36 Burst results for "Johnson Space Center"

Fresh update on "johnson space center" discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

00:37 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "johnson space center" discussed on NASACast Audio

"UNLE Storytelling is considered to be one of the best ways to capture and share organizational knowledge and lessons learned. This is the second segment in a two part series on technical storytelling, and today we get to hear a couple of stories from members of NASA technical workforce at the conclusion of their stories. The NASA storytellers will get feedback from our guest expert on storytelling. The. First story comes from John Lanson and Jenny Devil lights at NASA's Johnson Space Center John Currently serves as their production manager in the Gateway Program and Jenny is the systems engineering and integration lead for the gateway production. Office They previously held project management and systems engineering and integration positions for the MORPHEUS project and Orion's ascent abort to flight test. Let's listen. Our story today is set among the backdrop of to in house NASA flight projects that we had the opportunity to lead to successful conclusion. The morpheus project and a Ryan's S to flight test. Through, both with substantive insight into effective implementation of lean development strategies and management techniques, and we got to work with rockets. Sound like actual rocket scientists when you say it that way indeed, it does but I really rather give that moniker more directly to the hardworking members of our teams. Any case to begin our story, consider what we set out to accomplish. As you as a project manager, Start Your Project I, know your mission. For our first mission, we pursued capabilities necessary for human base on Mars. If. You've seen the movie the Martian. You may picture a base on Mars with a lab and a habitat and rovers an asset vehicle. And don't forget an astronaut Maroon there. To true. But all located in close proximity to each other on the surface. In reality, how will we get them there along with the humans to live and work there The two projects we highlight today advanced our knowledge of some of the technologies hardware and software we need to get there. But just as importantly, we evolved our understanding of what it takes to lead a team who is designing building and testing all of these capabilities. So John we started working together back in twenty ten. Wow. Is it really a decade already? Fast. So, back then we had the opportunity to learn how to develop and test and autonomous lander from the ground up on project called Morpheus and this project had all the elements of exciting adventure. We had high pressure systems we had cryogenic fluids we had flames, we had powerful lasers, we had cranes, we have mosquitoes, we had failure modes, and we even had a big red button to abort the flight and dropped the lander out of the sky. Those very exciting, but this project wasn't just about developing.

Nasa Unle Storytelling John Lanson Johnson Space Center Project Manager Morpheus Jenny Devil Rockets Production Manager Orion Rovers Ryan
SpaceX Capsule, NASA Crew Make 1st Splashdown In 45 Years, Crew Heads Home To Houston

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:06 min | 2 d ago

SpaceX Capsule, NASA Crew Make 1st Splashdown In 45 Years, Crew Heads Home To Houston

"Mission accomplished NASA and spacex completing historic feat this afternoon when to use astronauts in the SPACEX dragon capsule splashed onto the Gulf of Mexico here's ABC's Gio Benitez. Tonight that historic splashdown. SPLASHDOWN Dragging Endeavour has returned home astronauts Bob in Doug, Hurley inside the spacex Dragon Endeavor for this nineteen, our journey to Earth orbiting the planet at a mind blowing seventeen thousand miles per hour before entering the atmosphere at two, thirty, six, pm eastern the extreme heat cutting off all communications between the dragon and earth for four tenths minutes hoping and praying. That everything is going well, look we just made history. The United States of America once again has a human spaceflight program at two forty, the astronauts signal there. Okay. I F four minutes later, those chutes deploy dragon ultimately slowing down to just fifteen miles per hour splashing down in the Gulf of Mexico welcome back to planet Earth and thanks for flying space x the Dragon Avoiding Tropical Storm Isa else in the Atlantic Astronaut Doug Hurley with the first words from inside the Dragon Shirley are honored purpose a recovery boat loading up the dragon the heat shield underneath that chart by that re entry thirty, five, hundred degrees Fahrenheit locals racing in their own. Boats to get view maybe next time, we shouldn't announce our landing zone, the recovery team wearing masks and has met suits, Bob, and doug emerging on stretchers feeling gravity for the first time in sixty four days. The first American splashdown in forty five years since the. Apollo an incredible day for SPACEX and NASA Gio Benitez joins us now live from the Johnson Space Center in Houston and Geo. Tonight the big question how are the Space Dad's as they call them, Bob and Doug doing. Well Tom I, were told they are doing very well in fact, they're already on their way back home to Houston

Doug Hurley Spacex Gio Benitez BOB Splashdown Nasa Mexico Johnson Space Center ABC Houston United States Tom I America
Astronauts Set To Return To Earth In First U.S. Splashdown In Decades

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 3 d ago

Astronauts Set To Return To Earth In First U.S. Splashdown In Decades

"Astronauts on board the international space station ready to come back to Earth tomorrow in a water landing. NASA NASA monitoring Hurricane eye ISA is to make sure it is supposed threat, too. Details now from correspondent Geo Benitez, at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Flight director said overnight that he's feeling really good about a splash down tomorrow somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico, in part because that hurricane is actually making better weather there. For that splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico. This will be the first American splashdown in 45 years. Now, if they delay the undocking, they will try again on Monday. Astronauts Doug Hurley. Bob Duncan will be returning to Earth on the space Six Dragon capsule. It'll be Space X is first splashed down with astronauts wins news

Hurricane Johnson Space Center Mexico Geo Benitez Nasa Doug Hurley Bob Duncan Director Houston
US astronauts cleared for return despite weather concerns

Ken Broo

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

US astronauts cleared for return despite weather concerns

"U. S. Astronauts on board, the International Space station are packing up today and ready to return to Earth tomorrow. Ah planned water landing. The NASA is monitoring the hurricane is a yes to make sure it doesn't pose a threat. Details from ABC job. Anita's at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Flight director said overnight that he's feeling really good about a splash down tomorrow somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico, in part because that hurricane is actually making better weather there for That splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico. This will be the first American splashdown in 45 years. Now, if they delay the undocking, they will try again on Monday.

Hurricane Mexico International Space Johnson Space Center ABC Nasa Anita Director Houston
Allen Clark

The Candid Frame

06:02 min | Last month

Allen Clark

"A mistake that many photographers make as they make a go at being a professional photographer. is believing that being a generalist is an advantage. Saying that you can photograph, anything doesn't leave impression with a client that you think it should make. Secondly. It leaves the photographer to be defined by what they're hired to do. Rather than by the work that they have a passion for. You may achieve financial success. But. It may not be the type of photography. Sings to your heart Alan Clarke had a clear idea of the kind photographer. He wanted to be and the kinds of photographs you wanted to make. Based in Nashville Tennessee his desire to be a photographer in the music. Industry could have led him to photograph. Country Music Stars. But. He didn't want his physical address to pigeonhole his photography or his aspirations. so He created his own path as a commercial editorial photographer resulting in a career that has allowed him to photograph the likes of Sir George Martin even. Hawk Bob Newhart and two former presidents. I hope this conversation demonstrates the importance of defining who you WanNa be and who you are as a photographer. This is about an annex and welcome back to the candidate frame. Are, I. Alan Welcome to the show. Thank you glad to be here so glad to get Nice Mike. Voice this should be. This is gonNA sound good? Stuff. You ever watched thirty rock now know. Alec, Baldwin and Will Arnett, both have amazing voices, and so they played that up a lot, and that's to our strengths as well so they had like a sexy voice off at one point. Close to each other, and be like I can do that and then they to be like. Yes, you can this. Man Gets. Today's the record this. The astronauts took off on the capsule and the rocket today and I know you're thinking. What you're talking about. You're saying. Neil. Armstrong! Yeah, it's a replica of his suit over a Hoodie. So Yeah I've completely nerd out today you've you've photographed a bunch of the of the suits. But where did the best nation begin? I think like most of us. You think of these images and you dream when you're a child like I was I wanted to be. An oceanographer wanted to be part of the cousteau. Society I wanted to be an astronaut and. Set in my second third grade class looked out the window and reflected on every port report card ever had. Would get these notes of our report cards to be like a you unsatisfactory. He just doesn't pay attention. He looks out the window constantly. That's what I got. Unsatisfactory what they had on the report Carsberg. Takes. A dreamer looks like when they're little. We have the album are recordings of the Apollo flight at my house, growing up so double album and it had pictures of the flight and I remember. I didn't think I really understood exactly what I was listening to just Kinda of thought, it will couple. At record on and just listened to it and look at looking at the pictures. I think it's probably still in my house somewhere. Let even though I don't have a record player anywhere near, let's. I, don't know I'm not one of those. Guys. Are. You saying you're not a hipster? Is that what you're saying? I think that by a couple of decades man I duNno, sometimes. My wife tells me their original hipster. Looking into some of this I'm like I. Don't know, but then I look at myself. When I do that. A you still have a record player and listen to things and she may be right. Working the idea that you want it to be able to photograph the spaces issue. Number of them have and you know I guess the idea came along Huntsville. Space and rocket center is only two and a half hours from Nashville so. have been going down there since I was a kid. My parents took me when I was little, and it just never stopped and something like a tradition. Take took my children there and. I've had photo shoots. Their showed up multiple times I. Don't think they. Enough to where they're sick of me, but it's pretty close. And just kept going there and going there, but then when I would do like photo shoots across. You know our great country. I would go to in in Boston there's A. Museum for JFK and I've been there and just seeing Johnson, space center in Houston of course, and all the different spots every time I get a chance I'll go and visit and just take my camera with me when I go, and my whole point is to just record these to record them like I would do it. Not like a tourist would try to actually light it really well, and sometimes you get permission to do these things, and sometimes you don't. But most of these things are on public display, and were American citizens, so we can kind of like just Bassani and people don't know this, but all all the museums in DC are all. All free to American citizens, because that's part of our taxes, and that's what it goes towards, and so you can kind of do anything you and requests, these types of things, so it started years ago through a space and rocket center, which was a privately funded thing, and it was on the redstone arsenal, the right next to the arsenal base course Verner von Braun worked out of Huntsville Developing Saturn five, and so it's steed like a weird thing like an Alabama of all places steeped in this rocket tradition. You know that know people just don't know about and they kind of had them. They're just to kind of hide them a little bit. Kept them safe there instead of putting them in a big city like DC or New York, but that's when the fascination started from as from a very early age, just repeatedly going down there and shooting these things and You know on crappier cameras when I was little like instamatic disclaimer. Even growing up as a for NYKANEN.

