothy Johnston and award award-winning businessman lecturer published author in dental trade journals his business or dental center is the recipient of several prestigious awards is known for its excellent customer service Yod local community. . He is a professional member of numerous Dental Association's personally received the Healthcare Heroes Award, , and before you go running the other way because you know you hear dentist let me tell you. . We're not talking just about Dennis today. . Dr Johnson is also an international bestselling author of Ring Bell for service. . He has some brilliant insights into succeeding in any business that depends on customer service. . How are you doing today Dr Johnston I'm just fine. . Thanks. . Thanks for having me in absolutely absolutely, , and you know we talk a lot about customer service on the Nice guys on business obviously as a dentist, , it's Kinda critical isn't it? ? It really is and this is interview is not meant to really pertain so much the dental office because I've been doing that for years but <hes> one else I've learned from being. . In terms of <hes> in terms of everything, , but really what it means to be a dentist and take that experience. . So to speak. . I love that and again, , your book. . Ring Bell for service. . It has some really really great insights and I'm sure lots of great ideas that you have realized over thirty years in business <hes>. . So the first one I wanted to touch on that you bring up in the book is, , why is the customer not always right? ? It goes without saying that the customer is not always right. . The thing that makes it stand out so much to me is when a customer client customer or anybody comes in and thinks he knows you, , he thinks that his his take on the world is what's driving the whole thing. . For example guy comes into my office. . This is in a chapter in my book and before I can even. . Kevin brought to the back. . He stands up and he says I need to talk to the doctor right away. . And I'm walking Brown and I hear this I step out and I'd say who I am Dr Johnston and I'll be seeing you come back this way we talk about if you like he has no, , I need you to come out here. . So I, , walk out in the waiting room on it I stand there he goes I need to talk to you for minute about this TV. . So I look in on TV is just a commercial again you the. . Commercial. . I don't understand it's commercial for something, , and if you WANNA, , come back, , we could talk about not discuss it in front of these other patients here. . He has not before this commercial. . This was tuned to Fox News and I cannot believe you're playing Fox News. . I said Ob size it today it's Fox. . News. . Tomorrow could be discovery channel the next day and might be you know who knows what? ? It's something different every day my receptionist controls it's not me. . It's just whatever it is. . I. Said . if backup Santa Surprise that it's not the discovery channel because we we subscribe to that too and four days out of five of seems to be tuned into something dental. . So but either as May. . Come back. . We'll talk about your needs and everything is going to go on and he says, , no, , you don't understand I could not possibly be a part of this in a dental office from someone who is preaching as politics out to everybody else. . At this point I had to make a decision was this going to be a lifetime relationship with this guy or was it gonna be hi and bye because if I decided to keep them on to story for live longer and I was going to bend my ways to make him you know, , yes, , I could change the channel but if I was gonna bend over backwards to make this one person. . Happy. . was that going to be what my my position was going to be for the day? ? And you know flash of lightning ever only happens about once every five years I said well, , you know what? ? If that's your position you can see the door right there. . And he looked at me and he looked over behind him with the door said, , wait a minute and might be the straight. . You gotta let a perfectly good patient go because you won't change the TV station has no no, , I'll just let you go but I won't let these perfectly good patients go. . Ooh, , good answer. . I thought it was just a flash of lay. . It just came to me and he turn on his heels and he huffed and puffed and slam the doors and Audi went, , and there was two people sitting there in the waiting room. . They were both patients of mine for years and they both looked at me at applauded me lately it likes to say good job Tim good job. . So my point is you can't be everything to everybody the customer is not always right. . We hear that time and time again, , the customer's always right the customer's always right. . But in reality I have to make my plans for ninety nine percent of the audience in for the one percent I've gotta them go and it was some of the best decisions I've ever made I've done it maybe five times in my life. . I've been in practice for thirty <hes> thirty one years. . It's a rare thing but we don't click with somebody really don't click and that's the times when I have to say you know what you're out of here and this is one of those times. .

Doug Sandler Dr Johnson Dr Timothy Johnston Dental Association Healthcare Heroes Award Ring Bell lecturer Dennis
"johnston" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"johnston" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Our host Brian Johnston welcome back to life matters were your program on the right to life on the values and the culture that emanated from its singular idea the idea that you have a life that was given to you by a creator it wasn't given to you by society it wasn't given to you by the government it is your creator they gave me your life but there is a role for government in our founders said the rule for government is to ensure your right to be alive to ensure that your life isn't taken from you by someone else or even the government itself unless you've had due process of law the idea of the right to life is essential to understanding human freedom in America because it's the ideas behind the American experiment that have brought freedom throughout the world and I've been in many parts of this world I was in New Zealand when a gentleman there admitted to me he felt that the freedoms they had in New Zealand and Australia and that part of the world were guaranteed by the citizen soldiers the United States who fought for the idea that human individuals should be protected under just a government and this is important idea the reason we spend time on the right to life right now is that it's at stake it's an idea that's being brought into question it has been brought into question other times in human history by undressed governments but even the government of the United States now has begun to question whether the right to life should be applied to all individual human beings that there might be classes of human beings that could be dismissed we saw that in nineteen seventy three when the United States Supreme Court ruled in roe V. Wade and doe V. Bolton that an unborn child didn't have the right to life that would no longer be extended even though every state in the nation had protection for that child in the womb all the fifty laws in the fifty states were overturned by that Supreme Court pair of decisions roe V. Wade and doe V. Bolton and it's because because of that the right to life movement really came into existence to again assert this basic premise but more to the point that battle is raging right now in human lives are being lost because there's other categories of people that are now being dismissed those who have an illness terminal illness perhaps or perhaps they are simply in curable perhaps the depressed and curable well that particular class of human beings they're being discarded now even in the United States of America and legally so that is frightening and unless you understand this battle my ideas is really about individual lives you're gonna lose this battle so I know many people that are pro life and they do more the individual lives lost I have friends who have had abortions and they now deeply regret those abortions I used to teach high school and I saw students of mine who would just be crushed because they had had an abortion and it's a human cost here the cost of that child's life but the cost to that human individual and many of you are involved in counselling encouraging young women and that's a good thing but I tell you if we don't address the battle of ideas and the laws that are allowing this you'll be council a lot more women and this carnage is going to continue unless we address this very real battle of ideas and the reason we often talk about laws on life matters is because laws are basically ideas that are enforced so we want to encourage you to be aware of ideas and they're not scaring you do have to take time to think about him in the right to life is based on that premise that there is an essential idea behind a just society and in our society it is that every individual has been given a gift by god sometimes we'll talk a little bit about theology but not a lot and if we do it's as deep as the conflict on the back of your money if you're listening in America every call and every dollar bill you have says there's got it's pretty cool because what the founder said and what nature says is that there is a thought somebody designed all of this and if you want to make sense of what this is that we live in the reality that surrounds us you have to look at the fact that there's an ordered universe and if we want to have just laws we want to follow the laws that are represented in the laws of nature and of nature's god and that's what our founders did so if you're joining us by radio these last couple of weeks we've been talking about the conflict of ideas between natural law the laws of nature and of nature's god and the idea that truce in laws will they're all relatives and where did that come from last week we spoke in depth about Hagel and how Hagel is a leading philosopher in changing the world view of western society and we did some deep analysis on that it was a complex if you would like to go to the podcast I've already had folks tell me that they really appreciated understanding why Hagel was so important and how Hagel has infected our own view it isn't just that he spawned national socialism that's Nancy is a and international socialism that's communism Hegelian view of history and of reality infects our culture right now and I'm a spend a little more time talking about that I wish if you could you could read some writings of justice Antonin Scalia or justice Clarence Thomas two justices of the U. S. Supreme Court Antonin Scalia has since passed away but he was great in bringing these things down to earth and was well known for presenting these principles in a humorous way but in reality what a Supreme Court justice is is he's just talking about ideas in which ideas should be applied to the loss of the incident Scalia he's just a great source on these types of things but a lot of us don't have time to read that I understand listen to the radio are we you know turn on the television the computer will level watching videos people have said we should make life matters a video presentation well we're not doing that but you can listen in your car you can listen to the podcast you can listen on the radio wherever you are and we want to equip you for this battle of ideas because lives are at stake so in just a little bit we're gonna come back I'm gonna pick up again why Hagel is so dangerous to us right now where you are even if you don't see yourself as a Hegelian philosopher even if you've never heard the name Hagel this world view has infected America as well it's infected all of western thinking and we're gonna take just a little more time in explaining progressivism infectious nature its religious nature.

Brian Johnston
"johnston" Discussed on The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"johnston" Discussed on The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

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Merrill Johnston
"johnston" Discussed on The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"johnston" Discussed on The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

"It'll traditional advertising and or whether it's your it how do you look for an outsource her and how should people look for outsourcing are like Ninjas when they're thinking about outsourcing accounting in their worlds I stopped by thinking about whether it at cool business and at the somethings like web development that's not really a coal business and we work with the web development for that where a bookkeeping business since I wanNA make sure that we're doing that in house because we're actually the provider for someone else that's cool business that we wanna have fun control over that and really understand well at optimized for that and content I actually believe he's business too and in the early days when we were building content take we outsourced content writing to a provider and we work with someone way I felt confident that the we can delete by to the quality that we wanted and I could rely on them to deliver on the schedule that we'd agreed and also that they could provide some guidance and feeling announced you'll get bought in order for that relationship to work well I needed to ski law on content as well so that I knew I could have conversations about the jeep and so that I would know whether that would doing trouble and we'll sigh provide some liberal and feedback in the early days we outsource that a name I realized that content publishing actually a secondary pot about all business then we've gradually started to attain around that now the example want legal advice and so as an account I have some knowledge is some of my training was around the legal side of things but it's not my specific area of expertise so again if we're having contract stop wanting advice around trademarks did again we will outsource that expert net situation announce for recommendations from other people and also get really clear about what result I won't from whoever I'm engaging what does a good result in working with them look like it's my fault crisis around that skill up so you can scale up super quotable I love that we're talking to Merrill Johnston on the.

Merrill Johnston
"johnston" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"johnston" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Johnston. Former student of mean street, so we came to meeting street because Nathan was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder when he was eighteen months old. And Nathan was profoundly autistic. He didn't talk touch him. He didn't play English was like he was splitting to Chinese had. No idea what we were telling him about. Through intensive therapies. He just kept getting better. And better meeting street taught Nathan how to talk and this was on the communication book called picture exchange. That was created here as you can see is Nathan on. Just sort of sucked in language, even though he couldn't speak and his icons became more complex where he had nouns verbs sentence strips on Nathan didn't eat when he started at meeting street school. You can barely touch him. And the he had sensory integration where they literally taught him how to be touched and how to put food into his mouth. Well, I've been doing a lot lately. I'm in BC calculus AB biology history. The Britain free. Develop an interest in gardening. I've gone on various heights in New Hampshire..

Nathan meeting street school New Hampshire Britain Johnston. BC eighteen months