Nashville Huntsville DC Alan Clarke Bob Newhart Sir George Martin Verner Von Braun Tennessee Boston Will Arnett Armstrong Apollo Neil Alec A. Museum Johnson Alabama Houston New York Baldwin
NASA and SpaceX fly Astronauts to the Space

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

NASA and SpaceX fly Astronauts to the Space

"Other news SpaceX successfully launched two veteran NASA astronaut to orbit on the crew dragon spacecraft from Florida's Kennedy Space Center is pointed at Jerry Litton Jr a former NASA astronaut who flew on the space shuttle spoke live on WWJ today at that site the crew dragon capsule down at the Johnson Space Center and it's kind of a modern feel to it kind of spacious it screens knoll switches per se so it's a definite you know upgrade to the capsules we've had in the

Nasa Florida Kennedy Space Center Jerry Litton Jr WWJ Johnson Space Center
SpaceX launches NASA astronauts from Kennedy Space Center

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

SpaceX launches NASA astronauts from Kennedy Space Center

"Other news SpaceX successfully launched two veteran NASA astronauts into orbit on the crew dragon spacecraft from Florida's Kennedy Space Center this afternoon he's pointed Jerry Lynn injury former NASA astronaut who flew on the space shuttle spoke live on WWJ today at that site the crew dragon capsule down at the Johnson Space Center and it's kind of a modern steel to a kind of spacious it screens knoll switches per se so it's a definite you know upgrade to the capsules we've had

Nasa Florida Kennedy Space Center WWJ Johnson Space Center Jerry Lynn
SpaceX, NASA give final 'go' for historic astronaut launch

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

01:34 min | 2 months ago

SpaceX, NASA give final 'go' for historic astronaut launch

"The first test launch of Richard Branson's virgin orbit rockets fails Joe later reports the virgin orbit is supposed to be a rocket with a cargo of small satellites that rocket carried by a Boeing seven forty seven then propelled into space virgin did a test launch Monday the jet called cosmic girl took off from the Mojave air and space port north of Los Angeles and flew out just be on the Channel Islands the rocket was dropped from beneath the left wing of the job just like it was supposed to but NASA says the mission was soon terminated due to an anomaly no word on what the problem was version says the flight crew returned safely and they've got six more rockets under construction of pick up the mantle and try try again meantime tomorrow is the day to NASA astronauts fly commercial spacecraft up to the international space station marking a return of space flight for the U. S. here's Evan brown NASA and its contractors SpaceX the Elon musk company if made final checks of the crew dragon space capsule that two astronauts are expected to ride in tomorrow **** norm knight is the deputy director of the Johnson Space Center in Houston everything was ready to go and it turned out that it turned out very well we're very happy with that and and again looking forward to going forward Bob banking and Doug Hurley will be the first to ride aboard the so called space taxi the last humans to launch from U. S. soil were in twenty eleven tomorrow's launch is scheduled for just after four thirty PM

Richard Branson JOE Los Angeles Channel Islands Nasa Norm Knight Deputy Director Johnson Space Center Houston Bob Banking Doug Hurley Evan Brown U. S.
May the Fourth Be with You

Innovation Now

01:26 min | 3 months ago

May the Fourth Be with You

"Watching films aboard the International Space Station is one way for the crew to bond and decompress and guess which film just became an astronaut favorite innovation now occasionally NASA is share some of the latest film releases with astronauts on the International Space Station to enjoy at their leisure. Imagine watching your favorite science fiction movie while literally floating in microgravity recently astronauts on station had the opportunity to watch star wars the rise of skywalker while two of the actors from the film got to visit Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran and Naomi. Aki are used to inhabiting galaxies. Far Far Away at least on screen but they spent the day learning about NASA's plans for exploring places a little closer to home. The pair got a chance to train like real astronauts and posed for pictures with some of NASA's robotic explorers while learning about the optimist program whether your favorite is the rise of skywalker or return of the Jedi take a cue from the astronauts and watch a movie today and for all you star wars fans out there may the fourth be with you for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace through with NASA.

Nasa International Space Station Nasa Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran National Institute Of Aerospac AKI Naomi
Keeping an Eye on Earth

NASA ScienceCasts

03:36 min | 3 months ago

Keeping an Eye on Earth

"Earth's climate's is the product of many rich and complex systems. It's affected by water in its many forms on land in the air in the oceans and as is it feels influences from vegetation from soil conditions from the carbon cycle from human impacts. We study and observe our plants. Ever changing conditions in many ways for many locations we'll location in particular provides a unique and powerful vantage point allowing us to see our planet in high detail and on a broad scale space. The International Space Station is home to many instruments that help with the study of our planet in a variety of ways each is an amazing resource for scientists and researchers but together. They paint a picture of earth richer and more detailed than any one instrument could provide from the vantage point of the Orbiting Laboratory. Djeddai measures earth surface vegetation producing three d views of forest height and structure and the surface topography beneath forests and other plant life respond to a variety of environmental stresses and the ECHO. Stress Instrument allows researchers to study plant temperature and provides insights into how life on earth response to changes in water availability. Who's Yo three measures? Atmospheric Co two with high accuracy hoping researchers better understand co two increases and decreases and the impacts of those changes and through the use of to cutting edge spectral images on the station his we and deases researchers have access to highly detailed information on materials across birth surface from identifying minerals and rock types to distinguishing between plant species. There's another and often overlooked. Observational instruments on the space station crew members equipped with digital cameras over three million images have been collected by astronauts from the station and those images can be put to a variety of uses. William Stephens off his branch chief for the Exploration Science Office part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate at Johnson Space Center. He says hand held cameras used by the crew act as a complement to the data gathered by the station's various instruments. And that comes down to the ability of the crew to take pictures that are panoramic and oblique versus a straight down. Look that panoramic view can be quite useful. When observing natural disasters as the occur such as wildfires or volcanic eruptions Stephan explains a camera is an excellent tool for examining the plumes created by wildfires volcanoes. Because it gives you an immediate three dimensional picture. What the plume looks like what it structure is and how far it's extending. The observational instruments aboard. The Space Station provides science capabilities. That are more than the sum of their parts. These instruments along with photography from crew members serve to keep a multifunctional. I on the condition of our home plant

International Space Station Johnson Space Center Exploration Integration And Sc William Stephens Echo Atmospheric Co Exploration Science Office Stephan
Finding the Invisible

NASA ScienceCasts

03:56 min | 5 months ago

Finding the Invisible

"Humans have observed many wonders across the Cosmos yet. Much of our universe is still shrouded in mystery. Among those mysteries is the formation of our universe. Which should have resulted in a balance of matter and its corresponding counterpart any matter. Much of that matter is thought to exist in the form of dark matter which can't be directly observed much of the antimatter can't be found at all studying fundamental particles originating from sources up to billions of light years away may hold the key to understanding both the composition and history of our universe. Welcome to the World of particle physics. Currently being explored from low earth orbit by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer four am so two installed on the International Space Station or ISS planets stars interstellar gas dust but were able to observe across the universe comprises less than five percent of the total content found throughout the universe the other ninety five percent stark dark matter as well as dark energy dark matter doesn't interact with or produce light as far as we know it doesn't consist of normal matter or matter that can be observed directly. So how do you improve understanding of something? That can't be observed. One way is to look for evidence of its interactions. Kurt Castillo the ISIS program. Chief scientist at Johnson. Space Center explains how the giant magnet of Ams. Oh two is working to help. Scientists test and modify their theories. Scientists are using to to look at cosmic rays charged particles that travel near the speed of light. Ams Oh to categorizes each cosmic ray looking at a high energy range to see whether that's stellar phenomena that we can measure can account for all of the cosmic rays. We're seeing but if you see something in the spectrum that doesn't fit is and this could be evidence of dark matter. Interactions by studying cosmic rays. Scientists are also able to search for antimatter. The Big Bang theory of the universe's origin requires a fifty fifty ratio of matter to antimatter but to date. The amount of antimatter. Found doesn't come close to matching the amount of matter known to exist. Castillo says one of the goals of the mission is to detect antimatter and see if there are any large collections of it out there somewhere when particles pass through the strong magnetic field produced by Ams oh to their pads bent antimatter particles standout because their paths bend in The Opposite Direction compared to matter particles the instruments searches for antimatter with the sensitivity. Three orders of magnitude greater than the original. Ams which flew in space in June of nineteen ninety eight aboard the space shuttle Discovery. This could support the discovery of antimatter. Pools that were previously. Undetectable a key factor in our ability to get the most out of AMS. Oh to his time originally expected to have a life span of three years. The instrument has continued to perform into its eighth year of operation aboard the orbiting laboratory in late. Twenty one thousand nine hundred and early twenty. Twenty astronauts conducted a series of spacewalks to replace AMS. O Two's cooling pumps which were failing extending the life of the instrument will provide scientists more time in their quest to unveil some of the universe's greatest mysteries

AMS Kurt Castillo International Space Station Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Space Center Scientist Isis Johnson
What Would Space Do to the Human Body?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 5 months ago

What Would Space Do to the Human Body?

"Hey brain stuff. It's Christian Sagar. Do you remember that? Time in Battle Star Galactica when that one character was blown out an airlock into outer space without a suit. No what about when it happened in two thousand one or guardians of the galaxy or sunshine. Yes we all dream about traveling in space but movies are any indication we spend almost as much time thinking about flying around up there without a suit on. So let's answer this question once and for all what would space actually due to a human body. Well here's the good news. You wouldn't die instantly y-you might actually survive for a little bit out there. How do we know because somebody tested it out on dogs in nineteen sixty five researchers at Brooks Air Force Base in Texas exposed several dogs to a near vacuum? The dog survived for up to ninety seconds. But if they went two minutes or more they died when re pressurized and if your first thought is they did this two dogs look. I'm I'm right there with you. Researchers at NASA did the same to chimpanzees in the late nineteen sixties finding that they could last up to three point five minutes. And then there's been a few accidents where people got D and then re pressurized like technician at Johnson Space Center who lost consciousness after twelve seconds. This was just before the moisture on his tongue began to boil. That's right his tongue boiled seat without air pressure to keep your precious bodily fluids in their liquid state. They would rapidly lose heat energy before they froze and then evaporated totally. This isn't the worst thing the lack of pressure can do to you. Either the gases inside you would expand causing you to swell up like a balloon in a Thanksgiving Day parade. This includes air and gas bubbles formed from your boiling bodily fluids. That affect is called. Ed Bula Sam which can block your bloodstream with those bubbles and that would cause you to pass out in about fifteen seconds from the lack of blood flowing into your brain your skin's blood vessels would burst. Your internal organs would also swell in likely tear. But you wouldn't explode in total recall. You just stretch painfully until you died. Keep in mind so far. We've only been talking about the effects to a body

Brooks Air Force Base Johnson Space Center Christian Sagar Ed Bula Sam Nasa Technician Texas
Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

Liftoff

06:49 min | 5 months ago

Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

"An interesting idea. It's from a division of Northrop Grumman and what measures one is is. It's a satellite that has a grappler so we can grab other things in space and a lot of fuel and the idea of the program is you can extend the life of satellite that has run out of fuel and his either GonNa be parked or de orbited depending on where it is And and here's the challenge. Satellites are not made with gas caps. They're not generally built to be serviced by other satellites. That doesn't generally happen So you can see what's going on here. North Grim thinks that there is a market in building a satellite that is cheaper to launch and use to extend the life of an older satellite than it would be replaced. That satellite right. It's just it's simple economics here. What if we could make that satellite of yours? That's about to die last another five years. How what would that be worth to you? And if that number is lower than or higher than the price we would charge. Let's say or something like that. You do the math you know like. Oh that's better. Let's do that. So that's what that's what one did a demo with an eighteen year old satellite from. Its until nine one What Intelsat did is moved into a different orbit? So was up there. They actually moved. Until set up to the mid one orbit taking it out of service in doing so and meth one docked with Intelsat nine and one so came a few grabbed it with its grappling system. It's docking system and is now in the process of or over the next month or two is going to push Intelsat back into an operational orbit it will go back in operation and it will have five years more life this eighteen year old satellite with with a buddy satellite attached to it at the end of the five year period when it when Intel sat thinks it's reached the end of its operational. Life is then going to raise it up to a graveyard orbit like we talked about last time where where it's higher orbit above Geo Stationary Orbit. Where there's not a lot of stuff and it doesn't matter if there's dead stuff up there it's not a big deal so they're gonNA they're gonNA push up to a graveyard orbit So that's awesome five years extra life by adding a buddy satellite that can keep it operational and That's not all the plan then is after five years is one will grapple and can go somewhere else and do it again with a different saddling. Reasonable Buddy satellite right as long as it's got propellant and it can grapple stuff it can get to what it needs to grapple. It could do this so you have to is also coming later this year. They're going to use it for a different intelsat satellite and the goal. This time is because you know they wasted propel underuse propellant in taking it out of service and taking it somewhere else to try this the next one. They're going to do it in place. They're literally going to just drive over to wear that. Intelsat. Satellite is while it's operational and just grab it and then extend its life by having new propellant ability to move and even though because generally what seems to be happening. I mean if something breaks something breaks this is not something with like robot surgery to fix up circuit board or something. Although I think a future this stuff is that but in the short term. It's this satellite is cost us. Hundreds of millions of dollars is incredibly expensive electronics. And the only thing. We're missing is propellant. Well that's what the system is. Basically doing is like we will send up a thing full propellant and attach and move your satellite around for you. The great idea until sat says the economics work for them. Which if the economics and work for until SAT IN FOR NORTH OF GRUMMIN? This is really cool. Because you're extending the life of this stuff. It's almost like recycling in outer space. Like you're extending the life of this and you can see how this could get way more complicated down the road in terms of allowing tele presence cars of satellites there. You know the further out. They are the more of a delay. There is but when when you think back to the Hubble missions where they had to fix the Hubble Space Telescope over the course of decades say that was a user serviceable astronaut serviceable thing or I s space walks. You can see and you and I actually saw at least one of these at at Johnson Space Center the experimenting with a robot that can crawl around on the outside of the space station and do repairs. You could also see that. Same kind of thing. Po- possibility for one of these mission extension vehicle satellites to be able to potentially even do repairs. Come you know come by do a repair mission. And if that costs less than replacing the satellite. It's totally worth it. So it was very exciting. There's a lot of this being talked about. Nasa has a plan to do a spacecraft. That's GonNa Attach to an old land sat satellite in low-earth-orbit and and do a connection these. The mavs are built for geostationary orbit. I believe there's a Japanese company that we've mentioned on this before that wants to make like a sticky like web or arm satellite. That can actually just kind of like run into space junk and a ten. Yeah stick to it so that it's no longer space debris so there's a lot of this. We're entering a phase where one of the opportunities business opportunities in space is and from a different angle. You see it with spacex reusing. Its vehicles reusing. Its its first stage is that you make this incredibly expensive satellite and you leave it up there and it's got a lifespan. And then it dies. And it's like a disposable satellite and now there are companies coming along and saying what if we could take that disposable satellite and make it recyclable instead and extend its life and then move it out of the way. It's it you know it makes access to space cheaper right because it means that the stuff is serviceable and presumably over time. My mind started to raise as I was reading the story like presumably over time you would end up with things like perhaps some standard equipment like standard actual docking attachment. And things like that. Where it's like can we all agree? That the satellite's going to have this thing on it so that one of these buddies can come up later and refuel it maybe or or attached to it and move it around but there's so much that's already up there so is they figured it out. Like where do you grab on? How do you hold on? Is it GonNa work and it seems to work. It's awesome

Intelsat Northrop Grumman Hubble Space Telescope North Grim Johnson Space Center Mavs Intel Nasa Low-Earth-Orbit
Frozen on Return

Innovation Now

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Frozen on Return

"Of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years. These samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future one of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into the lunar regular with during Apollo seventeen the core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers exactly as they existed on the Moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the

Apollo Johnson Space Center Nasa
Unlocking the Origins of the Universe

NASA ScienceCasts

01:58 min | 9 months ago

Unlocking the Origins of the Universe

"Largest human made permanent magnets in space resides on the International Space Station or I S and it's helping scientists better understand the origins of our universe the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer or ams. Oh Two is an observatory server Tori that is collecting data from measurements of cosmic rays nuclei from hydrogen up to iron as well as electrons and positron that pervade all of our universe in the original. Ams was launched on the space shuttle in Nineteen Ninety eight to test the concept of using powerful magnet to conduct in-depth studies as of Subatomic particles coming from millions of light years from the Milky Way Ams. Oh two was installed on the space station in two thousand eleven with a projected lifespan of three years eight years later it's still working having already measured in categorized almost one hundred forty billion cosmic rays studying. These particles can help researchers understand their origin in ways not possible on earth whose atmosphere effects them data has been captured from sources of positron at high energies. That could be evidence of dark matter. Hut invisible form of matter that makes up most of the mass content of the universe. More data is needed before scientists can better explain these results. This space based Observatory is essential to helping scientists answer many fundamental physics questions but with Amsa to now five years beyond the lifetime it was designed for will it last long enough to give scientists the information formation they seek Dr Kirk Costello the ISS program chief scientist at Johnson Space Center says that's why astronauts are conducting a series of spacewalks squawks known as extra vehicular activities or V. as in the fall of Twenty Nineteen Ams oh two uses for cooling systems that circulate liquid would co two. Three of those

International Space Station Space Based Observatory AMS Johnson Space Center Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Dr Kirk Costello Tori Amsa Scientist Eight Years Three Years Five Years
An Immeasurable Legacy

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 10 months ago

An Immeasurable Legacy

"He created the concept of NASA's mission control this is innovation now. Christopher C kraft was one of the eighteen members who helped put humans in space and on the moon craft joined the NASA space task group in Nineteen Fifty Eight as Nasr's I in his honor but Christopher crafts legacy was immeasurable we joined NASA in paying tribute to one of spaceflights earliest pioneers grams. For realising America's vision of Space Exploration Nasr's Johnson Space Center named Building Thirty Housing Mission Control for innovation now I'm Jennifer pulling innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA

Nasa Space Exploration Nasr Christopher C Kraft Nasr Johnson Space Center National Institute Of Aerospac America Jennifer
August 1973: Crisis Looms for Skylab

American Innovations

02:51 min | 10 months ago

August 1973: Crisis Looms for Skylab

"August one thousand nine hundred seventy three at the Johnson Space Center in Houston access a pair of astronauts named Fans Brand and Don Lind sit inside command module simulator in full spacesuits brand works read one hundred percent how much fuel we have left you've got about seven minutes is that enough for a full retro burn that's -firmative simulation they're running as a reentry into the earth's atmosphere from space but there's a twist in this simulation their module has lost two of the thrusters it would normally use what's called a retro burn of reverse thrust used slow the module down so it comes out of orbit to compensate for the missing thrusters they're using smaller set there were only designed to help steer the module not slow it down at stake in the simulation or the fate of three astronauts aboard Skylab America's first I space station to thrusters on their command module have failed leaving them potentially stranded if this simulation doesn't work Brandon Lynn will have to fly Second Command module up to Skylab to retrieve the crew a risky procedure in a simulator brand works hand controllers checks his gauges like we're locked on our reentry quarter engineering can you confirm your locked in advance that's a successful reentry nice work brand let's go of the controllers both brand and lind have been NASA astronauts for over seven years but they've never flown in space they would have loved to have been the heroes who brought the Skylab crew home they also know that the safety of their fellow astronauts comes first and the re entry procedure that they've just figured out will be safer for everyone then a complicated rescue mission next morning aboard Skylab Commander Alan Bean wakes up to the sound of the space station's teleprinter he scans the new reentry and nations can calls out to his crewmates good news gentlemen we are officially no longer stranded ray break out the champagne tape we don't have any since Skylab I launched its lost a heat shield a solar array and very nearly a command module down all those problems have been solved being hopes that his crew can prove that living and working in space doesn't have to be a series of crises once they adjust to life aboard Skylab maybe living space can be almost normal maybe

Johnson Space Center Don Lind Skylab America Brandon Lynn Alan Bean Houston Nasa Commander One Hundred Percent Seven Minutes Seven Years
Moon Rocks

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 10 months ago

Moon Rocks

"NASA has selected teams from across the country to study untouched moon samples. This is innovation now. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future nine teams of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying in pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years these samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future. One of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into into the lunar regular with during Apollo Seventeen. The core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers players exactly as they existed on the moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the samples have ever been exposed to Earth's atmosphere atmosphere by studying these samples for the first time with today's more advanced and sophisticated technology. A new generation of scientists will advance our understanding of our lunar neighbor helping NASA prepare for our return to the moon for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H R V.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Apollo Johnson Space Center Fifty Years
How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

In Black America

22:58 min | 11 months ago

How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

"From

"johnson space center" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"And had purchased some light globes and filled with water and blue and put it on a frame and it agitated to see what kind of amick response you got from a scale model of <hes> of the mortgage vehicle and it was at fresh approach to say look the the endpoint high fidelity aerospace solutions are definitely important important but what kind of things can you do that are practical engineering to take advantage of of capabilities and that that kind of set the tone for for a lot of thought processes. We've had in the last decade to think about how do you how do you look at something just a little bit different and and get a an innovative innovative result. That's great. That's a much simpler solution than trying to find who is going to do that analysis for you and it's like no. I just taped a couple of things together. Shook it around a bit to get an easy enough answer for us to lead us in the right direction as right ended and then the flights proved it out so we're we're very happy with the result so you mentioned project morpheus. That's something i'm particularly interested in. There's a ton of heritage there from that project but i'm curious what happens between between maybe you can give us a short history of project morpheus. We've mentioned it before on the show but in case there are some people that haven't heard of it before maybe shorten history and then i'm very curious what what has happened between the end of that program and where you are today looking ahead to landing on the moon in two years well i think <hes> the spirit of project and project morpheus is the is the basis of what intuitive machines was founded against right right so back in two thousand nine you know we were frustrated about the direction of the agency and where we were headed and what we were trying to build and how we we're gonna move humans off the planet for exploration and here i sat at the head of <hes> johnson space center engineering which is essentially you know i would argue the n._f._l. Of engineering very capable organization and we're kind of <hes> without any clear direction of where the agency i had to go for exploration we were kind of ferrari running at idle and it would be great if we could step on the gas and and show the world where we were gonna go so as an organization so we kinda came up with this put a walking robot on the moon in one thousand as as a as a very powerful descriptive descriptive language kind of project or program that would excite the american people in the world a lot of resistance to that in the beginning but then slowly slowly it caught on because what it did was it was gave us an entrepreneurial kind of sense of what you could do by thinking differently and while you're still in the government and we built in a very short order you know it was three year project turned out to be four year project or so but we did a three year project. We're going to build a a a locksmith liquid oxygen liquid methane propelled lunar terrestrial testbed and use advanced navigation sensors in precision landing <unk> hazard avoidance software and show that you could actually they get to the moon and in the process also build a walking robot which by the way ended up on international space station but we pushed that four bird and even in the with the resistance of nasa in beginning the beginning to work on a technology development project that was not aligned with the major programs at the time it was constellation program iran and the and the al-tair lander. What are you guys doing it over here. What is this pocket of piracy engineering. That's going on and they started to watch and learn over months that we were asked to flying lying. We're operating differently. We were flying tethered. Tests were then flat moving to free flight tests and there was a lot of excitement in the team..

johnson space center ferrari nasa iran three year four year two years
"johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

"Johnson Space Center in Houston. AP correspondent Shelley Adler reports, Nasr's mission control from the Apollo days took years of work and millions of dollars. Donations Johnson Space Center director, Mark Geier, says not only does it have the same wallpaper the team that put it together manage to recreate the carpet. They also found some of the original carpeting on under some of the, the consoles, and they found the same company and they created a incredible fact simile so again attention to detail just like attention to detail able the landing on the moon. This was a great team making that happen. Nasr's mission control from nineteen sixty-nine open to the public Monday, just weeks before the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven moon landing, I'm Shelley Adler planned explosion, knocked down the remaining. Of the Italian bridge, that collapsed allows the blood d-, Gino cricket a huge cloud of grayish Dennis as the pillars and roadbed leaned in would then crumbled like, ascend Kozel in a few seconds, the Morandi bridge was history with Dave refueling into the riverbed under one hand being a key link between the high speed highway leading to the French Riviera and another highway linking Genoa, a major city to Milan some three thousand five hundred people who live nearby had been evacuated as a precaution on Thursday. And before dawn Friday ahead of the planned blast fun hoses sprayed water to reduce triggered by the blast still the cloud of dust and Davey seemed to Duncan the sunny sky. He's Scarlett Johansson, fiance and co host of Saturday Night Live weekend update. And he leads this weekend's birthday round. Weekend update on Michael J. I'm Colin Jost, who's turning thirty seven on Saturday. Lily ribs, been seen on American horror story in several roles including the possess. None, Mary Eunice. I tell you that won't happen against she's a run day with Kim Jong Hoon, I'm Jacky Quin within AP, news minute. President Trump at the g twenty summit in Japan says he's asked North Korea's leader to meet him at the DMZ when he visits Korea. I did is put out a feeler of like to meet the president says it was spur of the moment, and that his relationship with Kim has prevented war there've been a number of abortion, rulings today. Kentucky doctors will still be required to show patience ultrasound images of a fetus before the procedure, but a judge has blocked Indiana from banning a late term abortion procedure. The US supreme court meanwhile declined to revive a similar law in Alabama, the NTSB says a pilot and a person inside a home or killed with a plane crashed into the house in Fayetteville North Carolina. From the FAA, he had landed just taken off and was coming around again for another landing a man who spent nearly three decades in prison for the nineteen eighty nine killing of an Oregon prison director has been freed. I'm Jacky, Quin, AP, digital news. Back in a moment. Thank you. Get to old navy Saturday only women's and girls' tanks are on sale for just two bucks. That's right. Just two bucks. No.

Kim Jong Hoon Shelley Adler Jacky Quin Scarlett Johansson AP Nasr Johnson Space Center director Mary Eunice North Korea President Trump Mark Geier Morandi bridge Italian bridge Houston Colin Jost Kentucky FAA president
"johnson space center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Producer. And what does that mean? Then working from ten PM to six AM, and you were essentially, the only person awaken the entire Washington Post on this side of the world. So you were the Washington Post nerve center in essence. Yes. And so if anything happened overnight or early in the morning, it was your job to wake everybody up and update the homepage. Save time. Eventually was essentially the posts I any nerve racking moments during doing trying to think not really because I didn't do it that long, and then I did early mornings. I remember there were some nerve wracking early mornings. But there were never really any terrible overnight. Eventually became a what essentially amounts to imbed or or the people who follow around candidates with their cameras, and they're recording equipment and their notebooks and their laptops. During the await cycle for the post, but instead of being assigned to one person I got to travel to see all of them in a centrally. So everyone from John Edwards to John McCain and was mostly embedding with David broder and van bolts and found Weisman name corn shayla, very who where the post reporters covering those campaigns. And my job was to chew of those names are flat out legendary, Dan vaults and David broder. But I don't think I'm offending the others. They would agree and essentially bringing their work in print onto the internet, which still was in its infancy, right especially video, and they headed in video work for the post and podcasting. So being a part of this one takes me back to one of my earliest assignments with the post, which was not writing it was podcast, right? And at the end of that they said, well, you could keep doing this. You could go cover Washington. I said great. What are you going to cover the White House? Congress federal agencies. I said, well, I know nothing about the federal one. Is there a lot of citizens? You get all the ones that beat reporter. I said, well, I don't know anything about them. And the editor literally said to me major perfect you start next Tuesday. Right. Oh for four years. That was my anything that didn't have a beat I covered. And what I didn't realize that. I appreciate now. It was fantastic training in how Washington works because you get a real sense of the people that run those places get what did you learn the Marlins might appreciate well first of all that eighty five percent of people who worked for the federal government. Don't do it in Washington DC. They're all over the country. Right. Only about fifteen percent of feds federal employees live here in the Washington area. Most of the contractors that make big money live here in the DC area. That's why this series exploded so much through the years. But most of them are in regional offices are in tiny USDA offices out in farmland or at the Johnson Space Center in Texas or at the federal management. Absolutely any of the Federal Reserve offices across on of engineer, everything totally. So that was you know, because that's a famous talking point the faceless bureaucrats in Washington. They don't live in Washington. They live in congr-. Districts in every congressional district across the country. So that was one of the bigger revelations, but got to cover the repeal of don't ask don't tell the old Bannon gays and lesbians serving in uniform, and that was my introduction to congress. And it was through that watching that process.

Washington Post Washington DC David broder Federal Reserve Producer. congr White House congress Dan vaults Bannon John McCain Marlins USDA John Edwards reporter Weisman Texas editor Johnson Space Center engineer
"johnson space center" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"And also meeting anti Glenn his wife who is absolutely still the most delightful person, you imagine just a wonderful couple in a very very nice person Anna's. And then I was the lead scientist the same role for us seven the last mission of Columbia. So we had a very successful science mission. Which of course, as, you know, ended very tragically, but we still got a reasonable amount of results scientific results of out of that mission to to justify, you know, at least part of the of the the cruise loss. And then after that, I was of a part of the Johnson Space Center Mars, mission planning organization. So I got a chance to to see how the Mars mission would be developing and understand some of the constraints that were then valuable they were then valuable when it came time to to stand up the human research program NASA semen research program, which was established in about two thousand five by my Griffin. And the HR P had and has the charter specifically of preparing for astronaut flights to Mars than I like to say that we learn things about biology physiology in spaceflight, and if we happen to cure a disease along the way, well, we're sorry. That was not the intention. We're all about preparing astronauts. But you know, sometimes these things happen. We just can't avoid it. So far we haven't curated diseases. But we are getting a good handle. I think what happens to astronauts spaceflight and through through my time in HR PE, I became the chief scientist of the human research program, which really was the pinnacle of my career that was my dream job. And I'm here to tell you it is possible to reach your dream job and still have a life afterwards. I'm only sixty.

scientist Johnson Space Center Glenn Columbia Anna Griffin
"johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"And now be just introducing you today. If you're familiar with us, this is where we bring in scientists engineers and astronauts Alta, let you know the cool stuff about what's going on right here at NASA. So on today's episode we're doing something a little different something special in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight. You'll notice that this is part two for part one. We had the resident historian. Dr Jennifer rosina's Zell of the Johnson Space Center in the studio to take us back fifty years on the golden anniversary of the Apollo eight launch. We discuss details on the mission itself. And even broaden some interviews with some of the astronauts of that flight today were moving out of the studio and onto the stage to bring you some of the legends behind Apollo eight. We had a panel discussion hosted here at the Johnson Space Center for our workforce. And today, we're bringing that discussion to you just trying. Something a little different this time. The event occurred on November first twenty eighteen it was moderated by Vanessa white. The current deputy director of the Johnson Space Center seated next to her on the stage where Apollo astronauts, Walt Cunningham, the Apollo seven lunar module pilot Glenn loonie flight director for Apollo seven and eight Gerry Griffin. Apollo seven flight director and former director of the Johnson Space Center from eighty to eighty six and ginger Kerrick. The current chief of the flight integration division. And a former flight director white pose several questions to these legends to get some insight into what made these historic flights successful and how we can apply. These successes to our future endeavors. So continuing our celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight and the historic achievements of the Apollo program. We bring this special presentation on Houston. We have a podcast enjoy. County. Mark. We have. It is my pleasure to introduce the panel, and then to moderate these are folks that have a luxurious careers was going to take a little time to go through introductions. So, but please applause after each one as I go. So I we have Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham Walt has forty five years of diversified management. Experience accumulated at the highest levels during separate careers in private industry government service and the US military with notable achievements in each he was a United States, Marine corps, Colonel and fighter pilot. He was a NASA astronaut and program manager, he was Apollo seven, astronauts and lunar module pilot, his private sector career included venture capital real estate offshore pipeline and consulting engineering industries chief executive and senior operating positions. A few of his many awards include a national NASA, exceptional service medal distinguished service medal a medal.

Johnson Space Center Apollo Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham director Walt Cunningham United States deputy director Zell Vanessa white Dr Jennifer rosina Gerry Griffin ginger Kerrick Glenn loonie chief executive Houston Marine corps program manager forty five years
"johnson space center" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"I wanted to play that whole thing just to give more of a sense of the dorm room of bullshit are-, the the nature of the conversation. So after this clip went out into the world. A NASA spokesman offered to give a tour of the Johnson Space Center, and as well as show him a bunch of moon rocks the Sacramento Kings trolled curry with moon landing footage during player intros. Curry later told the SPN that he'd been joking that he was going to take NASA on its offer for the tour of the space centre. Vinson was Steph curry joking. You know, what I don't think? So when I heard it when I heard that it had happened when I read that it had happened. I guess I should say I thought no he's either kind of trolling or as some people have said, you know, jealously going after the sort of conspiracy theory market after Kyrie I entered it, but listening to it. I don't know. I think that when we hear athletes do these conspiracy theories. It's just a way to remind us that like a lot of people believe a lot of weird stuff. A lot of time on their hands too. Yeah. He's been playing basketball his whole life and just talking to his friends in settings like this. You know, I I wouldn't. I mean, I've had my haircut by guy that tried to tell me about the alumina like, I don't know. This is how people are. So I think he kinda meant it. And I think he quickly realized that that was not a majority opinion and has had to switch it up. Weekly realized that it was I mean, I mean, you know, the the conspiracy about the conspiracy about whether he was just trolling kyri is fun in a very, oh, my God, the NBA so entertaining sort of way, Kyrie Irving who said last year that the earth is flat and walked it back eventually took him a while to walk it back. We're going to play a clip for a minute. Go ahead. I think we want to believe that curry said that he believes that we didn't go to the moon as part of this broader NBA fun narrative like, oh, it's so wacky. And the players are sort of sub tweeting each other in real life all the time. Nathaniel Friedman had a Twitter thread in which he said curry is a basketball genius, but carbon copying the God kyri like that is more proof that he is a total lame kyri is supposed to be a weirdo flat earth was on brand. So Steph, I mean, maybe it's partly because of the lake under armor shoes, which got like kidded about which were fairly basic with his, you know, waifs cooking show, and he always just seems like pretty like stayed guy doesn't want to say the wrong thing. And so that's what Friedman is talking about there that this just seems like a totally. Like, not staff momentous seems like maybe he's trying to hard. But I think you're right Vinson and like. This is just a guy who's like watched a lot of videos on YouTube, and as we've as we've read about, and as I think we've seen in personal experience when you watch like one YouTube video it will suggest like twelve more of it YouTube videos to you about how the moon landing was a hoax or the earth is flat. Just go down the rabbit hole. And you start to to believe it. And I think that it can happen to anyone. I don't think just because you know, you're you don't have to be kyri Irving to to believe in stuff you watch on YouTube. Speaking of like YouTube, and it's trajectories I think we should all be happy that like flat earth stuff and the moon landing is the farthest we've seen in NBA player. Go like, I mean, there's a an alternate reality in which Steph curry is saying this elect Jordan Peterson right like. Jordan Peterson is popular NBA locker rooms. I bet you he is. I bet you. I mean who was it. All Goss peed on him into the Seahawks to talk. Yeah. I mean, he's telling people to like, you know, stand up straighten clean their rooms and stuff. I'm sure like there is a a world in which you know. A lot of players are watching that stuff and worse. So like as long as nobody's like bringing up Quillet articles. I think we should be happy. Let's listen to Kyrie Irving. So this was what? Stephan was alluding to before..

Steph curry Kyrie Irving YouTube Vinson NBA Jordan Peterson Johnson Space Center Nathaniel Friedman Sacramento Kings basketball Stephan Twitter Seahawks Goss
"johnson space center" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Here & Now

"I think I arriving really did believe that or to the extent that he had strong beliefs. He he wasn't kidding. I have no idea if Steph curry was kidding. I don't know. Why? I don't exactly know what the joke was there. I don't know why the other two guys agreed with him. But I find this disturbing a my a my so uncalled to think that of exactly what you said Jeremy that a prominent guy who little kids and teenagers, and maybe even adults like me look up to could say this and normalize a wackadoo conspiracy theory. Maybe it's because I'm stuck in the mud journalist. But I don't like even giving voice to these theories. And if this seems funny and benign, we have seen so many instances where the infection of non-fiction with conspiracy thought truth in the real world has had terrible consequences. So I really didn't love this. I would much rather have my NBA players. You know being fascinated by lunar modules or something. Having to do and rooted in actual line. And at least Steph curry now says he will happily accept Nasr's invitation to tour the lunar lab at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Mike Pesca here now sports analysts and editor of the book upon further review, the greatest what ifs in sports history. What if Steph curry was right was right? Right. Thanks. Welcome. VR w association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here..

Steph curry Jeremy Hobson Mike Pesca BBC World Service Robin young NBA Johnson Space Center Houston editor Nasr
"johnson space center" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So the bay focus that we do is billing planning scheduling tools is so I get to actually learn about everybody else's job in order to create these offer tools. So and then I get to test field them in different places. So I get to learn about how trainers might be teaching astronauts how to do their job. I get to go to mission control. Learn how they control robots how they manage the international space station, how they schedule astronauts time, and all we take all that information in order to build and design our tools, and then we get to test them in different environments. We've gone to test them everywhere from underwater in the extreme environments of analogues. We also work in analogs, but these analogues Dona -sarily have to. To simulate a planetary environment. It is simulating some aspect of mission control. So they have a slightly different or they're trying to push some aspect of human spaceflight, maybe 'isolation. So we give them our tools, and we get feedback. I've gotten to go to places like volcanoes and the mission under the water in underwater. The Arctic mission control of Johnson Space Center. I'm sorry tool has been up in space station. So that was also very exciting. Pretty cool mission control is the the brain of the space missions, right where they're controlling. How would you describe it? Yeah. So mission control. So we have astronauts up in space ation, and they're super busy and the whole entire space station is manage by a huge team of controllers back on ground. And so they're located physically in Johnson Space Center, but there's also different smaller mission controls. I'm in Europe in Japan, and we have another one in Alabama. We also actually have one here. Nasa Ames, and they all coordinate to make sure that the space station is healthy that all the science payloads are working and that we're keeping the science the sorry. The astronauts working if they have any questions, we keep them healthy. So did you bring a photo? I think she did. And this one has a really cool background story. Yes. So this is a picture of me in at NASA Johnson Space Center in mission control. So this is when we did our first appointment of our tool up in space station. So I got to sit down in mission control. And I got to talk on the loops, which is just the the way they talk that the the communication loops that they have and. Yeah, it was very excited. We got to talk to the astronauts and work with them that whole week that we were there through your voice is forever like down in the NASA record. So I was actually very hesitant to talk during during the mission and one of my colleagues was sitting in the front room. So there's actually multiple not only are there thousands of people that multiple rooms so sitting in one of the back rooms and someone in the front room calls over, and it's like, please give me a status on playbook. That's our tool and so forced me to actually talk on the loop. So that might Boyce was forever. Tempted to say Houston, we have a problem. I actually very hesitant about talking because it is they are listening to so many conversations that I didn't want to like add to that problem or add to that workload. So I was actually very much like I'm gonna just be here. Unless I have to talk them only gonna talk, but he called me out..

Johnson Space Center Nasa Ames NASA Johnson Space Center Boyce NASA Europe Arctic Houston Japan Alabama
"johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So the bay focus that we do is billing planning scheduling tools is so I get to actually learn about everybody else's job in order to create these offer tools. So and then I get to test field them in different places. So I get to learn about how trainers might be teaching astronauts how to do their job. I get to go to mission control. Learn how they control robots how they manage the international space station, how they schedule astronauts time, and all we take all that information in order to build and design our tools, and then we get to test them in different environments. We've gone to test them everywhere from underwater in the extreme environments of analogues. We also work in analogs, but these analogues Dona -sarily have to. To simulate a planetary environment. It is simulating some aspect of mission control. So they have a slightly different or they're trying to push some aspect of human spaceflight, maybe 'isolation. So we give them our tools, and we get feedback. I've gotten to go to places like volcanoes and the mission under the water in underwater. The Arctic mission control of Johnson Space Center. I'm sorry tool has been up in space station. So that was also very exciting. Pretty cool mission control is the the brain of the space missions, right where they're controlling. How would you describe it? Yeah. So mission control. So we have astronauts up in space ation, and they're super busy and the whole entire space station is manage by a huge team of controllers back on ground. And so they're located physically in Johnson Space Center, but there's also different smaller mission controls. I'm in Europe in Japan, and we have another one in Alabama. We also actually have one here. Nasa Ames, and they all coordinate to make sure that the space station is healthy that all the science payloads are working and that we're keeping the science the sorry. The astronauts working if they have any questions, we keep them healthy. So did you bring a photo? I think she did. And this one has a really cool background story. Yes. So this is a picture of me in at NASA Johnson Space Center in mission control. So this is when we did our first appointment of our tool up in space station. So I got to sit down in mission control. And I got to talk on the loops, which is just the the way they talk that the the communication loops that they have and. Yeah, it was very excited. We got to talk to the astronauts and work with them that whole week that we were there through your voice is forever like down in the NASA record. So I was actually very hesitant to talk during during the mission and one of my colleagues was sitting in the front room. So there's actually multiple not only are there thousands of people that multiple rooms so sitting in one of the back rooms and someone in the front room calls over, and it's like, please give me a status on playbook. That's our tool and so forced me to actually talk on the loop. So that might Boyce was forever. Tempted to say Houston, we have a problem. I actually very hesitant about talking because it is they are listening to so many conversations that I didn't want to like add to that problem or add to that workload. So I was actually very much like I'm gonna just be here. Unless I have to talk them only gonna talk, but he called me out..

Johnson Space Center Nasa Ames NASA Johnson Space Center Boyce NASA Europe Arctic Houston Japan Alabama
"johnson space center" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"And being a community college professor in south Phoenix again in my mind. I'm thinking the non pilot, astronauts are all these amazing people who are truly rocket scientists. And I really had to work my way through and not have really fun conversations with the voice inside my head about why I belonged and. How awesome and cool. This was that I was going to Johnson Space Center. Okay. So talk to us about the the flight down to Johnson Space Center, and and your experience. Our years exploding of excitement you are exploding. But also the butterflies because you have no idea. I mean, you're going, you know, it's it's the right stuff kind of thing the top of the top and you land, and they bring you in groups of ten, and, you know, the first thing people ask you in any high power group is what do you do? All right. There were the fighter pilots, and there were the doctors, and there were the well Harvard MIT professors, and then they ask you, and you say, we'll I'm a community calls professor in Phoenix Arizona, and I think people have this perception of, you know, well community college. What exactly does that mean because you're not K through twelve? So you're not or high school. And I think people understood that NASA had a teacher in space program, and that they had taken that some teachers, but I think that they all. Also were kind of like community college. So you not at the university would is that in in. How did you end up here if your community college, and I I gotta hand it to NASA. And I think Leland Melvin the astronaut because he was very big into education for recognizing that the community. College is a vital source for educating our citizens in the United States, and that the Batman me and staff in the in a student's fund, the community, college are all are amazing. And that you can have people that are at the community college doing amazing things and God. Yeah. I mean that just must have been incredible. And at the same time like you said, the impostor syndrome just just from that haven't thought about that. Also, you're a woman of color, right? I mean, so so what was the process than? And and sorta how everything ended up there, can you tell us how that worked through. Yes. So I showed up and there were again, we're in groups of generally ten, but we had eleven another person was added in. And then you go for either Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Wednesday Thursday Friday. And so you had one group of ten at the beginning of the week and the other group of ten at the end of the week and you cross dove on Wednesday. So it one time there's anywhere from, you know, eighteen to twenty one of you in this kind of cohort that NASA is wooing, and they have a social event where net astronauts come. And you get kind of talk to them on that Wednesday. And you the the most intimidating part is going in for the interview, of course, because it's not a one on one interview issue, and basically the NASA selection committee, which is I think it was. It was definitely over ten people. It was a nice. Big not intimidating, and you kind of sit in there, and you're like, okay. Who's who? And and you're just so nervous going into that interview. And but you're also excited, and you're, you know, for me, I think part of the thing with having the impostor syndrome is you can't believe that you're there anyway. So you just gonna enjoy it until they kick you out. And so you just like, well, I'm not gonna get any this might as well enjoy every minute. Sure..

NASA professor Phoenix Arizona Johnson Space Center Leland Melvin Harvard MIT United States Batman
"johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I assess what happens onward is clinically, and so we have a epidemiology group at the Johnson Space Center that the very kindly compiled a lot of that data for us through the first forty or so. I s expeditions. In fact, they do have some degree of clinical incidents onboard station, and we generally haven't heard a lot about that. It's not a tremendous amount. It's nothing that's. Of of a serious concern. I think for for Nassar for the public, but it's happening. And so even factious diseases on board is s some rear crews have some dermatitis issues persist during flight. And so- characterizing that on ISS is a very prudent thing to do because we don't want things like that to get worse on the way to Mars. But you mentioned the return option and yes, we have that rapid return option on board, I and we won't have that on the way to Mars. And so we very, definitely need to characterize the human system onboard. I assess during orbital spaceflight before we put it in this smaller more constrained vehicle and put it out into this higher energy radiation environment for say, several years mission to another planet. That's right. Now. Now, based on what we know for from an immunology perspective, we talked a little bit with Dr Anne. Johnson again about medication, do we do we know enough about immunology? Where is is, is there something universal that we can apply to the astronauts maybe medication or maybe some sort of countermeasure that can help prevent it, or is there? Is there a more personalized route that we really have to be considerate considering like a personalized medication or something? Some kind of I don't know something, which networks I'm not sure. Well, you made a very good point before when we were talking about getting a cold in the medication to take after that or a treatment. Yeah. So you can look at the med kit onward station and parse that out into, okay, what are the treatments most of it is treatments, but what are the countermeasures in the countermeasure is something that you're going to take before you get sick, right, and try and prevent the development of illness because you're fixing what's broken in your physiology and and that is something that the community is still discussing, what will the countermeasures be? What are the treatments you also mentioned personalized medicine, and that's going to be. Very important part of biomedical countermeasures for spaceflight. We have folks that are experts in this Jeff Ginsburg in particular who are starting to work with NASA and help us figure out how to take a personalized medicine precision medicine and apply it.

Johnson Space Center Nassar Jeff Ginsburg Johnson Dr Anne NASA
"johnson space center" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on WTVN

"That was injured she wanted she went, to the hospital for before she came to the scene she's, simply, there To let the officer know that we're taking care of things wanted to check on his condition and then she wouldn't come here, and make sure that the people that are doing, the job have. The resources to do heavy rains from hurricane lane causing massive flooding in. Hawaii according to Bill Cairns an NBC meteorologist now more than Duff two. Feet of, rain already hit the big island. One hundred sixty five miles south west of it is just barely moving I mean that's the problem with the storm that's going to, be the history and the legacy is how slowly it moved near the Hawaiian islands and people living along coast coaster being warned of storm surge above normal tide levels and surf as high. As twenty feet governor casick known for not being a big fan of President Trump says he'll be. A no show today's big Republican party event in Columbus for Trump and the first lady will. Be the main. Attraction President, Trump is scheduled to keynote the Ohio. GOP state. Dinner at the greater Columbus convention center that's at six this evening, the president and The first lady are first though scheduled to visit a Neo Natal clinic at nationwide children's hospital it is the second visit from President Trump this month to Ohio he, visited Delaware County for a rally back on August, fourth Jared alad. NewsRadio six ten WTVN the vice President Mike Pence is talking up the. Trump administration's policy priorities when it comes to the proposed sixth branch of. The military, space force just as our nation. Establish the air force to ensure American dominance in the skies in the mid twentieth century we will create an armed service devoted solely, to advancing American security in space in a visit to the Johnson Space Center in Houston Penn said the space force will work to establish a permanent presence on and around the earth's moon. And for a woman is facing a charge of aggravated vehicular homicide after causing a fatal car wreck. In Whitehall prosecutors brought charges against Maritza Martinez in connection with the crash that killed a twenty. Year old motorcycles. By the, name of Ralph Yeah this happened Monday night according to police Martinez was aggressively chasing the car. Woman she suspected of having an affair with her husband when she hit the out at the intersection of Hamilton road and Livingston According to be m v records, Martinez, has, never had a driver's license, ABC six first warning forecast. Eighty-two today plenty of sunshine is look, at your, forecast, down powered by the basement doctor. Currently it's sixty at your severe weather station News Radio six ten WTVN. Glenn Beck next don't, just remodel your, kitchen do it the, best way call seven seven one ten. Twenty four for best way cabinets listen to what some of their real customers have to say. About them I. Have looked everywhere and, I mean everywhere we went online we went to all the box stores we even. Went to some of the higher end companies and these best way. Cabinets are better they're just better we got the cabinets the countertops and. The. Installation for, just a little over ten at best way cabinets, so, we probably saved about. Fifteen thousand dollars, on the entire project you just can't. Find a better cabinet than best way for the price wow I said this is something else and we told them about The best way it's, like well, if, you ever are thinking about it. Don't go talk to the big box stores said you go talk to..

President Trump Maritza Martinez President vice President Ohio Johnson Space Center Glenn Beck Hawaii Columbus convention center officer Columbus Bill Cairns vehicular homicide Mike Pence Duff GOP NBC Neo Natal clinic Whitehall Jared alad
"johnson space center" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"President Mike Pence was at the Johnson Space Center yesterday touting thus base for this space Yes and you know it's probably. A good idea he said, that the administration wants the United States to return to the moon put Americans. On Mars explore. The deepest depths of space this is our nation establish the air force, to? Ensure American dominance. In the skies in the mid twentieth. Century we will create an arm service devoted solely to advancing American security in space Space force space-borne it'll be the. Sixth branch of the, military and this is why subsidary there is an asteroid it's. Asteroid twenty sixteen and twenty, three and it's sounds official rates of names for these is called like Fred Asteroid fred They should they should name it something other. Than at so it's going to pass by earth by about three million miles, on Wednesday but it's the size, of Egypt Egypt's great, pyramid Oh that's. Big have these worry me this is what I would like speed I truly, would like a space us to, be able to Know I need this Look at wiped out. The dinosaurs these asteroids they've had some that are way too close for comfort and and the ones we. Don't even know about they didn't tell us about how do we even know that they know that you know all the where these all these rocks are all these NF twenty three's Houses are now you sound like ancient aliens and that guy with the hair aliens man Astronaut theorists ancient astronaut theorists believe my God anyway so we'll let you know on Wednesday everything could end If we're here on. Thursday we'll. Be very well he's, got over the weekend. It's all we care about, as, bright kids world all right, coming up next guarantee. South Florida morning, show that's. Right by the way yes we. Have our kids world Joe DiMaggio children's. Hospital kids wrote family fun. Fest, it's both days tomorrow and Sunday we're? Going to, be hanging out there I'm reading to. The children Ricky are you reading to, children as well Didn't get an Email oh. No, you're going I swear on the air Said it before like some people. Have asked me like I don't. Know not getting out of kids. World, nobody, gets out. Of kids world nobody puts Nobody puts.

Mike Pence Johnson Space Center Ricky Joe DiMaggio United States Egypt President South Florida official
"johnson space center" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Ologies

"So like that's like how are we found out that we had like a group of meteorites so different from the rest and people started to wonder if they could have been come from mars because the minerals in them were similar to what we thought we knew was on mars and then so this group was like finally confirmed to be for mars when we sent a lander tomorrow we measured the atmosphere unlike isotopes in the atmosphere like they're different ratios where the same ratios that were like trapped in bubbles in these rocks and so we're like yep there for mars and then where do you put the meteorites like do they get stored under like lock and key so rare they well it depends who found them okay so like nasa has like missions to antarctica to collect meteorites and like just some desserts i think and so those are property of nasa and you can like apply to study them but you you can only ever borrow them they are owned by nasa and their store to johnson space center in houston yeah but like people can also fine muret on their own and then i think that's their meteorite depending on where they found it how often do areolla just's planetary geologists have someone say yo i found a meteorite and you're like that's olympic granite like how often does that happen oh yeah yeah people like bring me rocks all the time and asked me if there meteorites how do you how do you know that they're not sometimes i can just be like that's an earth rock because it looks like yeah that's a long for granted so like meteorites often have like a fusion crust which is when it's all glassy on the outside of the rock and that's like from heating up when it entered the atmosphere so that's like one thing that we can tell and then like there are certain things that we only see in meteorites like this coal metal powder and called a vid munson pattern and it's like a crazy like kind of etching looking thing it by the by these cross hatch patterns in meteorites are caused by apparently nickel iron crystals and they're credited to australian painter named ready count awas von beck bilman stocking which honestly would be such a great name for a cat anyway he discovered the patterns he was like whoa look at these patterns so we named him vin vince dominant in his honor and then we found out later that a british guy with a way more boring name william thomson discovered them like.

nasa william thomson antarctica johnson space center houston
"johnson space center" Discussed on Podcast

Podcast

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on Podcast

"All they called south lamma onoda sit up all this native some pastoral today would you ms johnson space center are you ton to have sauteed are to the south of moment on this yarder cy young hype up to the knew don't be hollum i'm on this special guy who aren't dhanjal pasha fan tackle fables suited on article beck the gunman masala call up savona palm your foot to preserve paletta to discover liepa mall do the best southern car effective more getting run as our laws that will be a coffin bennett mass high unit atar day i mode apple tv alec georgia the article keys few shave perceive you start over enough i'm assuming of unveil but the goals panic bianca to community certifications you is it while with his alone to demo of our fair i've exit of me e compiler who's may pug meticulous potter solicit you to settle john is in mouse comparison nova komo have cost of there on his mouth obama also since i don't pan connect deposits attire dilemma the we lit up three dollars she got brazil these under kilometer to reset it to this cup payments spur sellable at two dollars by tesla is talk to you the determinator compositions cock beck see flat shopper it is beck oughta know baffoni don't have unsecure lichter alec on july the dino an tyra the sasha was what sam up on a fantasy they bother desire never there's really just not appropriate tire pastula to saas fix the fantastic fantasy leasing imaginaire to at usa probably country allows the user the whole tablet of house clay allah the vetter delusion lieber would have systems expert assume an inex to smith or is imaginary upper victoria sunday's lack only agree or article the associate can our the for the pacifier lucia lieber investor with test match this days.

john obama tesla usa brazil beck sam smith lucia lieber three dollars two dollars
"johnson space center" Discussed on The Nerdist

The Nerdist

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on The Nerdist

"And i love that name and focuses on the science and multiple mission essential functions that take place at the johnson space center it the discussions includes face food astronaut training live conversations with astronauts currently on board the international space station and much more you can find it on i tuned samcloud everywhere or nasa dot gov slash johnson slash h w h a p oblige brought up houston a because first of all have been to the johnson space center yeah it's incredible and and we're just stood there were were wishing you if you're listening in houston were wishing you all the best for cleanup listen if anyone is listening that wants to help houston i guess i don't need the j watts based on saw he's really how i mean less i check they'd raised over thirteen million dollars and then also houston food bank you bank is good and they also yeah they need they need food for people they need food for people and then i had also asked about some good local pet charities yeah they the houston spca the humane society there's there's a whole bunch that you can find online yes but you know a donating blood food night verse diapers pet support money like anything anything will help but it is as you know uh is an utter same status but it was a devastating event and certainly one that you would never want to have to go through community so it's gonna be years have recovered it's going to be years to recover and so please please please help out houston and there's another fucking storm had two headed toward florida so in an it's about hit by puerto rico at us and for category five.

johnson space center houston food bank florida johnson space center puerto rico thirteen million dollars
"johnson space center" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"johnson space center" Discussed on WCTC

"Nbc news radio i'm tom roberts an advance copy of james comey's prepared remarks for congress show the fired fbi chief will testify that president trump urged him to lift a cloud of the russia investigation nbc chief legal corresponded ari melber says the statement to be read tomorrow before the senate intelligence committee make some getting very clear majority bad for the white house and president trump majority problematic allegations in fact patterns if you believe the testimony under oath about the president's approach his propriety his potential meddling in investigations me is also expected to tells senators the president demanded loyalty and wanted him to drop the investigation of omer national security adviser michael flynn to top intelligence officials say they never felt pressured to get involved in an ongoing investigation in a senate hearing today director of national intelligence bankote and msa chief mike rogers declined to answer specific questions about reports that president trump asked them to intervene in the fbi's russia investigation this is wrong rogers i had never been directed to do anything i believe to the illegal immoral unethical or inappropriate i do not recall ever feeling pressured to do so president trump says obamacare is in a total death spiral and he's urging the senate to take action in cincinnati today trump praised the house for last month's patches of a bill eight um that repealing and replacing the affordable care act former us assistant attorney general christopher raised president trump's choice to lead the fbi ray represented new jersey governor chris christie during the socalled bridge gates scandal the death toll of the london bridge attack has now risen to eight with australian sahra zelenik who is working in london as an ipad is the latest victim to be named in the london bridge attack which took place saturday night max napoli powell a ceremony today at johnson space center in houston.

christopher london london bridge new jersey assistant attorney general msa nbc russia james comey houston johnson space center chris christie ray tom roberts cincinnati senate fbi mike rogers director michael flynn president white house senate intelligence committee ari melber trump congress